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Dave Taylor
P.O. Box 87
Sylvania, OH 43560

419-842-1863

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12-10-01 - Standard Boyle & Gamble Foot Officer's Sword complete with original scabbard in overall excellent condition. The blade is gun metal grey, nice and smooth, it was never etched. Scabbard is full length and unbroken. The leather on the grip has some loss. All the wire wrap is present. The sword is 100% original, 100% complete, and “as found”. The best part of this sword, is that the guard is incised with the owners last name ... "Walkup". Research of Confederate records shows him to most likely be Samuel Hoey Walkup 48th North Carolina. The records show a total of four Confederate officers with surname Walkup. One was Matthew H. Walkup but he resigned in 1861 long before the sword was made. This is a mid-war example of the Boyle and Gamble. Matthew could not have carried the sword. Second man, William Henry Walkup served in the 14th Virginia Cavalry so he would not have been as likely to be carrying an infantry officer's sword though he "could" have. Third possibility is William M. Walkup 11th Virginia Infantry who started as sergeant but made Lieutenant by 1864. He could possibly be the owner. The last and most likely candidate is our Samuel Hoey Walkup 48th North Carolina Infantry. He served the entire war as a commissioned infantry officer rising through the ranks to become Lieutenant Colonel of his regiment, the 48th North Carolina Volunteer Infantry. This is as fine and honest a Confederate sword as you could hope to find. It is unblemished, unaltered, tight and solid. It is priced as friendly as I can make it and you don’t have to pay a 20% buyer’s premium for the privilege of buying it, (the way our auction friends charge us). SOLD

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12-10-02 - State of New York Buckle: Nice deep chocolate patina dug SNY stud back or “puppy-paw” belt plate. Often termed “New York Militia” plates, these State of New York plates were issued to early war volunteer regiments headed south and are recovered from camp site and battlefield alike in early war and late war locations. These stud-back SNYs were worn throughout the war. (Do not mistake these for the mid to late war arrow-back versions that saw little or no field use.) Nice clear old digger’s tape label on reverse reading “Bush Hill June 10 67” in pen. This refers to the Alexandria, VA, estate by that name, where there were Civil War encampments. Very nice condition. Hook and studs firmly in place, some slight corrosion to the lead back of course. Nice face with just minor dings, very slight push to rim at upper left, some rubbing on the high points of the rim. Very pleasing overall. Just the way plate collectors like them. One just sold on eBay on September 30th for $650. SOLD

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12-10-03 - Eagle and Shield decorated Civil War pocket watch, Tobias marked movement. For high ranking officers watches were essential in coordinating army movements, just as they were for lower officers who might face arrest for being ten minutes late in performing a task. But they were also a bit of flash and individuality for a common soldier, to the degree that pocket watch trading became a fad among enlisted men. Ours is a nice example of an 1860s watch made exclusively for the US market. It is engraved on the coin silver folding case cover with an eagle rising up from behind an urn-like US shield, surrounded with foliate scrolls. Nice markings on the interior works: “M.J. Tobias, London” and “Detached Lever 13 Jewels.” Mr. Tobias advertised in the US Newspapers during the Civil War offering watches for soldiers! The face has a couple of chips on the enamel face, no glass, and no hands. Any competent watch maker can put this back in running condition, but we don’t have the time (so to speak.)… and it displays wonderfully as it sits. I bought it for the decorated case and it looks great with an officer’s effects. A very affordable REAL Civil War pocket watch. SOLD

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12-10-04 - A Gatling Gun in the field! Keystone stereoview titled, “9th US Infantry Gattling Gun Detachment / Forbidden City Peking China” and numbered 12011 (their spelling of “Gatling.”) A seven man gun-team posed around the famous weapon on a field carriage with its magazine fixed. Behind them are some Chinese buildings and a file of soldiers marching past at shoulder arms with blanket rolls. View is tad light and has some dirt overall, but is scarce. 1900 copyright date and typical tan mount. The story of Dr. Gatling is too well known to need repeating. Invented during the Civil War, the gun was used by Ben Butler, taken in the field in the Indian Wars, and even used in Cuba. Here it is shown during the Boxer Rebellion— shades of “Fifty-five Days in Peking.” $135.00 SOLD

