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Welcome to our Civil War Antiques web catalog.

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Dave Taylor
P.O. Box 87
Sylvania, OH 43560

419-842-1863

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13-02-45 - M1860 Spencer Saddle Ring Carbine: This is the standard issue Civil War Spencer in overall very good condition.  This gun is 100% original and complete and is in perfect working condition. The majority of the metal has a deep plum brown patina, and matches perfectly from muzzle to butt.  The wood has some expected handling wear and light dents but no damage or abuse. Bore is excellent.  The left side of the stock shows a faint inspector’s cartouche immediately behind the sling ring bar.  The only small wart on this carbine is an inconsequential tiny crack just behind the sling ring bar.  Extremely minor, mentioned for accuracy’s sake only. (see photo). This is a great martially marked Spencer with serial number of 42,720.   The Spencer was the state of the art repeating rifle during the Civil War, the assault rifle of the era.... and this is a good solid representative specimen that you can be proud to display in your collection room or den...  To my knowledge this is the first time this gun has been on the collector market as I bought it from a family in Georgia along with a Boyle Gamble & McAfee foot officer’s sword and scabbard. ... $2,350.00 SOLD

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13-02-46 - Colt Model 1877 “Lightning” Revolver:  What better clip art for a Colt Lightning than Billy the Kid brandishing one in the form of Emelio Estevez. Legend says Billy the Kid did indeed carry a Lightning.   This revolver is a wonderfully honest specimen in NRA near “fine” condition.  100% original, 100% complete, mechanically perfect.  60% factory blue on the barrel and ejector.  Traces of blue on the cylinder.  30% faded smoky case color on the frame and hammer.   All matching serial numbers 86,519.  Manufactured in 1892 which was the same year the Dalton Gang got blasted to eternity at Coffeyville, Kansas.   Grips are VG with nice rampant Colt in an oval.  38 caliber. 4.5 inch barrel.  Very handsome.  Totally honest.  A most affordable Wild West cowboy gun. ... $975.00 SOLD

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13-02-47 - Interesting Outdoor CDV Photo of what Appear to be English Soldiers and their wives:  They appear to be “VIPs”.  I’ll let you research further.  I am sure these gents are veterans of the Crimea.  Neat early photo ... $45.00

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13-02-48 - Western Cavalry! A nice vigneted view on printed cdv mount of a line officer. Period pencil “Thos. Nichols” bottom front, signed ink reverse: “ Thos. A. Nichols Adjt. 9th Pa Cav” The regiment recruited in October, 1861, and served until July, 1865. It saw heavy service in the western theatre, serving with the army of the Ohio and the Cumberland and then in the Division of Mississippi, being in the March to the Sea and Campaign of the Carolinas. Being engaged in more than seventy fights in Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, and South Carolina, among them Perryville, Chickamauga, and Waynesboro, it lost six officers and sixty-six enlistedmen killed or mortally wounded, which is a very strong record for a cavalry unit. Nichols does not show up on CWData, whose Pennsylvania records are based on the incomplete Bates’ volumes, but he does show up as First Lieutenant and regimental Adjutant in the Official Army Register, being discharged in June, 1865, and the NPS database shows him going into the regiment as Sergeant Major. These western mounted troops saw more day-to-day action than
most cavalry in other theatres. ... $125.00 SOLD

13-02-49 - Buckeye line officer in his frock coat. Vigneted chest view of an officer turned slightly in profile. Hoag & Quick, Cincinnati backmark. A lot of troops went through that city, but very likely he’s a buckeye boy. ... $20.00 SOLD

13-02-50 - A veteran home on leave? Nice ¾ length standing view of bearded man in civilian clothes posed next to a chair, holding his military forage cap in his right hand. This looks like high quality private purchase piece and the fellow is may be an officer on leave or just out of service.
William Burgess, Broadway, NY backmark. ... $20.00 SOLD

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13-02-51 - Soldier and family. We see tons of shots of individual soldiers, but very few where the serviceman has brought his family into the studio for a group portrait- perhaps as a farewell keepsake for them, and reminder of home for him. This fellow is about as low as you can go in the army- he wears a simple four-button fatigue coat with a simple forage cap and seems the epitome of the buck private. His wife sits next to him holding an infant and slightly older child stands between. Family photos like this with soldiers in them brings home the reality of the sacrifice they made as the soldier went off and perhaps never returned. A collector’s pencil note on the reverse indicates the image was bought from me years ago. I liked it then, and maybe even appreciate it more now. ... $85.00 SOLD

