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Welcome to our Civil War Antiques web catalog.

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Dave Taylor
P.O. Box 87
Sylvania, OH 43560

419-842-1863

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12-11-01 - Model 1873 Winchester Lever Action Rifle,  .44 Caliber,  Made in 1884:  A very appealing and handsome example of  The Gun that Won The West.  100% original, 100% complete, mechanically perfect, good bore, great wood, and sharp markings.  NRA “very good” ++ condition.   Totally honest and unaltered.  This rifle was manufactured in 1884 and bears serial number 166,815 A.  At the time Jimmy Stewart made the famous movie this gun was only 66 years old.  The movie was made in 1950 and the rifle is now 128 years old.  The cowboys are gone, the great movie stars are gone,  the old guns live on.  This round barrel ‘73 is a tight and honest example with much appeal, and even more desirable in the large .44 caliber bore size.  This is about as affordable an old cowboy gun as you can hope to find.  I pulled the movie-still off the internet showing Jimmy Stewart and Millard Mitchell each holding a ’73. I think it makes a great illustration of the rifle’s use. Compared to prices of modern guns and replicas of antiques, this offering is a great value for the money…$1295.00 SOLD

 

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12-11-02 - Small Size Henry Deringer Phila’ Pocket Pistol: .41 caliber small size Deringer with two inch barrel and measuring only five inches in overall length. Has the Flayderman “type 6” trigger guard decoration indicating production ca. 1848 to 1850. Overall VG condition. 100% original. 100% complete. Mechanically perfect. Lock and barrel both signed DERINGER PHILADEL’A. Lock marking has weak “R” in Deringer and weak “A” in Philadela. Barrel legend is struck with top half of DERINGER being weak and bottom half strong. PHILADELA is strong overall. Left side of breech stamped “P”… not in a sunburst. Similar to the gun Booth used to murder Lincoln… and also a perfect piece to display with California Gold Rush artifacts or early River Boat Gambler items. Wonderful early Deringer…See Item 13-02-74 SOLD

 

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12-11-03 - 18th Century English Socket Bayonet Dated 1780: Superb example of the English Brown Bess bayonet being wonderfully and beautifully engraved with the United East India Company’s logo (VEIC in a heart), name “TWIGG”, and date “1780” engraved on the socket… and also bearing the name “Whately” stamped on the blade. 20.75” overall length with 16.5” blade. The Twigg marking possibly being John Twigg of London who made guns and accoutrements ca 1760 to 1780, or possibly he was an officer in the UEIC, or perhaps a small unit commander in India . Whately may have been an inspector or contractor or sub contractor, or maker? In any event… a handsome and high quality 18th century British Bayonet with wonderful markings and wonderful condition … dating back to the period of the American Revolution and early period of English colonialism in India...$375.00 SOLD

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12-11-04 - 5th Corps Officer Pards: Superb quarter plate tintype of two Union line officers both sporting fancy 5th corps Maltese Cross badges on their breasts. Clarity is outstanding. Condition is excellent with one minor abrasion as shown. Note the M1850 staff officer’s sword, double border extra rich shoulder straps, and the left hand subject has his eagle buckle upside down on his belt. Super Army of the Potomac image. Housed in mat, frame, and glass only. $550.00 SOLD

 

12-11-05 - Gettysburg Confederate Dead at the Rose Woods: Nice tonal quality stereo-card by Gettysburg photographer L. Mumper with his logo on left and right margins: “L. Mumper, Gettysburg, PA. / Views of the Battle Field of Gettysburg.” Mumper was selling views after the war to tourists and visiting veterans. Here he pirated the Gardner-O’Sullivan view of Confederate dead laid out for burial in the field above the Rose Woods. These men were killed in the heavy fighting around the Wheatfield on July 2 and had been laid out for burial by Confederate troops, but the area was retaken by Federal troops before they could be interred. Mumper decided to increase the salability of the view by adding a stamped title at the lower right reading “DEAD ON CULP’S HILL.” The fighting on that part of the battlefield had gotten a lot more attention in the battle’s aftermath and it made sense from a business point of view to give the public what it wanted. The same view was also marketed as showing the dead of the 24th Michigan of the Iron Brigade near McPherson’s Woods as tastes changed or maybe just for variety.

A strong image and an interesting one in terms of photographic history and the interpretation of the battlefield. Very good condition, good mount, period ink inventory number on reverse... $295.00 SOLD

 

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12-11-06 - The above Enfield and sling (as well as the saber shown below) were brought home from the Civil War by Ezra Rice 17th Indiana Mounted Infantry --- in the famed Wilder’s Lightning Brigade. Both pieces were purchased from the Great Grandson (Raymond Rice of Eden Prairie, Minn.) by a friend of mine in Minneapolis early this year. He sold them to me in September of this year (2012).

