The Jack Epstein Interview

This is an archive for all the interviews I have conducted. I Hope you all enjoy them. If you don't, well, screw you!
This is a legit interview I conducted with former ECWer Judge Jeff Jones. I know many of you are questioning if "Jack sold out".... You all should know the answer to that. Jack answers to nobody! ;)


These should be a regular feature here in RSPW.


11 Questions... The Jack Epstein interview with ECW's Judge Jeff Jones....

JE: Hello Mr. Jeff Jones. Even though we have a documented history on RSPW, its nothing personal. So please don't let your hatred for me cloud your judgment! Let me first congratulate you with your recent push in ECW as the manager of Sid. Do you expect big things for yourself and Sid in the future of ECW? Maybe TAZ's ECW Title?

JJ: I expect many big things for Sid & I in ECW. Right now I will be laying down the law and Sid will laying down the executions. As far as Taz' ECW World Title...I think that's a BIG MONEY PPV Main Event waiting to happen.


JE: How did you decide to get into wrestling? Did you always wanted
to a manager/referee type, or an actual wrestler?
JJ: In 1992 I started to work as a referee for a indy group out of Maryland called the Mid Eastern Wrestling Federation (MEWF). I then became good friends with Axl Rotten and he helped me refine my skills. When I was growing up I always wanted to be a wrestler but when I realized I could go more places as a ref I decided that was the career for me.


JE: What is your greatest moment ever in wrestling?

JJ: Besides bringing Sid into ECW it would have to be being in the Main Event of ECW Heat Wave '98


JE: Where do you see yourself 5 years from now? Do you see yourself in the Big 2?

JJ: It's kinda hard to say, but then again five years is not that long off. You can never rule out the "BIG 2" but right now I really like working for ECW. People right now only say the "BIG 2" but really there are 3 major companies right now. Back to the question though five years from now I would like to be involved with the production end of wrestling. you know helping put tv together after it has been shot, stuff like that.


JE: Growing up, what are your fondest memories of professional wrestling?

JJ: Watching Dusty Rhodes every saturday morning on NWA World Wide Wrestling. He was and still is my all-time favorite wrestler. You look back now and say he was the shits but that man could and still can control a crowd.


JE: What are your connections to the JOBSquad?

JJ: I am good friends with Al Snow & the Meanie. I am the one who designed the two shirts (1,2,3,4-Life & The Black & Blue Crew) they wearmost on RAW.


JE: With the internet becoming a large forum for the smart marks to voice their opinions, and the hordes of fly-by-night wrestling fans flocking to the arenas; What are your feelings towards today's wrestling fans?

JJ: Today's wrestling fan is alot different from when I was a fan. More money is being spent by today's fan. I think sometimes people come down to hard on promotions and/or workers. Like the stuff the WWF is doing right now, some people think it is horrible and has no place on television. But for that one person who does not like it, there are twenty people who do. You can't please everyone, so just lighten up.


JE: Who is the future of Professional Wrestling?

JJ: I am not just saying this because I work with them but Chris Chetti, Danny Doring, Justin Credible are the future of this business


JE: Bret Hart/Vince McMahon.... work or shoot?

JJ: BIG WORK. Are you gonna have me believe that stuff. The movie was great. It will come out twenty years down the road that it was a work.


JE: When you leave the business, what do you want to be remembered for?

JJ: That I worked hard when I worked and entertained the people.

JE: Thank you for your time Mr. Judge Jeff Jones. Is there anything else you'd like to add? Any shills? ;)

JJ: Sunday Night March 21st, 1999 Asbury Park Convention Center ECW's
Living Dangerously "99 order your tickets now because last year's event sold out.


copyright Jack Epstein Productions 1999. No unauthorized reproductions if you'd like to live a nice long life. If you'd like to use this interview, please send me $500 so I can buy one of those shirts that Stevie Ray and The Rock wear.
This is an interview I conducted with ECW's Steve Corino back in April 1999.




11 Questions... The Jack Epstein interview with ECW newcomer Steve Corino....

JE: Hello Mr. Steve Corino. Just so everyone knows, you
were ranked #343 in the latest PWI 500. You've won many titles in the NWA, MEWF, and other feds in your 5 years as a pro-wrestler. You've also made a couple appearences the WWF. Not bad!