13-02-52 - This guy knew he cut a dashing figure! An officer all togged out in his plumed dress hat and officer’s frock with sash, sword belt and sword, clutching a rolled up paper in his right hand- perhaps a meant to be a military map, but possibly his new commission. If you want to know what the newly minted officer looked like before a campaign, here he is. Excelsior Gallery, Warner & Elliott, Columbus, Ohio, backmark. ... $150.00 SOLD

13-02-53 - Seated western line officer. 2/3 view, hands down at his side. Officer’s sack coat with shoulder straps open to show his light colored vest, dark officer’s trousers with officer’s narrow cording visible on the seam. Scarce “Butler, Bonsall & Co. Army Photographers, Gen’l Rousseau’s Division” backmark. Rousseau served in the west, seeing action at Shiloh, Chickamauga, Chattanooga, and elsewhere, and this guy seems the epitome of the no no-nonsense western officer. ... $45.00 SOLD

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13-02-54 - CDV Oval midchest-up view. Signed ink reverse: Your Truly Charles N. Manring Co. M 7th O.V.C. Thurman Gallia Co. Ohio. Cancelled tax stamp. Manring enlisted at age 21 on 10/10/62, mustered in to Company M the same day and served until 6/7/65. He shows up as “Mannering” as well. The unit suffered 2 officers and 26 enlistedmen killed or mortally wounded in the war, fighting in Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, and Alabama. As is often the case with western cavalry units, they logged in a lot of fighting time. CWData has 66 entries for occasions when they lost someone killed, wounded, captured or missing, and they lost 560 men from all causes during their service. They were frequently engaged by detachment, but were also in larger engagements at Knoxville, Franklin, Nashville, etc. Summaries of their war service make thrilling reading… ... $135.00 SOLD

13-02-55 - CDV mounted gem tintype, waist-up view of Federal soldier showing off his fancy tie and best shirt for the folks back home. Delicate tinting to cheeks, wears a forage cap pushed back slightly on his head. Cancelled ax stamp on reverse. ... $29.00

13-02-56 - CS General Joseph E. Johnston. Oval vignetted shot. One of the best and most underrated generals of the war. He knew the advantage of strategic withdrawals and waited for opportunities to strike with advantage, but higher-ups lost patience. In the west Davis replaced him with Hood, who lost no time in destroying the army in costly assaults. By the time he came back to the army, it was too late to save it. An unmarked contemporary pirate copy by a photographer who did not wish to be sued for copyright infringement, but still a vintage Civil War card and probably more widely sold. ... $69.00 SOLD

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13-02-57 - Another view of Joe Johnston, this one is a much clearer image, from life. Has an Anthony backmark. Borderless card, some peripheral foxing, but not affecting the image, which has nice tones. Much better than most we encounter of Joe. ... $250.00

13-02-58 - Foreign cadet? Telegram delivery boy? Polish I guess based on the writing on the back of the card. He liked his cigarettes in any case. Nicely posed.
Don’t know why I put this in, I just found it in my drawer of photos… a bit narrower than a CW cdv,
Nice typography on the reverse ... $2 or FREE to the first person buying another photo! SOLD

13-02-59 - He commanded U.S. Grant! Brig. General John Garland, War of 1812, Seminole War, Mexican War, Utah expedition and beginning of the Civil War. “Genl. Garland US Army” in old ink on the upper reverse. Brady/Anthony backmark. Posed in his full dress brigadier general frock coat with epaulets, sash, chapeau and fancy prewar dress sword leaning against a curtained pedestal. Born in 1792, Garland was a Virginian and had a long career in the regular army. In Mexico he was Lieutenant Colonel of the 4th US Infantry and had Grant under his command. Garland served with distinction in a number of battles under both Zachary Taylor and Winfield Scott and was brevetted full colonel, commanding not on a brigade but even a division on one occasion, and was wounded while entering Mexico City. Garland’s son-in-law was James Longstreet and his nephew was Confederate General Samuel Garland, killed in action in 1862. John Garland remained loyal to the Union, but died in New York in mid-1861. A scarce general’s cdv ... $150.00