Captured Confederate Enfield Musket w/ Super CS Sling: A very good example of the standard P-1853 Enfield rifle musket in wonderful “attic found” condition. The gun is 100% original, 100% complete and mechanically perfect. Lock is marked TOWER, 1862, etc. Barrel has Birmingham proof marks of 25 cipher 25 cipher. “Hoosier” Rice was issued and carried a Spencer seven shot repeating rifle for his personal firearm. This gun was something he would have captured and brought home. The unit history shows that he and his regiment made a successful saber charge on the Rebs in 1865 capturing a great many prisoners. This may have been the point where he got his souvenir of the Confederacy. The best part of this rifle is the sling that has been on it since the Civil War. It is a brown russet leather sling closely following the pattern of the Enlish enfield sling, but being incredibly crude and hand sewn and carrying a crude white metal roller buckle. It is undoubtedly a Confederate made copy of the English sling. When found the sling had one break which I had helper Tom repair. The musket is just super and the sling whistles Dixie, and it is interesting to know that one of Wilder’s men brought it home. A wonderful “as-found” Civil War musket that you can be certain was carried by a Johnny Reb. The sling is likely worth half the price I have on this… $2,250.00 SOLD

 

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12-11-07 – This saber (and the preceding Enfield) were brought home from the Civil War by Ezra Rice 17th Indiana Mounted Infantry --- in the famed Wilder’s Lightning Brigade. Both pieces were purchased from the Great Grandson (Raymond Rice of Eden Prairie, Minn.) by a friend of mine in Minneapolis earlier this year. He sold them to me in September of 2012. The musket was a souvenir. The saber was carried by Rice himself. The saber is a wonderful Civil War weapon. It is a standard M1860 light cavalry saber with a near mint blade. It is deeply stamped with the Ames firm marking on one side, and US, CEW, 1864 on the other. Inspector’s initials “JH” visible on pommel. Brass 3-branch guard is VG. No bends. Has age patina and some verdigris. Scabbard is a gentle brown patina with some minor raised surface scale. There is some pitting on the drag obscuring the inspector’s stamp. The grip retains all the leather and twisted wire. There is some surface wear on the leather. Soldier Rice was a resident of Columbia City, Indiana (near Fort Wayne) He enlisted on March 9th 1864 as a Private. On 3/9/1864 he mustered into "E" Co. 17th Indiana Mounted Infantry. He was Mustered Out on 8/8/1865 at Macon, GA. During this period Wilder’s men saw action at the Atlanta Campaign and then in Alabama including a battle at Selma. An excellent example of the standard US saber and this one with a wonderful history attached to it... $950.00 SOLD

 

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12-11-08 - Officer’s Bullion Sword Knot: A very good to fine example of the Civil War knot for use with the Foot Officer’s or Staff Officer’s swords.  This one shows only light handling wear and a little looseness to the bullion tassles.  Solid and perfect for display …$250.00  SOLD

 

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12-11-09 - Soldier’s Money Belt, Housewife, Coin, and Relics with Family Tags:  A wonderful lot of soldier personal items with intriguing hand written family notes.  When I bought this all the items were mounted in a wall frame assembled in the mid 20th century mounted on non archival paper backing.  I removed it from that inappropriate container.  The grandchildren of the veteran wrote the notes stating that Grandpa Hiram Burlingame had been from Pennsylvania.   The research I have done indicates that Hiram Burlingame was actually from Massachusetts.  I find Hiram in the 46th Mass. with additional service in the 27th Mass.  There are no other soldiers with that name shown on either the National Park Service web site nor the civil-war-data site.  He is shown as Hiram J.R. Burlingame Jr. of Holyoke, Mass. --- wounded in action at Cold Harbor.  The housewife (sewing kit) is really great.  Measures about a foot long when unrolled and obviously made by hand by a woman on the home front.  The money belt is a high quality affair of fine red leather lined in a fine cotton or muslin. The inside has compartments for money and other valuables.   The coin is an 1853 copper cent.  The square nails were interesting to the family but not so much to me, and the little lead soldier likewise.

