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Welcome to our Civil War Antique web catalog.

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Dave Taylor
P.O. Box 87
Sylvania, OH 43560

12-07-01 - Wonderful Confederate Cavalry Saber & Scabbard by Haimann Brothers: Very handsome and solid example of the classic Georgia made Confederate cavalry saber. This saber was made in Columbus, Georgia by Louis and Elias Haiman (Haiman Bro.). It is believed that the Haiman Brothers produced more cavalry sabers for the Southern Confederacy than any other maker. In my personal experience I have certainly owned more Haimans than any other rebel saber. I have likewise owned more Haiman unsigned foot officer’s swords than any other CS officer’s sword. As is standard with all Haiman cavalry sabers the weapon is unsigned. It has the original leather grip covering and single strand iron wire wrap. There is a very small amount of deterioration on the leather. The guard is excellent with attractive patina and no bends. The blade is fine condition with nice smooth grey steel surface and no edge nicks. The original steel scabbard has the proper brass ring mounts with the identical patina seen on the guard. The edge seam is classically crude and lapped. There is some moderate pitting in the steel sheath. There is a deteriorated leather bumper-washer still present at the hilt where the blade meets the guard. This Johnny Reb cavalry saber is 100% original and genuine in all respects, and I believe you will find this price below that of my competition. You cannot find a more classic Confederate horseman’s saber… $3,350.00 SOLD

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12-07-02 - American Made War of 1812 Era Surveyor’s Transit: I am no expert on these early devices but when I found this one I knew it was darn early. This frontier style transit dates late 18th to very early 19th century. It is of the Lewis and Clark era and would be appropriate to display with early frontier items. It is housed in a cut-out, form fitted, wooden traveling box or case. The face of the compass is beautifully engraved “Daniel Dod Mendham”. This being Daniel Dod of Mendham New Jersey. The internet makes me an instant expert on Mr. Dod and his family. Daniel lived from 1778 to 1823 and he was a celebrated mechanical genius noted for his clocks, steam ship engines, and scientific instruments. He designed the engine parts for the 1812 Yacht of Governor Ogden (New Jersey). His father was a Revolutionary War soldier and armorer under George Washington. His father was Lebbeus Dod (1739-1816). Lebbeus established an armory for the make and repair of muskets after serving as Captain of Artillery in the continental army.

WASHINGTON DETACHED HIM FROM ACTIVE DUTY TO DEVELOP THE ARMORY. PRIOR TO THE WAR HE HAD BEEN WELL ESTABLISHED AS A CLOCK MAKER AND MAKER OF SURVEYING INSTRUMENTS AND HAD ALSO WORKED AS A SURVEYOR. Obviously Daniel followed in his father’s foot steps. Daniel was killed in 1823 when his boat the “Patent” exploded. This War of 1812 era instrument is constructed of brass with detachable “legs” or “arms” all of which fit into the wooden carrying case. The glass on the compass is cracked. The needle is present but has fallen off its pin. In my research for value I found an auction from the year 2000 where a simple brass drawing instrument made by Mr. Dod brought a high bid of $1,850.00, and that instrument was just a simple drafting tool. I bought this scientific instrument “right” and will offer it well under market value at $2,000.00 SOLD

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12-07-03 - U.S. MARINE CORPS 1859 PATTERN ENLISTEDMEN’S UNDRESS COAT:

This is a coat so rare that the vast majority of Civil War collectors do not even recognize it.   Case in point, when this coat first surfaced it was offered at a prominent militaria and Civil War auction house and the “expert” auctioneer described it as some sort of a 19th century militia coat.   I know of only three examples extant, (including this), and one of them is the usually published sergeant’s coat that does not follow regulations. This one does. The unpadded, fitted torso and short skirts can fool even a sophisticated textile collector into thinking they are looking at a later period uniform, but the USMC led the way in tailoring in their 1859 regulations and produced a shorter coat for field wear that was visually distinct from the army’s frock and sack coats.

Developed in 1859 as an intermediate uniform between full dress and fatigue garb, the undress coat was worn for tasks between formal dress parades on one hand and fatigue duties on the other. Though sometimes referred to as a “fatigue coat,” the 1859 enlisted undress coat was the real battle jacket, and evolved over the years into the current USMC enlisted dress uniform we know today.

With pre-war and post-war Marine establishments of under 2,000 men, and a wartime strength less than 4,000, any Civil War U.S. Marine uniform is rare.