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13-02-60 - Wonderful Confederate Cavalry Saber & Scabbard by Haiman Brothers Columbus Georgia:  Very handsome and solid example of the classic Georgia made Confederate cavalry saber.  This saber was made in Columbus, Georgia by Louis and Elias Haiman (Haiman Bro.).  It is believed that the Haiman Brothers produced more cavalry sabers for the Southern Confederacy than any other maker.  In my personal experience I have certainly owned more Haimans than any other rebel saber.  I have likewise owned more Haiman unsigned foot officer’s swords than any other CS officer’s sword.  As is standard with all Haiman cavalry sabers the weapon is unsigned.  It has a very worn grip with most of the leather worn down to the wood base. Thin twisted wire wrap is still in place.   The guard is deeply patinated and has a couple minor bends from wartime use.  Very attractive patina.  The blade is extra fine condition with nice smooth grey steel surface and no edge nicks.  The original steel scabbard is likewise very fine…  has the proper brass ring mounts with the identical patina seen on the guard.  The edge seam is classically crude and lapped. There is a deteriorated leather bumper-washer still present at the hilt where the blade meets the guard.  Pommel cap and forward edge of the quillon bear batch stamped numbers 129.  This Johnny Reb cavalry saber is 100% original and genuine in all respects, and I believe you will find this price below that of my competition. You cannot find a more classic Confederate horseman’s saber ... $3,350.00 SOLD

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13-02-61 - Bargain Priced Union Soldier’s Cartridge Box:  A worn out 1861 pattern cartridge box for the 58 caliber Springfield infantry rifle-musket.  Condition if about fair.  It displays great but lacks part of the closing tab, one of the roller buckles, and the tin liners.  On the other side of the coin it is priced dirt cheap.  A lot of bang for your buck and it certainly saw service early in the Civil War ... $145.00 SOLD

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13-02-62 - Bargain Priced English Bayonet:  Decent Martini - Henry Model 1876  socket bayonet and scabbard.  Bayonet is VG+ condition.   Scabbard is about excellent save for a slight seam opening along the top edge of the body. Very solid.  You will find these all over the internet priced by bayonet specialists from $179 to $225.  I got mine cheap in a box lot at auction and will price it like a gift at ... $79.00 SOLD

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13-02-63 - Austrian Lorenz Rifle Bayonet & Scabbard Remnant. VG example of the Lorenz bayonet as used by many Confederates and Union soldiers as well from the Midwest states. Has remnants of the proper US scabbard of 1842 design which is correct for the Lorenz bayonets issued by US forces. ... $145.00 SOLD

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13-02-64 - 1862 Dated Providence Tool Company Musket: Regulation US Model 1861 Springfield pattern rifle musket made and marked by the famous Providence Tool Company of Rhode Island. Condition is fair to good. The metal is decent. The stock is banged up and has a serious repair at the wrist. It is complete except for a missing sling swivel on the middle band and the forward lock screw. All the parts are original including the swelled ramrod. Despite the bangs and bruises still a nice looking musket with an early war date. This old veteran unquestionably “saw the elephant”. No telling how many Johnny Rebs it shot! Priced super friendly at… $595.00 SOLD

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13-02-65 - 1880–1890 Belgian 6mm Flobert Parlor Gun: I don’t generally buy these but this one came in a collection of old guns, and I bought the entire pile. These little Flobert action rifles (like a rolling block) of the late 1800s were frequently used indoors. The shooters would use ultra light loads and after a nice dinner might adjourn for a little target competition in the large parlor room. Flobert, a Frenchman, in 1849 put a small lead ball in the mouth of a percussion cap - a "BB Cap" (Bulleted Breech Cap) - thereby creating a self-contained round. Horace Smith and Daniel Wesson patented the .22 Short in 1860 that was more effective than the BB Cap. This one appears to be 6mm Flobert, but may be 22 BB Cap. Condition is VG. $225.00