A very honest and appealing lot of soldier items.  $595.00

 

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12-11-10 - Civil War Silver 7th Corps Badge with Family Note:  A dead-real Civil War badge with classic T-bar pin on the back, likely fashioned from a fifty cent piece.   Excellent condition.  Accompanying this is an eighty year old family note­­­ which reads “Dear Florence,  This moon & star pin was found while in battle of Wilderness during the Civil War by O.O. Weidner and the emblem represents the Army chor (sic. corps).  Othello had it made in this pin form.  Aunt Emma Sept.5, ‘34”.   The reverse of the note presents another piece of Civil War jewelry to another family member.   That piece has been lost to the ages.   In terms of researching O.O. Weidner --- that task was daunting… but it eventually bore fruit.   No luck was had searching the National Park Service records.  No luck on Civil War data site.   But utilizing an Ancestry.com service Othello O. Weidner was indeed found.  He is found in Co “G” 49th Missouri Volunteers.  Now with that being said there is MUCH research still needing to be done.  His Missouri regiment was not in the 7th Corps.   His Missouri regiment was not at the Wilderness.   In addition, the 7th Corps was not present at the battle of the Wilderness in Virginia.   Is it possible the badge is actually a Louisiana badge picked up by the Missourian?  It is known that similar pins were worn in the 7th Louisiana.  On the other hand… the 49th Missouri regiment was geographically close to the 7th corps.   I am going to let you do the rest of the heavy lifting in terms of research.  A great Civil War badge with a great letter and very intriguing... $875.00 SOLD

 

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12-11-11 - Pair of Flasks / Powder and Shot: Classic 1850 – 1860 flasks. Each measuring roughly seven inches tall.  The shot pouch is embossed leather embossed with a dog.  Powder flask is a lovely copper flask with modified clam shell motif.  Spout marked Am.Flask & Cap Co... $100 for the pair. SOLD

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12-11-12 - This canteen is inscribed several times. “Edward D. Dwyer Saratoga ????” “Edward D. Dwyer Co??????” (appears to be a long word). Also inscribed along the outer edge “Michael Dwyer of West Hadly”. Pretty easy to find the area the men resided in... Hadley and Saratoga are in Saratoga county New York. Edward D. Dwyer whose name is in the center of both sides of the canteen is listed in the records as serving from Saratoga and having served in the 77th New York being wounded at Spotsylvania. Michael is not as easily pinned down, though deep archives research would likely tell the story. Edward appears clearly to have been the war time owner of the canteen with his name in the center of both sides of the canteen. I assume Michael is his brother or son. Nice canteen just missing bottom bracket. $450.00

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12-11-13 - Very Scarce Sarson and Roberts contract 1861 Pattern Rifle: Musket aka the “New York” Contract. Only 5,140 made and very few of those survive in strong condition. With Springfield unable to keep up with demand, the government let a number of contracts to private manufacturers to make these M1861 muskets. Contract muskets are a collecting field in themselves, with this New York contract being one of the hardest to locate in original form and with strong condition. Correct S&R “Eagle / U.S. /New York /1862” marked lock plate. Attic untouched fine+ condition. Rear sight has lots of color. Balance of metal is bright shading to brown. Has that wood and cigar smoke patina from hanging on a den wall for decades. Very slight rounding to the wood back of the lock, but a very clear cartouche on the flat opposite the lock. Extremely fine condition. 100% original and complete, mechanically perfect… a darn fine example of a very scarce Union Army musket. Wonderful condition….$2,895.00 SOLD

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12-11-14 - Sixth Plate Tintype Yankee Card Sharks (or Sharps):  A cool Civil War image showing a couple Federal soldiers displaying their dark side --- Poker Playing !  A very unusual implied action image in VG condition housed in a modern by antique looking wooden frame.  Each yank wears a short jacket and slouch hat.  A very interesting mid war image...$375.00 SOLD

 

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12-11-15 - Quarter Plate Tintype Barefoot Federal Tough Guys:  Not sure if these guys are drunk,  escaped prisoners,  or just Northern country boys who dislike shoes.  Neat standing pose showing three Jaspers… the middle Goober is wearing a Union military vest, the two flanking fashionistas are sporting homemade shirts and fancy galluses (suspenders).  All three wear Union Army issue trousers rolled up to expose their jumbo bare feet.  One of the more unusual images I have found lately.  Housed in a full case.  $450.00 SOLD

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12-11-16 - 1861 Contract Rifle-Musket by the Providence Tool Company of Rhode Island.  One of the major contractors during the Civil War, Providence Tool made about 70,000 of these weapons from 1862 to 1865.  This is crisply dated 1864 at the rear of the lock and bears a sharp US on either side of the spread-winged eagle.  Firm name is stamped forward of the hammer.  The lock is smoky grey mixed with light cleaning with a mixture of age spots. Hammer gray, bolster a tad darker and crusty from wartime firing.  Very small speck of wood out above forward edge of the lock plate.  Bolster clean-out screw shows small sign of turning at lower edge of slot.  Barrel bands and mounts lightly shined and showing minor pitting.  100% original and 100% complete including the sling swivels and rod. The bore is VG++ with strong rifling and some light wear.  Wood pleasing medium brown, barrel bright mixed with gray and bears a date of 1864 at the breech. Mechanically excellent. If you use your imagination you can almost make out a faint cartouche in the wood opposite the lock.  A good representative Union infantry weapon from the middle of the war, Grant’s overland campaign, Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Petersburg and Sherman’s fighting in the west... $1,450.00  SOLD

