Here's part of "The Secret Guide to Computers," copyright by Russ Walter, 30th edition. For newer info, read the 33rd edition at www.SecretFun.com.

Microsoft Word 2007

Of all the word-processing programs ever invented, the fanciest and most popular is Microsoft Word.

This chapter explains its newest version, Microsoft Word 2007 (which is also called Microsoft Word 12). The next chapter explains older versions (such as Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003). If you’re stuck using an older version, skip to the next chapter, called “Microsoft Word classics”.

 

Preparation

Microsoft Word 2007 is intended to be used with Windows Vista (which was invented at the same time), though it will run even on computers that have just Windows XP (which is outdated).

To run Microsoft Word 2007 well, you need Windows Vista and at least 1G of RAM. This chapter assumes you have that.

(Microsoft Word 2007’s minimum requirements, to run at all, are “Windows XP or Vista” and “at least 256K of RAM.” If you have just that minimum, you won’t be happy, since of the commands in this chapter won’t work well.)

Before reading this chapter, read and practice my Windows chapter, especially the section about “WordPad”, which is a stripped-down simplified version of Microsoft Word.

When you buy Microsoft Word 2007, it comes on a DVD disk, which you (or your computer store) must copy to your hard disk.

For example, if you got Microsoft Word 2007 as part of Microsoft Office 2007, here’s how to copy Microsoft Office 2007 to your hard disk:

Turn on the computer without any floppy or CD-ROM or DVD disks in the drives, so the computer runs Windows Vista and the computer’s bottom-left corner shows the Start button.

Into the DVD drive, put the Microsoft Office disk (which is a DVD).

If the computer says “AutoPlay”, click “Run SETUP.EXE”. If the computer says “A program needs your permission to continue”, click the Continue button.

The disk came in a rectangular jacket whose backside sports a “Product Key” code, which contains 25 letters and digits (separated by dashes). Type the 25 letters and digits; automatically, the computer will capitalize the letters and insert the dashes. When you type the last letter or digit, the computer will pause before showing it on the screen; if you typed it correctly, the computer will show it with a check mark, which means you typed it correctly.

Press Enter. Click “I accept the terms of this agreement”. Press Enter twice.

The computer will say “Microsoft Office 2007 has been successfully installed.” Click the blue Close button. Remove the DVD from the drive.


Microsoft Office 2007’s fancy versions include an e-mail client called Outlook, which is too complicated. I recommend making your main (default) e-mail client be Windows Mail (which is part of Windows Vista), not Outlook. When you click “Start”, if you see —

E-mail

Microsoft Office Outlook

I recommend you change it to —

E-mail

Windows Mail

by doing this (after getting permission from any folks who share your computer):

Click “Default Programs” (which is in the Start menu’s right-hand column) then “Set your default programs” then “Windows Mail” then “Set this program as default” then “OK” then close the window (by clicking its X button).

 

Starting

To start using Microsoft Word 2007, click the Start button (at the screen’s bottom-left corner).

If you see “Microsoft Office Word 2007”, click it. (Otherwise, click “All Programs” then “Microsoft Office” then “Microsoft Office Word 2007”.)

If the computer says “Activation Wizard”, do this:

Press Enter twice. Put check marks in all 3 boxes (by clicking). Press Enter. Click “Download and install updated from Microsoft Update when available”. Press Enter. Click the Continue button.

See the Microsoft Word screen

The screen’s top says “Document1 — Microsoft Word”. You also see this tab bar:

Home   Insert   Page Layout   References   Mailings   Review   View

Type your document

Start typing your document.

Microsoft Word 2007 typically uses the keyboard the same way as WordPad. For details, read these sections on pages 82-84.:

“Use the keyboard”

“Scroll arrows”

“Insert characters”

“Split a paragraph”

“Combine paragraphs”

“Movement keys”

Here are differences.…

Enter key Microsoft Word 2007 automatically puts extra space below each paragraph; so at the end of a paragraph in Microsoft Word 2007, press the Enter key just once (never twice).


Ctrl symbols Microsoft Word understands more Ctrl symbols than WordPad. Here’s what Microsoft Word understands:

Symbol   How to type it

       ©      While pressing the Ctrl and Alt keys, type the letter “c”.

      ®      While pressing the Ctrl and Alt keys, type the letter “r”.

      ™     While pressing the Ctrl and Alt keys, type the letter “t”.

      €       While pressing the Ctrl and Alt keys, type the letter “e”.

      …     While pressing the Ctrl and Alt keys, type “.”.

      ¿        While pressing Ctrl and Alt (and Shift), type “?”.

      ¡        While pressing Ctrl and Alt (and Shift), type “!”.

      ç        While pressing Ctrl, tap the “,”  key. Then type the letter “c”.

      ¢       While pressing Ctrl, tap the “/”  key. Then type the letter “c”.

