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Dave Taylor
P.O. Box 87
Sylvania, OH 43560

419-842-1863

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12-11-39 - Nice Civil War Union Infantryman’s Leather Gear. Two of the key elements in a Civil War collection: a regulation issue infantry cartridge box and sling with plates and a rare dated percussion cap box. Very good condition cartridge box complete with the original tins on the inside, implement pouch on the box front, buckles and straps. The side ears of the inner flap are gone. The bridle leather sling is a fifty year old replica that looks totally original. 99 out of 100 collectors would not realize it was an ancient replica. My guess is that a skirmisher put the sling on and used it during the 1950s or 1960s. Both the box plate and the breastplate are attractive originals. There is a small repair to a tear in the sling. This is the 1864 pattern box with a rivet securing the latch tab and an embossed US on the cover under the original cartridge box plate. No markings on the box, but lots of finish overall and just enough wear to show it was used in the field. Together with this comes a rare dated issue cap box with a visible maker’s stamp and date of 1863! The maker of this was Josiah Longley of Lewiston, Maine. The left portion of his company name and the town are light, but there is no doubt about who it is from the letters, location and date: he is one of the few makers to actually date his products. The interior has remnants of the original lamb’s wool. This a great looking set such as used to show up regularly out of the woodwork at country auctions, but those days are long gone. Original cartridge box w/ tins, old replacement sling, 2 original plates, nice dated cap box … all for $875.00 SOLD

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12-11-40 - Union Infantry Leather Gear: H. A. Dingee marked musket cartridge box, with an infantry waist belt and cap box. The Dingee family of New York were one of the most prominent suppliers of US military accoutrements in the nineteenth century from the War of 1812 through the Civil War. This is a solid early war pattern .58 Cal. cartridge box made with just a line of stitching holding the latch tab and a plain cover flap showing crackling to the finish, but not a lot of flaking. Nicely marked on the inner flap “H.A. Dingee / N.Y.” Both tins in place, both buckles, all the straps, and the implement pouch. Complete with the oval US cartridge box plate. With this comes a bridle leather infantry waistbelt with the classic oval US belt plate with arrow hooks and the C-clasp brass keeper on the belt. A very solid belt, just overall finish loss from age, flexing and use. The cap box is in matching condition with a nice looking cover and inner flap and some wear and abrasion to the belt loops from actual wear and use. A very nice infantry set that needs just a bayonet and scabbard to fill it out. (And I may have a matching bayonet and scabbard if you call!) …. $975.00 SOLD

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12-11-41 - Super Condition Yankee Leather Set: Crisp Maker and Inspector Marks on this Belt and Cap Box! As the war went on the government got a lot more particular about making clear who was responsible for making and inspecting items they purchased. The demanded makers mark their goods. The markings on this infantry belt and cap box really jump out. The condition is about a 9 on a scale of 10. The belt is a bridle leather belt in fine+ condition with lots of finish and life, it still has the brass C-clasp belt tip (aka keeper aka adjuster), and a super nice oval US belt plate. The Nece maker’s mark and the Sniffen inspector mark are right next to one another and show clearly beside the belt plate. Similarly, White’s inspector stamp on the outer flap of the cap box jumps out, as does the Young maker’s stamp on the inner flap. The box is near mint with good finish. Minty but no lamb’s wool inside. both belt loops solid. Better than 99% of the other harness leather sets you will find. Super condition leather just like the old days --- $895.00 SOLD

