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Dave Taylor
P.O. Box 87
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12-06-01 - Officer’s Grade Traveling Chess Set. Very nicely made and sturdily constructed wood (I believe Mahogony) traveling chess set that folds up to about the size of a small surgical set and looks rather like one when closed. Two sections open outwards on brass hinges and then have wood inner covers that further swing outwards. The “vegetable ivory” chess pieces, dyed white and red are all present. The game board itself is alternating squares of light and dark wood, each drilled with a hole for the pegs of the chess pieces to fit. When the inner lids are closed the pieces are held in position so that a game can be halted and continued. When closed, the two sections of the box are held together by flat brass hooks on either side. The top and bottom are secured by screws at the corners. A little wear at three of the corners, otherwise very nice. We seldom find these early CW era game boxes any more, and this one is in extra fine condition. Perfect for display or careful use in living history or reenacting. $365.00 SOLD

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12-06-02 - Civil War era bowie knife by James Westa, one of the best quality English makers from Sheffield supplying knives to the American market during the period of the California Gold Rush up to the Civil War era. Double edge spear point style with a nice blade and no sign of modern sharpening, mixed bright and gray blade. Very attractive silver or German silver top mount and slab grips secured by two pins. On one side the slab is bone, and the other side has a mother of pearl slab. The guard is a very attractive “upside down wing” with floral or shell raised motifs. The pommel matches with similar slightly flaring ridges. A tight knife. A handsome knife. No play in the handle. Comes with the original leather covered pasteboard sheath in good condition, one slight crosswise crease, but sturdy, the leather a dark greenish blue with stamped gilt border. Original German silver upper or throat mount. The scabbard tip is a replacement from a period knife, slightly darker than the throat, but a good match. A top notch Bowie knife from the early days…. 6.5” blade. Roughly 12” total length. $1.150.00

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12-06-03 - Large Etched Blade Bowie Knife with SUPERB Blade: Harrison Bros. and Howson double edge spear point bowie with original scabbard and a central panel etched blade reading, “ROUGH & READY” in near mint frosty luster (just a couple age spots present). Excellent stag horn slab grips secured with four pins and an uninscribed excutcheon on one side. Straight cruciform German silver guard. Blade shows loads of original polish and central motif of “ROUGH & READY” on a ribband surrounded by gorgeous curling vine leaves. Just a few light wipes here and there and slight graying to the ricasso. The motto, of course, is typically American frontier (Non British) meaning someone or something that is rather simple, coarse, and unsophisticated but one who gets the job done without hoop-lah or fanfare. It gained wide-spread use in the presidential campaign of 1848 as a nick-name for Zachary Taylor for his lack of pretension and success in the Mexican War. This ties in nicely Harrison Brothers & Howson, who started in England in 1847. This blade is hardly crude, but it is simple and straightforward in design, and would certainly “get the job done.” Handsome, high quality, top end condition, and perfect for Western Frontier, California Gold Field, or Civil War display.
I had to pay dearly at auction for this… but I absolutely HAD to have it. $2,750.00 SOLD
8.25” Blade 12.5” Overall

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12-06-04 - Civil War 48th Penna. “PETERSBURG MINE REGIMENT” Silver Identification Badge: a wonderful jeweler-made badge for a member of a very hardcore Army of the Potomac regiment that served in the 9th Army Corps, losing 156 officers and men killed and mortally wounded. The regiment enlisted in late 1861 and served with Burnside’s Coastal Expedition in North Carolina, then back up to Virginia where they were part of the Ninth Corps, then out to Kentucky and Tennessee in mid-1863, and finally back east in time for Grant’s 1864 overland campaign. They saw considerable action, suffer­ing losses at Second Bull Run, Antietam, Fredericksburg, the Wilderness, Spottsylvania, North Anna, Cold Harbor, and near continuous action at Petersburg where they were the regiment who dug the famous mine whose explosion began the Battle of the Crater.