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13-02-66 - Scarce First Model Smith Carbine - This is the real war horse Smith from the Civil War. Also known as the artillery model, these Smiths with sling swivels instead of saddle rings are the early pattern and these ALL saw hard service during the Civil War in the hands of Union Cavalry and possibly some artillerymen as well. We see plenty of mint unissued Second Model Smiths because thousands of those went unissued and were sold as surplus. Not so with this early gun. Here is a VG+ artillery Smith, 100% original, 100% complete (except for the tension spring on the rear sight) and mechanically perfect. The wood shows expected light handling and use but no abuse. The metal is overall a uniform gun metal gray patina with hints of finish in protected areas. All markings are clearly legible. Serial number is 7,888. The 21 5/8 “ rifled barrel has a darn near mint bore. Cartouche on wrist of stock is faint but it is visible. Overall a much nicer than usually seen first model from the early days of the conflict… this one really saw service fighting Johnny Reb. $1,995.00 SOLD

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13-02-67 - Ohio Soldier’s Musket w/ GAR Post Markings: A VG example of the Special Model 1861 musket made and marked by Lamson Goodnow and Yale. 100% original, 100% complete, mechanically perfect, all markings legible except for the VP & eagle-head which has been replaced with a marking by G.A.R. Post 77. Nice clear cartouche in wood. Matched dates of 1863 lock and barrel. Also marked on the gun stock is 17 over S.L.G. These are likely the soldier’s initials and his company number or post member number. Butt plate also stamped 45 meaning unknown. Probably a rack number. This gun surfaced in central Ohio and was brought to me at a meeting of The Ohio Gun Collectors Association. GAR Post 77 was the Ben Butterfield Post in Lancaster, Ohio (Sherman’s home town). I will leave the heavy lifting on the research to you. If you can find a roster of the Butterfield GAR post and can match the initials on the gun to a unique member of that post --- then you can extract the history with a reasonable degree of certainty. Good old Civil War musket and one with a charming GAR association. ... $1,450.00 SOLD

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13-02-68 - American Copy? - Revolutionary War Brown Bess Bayonet: American Copy? - Revolutionary War era Brown Bess Bayonet: A good early example in VG++ condition save for the bridge over the mortise having been removed. (ie: The little raised area on the reinforced muzzle ring for passing over the bayonet lug.) Blade is 18.5 inches from tip to shoulder. 19.25 inches from tip to forward edge of socket. Overall length 23.25 inches. Socket just under 4 inches in length. The fact that the overall length is in excess of 23 inches is another reason I believe this may be an American copy. My research shows that the British made Bess bayonets were universally under 22 inches in overall length. No maker’s markings whatsoever, but does have a very crude “2” or “21” engraved into the forward bottom section of the socket. The socket appears to be hand forged with a lamination separation on the bottom of the socket. (See illus.) Not absolutely sure if this is an American copy made here in the colonies or a variant English example void of maker’s markings and having a rather crudely constructed socket. I don’t often see English made bayonets void of maker or inspection markings. ... $275.00 SOLD

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13-02-69 - Danish Pattern 1854 Socket Bayonet with Kyhls locking Spring: Excellent condition dated 1855 and bearing numerous regimental markings on the socket. Muzzle ring dia. 23mm. This bayonet was for use with the Dornbuchse M1849 Rifle and reissued as the Model 1854. The locking spring was designed by Johan Christian Wilken Kyhl and first used in 1794. It continued in use until at least 1860. More than a few were imported by North and South during the Civil War when Europe was invaded by purchasing agents buying anything that could shoot, stab, or cut. Priced well below other web pages at $165.00

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13-02-70 - Another Danish Pattern 1854 Socket Bayonet: This one lacks the Kyhls locking Spring. Otherwise excellent condition dated 1855 and bearing numerous regimental markings on the socket. Muzzle ring dia. 23mm. This bayonet was for use with the Dornbuchse M1849 Rifle and reissued as the Model 1854. More than a few were imported by North and South during the Civil War when Europe was invaded by purchasing agents buying anything that could shoot, stab, or cut. Priced well below other web pages at $75.00

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13-02-71 - Replica Civil War .58 Caliber M1861 Socket Bayonet: A darn near perfect copy of the original. Ideal for living history or reenacting. Priced at half of what the repro sutlers charge. ... $25.00

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13-02-72 - Regulation Cavalry Holster: Standard issue with the Colt and Remington Army and Navy revolvers. This one VG condition showing some expected handling and age. Small repair on latch tab and small hole in body near the end plug… Very solid example ... $475.00