 

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12-11-17 - 1863 Type-1 Springfield Rifle Musket: Several notches in quality above what you usually find at gun shows and auctions. The “1863” model was produced from 1863 through 1865 in two slight variations. This is the “1863 Type I” that incorporated standard Springfield features with some changes inspired by the 1861 “special models:” the hammer is beveled, the bolster is flat without a cleanout screw, and the barrel bands are rounded and friction screw fastened without retaining springs. The band springs were reintroduced in the Type II, and late type II guns will have knurled head rods and single leaf rear sights. So this is a good early version that retains the first type rod with no swell, but still with the tulip head. Nice tight wood with defined edges, just faint rounding forward, one tiny chip out on forward edge of lockplate, sharp inspector cartouches opposite the lock. Clear bolster and lock markings, just a tad light at the bottom of the plate eagle. Nice smooth metal with plum color on the barrel, signs of blue on the rear sight, good barrel proofs and 1863 date, smoky gray lockplate hinting at the orginal case colors with clear Springfield mark and 1864 date. These type-1 Springfields generally have 1863 dated locks but they do surface with 1864 dates quite frequently as both locks are identical except for the dates. A nice gun, and darn close to what it looked like when issued. Swivels in place, mechanically exc., excellent bore with sharp rifling. A dandy $2,250.00 SOLD

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12-11-18 - Harper’s Ferry M1816 Conversion Musket Matched 1835 dates - Typical Early Civil War musket with soldier’s initials carved in the stock.  Harper’s Ferry guns have always had a special attraction for collectors because of their southern origins (Virginia) and close association with John Brown and then the Confederacy.  This is an 1816 pattern musket (Type-3,)  smooth-bore .69 caliber, with a correct arsenal conversion to percussion using the “cone-in-barrel”  or “Belgian” method of conversion.   This was done from 1848-57.  Of some interest is the fact that guns dated after 1832 were considered first class and prime candidates to be updated.   Nice overall untouched condition.  Smooth metal with undisturbed age brown patina, nice wood with just a few dings between the upper bands,  a small speck out beneath the lockplate,  and a short crack back from the lower sideplate, but solid.  The original 1835 date of manufacture is clearly stamped at the rear of the  lock plate, as is “Harpers Ferry” and their eagle at front.   VP and eagle proofs on left of barrel at breech, date of 1835 is legible on the tang of the breech plug,  and the inspector’s view marks on the wood opposite the lock are visible.  As is typical of Harpers Ferry guns, even the lock screws have assembly numbers stamped on them.  Swivels in place, correct original rod,  front sight on top band, bayonet stud in place near muzzle.  Mechanically excellent, 100% original 100% complete.  A set of initials, “W.R.” or “W.B.” are lightly carved upside down on the edge of the forestock near the muzzle, very likely the original owner. These are the guns that fought the Civil War for the first couple of years until imports, arsenals and contractors could get up to speed.  

This is about as honest an 1816 as you could hope to find and priced very realistically at $1,150.00 SOLD

 

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12-11-19 - British P-1853 Enfield Rifle Musket. The standard Civil War Enfield imported in large numbers by both the Union and Confederacy.  These Enfields are a highly sought Civil War gun by all collectors.  Dated 1862 very clearly on the lock - a nice early war gun and likely one that was headed south.   Nice even smooth plum finish overall, sharp wood, just some minor flakes out on the forward edge of the lockplate.  Stock makers stamp visible behind the trigger guard tang.  Clear crown at rear of lock plate,  Tower/1862 forward of the hammer.  Very light vise marks near breech, clear proof and 25-25 bore marks indicating .577 caliber on the barrel.  Rear sight in place, original rod, screw fastened bands,  swivels intact, brass mounts… 100% original and complete with the exception of six inches of ramrod having been cut off.   This is not visible unless you remove the rod, and I have no idea why it was done in the first place.   Nice wood, just minor dings opposite the lock. Nipple and bolster show minor corrosion from percussion caps in actual use of the gun. Good bore with strong rifling, mechanically perfect.  Second in number only to Springfield pattern arms,  there is a good chance one of your favorite units carried these at some point.  A good example to fill out a Federal or Confederate firearms display. Totally appropriate for Confederate display and will not cost you a fortune.  $1,595.00 SOLD