SC: I have been very fortunite over the last five years to do everything that I have accomplished. There are alot of great wrestlers out there that have been working alot longer but haven't got to do half the stuff I have.


JE: Let me first congratulate you with your recent signing with ECW. I have been pushing for them to sign you for months now. I'm glad that we're gonna be able to witness your talents now on a national level. Do you feel like you've hit the Big Time?

SC: Not yet. Until I make a big impact on Extreme Championship Wrestling I won't be able to consider myself in the big time. There have been alot of times over the last two years when I thought that I was close but stuff sometimes doesn't work out, so I am on a wait and see here in ECW.


JE: How did you decide to get into wrestling?

SC: I was a wrestling fan since I was 8 years old and it was just something I could never stop thinking about and once the opportunity come up to learn wrestling I didn't hesitate.


JE: What is your greatest moment ever in wrestling?

SC: I don't know if I can give one greatest moment because there are alot of moments that have been awesome; My first match, first title, first appearence in the WWF, going to USWA & WWC, being invited into the WWF Dojo, wrestling guys I looked up to when I was a kid. All stuff like that I wouldn't trade with anyone.


JE: Where do you see yourself 5 years from now? Do you see yourself as a regular in the Big 2?

SC: Hopefully in 5 years I will have made a big impact somewhere in the big time, preferably ECW. By that time I will only be 30 years old and will have 10 years experience so hopefully I would be in a position to help out young talent just coming into the wrestling industry.


JE: Growing up, what are your fondest memories of professional wrestling?

SC: The first match I ever saw was a match form the Philadelphia Spectrum and it was Mr. Fuji and Mr. Saito vs. Tony Garea and Rick Martel for the WWF tag belts in a 2 out 3 fall match and was just amazed at what I was watching. The next saturday I noticed on WTBS, Tommy Rich was going off about someone on Georgia Championship Wrestling and the fans were so into him I was hooked. At that time on another channel we were getting Southwest Wrestling and that's where I noticed Tully Blanchard and said to my mom and dad-That's what I want to be.


JE: I remember first seeing you on WWF TV about 2 years ago. I remember either Brian Pillman or Steve Austin attacking you (you were a plant in the audience). Am I just imagining that, or did it really happen? If it did, what was it like?

SC: About 2 1/2 years ago, Tom Brandi took me up to the WWF TV tapings because he was debuting the "Sal Sincere" gimmack and sometimes they will let you work with someone you really feel comfortable with while feeling out the new character, so I wrestled him in a dark match at the RAW taping and then the next night I was just walking by Crush, Tracey Smothers, and Jake Roberts (who was the road agent at the time) and the came up with the fan in crowd thing and it went well enough for them to call me back to do TV again.


JE: With the internet becoming a large forum for the smart marks to voice their opinions, and the hordes of fly-by-night wrestling fans flocking to the arenas; What are your feelings towards today's wrestling fans?

SC: It all depends. I don't mind the fans that read the internet or the kayfabe sheets but still come to a arena and respect what we as professional wrestlers and professional entertainers do. I respect this business so much and it really is dishearting to see fans come out and think that they could do everything we do and better. But for the most part fans are a great way to determine if I am going to keep using a new move or a way I try to piss them off.


JE: Besides you, who is the future of Professional Wrestling?

SC: Two guys that I feel are going to be the future of this industry are Lance Diamond and Chris Daniels. They have so much to offer a big promotion. Nova, Chris Chetti, and Danny Doring are going to have awesome futures. I think Reckless Youth will make a impact somewhere and underated guys like Twiggy Ramirez, Harley Lewis, and J.R. Ryder would be a great addition to ECW.


JE: Bret Hart/Vince McMahon.... work or shoot?

SC: Ha Ha. To be honest I thought it was a work from the get go until I was up at the WWF Dojo and Andrew Martin (Test) and Glen Kulka told us the whole story and I was convinced it was a shoot.


JE: When you leave the business, what do you want to be remembered for?

SC: All I want to be known for is a guy that loved and respect the professional wrestling business and never regreted being a professional wrestler at all.