      ø       While pressing Ctrl, tap the “/”  key. Then type the letter “o”.

      ñ        While pressing Ctrl (and Shift), type “~”.    Then type “n”.

      ô       While pressing Ctrl (and Shift), type “^”.    Then type “o”.

      ü        While pressing Ctrl (and Shift), type “:”.      Then type “u”.

      å        While pressing Ctrl (and Shift), type “@”.   Then type “a”.

      æ      While pressing Ctrl (and Shift), type “&”.   Then type “a”.

      œ      While pressing Ctrl (and Shift), type “&”.   Then type “o”.

      ß       While pressing Ctrl (and Shift), type “&”.   Then type “s”.

      è        While pressing Ctrl, type the symbol `.        Then type “e”.

      é        While pressing Ctrl, type the symbol '.         Then type “e”.

      ð       While pressing Ctrl, type the symbol '.         Then type “d”.

       «        While pressing Ctrl, type the symbol `.        Then while Shifting, type “<”.

       »        While pressing Ctrl, type the symbol `.        Then while Shifting, type “>”.

Movement keys Microsoft Word differs from WordPad in this way:

Ctrl with Page Down makes the pointer move down to the next page.

Ctrl with Page Up makes the pointer move up to the previous page’s beginning.

Automatic editing

The computer will automatically edit what you type.

AutoCorrect While you type, the computer will automatically make little corrections to your typing. For example:

If you type “teh” or “hte”, the computer will change your typing to “the”.

If you type “loove”, the computer will change your typing to “love”.

If you type a day (such as “sunday”), the computer will capitalize it.

If you capitalize the first two letters of a word, the computer will make the second letter small.

The computer will capitalize each sentence’s first word.

The computer will change (r) to ®.

The computer will change (c) to © and change (tm) to ™.

The computer will change 2nd to 2nd, change 3rd to 3rd, change 4th to 4th, etc.

The computer will change 1/2 to ½, change 1/4 to ¼, and change 3/4 to ¾.

The computer will change -- to –, change --> to à, and  change <-- to ß.

The computer will change ==> to è and change <== to ç.

The computer will change :) to J and change :( to L.

If you type a phrase in quotation marks ("like this"), the quotation marks will become curly (“like this”).

If you type three periods (...), the periods will move farther apart (…).

If you type the first four letters of a month (such as “sept”) or day (such as “wedn”) and then press Enter, the computer will finish typing the word and capitalize its first letter.

If you type the current month and then press the Space bar and Enter, the computer will type the current date and year.

Some of those corrections happen immediately; others are delayed until you finish typing a word (and press the Space bar or a period).

The computer’s ability to make those corrections is called AutoCorrect.

If you dislike a correction that the computer made to your typing, here’s how to undo the correction:

Method 1: click the Undo button. (It’s a blue curved arrow pointing to the left. It’s at the screen’s top, above the word “Home”.)

Method 2: while holding down the Ctrl key, tap the Z key.

Those methods work just if done immediately, before you do any other typing or editing.

Red squiggles While you type, the computer automatically puts a red squiggle under any word that looks strange. The computer considers a word to look “strange” if the word’s not in the computer’s dictionary or if the word’s the same as the word before. For example, if you type “For a sentury, I love you you”, the computer will put a red squiggle under “sentury” and under the second “you”.

If you see a red squiggle, you misspelled the word or accidentally repeated the word or forgot to put a space between words or your vocabulary is more advanced than the computer understands. So if you see a red squiggle, look carefully at the squiggled word to make sure it’s really what you want.

If a word has a red squiggle under it, try right-clicking that word (by using the mouse’s right-hand button). Then the computer will make suggestions about what the squiggled word ought to be.

For example, if you typed “sentury” and the computer put a red squiggle under it, right-clicking the “sentury” will make the computer display two suggestions (“sentry” and “century”) and two other popular choices, so you see this list:

sentry

century

 

Ignore All

Add to Dictionary

Choose what you want:

If you meant “sentry” or “century”, click the word you meant.

If you meant “sentury” and want to add that slang word to the computer’s permanent dictionary (because the word means “a sentry who watches for a century”), click “Add to Dictionary”. Warning: before clicking “Add to Dictionary”, make sure the word “sentury” really exists and you’ve spelled it correctly and your colleagues give you permission to add slang to the dictionary!

If you meant “sentury” but don’t want to add that slang word to the dictionary, click “Ignore All”. The computer will ignore the issue about how “sentury” is spelled in this document; the computer will remove the red squiggle from every “sentury” in this document; but since “sentury” is still not in the dictionary, the computer will put red squiggles under any “sentury” in other documents.

If you’re not sure what you meant, press the keyboard’s Escape key (which says Esc on it). The list of choices will disappear; “sentury” will still be in your document and squiggled.