Our badge in the shape of a cross with foliate ends is nicely inscribed in script: 48th P.V.V. (Pennsylvania Veteran Volunteers) on the upper branch; “HK” on the left (owner’s initials); Co. G on the right; with a large 9 in the center and A.C.(Army Corps) below. (Note that in this case the cross shape of the badge is not an indicator of the corps insignia, but a decorative element offered by the jeweler. I am curious as to whether this unique design has some significance to the 48th P.V. that I am unaware of. If you know the answer I would love to hear from you.) The owner was undoubtedly Henry Krebs, who enlisted on 9/10/1862 as a Corporal. On 9/10/1862 he mustered into Co. G. He made Quartermaster Sergeant 3/17/64, and was discharged for promotion to 2nd Lieutenant on 9/25/1864 and commissioned into Co. A, 35th Infantry US Colored Troops. He was again promoted, to 1st Lt. of Co. K, and finally mustered out on 6/1/1866. Thus, he was in the 48th PA until well into their service at Petersburg and was in the 35th USCT in time to be in the Battle at Honey Hill, S.C.

There is one other soldier in the company with the initials “HK” He is totally unlikely as the owner of the badge. He is Henry Kyler, who was drafted into the regiment in January, 1865, and served until being discharged for disability in later June. He would not qualify as a veteran volunteer (as engraved on the badge) being a late war draftee, and would not likely have purchased a unit ID badge so late in the service when he had missed virtually all of the regiments service.

Very nice condition with great eye-appeal and history, measuring 1.5 inches tall and 1.5 inches wide --- standard corps badge size. It retains its T-bar pin and catch on the reverse. A top notch war time badge from a VERY famous regiment… $1,200.00 SOLD

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12-06-05 – Ames Mexican War to 1850 era Militia Sword: Fine straight bladed militia officer’s sword in brass scabbard. The blade is 31.5” in length and less than an inch in width. The scabbard is marked “AMES MFG. CO CHICOPEE MASS”. Very good condition... Mother of Pearl grip and wrap are likewise VG++. Pommel is a knight’s helmet… super militia officer’s sword that is approaching its 175th birthday. xzdejyv

About a hundred times rarer than a CW cavalry saber, but priced the same… $795.00 SOLD

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12-06-06 - Presentation Foot Officer’s Sword to 3rd USCT Officer – Also was a Police Officer and the Presentation is from his buddies in the Boston, Mass. P.D. I do not recall ever owning a Civil War officer’s presentation sword where the recipient and donors were all “flat foots” … “Cops”. Sword is a fine condition M1850 foot officer’s sword housed in its original brass mounted steel scabbard. The top scabbard mount is beautifully engraved “Presented To Capt. E.P. Barker by officers of the 3rd Police Station Boston Aug. 11th 1863”

The sword itself has near perfect shagreen grip covering and perfect twisted wire wrap. The blade is VG++ with no factory luster but being shiny steel overall. Ricasso is signed by Ames Mfg Co. Blade etching has eagle, US, etc… The scabbard is likewise fine. Top mount bears full Ames legend. Balance of steel scabbard is fine plum color with extra attractive brass mounts and drag. Records show Captain Barker served with the 3rd USCT from 1863 through 1865. The unit saw combat at Fort Wagner, Fort Gregg, Jacksonville Fla, and more. Of additional interest is that this sword and its presentation were reported in the Boston Newspaper in 1863. Accompanying this sword is a fine little hardbound book titled “Civil War Sword and Revolver Presentations as Reported in the Boston Daily Evening Transcript 1861-1865” by David Stroud. One of only 300 copies published. In the book our sword is entry 63 with a most thrilling account of Capt. Barker’s story. Quoting from the book “… Mr. Edmond P. Barker for several years past the well known and faithful driver of the city vehicle commonly known as the Black Maria.” (NOTE THIS IS THE POLICE PADDY WAGON). “… has just received a commission from the War Dept as Captain in the US 3rd Penna of Colored Volunteers…” (3rd USCT organized at Philadelphia). “… and leaves this evening to enter upon his duties….” Much more data on his service in Boston. A fine sword, with interesting history, and wonderful background. $3,200.00

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12-06-07 - 1833 Dragoon Saber by Ames - Much better than most we see on the market today... bears needle etched 1835 manufacture date as well as full firm name and “United States” markings. The blade is an even gray tone, and has a few minor edge nicks on the edge. The guard, ,grip, wrap, etc are all excellent with just some surface flaking on the grip leather... of no consequence. The twisted dragoon wire is all original, and the sccabbard is likewise very fine. Ther are just a few minor push dents near the drag. The rings are the rare early original split “key ring” style which is correct and mandatory on this early scabbard. Overall look is a dark chocolate patina. A fine example.. $1950.00 SOLD