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12-11-42 - Civil War Union Infantryman’s Leather Gear: Regulation cartridge box on its original sling, both plates, both tins, all buckles and straps in place and solid, together with a regulation Union army waistbelt and oval US plate. Early war .58 cal. cartridge box with both tins, and its original bridle leather sling still buckled on it. Both the round eagle plate and the oval US box plate are there and secured with small pieces of leather. Some flaking and minor finish loss overall, but nothing unattractive. A good solid set and representative of what every infantryman carried from Bull Run through Appomattox. Just minor finish crackling and abrasion at points of wear. Looks just like it did when the veteran finally came home and hung it up. Early war style box with just a line of stitching securing the latch tab. No markings as is correct for early war. The waist belt is a solid condition bridle leather belt with an arrow back oval US plate. No belt tip or sign of one, so the soldier probably just sized it to himself and lopped off the end to avoid having to deal with it. Good finish overall, just some typical crazing and finish loss from age. The plates on the box and sling have an aged mellow patina. The belt plate is just a tad lighter as would be expected from handling. Box, sling, both plates, waist belt, US buckle --- the whole shooting match for $1,450.00 SOLD

 

12-11-43 - Scarce 1855 Rifleman’s Cap Box: This has the two-piece cover that uses a full outer flap and separately attached latch tab secured by a single line of stitching. These are generally recognized as the early-war and pre-war versions of the percussion cap box. What sets this box well apart of standard cap boxes is the height of the belt loops. These loops are extra tall for the purpose of allowing use with the ultra wide 1855 rifleman’s belts. The 1855 rifleman’s waistbelt was 2.2 to 2.4 inches wide and the loops on this cap box are intended for that belt. Both loops and latch tab have lightly incised border lines. The latch tab has three small stitches in it repairing a small tear, otherwise very solid and even has some of the wool lining still present. No markings visible, which is correct for an early arsenal produced piece. The 9th and 10th US Infantry were rifle-armed regiments and saw service in the west in the 1850s. This would be the type of cap box required for their belts. You will look long and hard to find another. $350.00


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12-11-44 - Mexican War Dated US Model 1842 Musket by Springfield:  Overall VG condition.  Lock marked US Springfield 1847 with eagle.  Barrel tang date matches. 18 is crisp  47 is mixed with pitting being close to the nipple.  Barrel proof of eagle’s head and VP legible.  Stock VG with some burn-out behind the bolster.  No cartouche marks visible.  Ramrod color and weight lead me to believe it is an older replica.  Comes with excellent replica musket sling marked w proper CW style markings.  Finding these ’42 model muskets with Mexican War dates is not an easy thing to do.    $1350.00 TS

Bayonet and early style Mex War scabbard for the above gun.  Bayonet is 1835-42 style with squared shoulders.  No US mark--- has two marks I cannot decipher.   $300.00 TS

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12-11-45 - Remington Conversion M1816 Musket. VG to fine. Mkd Remington Ilion NY 1855 on rear of lock. Barrel tang dated “1857” - It is also stamped “E D 53”. Breech clearly marked with cartouched “P” in an oval plus eagle’s head, and then inspector’s initials “JT” this likely being John Taylor Arsenal Sub Inspector. Faint conversion cartouche visible on stock opposite lock. Long range rear sight. Rifled bore is VG showing light wear. Butt plate tang clearly stamped US. Comb of stock immediately forward of butt plate tang bears tine “D” over “2” stamping. Near fine condition. The rack markings “E D 53” intrigue me but I do not know what they mean. Much better than most we see. Comes with a proper replica brown leather rifle sling. $1,595.00 TS SOLD

Bayonet for the above gun. Fine condition bayonet with 1855 style rounded shoulders on the blade and 1816 style socket. A very scarce bayonet these days. $195.00 TS SOLD

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12-11-46 - H&P Conversion of M-1816 Wickham Contract Musket For State of New Jersey: This is a type-1 Hewes and Phillips conversion with the replacement breech which has the bolster with a cleanout screw. (The later examples do not have the screw.) Overall VG++ condition. 100% original, 100% complete, and mechanically perfect. The lock is marked “US M. T. Wickham” forward of the hammer, and “Phila 1827” behind the hammer. Barrel, bands, and ramrod are overall clean steel. The lock retains some smoky case color and has a grey patina. The wood is very good to fine with VG edges and wonderful color. Two inspectors’ cartouches are clearly legible on the stock opposite the lock. Left breech is stamped “NJ” for New Jersey. Rear sight is early style 1855-61 pattern mounted in reverse as is correct for these conversions. 8000 of these type-1 conversions were made, making them a rather scarce Civil War longarm. Most of the type 1 guns went to New Jersey troops. A very appealing early war weapon with strong condition. Comes with a perfect replica brown leather rifle sling. $1,950.00 TS