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12-11-20 - Extra Fine, High Finish, Springfield Refurbished 1860 Spencer Army rifle!   Only 1215 of these rifles were refurbished at our National Arsenal and this one not only has 80% of the arsenal reblue present,  but the serial number is just one number off a known Wilder’s Brigade gun!  Very scarce Civil War Model 1860 army rifle that was kept in the service and sent to Springfield Arsenal to have a Stabler Cut-Off added and be resleeved to .50 cal. rimfire with a three groove bore.  This retains very clear “Spencer Repeating Rifle Co. Boston. Mass. Pat’d March 6, 1860” marks at breech and the clear low serial number of 5380 on the wrist.  I don’t know whether I like this gun better because of the nice wood, excellent 80% barrel blue and visible case colors on the receiver, or because it is so close to a known Wilder’s gun.   Wilder’s Spencers all saw heavy saddle wear and those we find that went home with members of the Lightning Brigade show heavy use bordering on abuse.  The wood on those guns looks almost like an Indian carried gun.  Those rifles that were returned to the army and sent to Springfield are the few that now survive in fine condition.  This has fine wood and is  mechanically perfect.  100% original and 100% complete as refurbished ca 1867.  The history of the Spencer is too well known among collectors to need repeating and Wilder’s brigade is probably the unit most famous for carrying them  (I think he even edges out Custer’s Michigan Troopers.) Finding a Spencer with any sort of condition is very special. When these were sent to Springfield at the end of the war they were given new lined bores with three groove rifling,  they had the ejector port area of the frame filed to a rounded contour on the edges, were given new stocks,  and most were fit with a Stabler cut-off device.  The Stabler device was a simple mechanical turn key that prevented a fresh cartridge from loading into the chamber after the soldier fired and ejected a round.  This was not an option on the first guns.  The Stabler device let the soldier fire the gun as a single-shot and keep the magazine in reserve.  This is an exceedingly handsome example of a wartime Spencer rifle that was likely carried in the Lightning Brigade, and that still retains its 1867 Arsenal finish.  $3,450.00 SOLD

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12-11-21 - Civil War Import Prussian 1809 Pattern Brass Mounted Infantry Musket aka Pottsdam Musket. Another of the many types of weapons that Northern and Southern agents procured in Europe at the beginning of the war to arm our rival armies. 72 cal. smoothbore, brass mounts, including sideplate and triggerguard, inlet cheek rest. Clearly marked FW/Saarn/J on lockplate. Full length, complete with bayonet locking spring on the underside of the barrel at the muzzle. These used a socket bayonet with no mortise, that was held in place by the spring. Good wood, a couple of small dimples on the outboard side of the butt, and some loss along the ramrod channel just behind the nose cap. Swivels in place. Old replacement ramrod. Mechanism good. Even smooth patina overall. Butt plate has ancient unit marks from the early days of its life in a German army. Totally appropriate for early war US or CS display and very affordable... $675.00 SOLD ( I may have a bayonet for this --- call.)

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12-11-22 - Fine Condition Belgian-made large bore percussion infantry musket, about .70 cal.  Iron mounted, three band, elongated hammer with bulbous thumb piece. Trumpet shaped ramrod. Swivels in place. Bayonet lug underside of barrel near muzzle.  Sight on forward double band. Crown/AF on the upper part of the lockplate is the mark of August Francotte of Liege, who produced military arms for various countries.  I can’t peg the model designation on this, so will leave that detective work for you.  It is in very good to fine  condition, fine wood, decent bright metal, mechanically perfect, and must have packed a wallop.  A set of initials lightly carved forward of the trigger guard. Typical of many miscellaneous muskets bought up by US and CS agents scouring Europe for arms in 1861-1862 and often termed “pumpkin-slingers” for their large caliber ammunition by the soldiers carrying them.  A lot of gun for your money.  $825.00

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12-11-23 - 7th Illinois Cavalry Inscribed Cavalry Manual: This one was owned by The Colonel.   Excellent condition. Green cloth bindings. Gilt title on spine shows light wear. Vol.2 of the Cavalry Tactics and Regulations Manual published by Lippincott in 1862.  Superb ink inscription on the fly leaf reads “H.C. Forbes Co. B  7th Ills. Cav.  La Grange Tenn. Feb. 7th 1863”  He is Henry C. Forbes who entered as Major and rose to the rank of full-bird Colonel of the regiment!  Pretty important stuff.  The regiment served in Tennessee, Mississippi, Missouri, Alabama, and Georgia including Chickamauga and Nashville.  They lost dozens in killed and mortally wounded.  Contains bugle signals, tactics etc.  Measures 6 x 4 inches in size and about .75 inches thick.  108pp plus advertisements... $295.00 SOLD

 

 

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12-11-24 - Navy Surgeon’s Hynm Book:  Leather bound pocket size Methodist Episcopal Hymn book stenciled on the fly leaf in military stencil format “ J. Wesley Boydon / Surgeon USN”.   Boyden served from 3/3/1864  through  8/17/1866 assigned to the Gulf Squadron.  He died in the service after serving aboard the USS Ohio and USS Muscoota.  Book cover measures 4 x 2.5 inches and it is 1.5 inches thick.  Published by Lane & Tippett New York 1844.  Quaint, historical, and scarce... $225.00  SOLD