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12-10-05 - An intriguing 1836/40 Hall Carbine. This gun gets more interesting the longer I look at it. Halls went through a lot of changes and alterations in public and private hands. This includes alterations in Union and Confederate arsenals as well as alterations by numerous state facilities for many years prior to, and during the Civil War. The stock, breech block, and lever catch on this carbine are standard 1836 pattern components. The hammer, barrel, and ramrod are clearly the pattern of 1840. Hall parts are largely interchangeable and the breechblocks can be easily switched, but the condition and color on this carbine show the parts have been together since the guns period of use. The stock shows the 1836 pattern eye-bolt sling-ring through the wrist. Nice wood with excellent color, just a little darkening at the front barrel band and some areas on the left side, and only very slight rounding to the edges. The breechblock is also the 1836 pattern, Type II marked “J.H. Hall / U.S. / 1839” with the curved hook latch that was replaced by the fishtail latch starting in 1840. The hammer is the 1840 pattern without the 1836 hole. Likewise, the barrel is 1840 pattern 21 inches long in .52 caliber smooth bore, and is made with a standard 1840 ramrod, not the ramrod/bayonet of the 1836. Nice even brown patina overall, just some salt and peppering at the breech and on the block. The use of the .64 caliber breech block with the .52 caliber barrel would necessitate the ball or bullet being paper patched to seat properly in the block. I do not know if this is a modification done by the US Dragoons “in the field”… or a Confederate arsenal modification… or a state militia alteration or what??? But it is intriguing as all get-out and makes for some fun speculation and brain storming. All original save for a replaced nipple. SOLD

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12-10-06 - War of 1812 Musket. An untouched gun from our Second War of American Independence- the War of 1812! Harpers Ferry 1810 Dated 1795 Pattern Musket Still in original Flint! This gun walked into a gun show recently at a price out of the 1970s. It made my day. Background…. When trouble started brewing in the 1790s we started manufacturing muskets patterned on the French Charleville .69 caliber iron mounted muskets we had imported during the Revolution. Harpers Ferry started production in 1800, making their own distinct version that differed from the Springfield version in lock, barrel, trigger guard and other details. This specimen is clearly dated “1810” behind the hammer under “Harpers Ferry” and has all the details of the “Type II,” in collector jargon, made between 1808 and 1812. Original flint, top mounted bayonet lug, no sling swivels present, but the studs at the trigger guard and middle band are there; all barrel bands, retaining springs, etc., are in place. The iron butt plate has corrosion from sitting on a brick or stone floor for a century or so and the wood near it and the barrel tang shows typical loss and channeling from that environment but is still solid and has good color. The iron side plate shows corrosion as does the lock plate. The Harpers Ferry / 1810 is clear, but the eagle and US forward of the hammer cannot be made out and it is crusty on the frizzen spring. The serial number on top of the barrel is not visible, but the two oval barrel cartouches are evident. Narrow crack running forward from the trigger guard tang on the underside. Ramrod does not seat fully, probably lots of dirt and dust are in the channel. Mechanically good. Quite an historic weapon. Parks Canada has a US 1795 recovered from the Chateaugay River with its bayonet fixed and still loaded with its .69 caliber buck and ball cartridge! These guns were used heavily against the British and in our early forts on the frontier. One of those guns that really lets you hold history in hand. This is the real deal --- a real War of 1812 US Musket. SOLD

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12-10-07 - Arming the Elegant Elite- Flintlock New England Militia Musket ca. 1812-1830. These guns were once neglected in collecting, but are now coming into their own. They show high quality craftsmanship and interesting variations for the collector and student. This one shows a lot of British influence in the butt configuration. Brass mounted, four thimble ramrod pipes, full stock to the brass nose cap with bottom mounted bayonet stud. Keyed barrel with oval escutcheon plates, wrist escutcheon, and two smaller crescent side plates for the lock screws. Ramrod in place, but typically no provision for sling swivels. Nicely decorated trigger guard tang, rear of lock and side of hammer. Wood at toe of buttstock has been replaced. Also about ten inches of wood restored on the right side of the extreme forend out to the nosecap. The left side of the forend is original with no restoration. The right side restoration is quite well done and nicely hidden under amber shellac. Small finger nail-size chip out of the rear top edge of the lock mortice and roughness to the breech over the flashpan but smooth metal forward and still in original flint with its original lock and having a great overall patina. A rather patriotic reminder of the early republic when all adult males were part of the enrolled militia, but the wealthier could form uniformed companies and indulge in nicer arms such as this. Where else can you buy a real flintlock US martial longarm SOLD

