Photos (and captions) courtesy of Xen Scott


A picture taken from the Jersey shore side of the Delaware River showing the four tower array of WJJZ


A picture taken from the 12ft boat used by the transmiiter engineer to get to Burlington Island from Burlington NJ.
Access to the transmitter site was via a cove on the southwestern corner of the island.
The array is just visible in the center of the image.


A picture looking back out the cove after landing.
The trip was often a challenge because of the large ocean-going ships and the weather in winter.


A picture showing the boat landing site on Burlington Island.
Because of the tide, there was often a 40ft difference in the shoreline in the cove.
This part of the island was made from dredgings taken from the Delaware River ship channel.


A picture of the front of the transmitter shack.
You can see the Gates BC-5P2 transmitter.


A picture from just inside the door, looking left.


The Gates BC-5P2 transmitter.
They punched holes in the front panel so that they could observe the mercury vapor rectifiers when they heard an arc-over.
Because of AC power fluctuations caused by the nearby municipal water pumping plant, keeping the transmitter power within licensed values required regular operator attention.


The interior of the building, looking right from the entrance.
Shown is the phasor, monitor rack and the hand-operated water pump.
As I remember, the duty engineer spent three days on the island before being relieved.
There was a chemical toilet in the right front corner of the building and a bunk around behind the transmitter.


The WJJZ four tower array.
The transmitter building is in the distance.
I once got a call from the duty engineer who was in a panic because the phase monitor readings were fluctuating all over the place.
It turned out that a sample loop had come loose and was twisting in the wind.
The array did have problems because it was aimed right at a pipe manufacturing plant which had a rusty water tower contributing to all manner of re-radiation and directional pattern distortion.
I understood that this was a Gates turn-key installation.


One of the ATU's (Antenna Tuning Units).


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