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12-06-08 - Available for purchase is the following extraordinarily historical US Army officer’s sword. This incredible and rare weapon was used on the Wisconsin Territorial frontier and was carried by an army officer who personally staid off an Indian uprising at Fort Winnebago in 1837. It is likely unique in terms of being a documented weapon used in the Indian conflicts and military history of Wisconsin’s territorial period . I know of no other such documented weapons in public or private hands.
This is a model 1832 Staff Officer’s sword manufactured and signed by renowned sword maker N.P. Ames of Springfield, Massachusetts. It is a rare item in its own right with very few specimens being made and far fewer surviving to the 21st century. It was made expressly for Major Waddy V. Cobbs United States Regular Army.
The sword was carried by and is inscribed to Major W. V. Cobbs U.S.Army and has his name etched intothe blade itself. This done by Ames at the time of manufacture.
The sword is original and complete except for a replaced drag on the scabbard and a repair to the
leather on the scabbard. The replaced drag is an original drag from an 1840 sword.
This sword was owned by Major W.V Cobbs while he was commandant of Fort Winnebago in the Wisconsin Territory and where he was singularly responsible for thwarting an Indian Uprising between the Winnebago and Menomonee tribes in 1838.

Excerpt from the Army and Navy Chronicle
Published by Benjamin Homans, 1839
From the Boston Mercantile Journal.
Domestic Intelligence.
INDIANS ON THE FRONTIER
An occurrence took place near Fort Winnebago, in the Wisconsin territory, a short time since, which was near involving two powerful tribes in an exterminating warfare, and will serve to illustrate some points in the Indian character. The lands of the Menominees adjoin those of the Winnebagoes, and these tribes have for years lived, not only in peace, but in bonds of friendship and intimacy with each other.
It happened, early in May last, that a Menominee, in a drunken frolic, stabbed a Winnebago, and, what was considered extraordinary, was suffered to remain for some hours afterward in the Winnebago camp, and departed without molestation. In the course of a week or two after this transaction, Yellow Thunder, a Winnebago chief of warlike character, called at Fort Winnebago, and, in an interview with Major W. V. Cobbs, who commanded that post, narrated the occurrence, and stated that he had been selected by his people to avenge the murder. He had accordingly taken with him a band of warriors, and it was his intention to carry death and desolation into the Menominee country. His plans appeared to be formed with judgment and skill. The Menominees, at that time, resided in several villages, at some distance from each other, and the design of Yellow Thunder was to fall upon the unsuspecting Menominees in each village successively, cut them off in detail, and thus exterminate this powerful and warlike tribe.
Major Cobbs, who, by long and familiar intercourse with the Indians, was well acquainted with their
character, took prompt and decided, yet prudent, measures for preventing this sanguinary design of Yellow Thunder from being carried into effect. He had a long talk with him, attempted to show him not only the impropriety and injustice of such a proceeding, but its impolicy, and expatiated on the evil consequences to his people which would result from open hostilities with the whites, which must inevitably be the case provided his intentions were carried into effect. At length he so far prevailed upon Yellow Thunder as to induce him to postpone the execution of his projects of revenge, until attempts to settle it by other means had failed. He immediately sent an express to the head chief of the Menominees, who was then sixty miles off, informing him of the occurrence, and requesting his presence immediately at the fort. And, in a few days, the Menominee chief appeared at Fort Winnebago, accompanied by sixty-five chiefs and principal warriors of his nation, completely armed, and encamped near the Winnebagoes under the guns of the fort.