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12-10-08 - Regulation Cavalry Spurs: An extra fine pair of “dead-on-the-money” regulation Civil War Union Army cavalry spurs. I used to find these things everywhere. Now it is a darn rare occurrence. This pair is attic condition and have OLD (but not 1860s) leather straps which look great for display. SOLD

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12-10-09 - An Affordable 1863 Patchbox Sharps: All original and complete, just needs a sling ring and a rear sight elevation bar (the sight base is present, as is the sling-ring bar.) This gun just came out of the woodwork,  just as rusty,  crusty, and untouched as you can imagine. When you picked it up you thought you were shaking hands with the veteran himself.  The metal parts were then soaked in kerosene to loosen the rust,  which was then easily brushed away revealing some surprisingly nice metal, bright mixed with gray and some dark spots, with just scattered light pitting on the receiver and some very clear markings: “New Model 1863” on top of the barrel, correct Sharps markings on the receiver, and Lawrence markings on the sight base. Serial number 83131. A decent early version of the ’63 pattern with the iron patchbox which was a carryover from the Model 1859 carbines.  This would be one of the last carbines produced with a patchbox.  They seem to have been phased out starting in the late 70K serial range. We see some carbines without patch boxes with lower numbers, and some with patchboxes with higher numbers.  I do not believe I have ever seen a patchbox on a carbine above 85,000 serial.   Wood has good color and edges, tight wood-to-metal fit, just a sliver out on the top left of the forearm from midway on the rear sightbase to the breech. This would look great with a buff leather belt rig, carbine sling and cavalry jacket. A most affordable Patchbox Sharps at SOLD

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12-10-10 - 20th Connecticut Volunteers Wartime Identification Badge: A wonderful early to mid war soldier’s ID badge engraved to “Edwin J. Smith Co. “K” 20th C.V.” Soldier Smith enlisted in the 20th Conn. Volunteers in mid 1862 and served through the remainder of the war. He was promoted to corporal in May of 1863 and sergeant in January of 1865. The regiment saw battle action and took casualties in all the 12th / 20th corps engagements including Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, and the Atlanta Campaign. The regiment took severe casualties at Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Peach Tree Creek, and Bentonville. Badge is silver… about an inch tall… excellent condition but missing the attaching pin on the reverse. This is a genuine wartime badge and not a later veteran’s piece of jewelry. A great personal item from a great unit… $950.00 SOLD

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12-10-11 - Superb – Highest Quality Cigar Case 1846: One of the most attractive gentleman’s antiques I have found. Measures roughly 5.5” x 3” x 1” being constructed of an incredibly beautiful burl wood with high luster polish on the exterior. Interior is carved to hold four cigars. Inlaid into the hinged lid is a silver presentation plaque engraved in Latin with an 80th Birthday salutation, dated 1846. The owner of this having been born Dec. 11th 1766.

A wonderful antique on any front and makes a super display with Mexican War or Civil War items, or in a display of early Victorian men’s effects. SOLD

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12-10-12 - NRA “Very Good+” Early War 1862 Dated Bridesburg Rifle Musket: It was clear early in the war that Springfield would not be able to supply enough 1861 pattern rifle muskets and the government thus issued contract to a number of private manufacturers.  These guns were widely and heavily used.  Ours is a very nice 1862 dated example made by Alfred Jenks in Bridesburg, PA., with sharp lock plate markings including 1862 date at rear and eagle over US and Bridesburg forward of the hammer.  Also has a visible matching 1862 barrel date on top along with the V P and Eagle proofs on the left barrel flat.  You can read the lockplate from across the room. Very crisp.   Original early war Type I rear sight,  proper flat barrel bands, complete with swivels, ramrod, etc.,  everything correct and complete.  Nice mellow overall patina,  just slight rounding to the edges of the wood around the lock from legitimate wartime handling and use.  Good smooth wood, just one scratch line between the upper bands on the inside.  The metal around the nipple shows salt and pepper pitting from actual firing. Bore is excellent. Mechanically excellent, tight wood to metal fit, great color, and totally honest.  If you want a much better than average representation of the early war US infantry rifle musket, this is it.  Highly desirable for the reason that it had a chance of being in the most well known engagements of the war including Bull Run, Shiloh, Antietam, Gettysburg, etc…   SOLD