 

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12-11-25 - Artillery Musician’s Jacket:  The most colorful regulation enlisted uniforms are those issued to company musicians- fifers and drummers, or trumpeters and buglers. Artillery batteries and cavalry were each allowed two of these key personnel per company.   With “grid-iron” trimmed fronts piped with the branch of service color like the collar, cuffs, front lapel and back, these jackets were not only extremely dressy on parade, they let a commander know exactly where these men were so he could quickly signal orders to them for broadcast to the.   On the collector market they have always been in demand and have always been rare.   Norm Flayderman told me years ago that even back in the 1950s and 1960s when he bought BALES of original jackets out of surplus,  the musician’s jackets were damn scarce.  In those days when the last bundles of shell jackets were being opened by surplus dealers only two musician’s jackets were found in each bale of uniforms.   This artillery jacket has everything going for it- great color, excellent condition, nice lining and clear Schuylkill Arsenal markings in the sleeve. You won’t get many chances at one of these, and certainly not at so fair a price.  Displays like a million bucks and pretty enough your wife might even be impressed…  $7,950.00 SOLD

 

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12-11-26 - Cavalry Musician’s Jacket:  Like the above but piped in yellow.  There is probably no picture more iconic of the Civil War than that of a Union cavalry bugler, mounted and blowing the charge.  As with my artillery musician’s jacket above, this is a cornerstone of Civil War uniform collecting and the time to pounce on one is when you see it!  This is an exceptional example. All buttons and lemon-yellow trim in place,  tight stitching,  full lining in body and sleeves.  As with my artillery jacket,  this is probably a Schuylkill Arsenal product,  unmarked but exhibiting the characteristically oddball sleeve lining that Schuylkill products often show because they were pieced out to local seamstresses (a carryover from the prewar policy of providing work to soldier’s wives and widows.)  I can’t stress how scarce these jackets are, and how impressive they look in a cavalry or uniform display. In a collection room they can stop a visitor in his tracks. Excellent condition overall.  The yellow piping that was hidden under the button front is slightly more vivid than the balance.  Rare as rare gets in this day and age  $8,350.00 SOLD

 

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12-11-27 - Manual of Military Surgery

A Manual of Military Surgery, or Hints on the Emergencies of Field, Camp, and Hospital Practice

Gross, S. D., M.D.

Lippincott – Philadelphia – 1861 – 1st Edition

Exceedingly rare... offered by Charles Parkhurst Rare Books, Inc. ABAA (Prescott, AZ, U.S.A.)

This is the standard manual carried by Surgeons and Hospital Stewards in the field. I do not believe I have seen more than three copies in my life.

12mo, (6 x 4 inches) 186 pages; original brown cloth, hard cover binding showing wear and scuffs, with faded gilt lettering on spine. Both covers embossed with an eagle surmounting a shield and panoply of arms. A solid copy with some minor worm damage on the fly leaf. Some moderate scuffing on the forward edges of the covers. Shows honest handling wear but no abuse. Exactly what you would expect from a book actually carried on the battlefield during the Civil War. A very representative copy and rare on the market; only 3 show in the auction record. SOLD

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12-11-28 - Officer's Bullion Embroidered Crossed Sabers hat insignia: Has tin insert and brown polished cotton backing. Both loops in tact... $595.00 SOLD

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12-11-29 - Bullion Embroidered Civil War Officer’s Infantry Insignia:  Excellent condition bullion on black velvet.  Classic design with tin stiffener insert and brown polished cotton back.  Both loops intact.  Applied regimental number 1.  Measures 3 x 2.2 inches.  About perfect condition... $595.00  SOLD

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12-11-30 - CDV Nice from-life vignetted bust view of Confederate John C. Breckinridge, politician and CS general. Toronto, Canada, photographer backmark. Probably taken during his sojourn abroad after the Civil War when he feared he might be tried for treason and fled to Cuba, Britain, and Canada. Breckinridge (1821-1875) was a significant figure in the country’s descent into civil war. A Kentucky politician, he served as Vice President under Buchanan and ran unsuccessfully for President in 1860 as a pro-slavery candidate. He was, however, elected as a Senator from Kentucky and served until October, 1861, when it was clear Kentucky would remain in the Union and he went south to join the Confederacy, for a time commanding the Kentucky “Orphan Brigade,” and reaching the rank of Major General. He fought at Shiloh, Stones River, Chickamauga, and other engagements in the west (and spending a lot time at odds with Braxton Bragg) before coming east, taking over Confederate forces in the Shenandoah Valley, commanding troops at the Battle of New Market, fighting with the Army of Northern Virginia at Cold Harbor and with Early on his raid toward Washington. Toward the end of the war Breckinridge combined his political and military talents to serve as the last Confederate Secretary of War, from February to May, 1865. When Breckinridge left the Senate to go south he was formally expelled and declared a traitor. Fearing prosecution, he remained abroad until 1869 when he was granted amnesty and returned to the practice of law in Kentucky until his death in 1875. A very significant figure militarily and politically…. And a darn rare subject to find in a “from life” photograph… $375.00 SOLD