Bayonet for the above gun. Fine condition bayonet with 1855 style rounded shoulders on the blade and 1816 style socket. A very scarce bayonet these days. Bayonet is fine+ condition with bright steel and clear US stamp on the blade. $195.00 TS

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12-11-47 - 1860 Dated US Harpers Ferry “Artillery Model” 1855 Rifle: This form of gun has been the subject of debate for nearly a century. Government records refer to 2-band artillery rifles but to my knowledge none have been positively identified, and most collectors are skeptical about the existence of the artillery models at all. The only 100% documented cut-down 58 caliber CW muskets are at the Springfield Armory Museum… the guns being cut down by the arsenal to 36 inch barrel lengths and having 2 bands. In 1866, Springfield Armory had 775 arms described as “Springfield Muskets, short, cal. 58.” In June of 1866, Captain Chaffee reported “There are now at the Armory ready for issue, several hundred repaired arms corresponding to the rifle musket M1861, except that the barrels and stocks are four inches shorter, and they have two bands instead of three. They are handsome and clearly resemble the Cadet musket.” Those rifles are definitely NOT what we are looking at here. However, what we are looking at is really intriguing on many levels. It is a two-band rifle that was once a 3-band 1855 Harpers Ferry Rifle Musket with the patchbox. The barrel is 32 inches long, and has been turned down at the muzzle to accept a standard 58 caliber socket bayonet. The lock is marked US Harpers Ferry 1860. The stock is a 2nd model ’55 with the iron patchbox. It is a Harpers Ferry stock bearing remnants of the proper cartouches in the wood. The barrel markings are worn away... no VP, no Eagle, no date. The rear sight is a standard 1862-64 pattern US Springfield sight. I have not removed the sight to examine for the presence of a stabilizer slot. The ramrod is a swelled rod of proper proportions for the current size of the gun. All the metal is bright steel which has been burnished many times over the past century and a half. Perhaps the most intriguing element to me is the late date of 1860. That is a very rare date to find on Harpers Ferry products. It lends itself to the possibility that the Confederacy may have had possession of the musket early in the war. These altered guns are intriguing. Some swear they are wartime alterations. Others believe they were altered for cadet use after the Civil War. I would not think that to be the case with our specimen at hand. While Bannerman and company certainly sold a mountain of cut-down cadet muskets after the war, most were Springfields or contract muskets. There would have been very little US surplus Harpers Ferry inventory for the government to send to auction where Bannerman bought his inventory. By mid 1861 most all Harpers Ferry products were already issued, exchanged with other armories and issued, or captured by the Confederacy. What would have been left in US possession in 1865 would have been minimal. That is what makes THIS gun so intriguing. It certainly saw service in the Civil War but whether in the short version or not I cannot say. The lock on this rifle is darn near worth the price of admission all by itself. It is a VG to near Fine 1860 dated Harpers Ferry lock. The primer door MAY be a replacement. The patina on the door is duller than the balance of the lock, and the eagle stamped thereon is quite deep. This element is of minimal importance. A really appealing Harpers Ferry Model 1855, great antique, great conversation piece, ….. $2,450.00 TS SOLD

Bayonet for the above gun. $150.00 TS

Update data on 2-band 1855 Harpers Ferry Rifle.  I just received this email from Lee Gray regarding these shortened ‘55s……  quoting…

“I have one just like the one you are selling with 32" barrel turned down and is dated 1859 with Washington Grays stamped on stock. I have seen less than 5 of these….” 