JE: Thank you for your time Mr. Steve Corino. Is there anything else you'd like to add? Any shills? ;)

SC: I have a brand new website opening. The URL is: http://www.stevecorino.com Drop me a line with your thoughts.
Thank you for the interview.


copyright Jack Epstein Productions 1999. No unauthorized reproductions if you'd like to live a nice long life. If you'd like to use this interview, please send me $500 so I can buy one of those shirts that Stevie and The Rock wear. In addition, I would like a bottle of WWF Attitude cologne. The chicks dig it!

11 Questions... The Jack Epstein interview with WCW newcomer Lash LeRoux

JE: Hello Mr. Lash LeRoux. Just so everyone knows, you are currently working for WCW. You are a graduate of the WCW Power Plant, and recently got a Cruiserweight Title Shot on Nitro against Billy Kidman. Lets see if this interview can give you the proper push you deserve!

LL: Allo, and thank you very much, Jack. I have no doubt that I'll get exactly what I deserve.


JE: Congrats for finally making it to the big time. Wrestling on national televison must have been an incredible experience. How did it feel to work a match in front of thousands of fans in the arena with millions more watching at home?

LL: Honestly, it felt very natural. I have always enjoyed being atheletic, obnoxious, and competitive...so, I fit right in.


JE: How did you decide to get into wrestling?

LL: Actually, I was a freelance artist. I was sitting at home, drawing comics and watching Nitro. I saw the promo for the Power Plant and thought: "Hey, I was a fairly impressive amateur wrestler. I think I can do this thing." Boy, did I underestimate the Power Plant. It was the toughest thing I have ever accomplished.


JE: Suppose WCW gives you full control of your character... What gimmick would you like to portray? Can you do the Big Wiggle?

LL: The Lash LeRoux thing is totally me. My family is Cajun. I'm Cajun. Any "gimmick" you see me do on TV, I came up with. From the T-shirt design to the double L sideburns, all of it was my idea. I am Lash LeRoux both personally and professionally. Any other "gimmick" wouldn't feel natural.


JE: Where do you see yourself 5 years from now? Do you see yourself as a 'the next big thing'?

LL: As far as being "the next big thing", your Hogans and Goldbergs don't happen everyday. They are immensely talented. Although, I think that I have the work ethic and enough talent to make it to the top. If not in five years, I will eventually. I am where I am because hard work does pay off and there is no substitute for it. Look at Diamond Dallas Page.


JE: Growing up, what are your fondest memories of professional wrestling?

LL: By far, my favorite memory is the whole feud between Hogan and Andre which peaked at Wrestlemania III. I also was a fan of the original 4 Horsemen, the Midnight Express, Ted Dibiase, and all of the Armstrongs including Bob.

JE: Whats the thing that most people don't know about you? Any secrets? And why are you wasting your time posting to RSPW? The newsgroup is frowned upon by most workers in the biz.

LL: I am actually quite an artist, which surprises most people. I don't consider posting to RSPW a waste of time. Whether you like certain fans or not, they are still fans. They are the ones who buy the tickets which ultimately allows me to do what I do. That's a big deal. So, what they like and don't like dictates what I do to some degree. Posting to RSPW keeps me abreast of what the fans like to see.


JE: With the internet becoming a large forum for the smart marks to voice their opinions, and the hordes of fly-by-night wrestling fans flocking to the arenas; What are your feelings towards today's wrestling fans?

LL: Well, it definitely takes more to impress fans these days. The average fan frowns when he sees any kind of a hold applied in the ring. Fans want to see action. So a wrestler is constantly trying to outdo himself. It is more physical than ever, and the chance of injuries are far greater. But you always have to give the fans what they want to see.


JE: Besides you, who is the future of Professional Wrestling?

LL: For the next ten years? Definitely Kidman, Jericho, Saturn, Booker T, Rey Mysterio, Jr, Juvi, Disco, Raven, Wrath, Kanyon, and many others whom I am just failing to think of now. We have a lot of talented people in this industry; which is making it more and more competive everyday.


JE: Bret Hart/Vince McMahon.... work or shoot?

LL: I honestly have no idea.


JE: When you leave the business, what do you want to be remembered for?