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12-10-13 - Civil War Cavalry Carbine Socket. These were once all over the place and now they, too, are drying up. The classic piece of cavalry gear and a great starting piece for any collection.  When mounted, the cavalryman carried his carbine suspended from a carbine sling over his shoulder and thrust the muzzle and forestock of the gun into one of these sockets buckled onto the saddle rigging low down on his right side.  The last thing you want when riding at a gallop is carbine swinging wildly at your side.  Excellent condition,  functional black japanned buckle and strap.  Whether you need one to outfit a saddle or you are just getting into Civil War collecting and want to get a feel for what real Civil War leather looks and feels like, this is a good deal… SOLD

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12-10-14 - Colonial State of Connecticut Bond, issued to John Hait, Junior, Esq. for 18 pounds, 16 shillings and 7 pence. This was issued in 1785 as part of a 1783 series that would be payable in full in 1788 with annual interest payments. These are recorded on the reverse by hand. The round puncture is a cancellation indicating the note was paid off. These documents were retained by the state for almost two hundred years and then literally thrown out in the trash to clear space. A few foresighted collectors with a sense of history rescued them. A nice souvenir of our early history, issued just after the Revolution and even before the ratification of the Constitution…  A most affordable antique from the early days of our republic…  SOLD

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12-10-15 - Another early Connecticut document: a 1790 payment note from the Comptroller’s office authorizing payment of 3 pounds 5 shillings and 9 pence to Jonathan Janes who was serving on the Civil List.  On the reverse is a signed receipt for the payment by Janes.  As with our other Connecticut document the circular puncture was intended to take it out of circulation.  A most affordable antique from the early days of our republic…  SOLD

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12-10-16 - Civil War Model 1851 Navy: A very handsome and solidly representative example of the Civil War Model 1851 Navy.  100% original, 100% complete, mechanically perfect. All matched serial numbers 143,766. Wedge is original and un-numbered. No bad nicks or dings. Very handsome. Has nice medium tan age patina, sharp edges, 75% cylinder scene, one-line New York barrel address, and good varnish on the grips.  …Hints of original blue in protected areas and a whisper of case color on the rammer. Front sight is the blade style sight dovetailed in place.   A tight solid cavalryman’s weapon appropriate to display with Union or Confederate effects.  Much nicer than most you will find on the web and at auction…  SOLD

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12-10-18 - Cedar Wood Canteen: This is about as Johnny Reb as you get! Classic Confederate Cedar Wood Canteen with the ORIGINAL Coarse Linen Shoulder Strap!  Overall VG to fine condition.  Front and back faces smooth and undamaged, still showing the lathe marks.  All side slats are in place and tight.  Iron rims intact with three strap guide-cross pieces to retain the shoulder strap and keep the rims aligned.  Superb original CSA coarse linen shoulder strap is still in place… this is something we very seldom see, the straps being about a hundred times rarer than the canteens.   Excellent patina with an original soldier carved set of initials “CCS” crudely done near the edge on one side.  These were such icons of the Confederacy that they were taken or traded during the war as desirable souvenirs by Yankee soldiers.  What a relief to find this before some con-artist got his hands on it and added a Texas star or something!  Loads of character and just the right amount of real use.  The bung hole is widened a bit from use and the wood shows just enough loss around it from the dampness of its contents to show this was carried in the field for some time.  This is a key piece of Confederate gear and looks great in a CS display or as a nice counter balance to a Federal example.  SOLD