and another

Hi Dave
I was looking at the M1855 rifle.
And I thought that I would mention, that I once owned
A M1842 Dated 1852  Harpers Ferry that I bought back in 1968,
It also was cut down to two bands ,turned down for a bayonet.
The interesting part was the butt plate,Marked S.C. for South Carolina
I believe it to be a real Confederate gun . But who knows for sure.
Regards Greg Beck

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12-11-48 - Premier Item / Philadelphia Rifle / Brass Trim P.S. Justice 2-Band Infantry Rifle w/ Patch Box: One of the rarer shoulder weapons from the Civil War. With estimated production of 2,500 pieces (according to Flayderman) combined with the fact that they were made in 1861 and saw hard service in the hands of valiant Pennsylvania soldiers for the entire four years of Civil War, surviving specimens are consequently very very scarce. This gun bears serial number 2591 so we know there were a few more than 2500 produced, but still darn scarce. .58 caliber. 35” barrel with saber bayonet lug near the muzzle. Lock is marked “P.S. Justice / Philada” as is the top of the barrel behind the rear sight. Trigger guard stamped “2591” (serial number). Trigger guard, butt plate, patch box, nose cap, and barrel bands are brass. Rear sight is proper two leaf 1855-61 short range pattern. Condition is overall VG. 100% original, 100% complete, and mechanically perfect. Steel is overall attractive age brown patina. Brass is overall mustard yellow patina. Wood is VG and shows numerous bangs and bruises, especially along the ramrod channel. Numerous deep dings along ramrod channel between the two bands. Also two small wood chips missing,… one forward of, and one behind the lock. Looks like this was carried in a wagon or on a caisson, where the bottom edge of the stock bumped against the wood edges. Wood edges are strong. Ramrod is not a Justice product --- It is a brass tipped steel rod somewhat crude in construction but unquestionably of the period. A rare Civil War weapon priced well below my competition…. $2,850.00 TS SOLD

Saber bayonet and scabbard for the above gun $450.00 TS

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12-11-49 - Model 1863 Springield Type-1 Rifle Musket:  Overall VG+ condition. 100% original, 100% complete, and mechanically perfect.  Metal is overall grey steel patina.  The wood has good edges just showing expected handling age and dings. No damage, no abuse.   The lock is marked US Springfield 1863 with an eagle… all very sharp and legible.  Barrel breech carries legible eagle’s head and VP.  Barrel date is obliterated from the fulminate of mercury corrosion of percussion caps.  The eagle stamp on the bolster is very good.  Both stock cartouches are visible including the ESA --- Erskine S. Allin --- Master Armorer at Springfield.   Has proper 1862-64 style rear sight, original ramrod, and a very nice replica rifle sling.  The bore is about horrible… if there is any rifling left , it is as thin as a politician’s promise in an election year.  A good solid mid war Springfield as carried at Gettysburg,  Vicksburg, The Atlanta Campaign, Wilderness, etc…   Handsome, solid, and totally honest & complete.  $1,395.00 TS SOLD

VG Bayonet and scabbard for the above.  Standard 58 socket bayonet.  Scabbard is early style with two rivets and triangular stitching.  Good match for the gun.  $295.00 TS

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12-11-50 - Model 1863 Springield Type-2 Rifle Musket w Matched Dates:  Overall VG  condition.  100% original, 100% complete, and mechanically perfect.   Metal is overall grey steel patina.  The wood has fair edges showing light signs of sanding from decades ago. . No damage, no abuse.   The lock is marked US Springfield 1864 with an eagle… all very sharp and legible.  Barrel breech carries legible eagle’s head and VP, and crisply legible 1864 barrel date.  The eagle stamp on the bolster is very good.  Both stock cartouches are worn away from the earlier sanding of the stock.   Has proper 1862-64 style rear sight, original ramrod, and a very nice replica rifle sling.  The bore is VG but dirty.  The rifling is sound but it definitely needs a cleaning with some Hoppes No.9     A good solid mid war Springfield as carried at during The Atlanta Campaign, Wilderness, Spotsylvania, March to the Sea  etc…   Handsome, solid, and totally honest & complete.  $1,550.000 SOLD