LL: Being a good wrestler. It would be dishonest for me to say that I don't want the fame and fortune that can come with being a pro wrestler. Of course, that's a big reason for being in the business. But, when it is all said and done, and everyone is looking back on my career, I want them to say I was a great wrestler. I want Lash LeRoux to be mentioned in the same context as Ric Flair, Dusty Rhodes, Arn Anderson, Harley Race, Ted Dibiase, Bobby Eaton, Brad Armstrong, Sgt Buddy Lee Parker, to name a few. They are legends. They were / are great wrestlers and that is what I want to be remembered as.


JE: Thank you for your time Mr. Lash Leroux. Is there anything else you'd like to add? Any shills? ;)

LL: Keep watching for Lash LeRoux. I have a feeling that I will continue to impress a lot of people in the future. In the meantime, Laissez les bon temps roulet! Let the good times roll!!


11 Questions... The Jack Epstein interview with indy standout Otto Schwanz,
(now wrestling in the WWF as one of the Dupp Brothers)

JE: Hello Mr. Otto Scwanz. Just so that everyone knows;
you're a former football player who attended Georgetown
University. You're in your sophmore year. You have won
various indy titles in the North Carolina area, and
you were ranked #447 in the PWI 500.

OS: You are partially correct. I was the greatest Offensive Line
Man ever in the schools history. Just saying I played there is not
enough.



JE: So explain your German "uber-heel" gimmick. How did you
come up with this one?

OS: Gimmick. That is what you think, wait til you get to know me.
But the name Otto Schwanz was given to me by Cueball Carmichael,
who brought me in the business.



JE: How did you decide to get into wrestling?

OS: Growing up in a Trailer park in the old NWA Mid Atlantic
region of Germany made me an automatic fan I guess, and I did not wanna
be watching in five years and wonder what if.



JE: You're listed as 6'4", 287 lbs... Why didn't you
play football professionally?

OS: I think the real reason, was that I lost the disire. All passion
for the game was gone. However, I think it was a real tribute to my
athletic abilities that pro scouts were showing up on a weekly basis to
meet me.



JE: Where do you see yourself 5 years from now? Do you
see yourself as a 'the next big thing'?

OS: Since I have the biggest thing, I hope that might make me the
biggest thing.



JE: Growing up, what are your fondest memories of professional
wrestling?

OS: The Mulkeys win over the Gladiators, that was the culmination of
paying your dues in wrestling. I think close seconds were the debut of
the Ding Dongs, and the fact that PN News was in the fed at the same
time, and Baby Doll, what were in those pictures of the Dream.



JE: Are you happy performing down in the Carolinas,
or do you wanna take over the east coast (tri-state area) indies?

OS: I would love to come up and get a chance to wrestle some of the guys
up North. Take over their feds. i doubt it, the whole pupose in coming
up there would be to get experience and learn some new things. Winning
and losing don't matter in comparison.



JE: With the internet becoming a large forum for the smart marks to
voice their opinions, and the hordes of fly-by-night wrestling fans
flocking to the arenas; What are your feelings towards today's wrestling
fans?

OS: First off I think that internet smart marks are mostly located in
the North East. Maybe that is why you ask me if that is where I wanna
be. The Majority of the shows I do, are still the NWA traditional
audience that I grew up on, with the exception of the Berkeley Cafe. I
think that as an independent wrestler, some times you need to remember
where you are. One thing that gets me, is when wrestlers wanna act like
their audience is smart. I don't think I get a lot of smart marks down
here. Very few. I really don't care if you are a smart mark, just if you
show up to be a fan. The Berkeley is the only time where I am aware
that there is a smarter audience. I guess I treat them smarter but they are
still marks, the term smart mark is an oxymoron.



JE: Besides you, who is the future of Professional Wrestling?

OS: Joey Matthews claims he is the future. SO I guess him. I would
say next to us, if the Warlord makes a come back, then him.



JE: Bret Hart/Vince McMahon.... work or shoot?

OS: It looked like a documentary, all shoot, I was workering and did
not see it.



JE: When you leave the business, what do you want to be remembered for?

OS: For being absulutely NUTS.


JE: Thank you for your time Mr. Otto Schwanz. Is there anything
else you'd like to add? Any shills? ;)

OS: Nothing really, there is nothing wrong with all you people
worshipping pro wrestling. I only wish that the rest of the world
looked to pro wrestling to solve there promblems. Thank you
for the interview.

http://www.itscwrestling.com/baron.htm


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