Worn only from 1859 to 1875, the coat followed the pattern seen here: a low collar trimmed with a red welt along the base only; seven large buttons on the front and two on the rear at the waist; and two small buttons on each cuff.  The skirts were made shorter than the army enlisted dress coat, officers’ frock coats, and those on the Marine enlisted full dress coat, extending only “from the top of the hip to the crotch of the trousers,” (1859 Regulations).  Precisely what we see here.

   The internal lining is like the full dress coat, brown polished cotton in the front and sides of the torso and the back of the skirts, and white linings in the sleeves.

As with the full dress coat, and unlike the army version, there are no pockets in the tails. Marines were intended to take part only in shipboard engagements, defense of posts, or limited landing operations.  Hence you don’t see many Civil War Marines with gun slings or knapsacks.  Wartime demands, of course, meant wider service. There was even a USMC battalion at First Bull Run, and they took part in many engagements right through the assault on Fort Fisher in 1865.

Shown here are three wartime photos of leathernecks wearing this coat.

There are three war date USMC buttons present.  Additional war date examples can be had at some expense, or you can buy similar later examples for display purposes for a nominal cost.  Condition is excellent save for a couple very minor blemishes.  There is one tiny area of moth tracking on the lower breast that is hardly noticeable, and a couple lines of stitching that have given way on the collar hanging tab, one skirt panel, and part of the sleeve lining.  No material is missing.  The skirt panel is secured now with two pins to keep it from pulling out the rest of the stitching.

Far rarer than a Confederate jacket, and rarer than virtually all US cloth except for the enlisted Engineer’s coat.  I can guarantee you will not find another available for purchase anywhere.  This is the first and only 1859 USMC Undress Coat we have handled in over forty years of collecting and dealing.  In fact I have owned only  one other 1859 Marine coat in my lifetime… that being the 1859 Dress Tunic I found and catalogued several years ago.  An incredibly rare and desirable coat: So rare even the USMC museum does not have one.  $15,500.00 SOLD

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12-07-04 - Fine Colt Navy: Beautiful example of the Civil War Model 1851, .36 Caliber Navy Revolver.  The photos here do not do this gun justice. There is more finish present than the photos indicate.  It is extremely handsome with generous traces of factory blue finish and kisses of case color. The cylinder scene is very visible.   It has all matching serial numbers 129,306  including the wedge.  Gun is tight, solid, handsome, and mechanically perfect.  One of the better looking Colts I’ve been able to buy lately.  A great mid-war production revolver perfect to display with US or CS cavalry or officer’s effects…   $3,350.00 SOLD

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12-07-05 - Wonderful Metropolitan Navy Revolver and Holster: As honest and appealing a Civil War revolver and holster as I have ever owned. These Metropolitan Navy revolvers are virtually identical to the ’51 Colt Navies. However, they are about twenty times rarer and still less expensive than the more common Colts. This Metro’ is overall NRA “very good”++ condition. 100% original, 100% complete, mechanically perfect, and very handsome. There is the smallest sliver of wood gone from the right side of the grip … this being gone since the gun’s period of use. It comes with the original Civil War full flap military holster which is form fitted to the revolver. The holster looks as if it gave birth to the gun… a perfect fit. Again, many times rarer than the Colt counterpart, but cheaper than the Colt. I wish this rig could talk. $2,450.00 SOLD

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12-07-06 - Mexican War 1st US Dragoons Letter / Fort Gibson Indian Territory Cancellation:  This is the real deal – a real Indian Fighter’s letter written from the Indian Territory during the Mexican War in anticipation of being sent to Mexico.

... "We are fully equipped. We got new Saddles, Carbines and Pistols and savors (sabers)…Ready for action at a moments warning and I hope we will get to go to mexico as I should like to go at the risk of my life".  Dated Dec. 14th 1847 our trooper with the 1st US Dragoons.  His mention of being issued “pistols” makes one wonder whether he is referring to single shot horse pistols, or Walker Colts.  The letter is three large pages in ink.  Content includes…  “…things I have experienced would astonish you… I could hardly believe it myself… “  he then changes the subject and says “…tell cyrus I would like to see him with his little gun on his shoulder marching after the birds… tell him to learn to shoot well then he can become a soldier and kill the Indians…”  Regarding Indians he further says: “… I have seen some great movements among them.”  He describes army life, asks questions of those at home, tells them he wants to come home and tell the stories of his adventures in the wilds with the Indians.  He says regarding Christmas “…We are going to have a great ball and we will all be dressed in uniforms and the young indian squaws in white and we expect to have a great time of it. Our squad room is fixed up all ready for the ball with green … pine and flags….”  Signed    DW Koller Co H 1st Dragoons.    This letter bears a Fort Gibson cancellation dated December 19th.  Accompanying this is an 1858 dated military document on War Department stationery being a letter regarding trooper Daniel Koller’s discharge from the dragoons in 1856.  This is signed by E.D. Townsend.  Two neat early frontier army letters…  US Dragoons with what I assume is a very rare cancellation… $495.00 SOLD

