Submachine Gun Model 1939

Submachine Gun Model 1939 (Danuvia 39M)

Made by Danuvia Motorcycle Factory, Budapest and by Femaru Fegyver es Gepgyar (FEG), Budapest, 1939-43.
Caliber: 9mm Mauser.
40-round staggered row detachable box magazine.
Delayed blowback, selective fire.
1046mm [41.2 inch] overall, 3.7kg [8.2 lbs].
500mm [19.65 inch] barrel.
Tangent ramp type rear sight graduated to ? meters.
Muzzle velocity 463 m/sec.
Cyclic rate: 750 rpm

This submachine gun (Roham Puska - Sturmgewehr) was designed and produced in Hungary in the thirties and adopted for service in 1939. The design of this weapon, which is chambered for the 9mm Mauser cartridge, is credited to Pal D. Kiraly and resembles in many respects that of the Swiss SIG MKMO submachine gun. The folding magazine system of the Model 39 is similar to that of the SIG MKMO. The magazine can be folded forward into a recess in the stock, where a plate then slides over it.
The standard Model 39 submachine gun has a one-piece stock; a version with a folding wooden butt was produced as the Model 39/A. Both the Model 39 and 39/A were produced in very limited numbers. The fire selector/safety is the circular cap located on the rear of the receiver and is operated by rotating the cap to align with one of the three settings:-'E' for semiautomatic fire, 'S' for full automatic fire and 'Z' for safe setting.

Submachine Gun Model 1943

Submachine Gun Model 1943 (Danuvia 43M)

With stock and magazine folded

Approx. 8000 were made by Danuvia Motorcycle Factory, Budapest and by Femaru Fegyver es Gepgyar (FEG), Budapest, 1943-45.
Caliber: 9mm Mauser.
40-round staggered row detachable box magazine.
Delayed blowback, selective fire.
952mm [37.5 inch] overall, 3.63kg [8 lbs] without the mag, 4.46kg with mag.
424mm [16.7 inch] barrel.
Tangent sight graduated to ? meters.
Muzzle velocity 455 m/sec.
Cyclic rate: 750 rpm

The Model 43, which was made in much larger quantity than the Model 39, is essentially the same as the Model 39, but has a folding metal stock. The folding stock has wooden strips on the side of the metal stock frame. The magazine of the Model 43 is canted slightly forward when in the fixed position as opposed to the straight vertical position of the Model 39 magazine, and the barrel of the Model 43 is approximately 76mm (3 inches) shorter than that of the Model 39. The magazines of the Models 39 and 43 are not interchangeable.

Machine Pistol Model 1944

Machine Pistol Model 1944 (Danuvia 44M)

Only a few were made by Danuvia Motorcycle Factory, Budapest, 1944-45.
Caliber: 9mm Mauser.
40-round staggered row detachable box magazine.
2.92kg [8 lbs] without the mag.
Tangent sight graduated 100-600 meters.
Muzzle velocity 450 m/sec.
Cyclic rate: 650-700 rpm

All steel construction. Convenient large grips. Ventilated barrel shroud. No stock.

Submachine Cristobal Carbine

Submachine Gun 'Cristobal Carbine'.

Designed by Hungarian Pal Kiraly, Made by Armeria San Cristobal, Dominican Republic.
Caliber: .30 M1 Carbine, rimless.
Auto-loading action, delayed blowback.
945mm [37.2 inch] overall, 3.55kg [7.8 lbs] without magazine.
412mm [16.2 inch] barrel, 4-groove rifling; RH, concentric.
Detachable box magazine, 30 rds.
Spring-leaf and elevator sight.
570 m/sec with standard ball cartridges; 25 rpm.
No bayonet.

Cristobal carbines were popular in Central America, selling in quantity to Cuba in addition to service with the Dominican Republic armed forces. Production has been estimated in excess of 200,000, but details are lacking.

1953: Designed by Hungarian Pal Kiraly, the bolt design was similar to that of the Hungarian Model 39. The Cristobal M2 had a Beretta M1938-like appearance externally, relying on the mechanism of that sub-machine-gun to give single shots from the front trigger or fully automatic fire by pressing the rear trigger. Internally, however, a lever connected the lightweight bolt head and the heavy body. When the gun fired, the resistance of the lever had to be overcome before the bolt body began to move backward, delaying the opening of the breech until the chamber pressure had dropped to a safe level, much the same system had been used in Kiraly's Hungarian submachine-guns a decade earlier.

1961: Service showed that the M2 overheated in automatic fire. The improved M3 (or 'Mk 3') discarded the original wooden hand guard for a perforated sheet- metal fore-end and could accept an FN export-pattern knife bayonet. A few guns were made with a tubular folding butt.

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