VG Bayonet and scabbard for the above.  Standard 58 socket bayonet overall bright steel with good US stamp.  Scabbard is standard Civil War pattern with eight  rivets .  Good match for the gun.  $295.00 SOLD

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12-11-51 - Minty 1819 Hall Conversion Rifle by Harpers Ferry with Sling: Near Mint example of the famed Hall breech loading Model 1819. Converted to percussion. Superb condition. Stock is near perfect with razor sharp edges and raised grain. There are just a handful of minor handling dings here and there. The barrel and bands retain 95% vivid arsenal lacquer brown finish. The breech block is marked “J H Hall / H. Ferry / US / 1834” and it retains generous amounts of the original case hardened color. Top notch condition in all respects. Most interesting aspect to this is the original CW rifle sling in fine condition that accompanies this rifle. It did not come with the rifle but was added by the previous collector who found it years ago marked as a “Hall Rifle Sling”. When he asked the seller why he thought the sling was connected to a Hall, the seller showed him a cut-out in the leather. On this sling and obviously from its period of use there is a rectangular cut-out spot which accommodates the lever release catch forward of the trigger on a Hall rifle. No doubt about it, this sling had been used with a Hall. That clinched the sale, and the previous owner added this wonderful Hall-used sling to his superb 1819 rifle. Really cool --- the sling was definitely used with a Hall rifle during the Civil War, and in my opinion has a value of at least three or four hundred dollars. An investment grade example with a very rare sling…. $3400.00 TS
Slightly pitted bayonet for this specimen @ $450.00 TS SOLD

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12-11-52 - Massive Confederate D Guard Knife with History – This is a great CS knife with a sad history. Quoting the description in catalog of The Horse Soldier catalog from whence this came in 1995… “Massive double edge spear point blade measures 15 inches. Heavy iron guard with oval cross guard, walnut grip. Blade is semi-bright with 2 very minor nicks. Actually still holds quite an edge. Guard with slightly darker patina. Classic CS style. Interesting paper sleeve used for mailing the knife through U.S. postal system in 1938. Front side has the following written in ink; “this knife was found on the bank of the Pend Oreille River. A man’s bones and a bear’s bones were found with this knife of ancient origin.’ Reverse side with preprinted label affixed which reads, :From W.W. Fordham, Independence Missouri, Postmaster. This parcel may be opened for postal inspection, 4-10-38.” Paper sleeve fits perfectly over blade and has eyelets for fastening with small string attaching sleeve to guard. No doubt sent through US postal service in this manner. Great example of CS fighting knife.: Now the bad part: The prior owner who had purchased this from the “Horse Soldier” shipped the knife to another dealer for appraisal and the paper sheath was lost. Included here is the picture from the Horse Soldier catalog showing the knife and 1938 note… but that’s all we have. Knife is classic Keenansville Bowie – Cutlass. $4550.00 DH SOLD

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12-11-53 - Confederate Short Sword or Cutlass - This interesting weapon is unmarked but of typical Confederate construction. Cast brass grip modeled on US Naval Cutlass pattern, fish scales, fastened to the blade in the typical tang through the grip, and peened on top. You can see the three indentations cast into the side of the grip for the brads which would have held the grip on a us product. The slot where the handguard of a US naval cut lass would have attached to the pommel of the grip is neatly plugged with brass. The blade is 21” long, double edged. The guard is cast brass, oval shape, slightly bent down on one side. This is a well made, in very good condition and is of unquestionable Confederate manufacture. We just don’t know for sure who made it. $2,000.00 DH SOLD