12-11-31 - The Mississippi Riverboat Natchez unloading in Baton Rouge.  CDV by McPherson & Oliver and bearing that back mark.  Tons of detail in this great image.  Wagons and teams are lined up to pick up supplies from the steamer.  The Natchez was utilized much like a movable warehouse on the Mississippi.   Another well known view of the ship shows the word “hotel” painted on one end of the vessel,  explaining that the upper deck cabins were used for temporary lodgings.

The disorganized crowd of teamsters, wagons with covers and without, horses and carts,  gives a good idea of the busy activity at supply points that were necessary to support the armies in the field.  Views like this that actually impart the REAL flavor of daily life in early America are beyond rare, and this one is head and shoulders above most.  Civil War History. Southern History. Mississippi River Boat History.  This carte has it all... $650.00  SOLD

 

12-11-32 - CDV General Andrew D. Porter and staff. Nice early war horizontal view taken in the field, probably just before Bull Run, corners slightly clipped for album insertion, all the officers in fatigue coats, nice high McDowell style officer forage caps, one dashing fellow with a hat pinned up on one side.  A group who definitely look like they mean business.  Old pencil identification at top reverse, collector pencil notes below that. Partial Philadelphia photographer back mark on reverse and partially present on right edge of card. Porter stands at center with a binocular case slung over his shoulder, sword and sash buckled over his non-regulation double-breasted fatigue coat.  His staff are standing and seated around him similarly attired in real field wear.  They are posed on a house porch, a civilian peers out from a door on the left and another man in civilian clothes is seated with the group.  Porter had served in the Mexican War and on the frontier in the Regiment of Mounted Riflemen and became Colonel of the 16th US Infantry in 1861 and one of the first new brigadier generals of volunteers.  At First Bull Run he commanded a brigade in Hunter’s division and took over after Hunter was wounded.  Appointed Provost Marshal of the Army of the Potomac during the Peninsular Campaign, he later supervised the draft in Pennsylvania and a recruiting depot before resigning for health reasons in 1864.  A “from life” CDV photo like this is found only once in a blue moon.  This had been part of my friend Arthur Marchand’s collection for decades.  He passed away earlier this year and I picked a handful of his best cards to buy from his estate.  Great photo $395.00

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12-11-33 - CDV 3rd Regiment Drummer:  Very touching view of a young fifer or drummer.  Probably no older than 14, he stands wearing a forage cap with clearly visible numeral “3” on the front,  a four-button sack coat that is just a tad too big and belt with two-piece buckle typical of Massachusetts troops, and a narrow stripe on the edge of his light colored trousers.  Adding to the image is the fact that he clutches a typical fife and drum music  book in his right hand.  Many images of young boys in semi-military garb are passed off as drummer boys. This young man really is one. American Heritage once captioned an image as “the haunting face of a truly lost generation.” We don’t know the fate of this young man, but he certainly answered his country’s call.  Back of card is inscribed “Feb. 1863”.  The numeral “3” on the cap in conjunction with the date indicates that the soldier was likely serving in either the 3rd Mass. Infantry or the 3rd Co. Mass. Artillery.  Research should uncover an identification.  It is a very special image.  Henry Wyman, Boston, backmark. Period pencil date “February, 1863” on reverse... $225.00 SOLD

 

12-11-34 - Touching Civil War CDV Photo:    Major-General Edward Otho Cresap Ord, commander of the 24th Army Corps and then the Army of the James, posed outdoors seated on a porch opposite his wife, with his daughter standing next to him resting her head on his shoulder.  Behind them a vase of flowers stands on a table in the long window whose open shutters frame them.  Ord was a Marylander, graduate of West Point in 1839, veteran of the Seminole War, and participant in the capture of John Brown at Harpers Ferry in 1859. He remained loyal to the Union and commanded a brigade in the First Corps and division in the Department of the Rappahannock until mid-1862.  He then commanded a division in the Army of West Tennessee before moving to corps command of 18th Corps in the Army of the James and finally the whole Army of the James in January, 1865, when he replaced Butler.  In the fighting around Petersburg Ord was wounded in the attack on Fort Harrison,  but remained in the field.  He finally retired in 1880 and died in 1883. This is scarce photo of an important officer in a very unusual setting with his family is most unusual and very desirable... $225.00  SOLD