UPDATE: Upon researching further cancellations, it appears that these realize $500-800 at auction.

 

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12-07-07 - Identified and Inscribed Horstmann Model 1840 Cavalry Officer’s Carried by an Officer Mortally Wounded at Grand Gulf, Louisiana in 1862! “We learned of the death of De Kay with great sorrow. Poor De Kay; that so much worth should be lost to his country and his friends!

Brig. Gen. Thomas Williams 7/16/62”

Cavalry officers’ sabers are scarce and Horstmann examples, having a number of variations, are particularly sought after.

Here is a very nice example and one carried by a truly heroic mounted staff officer who was mortally wounded in action. Truly historical.  The hilt is a standard Horstmann configuration with acanthus leaf decoration, a sharkskin grip (showing just minor wear,) and complete wire wrap. The blade is flat-backed with very narrow fuller beginning and ending part way down, bright mixed with gray and a few dark spots, but clearly showing the elaborate etching not only on the sides but down the spine as well.  Correct plain steel scabbard, dark gray with smooth finish and both carrying rings in place, no pitting, dents or damage.  The firm name etching is very clear above the ricasso: “W.H./ Horstmann /& Sons/ Philadelphia.” On the ricassso itself is the knights head mark of Weyersberg, one of the better known Solingen suppliers to Horstmann, and the scabbard drag shows the typical German scalloped edge.  A striking period professional engraving on the reverse of the guard reads: “Lt. G.C. Dekay” in Old English over “1861” in a plainer font, absolutely dead-real and of the period.  This saber and another DeKay family sword surfaced at estate auction in eastern Ohio attended by a friend of mine.  He sold me the better sword, so I am the second owner outside of the family itself.   George C. Dekay was from one of New York’s old aristocratic families, the son and namesake Commodore George C. DeKay who was something of an adventurer and gained his title from commanding the Argentine Navy in the 1820s and 1830s in its war with Brazil!  At home he had enough political influence with Congress in 1847 to get two US warships temporarily transferred to civilian service, including the USS Macedonian, manned with a volunteer crew under his command, to sail to Ireland on a mercy mission to deliver a cargo of food during the potato famine. It was probably family connections that enabled two of his sons to receive staff appointments during the Civil War. One, Drake DeKay, served on Gen. Mansfield’s staff and became famous for his large and florid signature on military passes issued in Washington in 1861.  Most collectors have seen Drake’s autograph.  The other, our sword’s owner, was offered and declined a lieutenant’s commission in the First Rhode Island Light Artillery and instead secured an appointment on the staff of Gen. Thomas Williams, who was on Burnside’s Coastal Expedition and then commanded a brigade under Butler at New Orleans.