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12-10-19 - Investment Grade Model 1819 Hall Rifle Converted to Percussion in NRA “Excellent” Condition:  Extremely fine condition retaining 95% original lacquer brown finish on the barrel and frame, and having “minty” stock with very sharp edges and showing only minimal handling wear. Slight wear on the finish near the muzzle.   A top notch example in anyone’s book. The breech block is stamped  “J.H. Hall / H. Ferry / U.S. / 1832” showing this to be part of the second production run of these interesting breech loading rifles.  52 caliber with an excellent bore.  You would be hard pressed to find a better example.  $3,250.00

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12-10-20 - Ca. 1770s-1790s Flintlock Pistol.  These guns can be tough to date, but the maker on this gun Andre Mercier lived only from 1757 to 1796 pinning the period he could have made this quite nicely.  A shame that such a talent died at age 38 or 39.  Gun has beautiful raised carving and scroll engraving… classic eighteenth century embellishments.  These pistols are undervalued, true antiques from the pre-industrial era when craftsmen and small shops made each gun unique and spent time creating an artistic whole. “Mercier a Liege” lockplate markings show this was a product of the thriving Belgian gun trade. Bright mountings. Two stage barrel, octagon to round, with a transitional baluster ring between and a raised muzzle ring.  Solid two-screw sideplate covered with elaborate scroll and foliate engraving.  Raised carving on the wood with teardrop finials at the rear of both the lockplate and the sideplate,  and a raised apron around the breechplug tang.  The tang itself shows lined and floral engraving,  the latter of which is picked up by the raised fan/shell carving of the wood next to it that shoots out onto the grip.  The underside shows just as much attention, with raised panels under the extended ornate urn-shaped trigger guard tang,  leading to two decorative ramrod ferrules, holding a correct and proper, but replacement horn-tipped rammer.  Looks nice next to the original horn nosecap, which shows dark on one side and a light area on the other.  Simple line engraving in the wood runs next to the barrel along the forestock, and shows up again in simple line engraving on the steel birdshead pommel.  Fully functional mechanism, just some light rust spots on the back edge of the hammer that would clean. The kind of gun that you appreciate more, the more you hold it.  Totally appropriate for display with French Revolution, American Revolution, or Napoleonic military antiques. .52 cal... Overall 14".  Very handsome and very refined… SOLD

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12-10-21 - US Model 1836 Flintlock Pistol by Waters:  The last flintlock pistol produced by the US Government.  Produced from 1836 to 1844 this gun is appropriate for display with post Alamo Texas history,  US Western Frontier, and Mexican War related displays.  Overall VG++ approaching fine condition.  100% original and complete.  Mechanically perfect.  Sharp markings “Eagle, A. Waters, Millbury MS., 1843”. Two good cartouches are legible in the wood opposite the lock as well as a soldier incised 5 pointed star.  Barrel is stamped with inspector’s initials “JH” over an illegible letter.  Tight, honest, solid, and very handsome.  One of the few affordable martial flintlock pistols still available on the collector market. SOLD

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12-10-22 - Civil War era bowie knife by James Westa, one of the best quality English makers from Sheffield supplying knives to the American market during the period of the California Gold Rush up to the Civil War era. Double edge spear point style with a nice blade and no sign of modern sharpening, mixed bright and gray blade. Very attractive silver or German silver top mount and slab grips secured by two pins. On one side the slab is bone, and the other side has a mother of pearl slab. The guard is a very attractive “upside down wing” with floral or shell raised motifs. The pommel matches with similar slightly flaring ridges. A tight knife. A handsome knife. No play in the handle. Comes with the original leather covered pasteboard sheath in good condition, one slight crosswise crease, but sturdy, the leather a dark greenish blue with stamped gilt border. Original German silver upper or throat mount. The scabbard tip is a replacement from a period knife, slightly darker than the throat, but a good match. A top notch Bowie knife from the early days…. 6.5” blade. Roughly 12” total length. $975.00