12-11-35 - This Man Was On the field at Gettysburg, July 1, 1863!  Vignetted bust shot of Capt. Samuel Miller Co. A 107th OVI, a hard-fighting Ohio regiment in the Army of the Potomac.  Recruited at Camp Cleveland in Fall, 1862, this regiment served briefly in Kentucky and then moved east to join the 11th Corps in the Army of the Potomac.  They took a lot of casualties at Chancellorsville and a number had just returned from captivity when they embarked on the Gettysburg campaign. Entering the fight with 550 men they took part in the ill-fated stand of Barlow’s division north of the town.  As part of Ames’ brigade, they were overwhelmed in the assault of Ewell’s division and driven back with heavy casualties, losing some 13 killed, 91 wounded, 66 captured, and 5 missing on July 1,  and more on the subsequent two days. With only 111 men left in the ranks, it joined the pursuit of Confederates after the battle.  In August, rather than going west with the rest of the corps it was assigned duty in South Carolina, where it engaged in a number of smaller fights and in March, 1865, captured three enemy artillery pieces in a fight at Sumterville.

We know Miller was on the field from testimony he gave in support of the Colonel’s actions in the first day’s fight.  (See Baumgartner, Buckeye Blood, page 65.)  Miller is a determined looking man with a good record: enlisted as a sergeant 7/31/62 and mustered into Co. A 9/9/62. Promoted 1st Sergt. 12/1/62, 2nd Lt. 5/13/63, 1st. Lt. 12/1/63, and Captain 11/3/64. Mustered out 7/10/65. The top two buttons of his single-breasted line officer’s frock coat show, along with the shoulder strap on his left shoulder. Signed in ink lower reverse: “Yours S.M. 107’ O.V.I.” (Only one other officer bore those initials- their Colonel, who was never a line officer.)  Gettysburg fighters are always in demand, and Ohioans at the big-one are seldom found in the photography market... $295.00  SOLD

12-11-36 - CDV Full standing view of KIA 2nd Rhode Island Colonel John Slocum.  Wearing his Colonel’s frock coat,  gauntlets, and clutching his saber, his forage cap resting on the table next to him with its hunting horn insignia partially visible,  Col. Slocum faces the camera ready for war, though perhaps not for the fate that would soon overtake him at the First Battle of Bull Run.   Slocum’s regiment was in Burnside’s brigade on the Federal right that day, part of the column which attempted to flank Confederate forces behind Bull Run.   As Confederates turned to meet them Slocum was mortally wounded as he climbed a fence to wave his men forward in the attack on Matthews Hill. Nicely identified in period ink at the bottom front: “Col. John S. Slocum / 2nd R.I. Regiment/ Killed at Bull Run July 21, 1861.”  Overall VG++ condition.   A real significant piece of Civil War photo history. $250.00

12-11-37 - CDV Soldier of the Tenth Legion. Named after Julius Caesar’s famous commands, the Tenth Legion was the 56th New York Volunteers, recruited in the Fall of 1861. The “legion” nickname also reflected the regiment was enlisted as a mixed unit of infantry, cavalry, artillery, and sharpshooters. Our man is Benjamin Soules, who enlisted at Liberty, NY, on 8/16/61 at age 18 and mustered into Co F as a private on 9/1/61 and served until 7/14/63 when he died of consumptive fever. During his period of service the regiment was reduced to a purely infantry outfit and served during the Peninsular Campaign with the 4th Corps, where they suffered 66 killed and wounded at Fair Oaks. Later in 1862 they were assigned to the 18th Corps in South Carolina and served in the Charleston area and in the siege of Ft. Wagner. Soules is shown in a vignetted chest up view wearing an enlisted infantry frockcoat. Period pencil signature reverse: “Benjamin Soules / Ephratah / Fulton / Co./NY.” Addis, Washington, DC backmark. Ephratah was a small village of 359 inhabitants. It is likely just about everyone of them knew him... $95.00 SOLD

12-11-38 - CDV Major General William S. Rosecrans. Seated waist-up view of “Old Rosey.”  The writer of the old ink inscription on the bottom front seems to have misremembered his middle initial and written, “William O. Rosecrans / Major General,” but judging from their penmanship writing of any sort may not have been their strong suit.  A nice view, slightly light at the top and with minor upper corner folds.   Rosecrans graduated West Point class of 1842, went into the Engineers, resigned a few years later and reentered the army at the beginning of the war.  He was involved in driving Lee out of West Virginia, was at the Battles of Iuka and Corinth, and eventually commanded the Army of the Cumberland at Murfreesboro.  He did well against Bragg until Chickamauga and then was bottled up at Chattanooga until Grant took over. In many ways an underrated general,  he was very well liked by those under his command, one of whom probably retained this as a memento.  Great historical CDV… $125.00  SOLD

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