After New Orleans fell at the beginning of May, 1862, Butler sent Williams up river to take Baton Rouge and Vicksburg. He occupied Baton Rouge, but decided an attempt on Vicksburg was impractical.  While dropping back down river on May 26, his ships were fired on by Confederate artillery at Grand Gulf. One of these guns was reported abandoned under return fire and De Kay, an aide-de-camp, volunteered to accompany a four-company expedition to the site.  He may have done so out of sibling rivalry: Drake DeKay had “distinguished himself in several daring adventures, sometime undertaken with the object of getting information of the enemy.”  In fact, though, the Confederates were just in the last stages of departure when the Federals arrived and De Kay, in front of the advance guard, was hit by seven buckshot in the arm and another five in the side and back in the skirmish that followed.  He was paralyzed in the lower limbs, but bore his misfortune “manfully” in Williams’ words, and despite hopes for recovery, died of his wounds about a month later.  DeKay had been well regarded and “much loved by all that knew him,” and was considered the first officer killed in the Department.  During his funeral procession through New Orleans a certain Mrs. Philips, who had earlier been caught teaching her children to spit on Federal troops, stood on the balcony of her house, “laughing and mocking at his remains.” When Gen. Butler inquired if it were so, she “contemptuously replied, ‘I was in good spirits that day.’  Butler had had enough with women of the city who insulted Federal troops and decided to go one better than even his famous Order No. 28, which allowed such a woman to be regarded as “a woman of the town plying her avocation.”  He therefore ordered that she be not “’regarded and treated as a common woman,’ of whom no officer or soldier is bound to take notice, but as an uncommon, bad, and dangerous woman, stirring up strife and inciting to riot; and that therefore she be confined at Ship Island, in the State of Mississippi, with proper limits until further orders…’”  He also took great pleasure in publishing the fact that another prisoner destined for two-years’ hard labor on Ship Island and permitted to communicate with no one there but Mrs. Philips requested in writing to have that part of his sentence changed so as not to be associated with “that woman,” a request to which Butler graciously agreed.  This is a wonderful inscribed sword with as interesting a history as I have found in recent years.  Seldom do we find a tangible piece of antiquity that yields such exciting history.  The research on this one has proved truly heart stopping.  $3,950.00 SOLD

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12-07-08 - Rare Pattern Staff or Infantry Militia Officer’s Sword Ca. 1830’s: Noted sword authority Harold Peterson recognized this pattern as interesting and unusual when he first wrote his book The American Sword over half a century ago. The photos can give you a better description than my written attempt, but I will fill in the technical notes. This sword can be considered quite scarce with only a few specimens coming on the market each year. This has a richly etched 30 inch straight, double edged, blade with beautiful floral sprays, military motifs, US eagle, E Pluribus Unum, Warranted, etc... acid etched into both sides of the blade. The etching is extremely well done... every bit as good as Ames. The blade is unsigned. The pommel, guard, languets, and scabbard are all finely decorated polished steel that was once likely silver plated. The metal color now is a most appealing, shiny black about like tarnished silver. The condition is excellent save for a tiny chip in one side of the grip where it meets the pommel. The languets are shell shaped, and the finials on each end of the cross guard are acorn motifs. Very handsome and very solid. $1,250.00

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12-07-08  Civil War Dog Tag:  Just like the old days…   A near mint surplus REAL Civil War dog tag.  This one is the McClellan War of 1861 variety.  Perfect for display at a fraction the price of one that was “filled out”.  $150.00 SOLD

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12-07-10 - Civil War Model 1860 Spencer Saddle Ring Carbine: This is the standard issue Civil War Spencer in overall very good condition. This gun is 100% original and complete and is in perfect working condition. The majority of the metal has a muted plum brown patina, and matches the smokey gray hammer nicely. The wood has some expected handling wear and light dents but no damage or abuse. There is some deterioration of the wood where it meets the butt plate.  The butt plate is fine.  My guess is that the carbine sat somewhere in a damp area and the butt plate rusted and this affected the wood fit there.  Then I surmise that a previous owner replaced the butt plate with a very good condition original.  This is the only “wart” associated with the nice gun.  Faint cartouche still visible.  SN.  51,594 .  A good solid M1860 Spencer carbine.  $2,200.00 SOLD

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12-07-11 - Allen’s Patent Pepperbox: This 6 shot pepperbox was made by Allen Thurber & Co. in Worcester Mass. Circa 1840s to 1850s. It has a 4 inch barrel. The bar hammer is marked “ALLEN’S PATENT 1845” on the side, and the barrel is marked “ALLEN THURBER WORCESTER”. This gun is a standard medium size and has the evenly curved bag shaped round handle, an engraved frame and nipple shield, and fluted barrels. Overall in VG condition, though the action is a touch temperamental. These pepperbox pistols are great conversation starters when a neighbor comes to view your collection... $495.00 SOLD

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12-07-12 - Slocum Front Loading Revolver: Made by Brooklyn Firearms Company this is one of the more ingenious little revolvers to come out of the Civil War. Each cylinder has an interior tube which slides forward to facilitate loading.­­ 32 caliber, five shot, 3 inch barrel. Overall VG. Complete and original in all respects and mechanically perfect. Barrel has 1863 patent date. SN is 7386. $675.00 SOLD