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13-02-73 - Another Regulation Cavalry Holster: As above - standard issue with the Colt and Remington Army and Navy revolvers. Virtually identical condition to the above but showing more handling and being more supple and floppy. Small repair on latch tab ... $450.00

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13-02-74 - Small Size Henry Deringer Phila’ Pocket Pistol: .41 caliber small size Deringer with two inch barrel and measuring only five inches in overall length. Has the Flayderman “type 6” trigger guard decoration indicating production ca. 1848 to 1850. Overall VG condition. 100% original. 100% complete. Mechanically perfect. Lock and barrel both signed DERINGER PHILADEL’A. Lock marking has weak “R” in Deringer and weak “A” in Philadela. Barrel legend is struck with top half of DERINGER being weak and bottom half strong. PHILADELA is strong overall. Left side of breech stamped “P”… not in a sunburst. Similar to the gun Booth used to murder Lincoln… and also a perfect piece to display with California Gold Rush artifacts or early River Boat Gambler items.
Wonderful early Deringer ... $1350.00 SOLD

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13-02-75 - Quarter Plate Tintype youthful federal wearing state issue dark greatcoat. A fine artistic pose housed in a full case (spine split). Excellent save for a rub which appears as a dark spot on the extreme right of the image and is of no consequence. A great image. ... $250.00

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13-02-76 - Fine Condition Waters 1816 Conversion Musket: I am rushed for time as I type this trying to get this list uploaded in the next half hour… so will let the pictures tell the story. Very Fine condition, great markings, full inspectors marks, 100% original 100% complete. Really a top shelf musket ... $1,475.00

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13-02-77 - Smith and Wesson No. 2 Army Revolver: The standard S&W Civil War revolver. I am rushed for time as I type this… trying to get this list uploaded in the next half hour… so will let the pictures tell the story. VG condition, great markings, great grips 100% original 100% complete. Groove filed into steel butt strap obliterates serial number. ... $625.00 SOLD

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13-02-78 - Another Smith and Wesson No. 2 Army Revolver: The standard S&W Civil War revolver. I am rushed for time as I type this… trying to get this list uploaded in the next half hour… so will let the pictures tell the story. Fair to Good condition with obvious pitting and cleaning… but still solid and representative.100% original 100% complete. Serial number lost due to cleaning long ago. Our most affordable Civil War revolver this week ... $395.00

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13-02-79 - First Model Merrill Carbine: I am rushed for time as I type this trying to get this list uploaded in the next half hour… so will let the pictures tell the story. Good to VG condition, great markings, 100% original 100% complete. Well done repair to a crack at the wrist. Definitely saw action in the Civil War. Scarce carbine and many were carried by Confederates from Virginia and Maryland ... $1,450.00 SOLD

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13-02-80 - Belgian Made Lefaucheux 12mm Revolver: Large army size pinfire revolver profusely marked and overall VG condition. This one will function ok on single action… but will not function all the time on double action. I will leave that tune-up to you. Complete except for lacking the ejector rod. The LeFaucheux was one of the only foreign-manufactured revolvers to have been imported by the U.S. government during the Civil War. At the outbreak of war in 1861, both the Federal and Confederate governments looked to Europe to supplement insufficient arms inventories, and approximately 14,000 Lefaucheux revolvers were purchased at a cost ranging from $12.50 to $20.04 each. Of these, 12,000 found their way into Union service with known serial numbers in the 25,000 to 37,000 range. The serial number in this revolver is #22,666 making use by the Confederates a possibility. The grips are VG+. The gun has the Belgian Liege stamp on the cylinder, and it is a licensed contract brevet with the frame marked “E. LEFAUCHEUX / INVr BREVETTE” as well as the proper proof marks. Much better condition than most we see. This one has the flat butt and no trigger guard spur. Tune it up and add an ejector rod and you will have an eight hundred dollar gun. ... $550.00 SOLD

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13-02-81 - Sixth Plate Tintype Inscribed Tintype:  Tintype shows Union soldier in state issue jacket that appears to be a NY State jacket.  Note on reverse reads "Charles Hanks son of Susan Hannah Hanks".  Records show four yanks named Charles Hanks but none from New York.  He may be NY National Guard circa 1864.  I'll let you do the research.  Tintype VG with couple surface abrasions.  Tin trimmed on edges as shown.  ... $75.00 SOLD