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12-10-23 - Large Etched Blade Bowie Knife with SUPERB Blade: Harrison Bros. and Howson double edge spear point bowie with original scabbard and a central panel etched blade reading, “ROUGH & READY” in near mint frosty luster (just a couple age spots present). Excellent stag horn slab grips secured with four pins and an uninscribed excutcheon on one side. Straight cruciform German silver guard. Blade shows loads of original polish and central motif of “ROUGH & READY” on a ribband surrounded by gorgeous curling vine leaves. Just a few light wipes here and there and slight graying to the ricasso. The motto, of course, is typically American frontier (Non British) meaning someone or something that is rather simple, coarse, and unsophisticated but one who gets the job done without hoop-lah or fanfare. It gained wide-spread use in the presidential campaign of 1848 as a nick-name for Zachary Taylor for his lack of pretension and success in the Mexican War. This ties in nicely Harrison Brothers & Howson, who started in England in 1847. This blade is hardly crude, but it is simple and straightforward in design, and would certainly “get the job done.” Handsome, high quality, top end condition, and perfect for Western Frontier, California Gold Field, or Civil War display.
I had to pay dearly at auction for this… but I absolutely HAD to have it. SOLD
8.25” Blade 12.5” Overall

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12-10-24 - Rare Pattern Staff or Infantry Militia Officer’s Sword Ca. 1830’s: Noted sword authority Harold Peterson recognized this pattern as interesting and unusual when he first wrote his book The American Sword over half a century ago. The photos can give you a better description than my written attempt, but I will fill in the technical notes. This sword can be considered quite scarce with only a few specimens coming on the market each year. This has a richly etched 30 inch straight, double edged, blade with beautiful floral sprays, military motifs, US eagle, E Pluribus Unum, Warranted, etc... acid etched into both sides of the blade. The etching is extremely well done... every bit as good as Ames. The blade is unsigned. The pommel, guard, languets, and scabbard are all finely decorated polished steel that was once likely silver plated. The metal color now is a most appealing, shiny black about like tarnished silver. The condition is excellent save for a tiny chip in one side of the grip where it meets the pommel. The languets are shell shaped, and the finials on each end of the cross guard are acorn motifs. Very handsome and very solid. $1,195.00

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12-10-25 - Fine and Scarce Autographed CDV of Maj. Gen. John A. Dix. His most famous quote … “If anyone attempts to haul down the American flag, shoot him on the spot.” There is even a Civil War penny token which utilizes this wonderful quote. Very sharp full-standing Matthew Brady view with Brady’s name in the negative at bottom right (the better to deter pirate copies!) Signed boldly in his own hand… “John A. Dix” in ink prominently at bottom center. Dix is shown with his hands folded on a beautiful 1832 General Officer’s sword with a knot, swordbelt with NY officer plate, and a major general’s frockcoat with epaulets. Dix had served in the War of 1812, but left the army in 1828 and settled in New York. He served briefly in the US Senate and after the war a term as Governor of the state. In 1861 Lincoln made him Major General of Volunteers 5/16/61 and that early date meant he outranked all other volunteer officers. As Secretary of the Treasury under Buchanan as the Civil War approached he sent his famous message to a Treasury official in New Orleans: “If anyone attempts to haul down the American flag, shoot him on the spot.” Dix’s signature is very strong at the bottom center of the carte … A very collectible CW autograph and even more desirable being autographed on the front of the photo. $675.00

12-10-26 - Full length standing view of an unidentified Yankee line officer. This lieutenant or captain stands next to a photographer’s studio chair with his slouch hat held by his side. Regulation single breasted frock coat with straps makes clear he is a line officer, but I can’t quite make out the bars on the shoulder straps, so his exact rank is unclear. A serious looking older officer, possibly an assistant surgeon, but most likely one of the unsung heroes who led their companies through the war and, if lucky, made it back to civilian life. No backmark. A classic real Civil War soldier photo… SOLD

12-10-27 - CDV Subject Captured at Gettysburg! Vignette bust view of Captain, later Major, Charles W. White, 3rd West Virginia Cavalry. Perkins, Baltimore St. backmark. Signature on front of image is almost faded away but can still be seen… “C. W. White… “ Very faint but it IS there. White wears captain’s shoulder straps on a fatigue blouse. White enlisted on 6/15/1862 as a 1st Lieutenant and was commissioned the same day in Co. E. He made Capt. Co. B 10/3/62. He was taken prisoner 7/1/63 at Gettysburg and confined at Macon. He rejoined the regiment and received a promotion to Major on 5/26/65.