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12-07-13 - Inscribed Smith and Wesson Model One Second Issue: Smith and Wesson Model Number 1 Second Issue .22 caliber revolver. Seven-shot cylinder, rosewood grips, NRA Very Good, silver plated brass frame. Maker name and address on top of barrel: “Smith & Wesson Springfield. Mass.” Very good grips. About 50 percent silver or better. 78560 Serial Number (1865 production). Hand inscribed to a "B. J. Bliss".Strong condition, with inscription...$400.00 SOLD

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12-07-14 - Moore Front Loading Teat-Fire Revolver: One of my favorite Civil War personal sidearms. I’ve owned lots of these over the years. This gun took a unique 32 caliber teat fire cartridge, long obsolete, and was heavily advertised in Harpers Weekly Newspaper during 1864 and 1865. This example is in extra fine condition with much original factory blue still present as you can see in the photos. This gun is marked “Williamson’s Patent June 5th May 17th 1864” and “National Arms Co. Brooklyn NY> This is the early pattern with the first barrel marking of “Moore’s Pat. Fire Arms Co. Brooklyn NY”. SN 23256. A tight solid example. 100% original, 100% complete, and mechanically perfect. One of the best I’ve owned $675.00 SOLD

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12-07-15 - Model 1841 U.S. Percussion Rifle, a.k.a. the “Mississippi Rifle.” A very nice example made by Robbins and Lawrence in 1851: “Robbins /&/ Lawrence” over “US” forward of the hammer and “Windsor VT /1851” vertically at rear. “US/JCB” on the barrel. Front sight and fixed rear sight in place. Brass mounted walnut stock with both sling swivels and original brass tipped steel ramrod. .54 caliber barrel with good rifling, in the bright, with just some graying. The brass has a nice mid-range tone, the triggerguard being just a touch brighter from handling. Edges to wood just slightly rounded from handling also. Obviously used but not abused. Only some very minor dings and handling marks to the wood. Still some bluing left on the patchbox screws.
Long regarded as one of the handsomest US military firearms, the 1841 gained fame in the hands of the Mississippi Regiment of Jefferson Davis at the Battle of Buena Vista in the Mexican War. Its popularity resulted in several contracts after the war including one for 15,000 arms from Robbins and Lawrence between 1848 and 1853. It was popular in the regular army, in the militia, on the frontier and was still regarded as an excellent and desireable arm during the Civil War. There were a lot of variations of this gun and it is a very popular collecting field of its own. The 1851 date on this example is a nice touch since Robbins and Lawrence exhibited their rifles at London’s Crystal Palace Exhibition that year, thus gaining international exposure...$2,595.00 SOLD

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12-07-16 - Large Deringer Style Pistol: Southern Association -marked "Van Wart & Son" on the lock.  A classic 1860 era pistol that greatly resembles the Philadelphia guns of Henry Deringer. The barrel is about 4.5" in length and marked "London" on the top. The lock is nicely signed “Van Wart & Son” the same as seen on the back marks of Confederate buttons.  The gun is overall VG condition except that the breech-block tang has been repaired using a lead or solder inlay as shown above.  The barrel length is near 4 inches with overall length of roughly 9 inches.  Van Wart & Son supplied goods to the southern United States before the war and then buttons on blockade runners during the war.  The buttons never reached the south as far as we know.  A great gun with solid Southern association…    $1,250.00 SOLD

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12-07-17 - Percussion Deringer Style Pistol: Another nicely engraved coat or pocket size pistol with checkered grip and back action percussion lock. Bore is .46 caliber.  This one marked by Wallace on the lockplate. German silver mounts, half stocked to the muzzle, with nice profuse floral engraving on the lockplate, hammer, triggerguard and also the breechplug and banded breech. The 6-inch barrel still shows some residual brown. The wood is pleasing, checkered at the grip, and shows just minor loss at either side of the breech and one small stable crack at the lock screw on the reverse. Ramrod replaced of course.  The silver butt cap has an inset, hinged lid,  hidden cap box. This is a pretty gun and very typical of a pistol carried by a wealthier traveler in the early US.  $650.00 SOLD

 

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12-07-18 - Marlin XXX Standard .30 Cal: Very pleasing Marlin XXX Standard 1872 Pocket Revolver, the Round Ribbed Short-Fluted Cylinder type. Clear 1872 barrel markings on top and July 1, 1873, patent markings on the left side of the round barrel. Standard nickel finish in very good condition and ivory birdshead butt in excellent condition, no chips or cracks. Nickel finished guns are notoriously prone to ugly flaking but this one is very nice, showing just the slightest rubbing wear at the high points. These are .30 caliber rimfire pistols with tip up barrels and were great pocket guns for travelers, gamblers, and the like. The cartridges were stable, not subject to dampness, and the gun was light and easily concealed. This would look great in a western display the condition shows off extremely well. $350.00 SOLD

Markings: "I.J.M. MARLIN NEW HAVEN, CT. PAT JULY 1 1873" and on the top "XXX STANDARD 1873". Ca. 1876.