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13-02-82 - Near Mint Sixth Plate Thermoplastic (Gutta Percha) Image Case:  Damn near mint.  If you have a top drawer sixth plate image this is a perfect case for you. ... $135.00 SOLD

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13-02-83 - Superb Thermoplastic Sixth Plate image case with two fine civilian daguerreotypes inside. Top Shelf ... $295.00 SOLD

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13-02-84 - Ninth Plate Young Soldier in Fine Gutta Percha Case:  Wonderful portrait of Union soldier wearing a state issue artillery jacket and military vest. Case is near perfect thermoplastic example.  (aka  Gutta Percha).  Top drawer in all respects.  ... $150.00 SOLD

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13-02-85 - Ninth Plate Tintype Soldier in Regulation 4-Button Blouse: Just the tintype. 2.4" x 2.1"  Excellent. Near mint. This is the classic Civil War fatigue blouse worn by ALL branches of the service. ... $49.00 SOLD

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THREE DOCUMENTS RELATING TO SOUTH CAROLINA
AND CHARLESTON ON THE VERGE OF WAR!

It is not often I get excited about documents, but these are some of the most historically significant documents I have ever had the pleasure of handling: Official 1861 manuscript retained copies of THE CORRESPONDENCE that relates to the opening of the Civil War… SUPER correspondence and instructions relating to the secession of South Carolina, the crisis at Fort Sumter, and eventually the price for the conflict paid by the city of Charleston. The state owned copies of these can be found in simple online searches. These were retained as personal copies by one of the many officials involved in the early movement for secession in South Carolina and then came north as war souvenirs after Sherman’s army destroyed much of Columbia including the total destruction of their State House in 1865. With Lincoln’s election in November, 1860, South Carolina secessionists went into overdrive and six weeks later a state convention passed an ordinance of secession claiming the dissolution of the Union, and in accordance with that determination state officials decided to open negotiations with Washington for the transfer of Federal facilities within their borders. Major Anderson, in charge of Federal troops at Charleston moved his men to Fort Sumter in late December, but instead of pulling out, the Federal government sent reinforcements and supplies on the USS Star of the West, which was fired on by state forces on January 9, 1861. Negotiations were then halted and the governor demanded Anderson surrender two days later. Anderson declined, but agreed that envoys would go to Washington to try to straighten things out. South Carolina Governor Pickens then sent Attorney-General Isaac W. Hayne as the envoy to meet with (still) President Buchanan and demand the fort. Isaac William Hayne (1809-1880) was the state Attorney-General and had been the man who officially read out the ordinance of secession. A member of a prominent South Carolina family, among his relatives was Robert Y. Hayne, Senator and Governor, who engaged in a famous debate with Daniel Webster in 1830, and was active in the nullification convention in South Carolina in 1832. Isaac Hayne was admitted to the barr in 1831 and after practicing law for a time in Alabama, returned to South Carolina in 1848 and was elected repeatedly to the office of Attorney General (an office Robert Y. Hayne had also held,) a post he held continuously from 1848 to 1868.

13-02-86 - Our first offering (above) is the five-page set of instructions from A,G. McGrath the S.C. Secretary of State on behalf of Governor Pickens to Hayne dated January 12, 1861. This is in longhand on five pages of lined paper secured with the proverbial government red tape, with a cover sheet, the first page with a pre-printed heading: “State of South Carolina, Executive Office, Sate Department, Charleston,” with the filled-in date of January 12, 1861. The document is also docketed on reverse: “Instructions from the State Department of the Executive Office to I.W. Hayne,” and has on old pencil note on the contents on the cover sheet indicating this was not published until 1862, but I find a report of it in NY newspapers in 1861. McGrath was a South Carolina lawyer involved in the secession movement and served as S.C. Secretary of State until 1862 when Jefferson Davis appointed him to a judgship, and he later succeeded Milledge L. Bonham as Governor in 1864 (see another of our offerings below.) McGrath presents the Governor’s instructions to Hayne and lays out South Carolina’s position. The attempt to reinforce Fort Sumter had caused to the S.C. commissioners to cease negotiations and the Governor now demanded both a clarification of Washington’s position and the delivery of the fort to the state. Hayne was instructed to get a direct answer on whether Buchanan had ordered the reinforcements sent to Sumter: “You are instructed to proceed to Washington, and there in the name of the Government of the State of South Carolina, enquire of the President of the United States whether it was by his order that troops of the United States were sent into the harbor of Charleston to reinforce Fort Sumter; and if he avows that order, you will then enquire whether he asserts a right to introduce troops of the United States within the limits of this State to occupy Fort Sumter; and you will in case of his avowal, inform him that neither will be permitted, and will be regarded as his declaration of War against the State of South Carolina.” Hayne was allowed to negotiate and discuss payment for some Federal property, but was to be clear the possession of the fort was not a matter for discussion or negotiation: “you will therefore require from the President of the United States a positive and distinct answer to your demand for the delivery of the Fort.” Further, Hayne was instructed to tell Buchanan, “that the Governor regards the attempt of the President of the United States, if avowed, to continue the possession of the Fort Sumter as inevitably leading to bloody issue…” In the light of the subsequent four years of war, death, and destruction, this seems an understatement.
OUR PRICE FOR THIS DOCUMENT ... $2,850.00