Major Cobbs assured both parties that, if either band commenced hostilities, he should open his batteries upon the aggressors without ceremony, and set himself to work in good earnest to heal the difficulties between them. He was at that time suffering from severe indisposition, but he was so fully aware of the importance of adopting prompt and decided measures, if he would prevent a sanguinary war, that he caused himself to be carried to the place of council, between the two encampments, where he conferred with the chiefs, sometimes with one, sometimes with both together, for several days, using all his powers to induce the tribes to bury the tomahawk.
The chief of the Winnebagoes was at the outset furious for war, and would not patiently listen to any
proposals for peace. One of the warriors of his tribe had been basely murdered, and a dreadful vengeance must follow. On the other hand, the chief of the Menominees was, from the commencement, anxious for a continuation of peace. He regretted the unhappy circumstance which had excited the angry and revengeful feelings of the Winnebagoes ; but was unwilling to surrender the offender, (his nephew,) to the vengeance of his foes. He said that if the Winnebagoes had killed him on the spot, when he had perpetrated the crime of which he was accused, they would have acted right, and in accordance with Indian customs, and he would not have complained ; but, after suffering such an opportunity for immediate revenge to escape, they had no right to insist upon having the offender placed in their hands. For the sake of peace, however, he was willing to make some valuable presents to the Winnebagoes, which he hoped would have the effect of disarming them of their resentment.
It was with much difficulty that Major Cobbs could get the Winnebagoes to listen to any overtures for a compromise of this kind. But it happened fortunately that a case of a similar kind had happened a few years before. Life had been taken in a drunken affray, and the offended tribe had been induced to forego their revenge, by a rich display of valuable presents. This precedent was urged with much force by the commanding officer of the fort, and the time was appointed when the final determination of the parties was to be made known. The Major was carried in his chair to the place of meeting. The Winnebago chiefs were on one side of him, and the Menominees on the other. He made them a harangue, in which he repeated all his arguments in favor of a peaceable termination of their difficulties ; and he strongly urged upon Yellow Thunder to accept the conditions offered by the Menominees. While he was speaking, the wife of the Winnebago who had been killed was sitting in front of the warriors, weeping bitterly, and sobbing as if overwhelmed with the dreadful calamity.
When the Major had finished his remarks, the chief of the Menominees arose and made a speech, in
which he deeply regretted the difficulty which had taken place, and avowed his sincere desire for peace ; and concluded by ordering presents, consisting of strings of wampum, furs, etc., to be brought forward, to the value of two or three hundred dollars, which he offered to the Winnebagoes as a peace offering. A silence now ensued for a few moments, when the desolate widow arose from her recumbent posture, and with a firm step walked up to the warrior who had killed her husband, and who was standing near the principal chief, with a forgiving smile she tendered him her hand, which he took and shook heartily ; at the same instant the head chiefs advanced toward each other and shook hands, and the whole of the Winnebagoes and Menominees mingled with each other, renewing their former intercourse, and exchanging congratulations on the peaceful termination of an affair which, at one time, threatened the most sanguinary results. The pipe of peace was then smoked, and the tomahawk buried with the usual ceremony. The commanding officer of the post then retired within the fort, much pleased with the successful result of his attempt at pacification.
$5,800.00