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12-11-54 - Regulation Civil War Forage Cap aka Bummer’s Cap: Easy to describe… near perfect wool body, perfect visor, complete sweatband, burlap inner facing firmly in place. No lining, replaced chin strap and replaced stiffener in the crown. This cap is a classic example of the last forage caps from Francis Bannerman’s surplus stock. By the late 1950s and early 1960s all the perfect caps were gone and the old timers tell stories about how you could paw through the remaining caps at $6 apiece but most were missing the linings, chin straps, and stiffeners, and some were missing visors. If you were lucky you might find three or four caps that you could cannibalize and put together two complete caps. In the early days of the 20th century Bannerman had thousands of forage caps in surplus, and in the early 1900s sold them for ten cents each. He bought them at Government auction just after the Civil War. The architecture of this cap tells me it is likely from the “L. J. & I. Phillips” contract of which Bannerman had a pile. One of the best deals I have seen on a real Union cap. $1,250.00 SOLD

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12-11-55 - CDV Mid-chest-up view of a young mustached soldier. Albumen portrait trimmed to an oval and fixed on a CDV card with a pre-printed frame to surround it. Corners slightly rounded for album insertion. Ewing & Co. Cumberland, MD, photographer backmark and tax stamp. Our boy wears a somewhat high-collared military jacket with six brass uniform buttons showing. No further identification seems possible, but he is a nice representative of the thousands who went off to defend the Union and this is a good example of the carte-de-visite format of photography that used a negative to print multiple positive images for a customer. $29.00

12-11-56 - Waist-up vignetted view of a soldier in a uniform coat or jacket showing seven buttons. Dashing, fair-haired and mustached. Corners slightly rounded. No backmark, but a modern collector pencil id on reverse as “Ohio soldier,” probably an accurate note on where this card surfaced. Signed in pencil on the lower front edge, “Yours, J. Silvers.” I find five candidates among Ohio troops, in the 16th, 76th, 102nd, 105th, and 189th Regiments. I will let you complete the detective work. A nice original Civil War photograph of a man who served his country and one that a collector can purchase without breaking the bank. $29.00 SOLD

12-11-57 - CDV Researchable Regular Army or New Jersey. Another friendly-priced Civil War carte-de-visite. Vignetted waist-up view of a young man wearing a sack coat turned back to show a military vest. Signed in ink across the front: “Truly Yours, / E. V. H. Bowe or E.O.H. Bowe or… Boon or Bone or Bo??? / U.S.A.” S. Stokes, Trenton, NJ photographer backmark and tax stamp. Card trimmed at top and corners rounded for placing in an album. In the Civil War “USA” was the customary abbreviation for “US Army,” meaning the regular army versus the volunteer forces raised by the states. If you have some time on your hands you will undoubtedly be able to uncover this man’s identity. I simply don’t have the time to spend researching all the possible names that might match his stylized autograph. A fun project for you… $35.00

 

 

12-11-58 - CDV Mystery General In New Bern NC: Dashing looking gent wearing a Union Army General’s frock coat. Top two buttons visible as is velvet collar. I do not recognize this man but the back mark shows he had this picture taken in New Bern NC. That should aid you in your research to uncover his identity. Obscure generals are among the most collectible of Civil War CDV photos. $165.00

12-11-59 - CDV General Alexander McDowell McCook: One of the fourteen “Fighting McCooks,” well known members of a large family devoted to the Union. 2/3 standing view in civilian clothes, Anthony backmark. West Point class of 1852, served on the frontier and at the USMA. Colonel of the 1st Ohio at Bull Run, brigadier general in September, 1861, and major general in July, 1862, commanding a brigade in Kentucky and a division in the Army of the Ohio at Nashville, Shiloh, and Corinth. Commanded the 20th Corps at Perryville, Murfreesboro, Tullahoma, and Chickamauga. He was given brevets of brigadier and major general at the end of the war and made lieutenant colonel of the 26th US Infantry. He remained in the army after the war, serving on the frontier and on Sherman’s staff, eventually making colonel, brigadier and then major-general, at which rank he retired in 1895. $79.00