Green squiggles When you finish typing a sentence and start typing a new one, the computer automatically check the grammar of the sentence you just typed and puts a
green squiggle under any obvious grammar error. For example, if you type “We is” instead of “We are”, the computer will draw a green squiggle under the “is”. (The computer will draw the squiggle when you finish typing that sentence and start typing the next one.) If you accidentally press the Space bar twice instead of once, so you type “They  kiss” instead of “They kiss”, the computer will put a green squiggle under “They  kiss” (when you finish typing that sentence and start typing the next one).

If a word has a green squiggle under it, try right-clicking that word (by using the mouse’s right-hand button). Then the computer will make a suggestion about what the squiggled word ought to be.

If you agree with the computer’s suggestion, click that suggestion; the computer will fix what you wrote.

If you disagree with the computer’s suggestion, click “Ignore Once”. The computer will ignore the issue about that sentence’s grammar and remove the green squiggle from that sentence.

If you’re not sure why the computer is complaining, click “Grammar”. The computer will tell you why it’s complaining. Then double-click the computer’s suggestion, or click “Ignore Once” (to erase the green squiggle from that sentence), or click “Ignore Rule” (to erase the green squiggle from that sentence and from all similar sentences in that document), or click “Cancel” (if you’re not sure what you want).

Synonyms Suppose you’ve typed a word correctly (so it has no red or green squiggle) but wish you could think of a better word instead. Just right-click the word then click “Synonyms”. The computer will show you synonyms (words that have similar meaning).

For example, if you type the word “girl” then right-click it then click “Synonyms”, the computer will show you these words, which have similar meaning:

young woman

lass

schoolgirl

daughter

youngster

child

teenager

If one of those words appeals to you, click it: that word will replace “girl” in your document. If none of those words appeals to you, press the Escape key (which says “Esc” on it) twice.

What about the word “hot”? It has 4 meanings: “high temperature”, “miserably warm and humid weather”, “spicy food”, and “excited person”. Try typing the word “hot” then right-click it. The computer will start by showing you these synonyms:

burning

scorching

boiling

blistering

sizzling

searing

warm

It will also show you this antonym (word that has the opposite meaning):

cold (Antonym)


If one of those words appeals to you, click it. If none of those words appeals to you, try clicking “Thesaurus” (which appears under the synonym list and means “book of synonyms”): that makes the screen’s right edge show you the Research window, which shows you this longer list of “hot” synonyms and antonyms, grouped into 4 categories:

burning

burning, scorching, boiling, blistering, sizzling, searing, warm

cold (Antonym)

sweltering

sweltering, stifling, muggy, sultry, boiling, scorching, oppressive

fresh (Antonym)

spicy

peppery, piquant, fiery, strong

mild (Antonym)

passionate

fierce, vehement, emotional, strong, intense, excitable, angry, ardent, fervent, stormy

mild (Antonym)

If you click one of those words, the computer will show you synonyms of that word. If you finally find a word you like, point at it without pressing the mouse’s button, then click the word’s down-arrow then “Insert”: that makes the word replace “hot” in your document. When you no longer need the Research window, close it (by clicking its X).

Translate The computer can translate words among 15 languages: English, Spanish, French, Chinese, and others! To translate, choose one of these methods:

Method 1 This method is easy but translates just to Spanish or French, just from English, and just occasional words. Right-click anywhere in your document, then click “Translate” then either “Spanish” or “French”. Then point at any word in your document without pressing the mouse’s button: that makes computer show you how to translate that word from English to the language you requested. You see an entry from a bilingual dictionary. The entry shows you several ways to translate the word and how to translate phrases & slang expressions containing that word. To translate other words, point at them without pressing the mouse’s button. When you tire of viewing translations, turn the feature off by doing this: right-click anywhere in your document, then click “Translate” then “Turn Off Translation ScreenTip”.

Method 2 This method translates your entire document immediately to 14 languages but requires you to first connect to the Internet. While connected to the Internet and using Microsoft Word, right-click anywhere in your document then click “Translate” then “Translate…”. At the screen’s right edge, in the Research window, click the From box’s down-arrow then the language you want to translate from, such as “English”; click the To box’s down-arrow then the language you want to translate to, such as “Spanish”. (Each box gives you these choices: Arabic, Chinese from the mainland’s People’s Republic of China, Chinese from Taiwan, Dutch, English, French, German, Greek, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, and Swedish.) Afterwards, click the right-arrow below those boxes. Press Enter. At the screen’s bottom, click the orange button that says “http://www.worldli...”. You’ll see WorldLingo.com’s Webpage containing your translated document. When you finish reading it, close its window (by clicking the X at the screen’s top-right corner). When you finish using the Research window, close it also (by clicking its X).

Bottom corners

Look at the screen’s bottom corners.