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12-06-09 - Fine Condition M-1850 US Staff & Field Officer’s Sword. A much better than average specimen. The blade is mixed grey steel and original luster. Much luster at tip end, more grey from center to hilt. Etching very clear with eagle, US, and patriotic motifs. No edge nicks. Brass mounted steel scabbard is fine. Mounts are fancier than most with top mount having a shield where an inscription could be engraved. Grip has full shagreen and twisted wire wrap. Brass guard is about perfect. A very handsome and solid example of the sword worn by officer’s holding the rank of Major and above. $1,950.00 SOLD

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12-06-10- Another Fine Condition M-1850 US Staff & Field Officer’s Sword. Nearly identical to the specimen shown above except that the blade etching is somewhat worn. A much better than average specimen. The blade is worn grey steel with faintly visible patriotic etching including eagle, US, shield, etc… No edge nicks. Brass mounted steel scabbard is fine. Mounts are fancier than most with top mount having a shield where an inscription could be engraved. Grip has full shagreen and twisted wire wrap. Brass guard is about perfect. A very handsome and solid example of the sword worn by officer’s holding the rank of Major and above. $1,750.00 SOLD

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12-06-11 - This is an amazing offering. two pistols and holsters that belonged to Lt. Col. Hugh McDowell McElrath CSA.
These are .54 caliber percussion guns. Barrels are 8.5” and both are stamped on the left flat J.H., both lockplates stamped “U.S. H. Aston” and “Middletn, Conn 1850” in rear of lockplate. Handsome walnut stock and brass hardware, smooth bore and swivel ramrods. Brass buttplate, sideplate, trigger guards and barrel bands. These are about fine condition with smooth metal with sharp markings and excellent wood with great edges. The best part is that the backstraps are beautifully inscribed “Lt. Col. McElrath”. Included with these are the original pair of saddle holsters which have always been with them in solid condition but lacking the covers and connecting yoke. This pair of pistols surfaced at an auction many years ago and were purchased by a prominent Dayton gun dealer who sold them to an Indiana dealer who in turn sold them to an Indiana collector, where they remained until recently. A couple years back the last owner sold his collection at auction where I bought these pistols. This previous owner had thought the guns might have belonged to Major J E McElrath as that was the only name he could find in researchable library and archives records. In fact this man turns out to be the son of the actual owner. This was long before the presence of the internet and the wonderful data bases we have access to today. Prior to the auction I had researched these pistols. I knew who the owner was. They have been prominently displayed on my book shelf in my office ever since. I am offering them for sale here for the first time since I bought them, and this is the first time that the accurate ownership has been properly attributed to them. In searching each and every officer in the US and Confederate forces the ONLY officer whose name and rank matches the inscription is Lt. Col. Hugh MdDowell McElrath Confederate States Army... Born Sept 6th 1815 Died Oct 1st 1863 at Calhoun Tenn. Served as General Kirby Smith’s Quartermaster and also under General William R. Boggs. There are but two officer’s named McElrath in the CSA, only one is a Lieutenant Colonel. The other officer is this man’s son. Listed alternately as J E McElrath and I E McElrath 3rd Tenn. CSA Lt. Colonel McElrath is mentioned
in the book The Military Reminiscences of General Wm. R. Boggs. And in further researching on the internet “The Lincoln Log” (website) we find that McElrath’s wife was, petitioning Lincoln in 1864 to be able to return to her home in Knoxville. She is referred to as widow. Also of some note is the presence of an ink stamping found on the back of Confederate states currency which reads “Issued at Knoxville H McD McElrath MAJ and AQM Jun 5 1863” This too we found on internet searches. If you are interested in Tennessee history, or inscribed Confederate handguns, these should light your fire in a big way. Superb condition, wonderfully inscribed, and dead real. $7,850.00 SOLD

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12-06-12 - Regulation Civil War U.S. Issue Haversack in good condition! These have never been easy to find! An essential piece of soldier’s gear, they were so useful after the war also that they were quickly used up. While stacks of knapsacks were still available until recent years, you always had to look hard for a haversack. They were always scarce. This is the US regulation issue pattern. A simple tarred canvas bag with a wide tarred canvas shoulder strap stitched at the top rear corners of the bag. This one even retains the tinned iron buttons on the interior which secured a removable liner. The closure strap and buckle are long gone, which is usually the case. (You can replace them by robbing them from a common knapsack.) The tarred canvas shoulder strap has no tears and the body of the bag is solid, with just a brief separation line along the top fold and small line on the lower left face, both of which are easily repaired if you so desire.

This is a key piece for any Civil War display or collection. Men from every branch of service were issued these to carry food and mess gear. They are a great piece for a camp or combat display. Men frequently discarded knapsacks on the march or going into action, but they kept canteens and haversacks close by. A true rarity in Union Army equipment. $1,395.00 SOLD

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12-06-13 - Quality CW Style Binoculars: Much better than most we encounter. This set has a selector rod to set your viewing for Marine, Field, or Theater. And all three settings fuction well. Eye pieces are signed “LeMaire FABt Paris”. Internet searches indicate that LeMaire optical instruments were around from the 1860s to 1915 era. I have found numerous auction listings offering LeMaire products made circa 1860, 1875, and early 1900s. The style of binoculars is virtually identical to known Civil War examples, but we know that style remained unchanged for several decades. In any event, these are perfect for careful use in reenacting or to display with officer’s effects. Nice pair with good optics. One lens has some haloing around the outer edges, but they function very well. $165.00 SOLD

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12-06-14 - Extra Fine Early Civil War Officer’s Buckle: A superb regulation officer’s sword belt plate as worn by virtually all US officers and a great many Confederates as well. Extra beautiful patina! Nicer than 90% we see. Very attractive ... $295.00 SOLD

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12-06-15 - Allen’s Patent Pepperbox with Finish - This 6 shot pepperbox was made by Allen Thurber & Co. in Worcester Mass. Circa 1840s to 1850s. It has a 4 inch barrel. The bar hammer is marked “ALLEN’S PATENT 1845” on the side, and the barrel is marked “ALLEN THURBER & CO.” This gun is a standard medium size and has the evenly curved bag shaped round handle, an engraved frame and nipple shield, and fluted barrels. Overall near fine condition with rich traces of original blue finish in protected areas. Much nicer than most we find. These pepperbox pistols are great conver­sation starters when a neighbor comes to view your collection… $795.00 SOLD