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13-02-87 - Our second offering (above) dates just a few days after Hayne arrived in Washington. On January 15 several Senators from other states that had seceded or were on the verge of doing so (among the visitors were Jefferson Davis and Judah Benjamin) asked Hayne to delay delivering his demand to the President, assuring him and the Governor of South Carolina that the arrival of the Star of the West was not an attack on the state and suggesting that negotiations might still resolve the question of Federal facilities. They advised delay at least until February 15, by which time they expected their own states would meet in convention with South Carolina and form a “new Confederation and Provisional government.” They hoped the delay would allow for, “calm and deliberate” counsel, and that together they might come to some “wise just and peaceable solution of existing difficulties.” They must have been also worried that South Carolina might provoke outright war prematurely. We offer Hayne’s response to this letter from the Senators of seceded states, dated “January, 1861,” but probably January 17, given a subsequent reference in another document. In our letter Hayne acknowledges the Senators’ letter and its contents: “that your people feel they have a common destiny with our people, and expect to form with them in that Convention a new Confederacy and Provisional Government; that you must, and will share our fortunes, suffering with us the evils of war, if it cannot be avoided, and enjoying with us the blessings of peace, if it can be preserved.” Hayne then agrees to delay delivering the demand until he can hear from the Governor and assures them that the state has not cut off Anderson and Fort Sumter from essential supplies and communications. Two pages in ink. Tied at top with red tape. Docketed on reverse.
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Shortly after the above exchange, President Buchanan addressed a letter to the Senators through Secretary of War Holt to buy time, maintaining that his actions so far had been without any hostile or unfriendly purpose to South Carolina, but simply to protect and preserve U.S. public property and that while he could not promise no further reinforcements would be sent to Sumter or any act of hostility would take place, since the power to wage war rested with Congress, he did not deem it necessary at the moment to reinforce Anderson.

13-02-88 - Our third offering (above) is a copy of the follow-up letter sent to Hayne by the Senators of seceding states who still remained at Washington, dated January 23, 1861.  Two pages, ink, bound at top by red tape. Docketed reverse: “No 12 Letter of Senators of Seceding States to I.W. Hayne 23 Jan. 1861 Copy”

In this letter the Senators who had asked Hayne to delay delivering his demand to the President enclose the letter from the Secretary of War (not included with this.) “Altho’ its terms are not as satisfactory as we could have desired in relation to the Ulterior purposes of the Executive, we have no hesitation in expressing our entire confidence that no reinforcements will be set to Fort Sumter, not will the public peace be disturbed within the period requisite for full communication between yourself and your government…” They therefore again ask Hayne to delay delivering his demand and express the hope that, “South Carolina will not deem it incompatible with her safety, dignity or Honor to refrain from initializing any hostilities against any power whatsoever or from taking any steps tending to produce collision until our States which are to share her fortunes shall have an opportunity of joining their counsels with hers.” The letter was then signed by seven of the Senators who had signed the earlier letter, with a note that the others had returned to their respective states.

Needless to say, these attempts to avoid a conflict failed. Hayne finally presented his demand for Fort Sumter to the President on February 6, a provisional constitution for the Confederacy was adopted February 8, Jefferson Davis was elected provisional President the next day, and war would now decide whether there existed one country or two.
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