The Third West Virginia Cavalry saw lots of action in different areas, serving in separate detachments of companies and squadrons until it was finally united in mid-1864. In 1863 two companies were in Devin’s Brigade of Buford’s cavalry division in the Army of the Potomac, and as such were involved in the fighting at Gettysburg and other cavalry engagements of the campaign. Their strength is given as 5 officers and 59 enlistedmen of Companies A and C. White had apparently been assigned to the group, perhaps because one captain was assigned to overall command of the squadron. Id’d in modern collector notation on rev: “Maj. Charles W. White 3rd WV Cav.” Great Gettysburg history. $125.00 SOLD

12-10-28 - CDV Photo - Assistant Surgeon James R. Kelch, 151st Ohio. Half-length seated view in non-regulation double breasted frock with ball buttons and no shoulder straps, typical of a doctor’s casual approach to military regulations, but clearly a military vest with brass uniform buttons under it. Nice period pencil identification or signature vertically on reverse: “J R Kelch MD.” James R. Kelch was an Assistant Surgeon in 151st Ohio. He was 30 years old when he enlisted on 5/2/64 and was commissioned 5/13/64. He mustered out 8/27/64. The 151st was a one-hundred day regiment organized at Camp Chase in May, 1864, and sent to Washington, where it actually served under fire in some of the forts around the city during Early’s expedition against it: companies C and G were at Fort Stevens, which is the engagement where Lincoln himself came under Confederate fire. Fine Civil War image with good history… and interesting medical history as well… SOLD

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12-10-29 - 5 GAR Pieces:

A) Large Yellow Silk Ribbon 54th Convention of the Woman’s Relief Corps. Washington DC 1936. Near Perfect.

B) Near Mint 1938 Dept of Michigan GAR medal. Top bar is an eagle, RWB ribbon embossed with data from Grand Rapids June 13,14,15 1938, bottom planchet is GAR star motif. Near mint. These late badges are quite rare as the ranks of Union Veterans was darn thin by then. Roughly 6 inches in length.

C) National League of Veterans & Sons Reunion - Political ribbon” 5 inches in length. Silk ribbon with 2nd Corps Insignia. Ribbon is embossed with the wording “The Fordney NLVS . 1911”. Pinned to it is a celluloid 2nd Corps Clover insignia. Fordney was US Congressman from Saginaw, Michigan .
Per Wikipedia - “In November 1898, Fordney defeated incumbent Democrat
Ferdinand Brucker to be elected as a Republican from Michigan’s 8th
congressional district to the 56th United States Congress. He was
subsequently re-elected to the eleven succeeding Congresses, serving from
March 4, 1899 to March 3, 1923. Fordney served as the chairman of the
Committee on Expenditures in the Department of the Navy in the 59th
Congress; and of the Committee on Ways and Means in the 66th and 67th
Congresses. He co-sponsored the 1922 Fordney-McCumber Tariff. He declined to
be a candidate for renomination in 1922. He was also a delegate to the
Republican National Conventions in 1908, 1924, and 1928. Interesting ribbon
with Civil War and political connections.

D&E) Pair of Civil War Veteran Ribbons: First ribbon is mint red and gilt lettering ribbon for 1938 Woman’s Relief Corps delegate. Second is near perfect celluloid shield over RWB ribbon embossed for the Ingham County Michigan 35th Reunion of the Soldiers and Sailors Association at Mason, Michigan Sept. 24-25 1901.

All 5 for $125.00

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12-10-30 - Early War Stud Back US Buckle: The most desirable of the CW buckles are these early pattern plates with two so-called “puppy paw” studs and a prong in the back of the plate. By 1863 most of the buckles were being made with two arrow shaped hooks and a prong. This buckle likely worn by a Michigan or Illinois soldier as I found it in a box of GAR material and CDV photos pertaining to those two states. Excellent condition with attractive undisturbed age patina on the brass face. The lead-solder filled back shows a pattern of scrapes apparently done intentionally by someone … out of boredom I suppose. Very handsome early war buckle. SOLD

 

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