12-11-60 - CDV Photo Col James Fry: He defended Buell at Shiloh. Served as Colonel, Brigadier, and Major General. Nice waist-up seated view, Brady/Anthony backmark showing him in his Colonel’s uniform. Born in Illinois in 1827, Fry was West Point class of 1847 and served in Mexico before being detailed as Adjutant of the USMA from 1854 to 1859. Briefly commanding an artillery battery at the beginning of the war, he was commissioned into the Adjutant General’s Department and acted as chief of staff for both McDowell and Buell. He was one of the champions of Buell’s role in the Battle of Shiloh which Grant and Sherman were very interested in playing down since they did not want to seem rescued by Buell’s timely arrival. Nevertheless, upon creation of the Provost Marshal’s Department Fry was recommended by Grant and made Provost Marshal General. Fry enlisted and was commissioned on 3/16/1861 as Captain and Asst. Adj. Gen. in the US Army Adjutant Gen’l Dept . Discharged for promotion on 11/14/1861, he was commissioned into US Army as Colonel and Asst. Aide-De-Camp and then discharged again for commission and promotion on 3/17/1863 into the US Army Provost Marshal Dept (Colonel and Provost Marshal General,) and on 4/21/1864 for commission into US Army General Staff as Brig. Gen. At the end of the war in March, 1865, he received regular army brevets as Colonel, Brig.-General, and Major General. Fry served in the army until 1881, but continued writing on military subjects after retirement and died in 1894 in Rhode Island. A fine view of a very scarce subject. $225.00

12-11-61 - Harness Racing 1860’s Style. Nice horizontal outdoor cdv view of a proud horse owner seated on a two-wheel sulky showing off his favorite racer. The reverse has the image of a young man on it, so we can’t tell the location by a backmark, but several large houses are visible in the background. Immediately behind him is either a street or part of race track. There is a vertical crease in the center of the carte, and some dirt along the bottom edge. Another of those outdoor views I like that let you step back in time to mid-nineteenth century America. $45.00

12-11-62 - CDV Possible 84th Illinois officer. ¾ length standing view of a line officer in his frock coat, his right hand bare and resting on a table, wearing a gauntlet on his left hand while clutching the other glove. On the table rests his round hat with a very clear “84” inside a hunting horn. The card bears a Nashville photographer’s backmark. In terms of which units this man might have served with…. There was an 84th Tennessee US that served for three months, but this guy looks a lot more serious than a 90 day wonder. The other two likely candidates are the 84th Indiana and 84th Illinois, both of whom served in that theatre of war. The Indiana unit mustered in at Richmond, IN, in September, 1862 and served in the 4th Corps of the Army of the Ohio and Army of the Cumberland, fighting hard at Chickamauga, where they suffered 23 killed in action and Kennesaw Mountain, Atlanta, and other engagements, losing 5 officers and 82 enlistedmen killed and mortally wounded in the course of the war, mustering out in June, 1865, at Nashville. The Illinois regiment saw similar service from Sept., 1862, to June, 1865, in the Army of the Ohio and the Cumberland, serving in the 2nd, 14th, 21st, and finally the 4th Corps also. They were particularly hard hit at Stones River, where they lost 228 out of 350 men engaged, as well as Chickamauga, Kennesaw, and other engagements, losing 4 officers and 120 men killed and mortally wounded, and a total of 558 battle casualties altogether. This officer bears some resemblance to Adjutant Russell W. Caswell, whose photo is on CivilWarData, but the resemblance is not proof of identification. It is a nice image of an officer who looks like he has seen some serious field service. Lower left corner of the albumen is missing a tiny portion, not affecting the image in any way, otherwise very good. $79.00 SOLD

 

 

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