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12-06-16 - Allen’s Patent Pepperbox - This 6 shot pepperbox was made by Allen Thurber & Co. in Worcester Mass. Circa 1840s to 1850s. It has a 4 inch barrel. The bar hammer is marked “ALLEN’S PATENT 1845” on the side, and the barrel is marked “PATENTED APRIL 16” This gun is a standard medium size and has the evenly curved bag shaped round handle, an engraved frame and nipple shield, and fluted barrels. Overall in VG condition… $495.00 SOLD

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12-06-17 - Civil War Bacon Revolver with variant grooved frame. Bacon hoped for a military contract for his .38 rimfire revolvers but never got one. Still, many collectors consider it a secondary martial pistol. Like many rim­fire cartridge revolvers, these were well liked by officers, who carried privately purchased sidearms: there was no worry about dampness ruining paper or skin cartridges or need to worry about percussion caps. Bacons also packed a bigger punch than the Smith and Wesson .32. This one is in good condition with nice grips, showing wear, with some dings and dark spots to the metal on the barrel and forward part of the frame, but still showing the engraved line in the frame above the grips. Bacons show a number of variations. This one has a milled loading and ejecting groove behind the cylinder: a fault in the early models was that the cylinder had to be taken out to be loaded and to eject spent casings. The hinged rod beneath the barrel doubles as a center pin and ejector rod. This rod bears serial number 88 while the gun bears serial 31. A very scarce Civil War revolver that seldom shows up for sale. $735.00 SOLD

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12-06-18- LeFaucheux 12mm Pinfire Civil War Revolver - The LeFaucheux was one of the only foreign-manufactured revolvers to have been imported by the U.S. government during the Civil War. The Rebs likewise bought thousands. At the outbreak of war in 1861, both the Federal and Confederate governments looked to Europe to supplement insufficient arms inventories, and approximately 14,000 Lefaucheux revolvers were purchased by the USA at a cost ranging from $12.50 to $20.04 each. The Confederates likewise had thousands of the Lefaucheuxs in the field with N.B. Forrest’s boys alone having over 400 in their possession as late as 1864. In that same year of 1864 the Selma Arsenal records show they had over 50,000 rounds of Lefaucheux ammunition on hand and over a thousand revolvers. The se­rial number on this revolver is 6481, a very low number. The condition is good to very good. The right side of the gun is quite nice with just a couple areas of pitting. The left side of the gun has moderate pitting along the entire length. Luckily we display this gun with the right side facing up. It is mechanically perfect. This is the classic Civil War issue Lefaucheux. Top of barrel marked “INvon E. Lefaucheux Brte. Paris” Right side of frame marked with the tiny Lefaucheux “broken gun” stamp and “L.F. 6481”. Perfect to display with US or CS cavalry effects and still very affordable… $695.00 SOLD

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12-06-19- Fine Condition Civil War Smith & Wesson No. 2 Army Revolver- This is the largest caliber Smith and Wesson that was available during the Civil War… 32 caliber rimfire, and this is a darn nice example. NRA “Fine” condition with standard 6” barrel. This gun has a serial #30716 which is smack-dab in Civil War production. This fine piece has over 40% of the original factory blue remaining on the frame, cylinder, and barrel, and the rosewood grips are likewise Fine plus condition. The patent information is pretty clear on the cylinder, the barrel legend is crisp as is the action. 100% original, 100% complete, mechanically perfect. A great CW Smith & Wesson for your collection. $1,150.00 SOLD yhejut-bod..

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12-06-20- Extra Fine Remington Army Revolver: A very solid example of the early production Remington New Model Army revolver with much original finish and a very low serial number of 19,563. This is one of the very first “New Models” as the serials on this model start in the 15,000 range. This one has the earlier cone style front sight as seen on the Beals and 1861 models. This serial number indicates production in 1863 which is the first year this model was produced. This great old gun is in NRA “Fine” condition being 100% original, 100% complete, and mechanically perfect. The metal is an honest plum patina mixed with over 50% original factory blue finish on the barrel, rammer, and cylinder. The frame is an attractive plum patina with vestiges of blue. The grips are likewise extra fine. The two line barrel legend and firm marking is totally legible, and this gun is so early that it does not yet bear the “New Model” stamp as seen on later produced pieces. There are government sub inspectors’ initials on the proper various metal parts. The inspector’s cartouche on the left grip is visible but slightly worn. These Remingtons were issued in about the same quantities as the Colts and were actually a stronger and more advanced design. The Remington has a solid frame with a top strap just like present day modern revolvers. Also, the Remington could be easily reload­ed with a fresh full cylinder without the need of tools, whereas the Colt could not. This is a good solid Civil War cavalry revolver with generous amounts of original finish. You will be well pleased at ... $1,850.00 SOLD