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12-07-19 – Extra Fine French Double Barrel Sea Captain’s Pistol:  One of the most interesting and appealing weapons I have found in recent years.  Very large in size with near 8 inch Damascus steel barrels. Quality is top notch.  Made circa 1840 this serious weapon retains elements of guns from the previous century… note the chiseled engraving and grotesque lionesque face engraved on the intricate butt cap.   Damascus steel barrels are .50 caliber smooth bore.  The locks retain vestiges of fine scroll engraving with the right lock retaining the lettering “LAT..???”.  Finely scroll & floral engraved on the barrel rib, tang, ramrod ferrules, and butt cap.  The trigger guard is chisel engraved in the thick steel. The walnut stock is wonderfully finished and exhibits fine relief carving behind the tang and behind the ramrod thimbles. Overall VG condition and mechanically perfect.  A wonderful weapon to display with a sea captain’s, or pirate’s, or blockade runner’s effects.  Much cooler than a Civil War Colt, but priced the same.   $1,575.00 SOLD

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12-07-20 – English Flintlock Boot Pistol:  A nice little box lock flintlock that is overall VG condition.  All original and complete. Cock the hammer and the trigger cocks down.   Signed  "THOMAS" on the frame. Barrel is 3.5" in length...  A classic early sidearm carried by Gentlemen and Rogues alike.   $595.00 SOLD

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12-07-21 - High Quality Belgian Percussion Boot Pistol:  Another dandy little self defense weapon.  Barrel is 2.25" in length.  VG to near Fine condition.  All original and mechanically perfect.  Cock the hammer and the trigger pops down.  Has ELG Belgian proof marks at the breech.   $265.00 SOLD

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12-07-22 – English Flintlock Boot or Muff Pistol: Another nice little Box-Lock.  This one signed "PERRY". Barrel is 4" in length. Oveall VG condition. 100% original and complete and mechanically perfect.   $650.00 SOLD

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12-07-23 –  Mariette Brevete 4-Shot Pepperbox: A handsome Belgian  four shot percussion pistol. Damascus steel barrels are 2.5” in length and are .36 caliber. .  Liege proofs.   Scroll-engraved frame. Ring trigger. Varnished walnut grips.  You pull the trigger and the barrels rotate and hidden hammer strikes the next nipple.   Overall VG condition showing evidence of light cleaning. A non functioning example of this pistol sold at Heritage Auction for just under $800 (including their premium).  Here is a fine functioning example for….   $695.00 SOLD

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12-07-24 - Pair of Engraved, Ivory Grip Muff Pistols: Great little pair of fancy Belgian proofed Muff Pistols with beautiful Ivory Grips.  Each pistol has a 3 inch barrel.  Hammers are wonderfully formed with the striking surface being the design of an open-mouth fish.  The open mouth covers the nipple when discharged.  Grips are solid with some stress lines in the ivory.  Frames and tangs are profusely engraved.  Butt cap doubles as a hinged-lid cap box with the lid being a tiny clam shell.  Overall VG… both are 100% original, 100% complete, and mechanically perfect… One is numbered 23 the other is numbered 25 on the bottom of the frame where it meets the barrel.  $775.00 for the pair SOLD

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12-07-25 – Autographed CDV Photo of Robert E. Lee in Uniform:  This is the quintessential Lee carte de visite.   He autographed a great many CDVs in the years immediately following the Civil War, but most of those are civilian views of Marse Robert.  Finding an autographed view of him in his general’s uniform is a great rarity.  Image is strong with a small amount of fading.  Signature is classic “RE Lee” in brown ink script.  Very slightly faded but totally legible.  Years ago any signed CDV of Lee commanded $4500 or more with uniformed views bringing $6000 to $8000.  A poor economy has made these wonderful pieces of history quite affordable again.  Back mark: "VANNERSON & JONES, PHOTGRAPHERS, 77 MAIN STREET, Richmond, Va." The Real Deal...$3,850.00 SOLD

 

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