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A Monastery Photo Album



HAUTERIVE

Monasterium B. M. V. de Altaripa


The following photographs are from the internet and provide a glimpse of the Abbaye Notre Dame d'Hauterive, Posieux, Canton of Fribourg, Switzerland.


The Abbey of Hauterive

Founded in the 12th century, the Abbey of Hauterive became my home on September 19, 1978, the Feast of Our Lady of La Salette. I was sent there, with a group of monks from Spring Bank, to further my monastic formation.

The Cloister

Hauterive was constructed according to the typical Cistercian plan. The monastic buildings being clustered around the quandrangle. This is a view of the lower, open cloister. There was a second, upper cloister, not exposed to the elements.

It was in this lower cloister that the community would gather for processions and each evening, prior to Compline, for a reading from the Fathers of the Church.

Cloister Detail

The intricate pattern of the rosettes set into the cloister garth date from the 14th century.

The Sanctuary of the Abbey Church

Behind the main altar of the Abbey Church is a large stained glass window depicting the life of Christ. Suspended above the altar, in the form of a pelican, was a hanging tabernacle which could be lowered onto the altar by means of a pulley system.

Originally the church had no stained glass windows, which is traditional in Cistercian churches. During the middle ages permission was granted to install stained glass in the church. The choir stalls are from the 15th century.

The Abbey

The Abbey of Hauterive is nestled in a valley, alongside of which runs the Sarine River. Typically, Cistercians preferred valley locations for their monasteries with a river or lake nearby.

Hauterive

The monastic complex of Hauterive.




My Websites


Akathistos

Carthusian

Catholic Prayers and Devotions

My Icon Collection

Our Lady of Czestochowa

Sancta Maria

St. Herman of Alaska

St. Michael the Archangel

The Passion

The Sacred Heart of Jesus Ring

The Mother of God Ring


This webpage is dedicated to my friend, Deborah, whose love for things Cistercian matches mine.