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12-06-21 - 3rd Model Burnside Carbine: One of the scarcer CW carbines is this third model Burnside. Only 1500 were produced compared with nearly 50,000 of the 4th and 5th models. Truly a scarce pattern. It is the first Burnside to utilize a forestock, so it looks similar to the 4th and 5th models in profile. But it has the straight breech lever block without the center hinge as do the earlier models. It is basically a 2nd model with the addition of a fore stock. Overall NRA “very good” condition. 100% original, 100% complete, mechanically perfect. Barrel marked “Cast Steel 1862”. Breech marking is faint but still legible with 1856 patent date. Serial number is 3,730, matched on breech and block. Metal is overall plum-brown patina. Stocks show wear and use but no abuse. Small sliver of wood repaired left of tang in wrist. Bore has rifling but is as dark and black as a coal mine. I would guess it was not cleaned after the last time it was shot. A very representative example of a very scarce CW cavalry carbine. $1,675.00 SOLD

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12-06-22 - Ultra Fine High Finish 1840s Belgian Transition Revolver:  These early repeating hand guns are fascinating.  They are a transition of technology from the pepperbox design to the modern revolver design.  There are dozens of variations on them, usually western European.  This example is a superb Belgian example with 90% of the original rich factory blue finish, and a beautifully hand engraved silver frame, back strap, and trigger guard.  It has the grip, frame, and mechanical design of a pepperbox, but the hammer, cylinder and barrel of the early style Colts.  Appears to be about .36 caliber and is roughly the size of a Colt Navy revolver.  The barrel length is six and a half inches. It is signed “T L Hoist Brevete A Cheratte” and bears serial number “5”.  Also has a few Belgian proof marks of a crown over “V”, as well as the “ELG” in an oval.  Extra fine and infinitely attractive. ... moved to 1303webcat.

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12-06-23 - Quarter Plate Tintype 5 Pards:  A very appealing group portrait showing men as they appeared mid-war in the field.  The left hand subject is a bit of a mystery as he wears a civilian style coat with military brass buttons and has some sort of a medal or badge on his cravat (tie).  The right hand subject is a sergeant wearing a non regulation shell jacket and NCO sash with huge tassel. The central Yankee is sitting on a wooden barrel. Very cool.  VG condition with minor horizontal crease. Housed in mat, frame, and glass. No case.  $365.00

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12-06-24 - 5th Corps Officer Pards:  Superb quarter plate tintype of two Union line officers both sporting fancy 5th corps Maltese Cross badges on their breasts.  Clarity is outstanding.  Condition is excellent with one minor abrasion as shown.  Note the M1850 staff officer’s sword, double border extra rich shoulder straps, and the left hand subject has his eagle buckle upside down on his belt.  Super Army of the Potomac image.  Housed in mat, frame, and glass only.  $575.00

Call us @ 419-842-1863

12-06-25 - California Gold Rush 49ers:  Classic quarter plate ambrotype of two bearded adventurerers decked out in classic California Gold Rush Garb. The placket front shirts, huge cravats, and galluses (suspenders), are dead-on classic 49er style.  Excellent clarity and contrast.  Some abrasions and scratches as shown.  Housed in mat, frame, glass, and half case.  $175.00 SOLD

Call us @ 419-842-1863

12-06-26 - Yankee A’La’Napoleon:  Fine, artistically posed, quarter plate ambrotype showing a baby faced Union Army soldier posed like Napoleon with his hand tucked inside his blouse.  He sports a commercial high grade forage cap,  officer’s grade caped greatcoat, and a nine button frock coat.  He is likely a young line officer but his greatcoat covers his frock coat’s shoulders so we do not know if there are rank straps on his frock.  Excellent in all respects save for a vertical rub near the right edge of the mat clearly shown and of no consequence. (Very minor). The photographer was quite accomplished… showing great artistic ability with the posing, composition, focus, and lighting…  far more sophisticated than most soldier photos. Housed in a full case.  $285.00

Call us @ 419-842-1863

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