Page count The screen’s bottom-left corner tells you which page of your document you’re on and how many pages are in the entire document. For example, if it says —

Page: 2 of 3

it means you’re on page 2 of a 3-page document.

Here’s how to hop to a different page:

Click the word “Page”. Type the number of the page you want to go to (and press Enter). Click the word “Close”.

Word count To the right of the page count, you see the word count. For example, if it says —

Words: 279

it means your document contains 279 words.

Here’s how to find out more about your document’s length:

Click “Words”. The computer will tell you how long your document is:

how many pages

how many words

how many characters if you don’t count blank spaces

how many characters if you do count blank spaces

how many paragraphs

how many lines

When you finish looking at those statistics, press Enter.

Zoom slider At the screen’s bottom-right corner, you see a plus sign (+). Left of it, you see a minus sign (-). Between those signs, you see the zoom slider, which is a pentagon.

Try this experiment: drag the zoom slider toward the right. Here’s how:

Put the mouse pointer on the zoom slider. Then while pressing the mouse’s main button (the left button), move the mouse toward the right.

If you drag the zoom slider toward the right, the screen’s characters enlarge, so you can read them even if you’re sitting far from the screen or have poor vision. It’s like looking at the document through a magnifying glass: the document looks enlarged, so you can see the details of each word and character more clearly; but not as many words and characters fit on the screen. Use the arrow keys to see different parts of the page.

If you drag that slider toward the left, the screen’s characters shrink, so they’re harder to read but you can fit more characters and pages onto the screen.

When you finish playing with the zoom slider, put it back to its normal position (the middle), so the number left of the minus sign is “100%”.

Page arrows Near the screen’s bottom right corner, you see this symbol:

5

5

If your document contains several pages, clicking that symbol makes the computer go back up and show you the previous page. For example, while you’re looking at page 4, clicking that symbol makes the computer show you page 3.

Under that symbol, you see this symbol:

6

6

Clicking it makes the computer show you the next page. For example, while you’re looking at page 3, clicking that symbol makes the computer show you page 4.

Page break

After you’ve finished typing a paragraph (and pressed Enter), try this experiment: while holding down the Ctrl key, press Enter again. That creates a page break: it makes the next paragraph be at the top of the next page.

If you change your mind, here’s how to remove the page break:

Click at the beginning of the paragraph you’ve put at the top of a page. Then press the Backspace key twice.

All delete

Here’s how to delete the entire document, so you can start over:

While holding down the Ctrl key, press the A key. That means “all”. All of the document turns blue.

Then press the Delete key. All of the document disappears, so you can start over!


Quick Access Toolbar

At the screen’s top-left corner, you see a circle. Next to the circle, you see a gray bar (called the Quick Access Toolbar), which contains these icons (little pictures) called buttons:

The Save button is a purple-and-white square that’s supposed to look like a floppy disk (though it also looks like a TV set).

The Undo button is an arrow curving toward the left. The arrow is blue (unless you haven’t typed anything yet).

If you point at a button (by moving your mouse’s arrow there, without clicking), the computer will tell you the button’s name.

Here’s how to use those buttons.…

Save button To save the document you’ve been typing (copy it onto the disk), click the Save button.

If you haven’t saved the document before, the computer will say “File name”. Invent a name for your document. Type the name and press Enter.

That makes the computer copy the document onto the hard disk. For example, if you named the document “mary”, the computer puts a document called mary.docx into the Documents folder. If you wish, you can prove it by doing this:

Click Start then “Documents”. If you called the document “mary”, you’ll see mary is one of the files in the Documents folder. If you right-click mary’s icon then click “Properties”, you’ll see the type of file is “.docx”. Finally, clear that proof off your screen (by clicking “OK” then the red X button).

Afterwards, if you change your mind and want to do more editing, go ahead! When you finish that extra editing, save it by clicking the Save button again.

Save often! If you’re typing a long document, click the Save button about every 10 minutes. Click it whenever you get to a good stopping place and think, “What I’ve typed so far looks good!” Then if an accident happens, you’ll lose at most 10 minutes of work, and you can return to the last version you felt good about.

Instead of clicking the Save button, you can use this shortcut: while holding down the Ctrl key, tap the S key (which stands for “Save”).

Undo button If you make a mistake (such as accidentally deleting some text or accidentally inserting some useless text), click the Undo button (which is an arrow turning back). That makes the computer undo your last activity, so your text returns to the way it looked before you made your boo-boo. (To undo your last two activities, click the Undo button twice.)

Instead of clicking the Undo button, you can use this shortcut: while holding down the Ctrl key, tap the Z key (which stands for “Zap”).

Extra buttons If you click the Undo button, the computer might undo a different activity than you expected. For example, it might even erase everything you typed!

If clicking the Undo button accidentally makes the text look even worse instead of better, and you wish you hadn’t clicked the Undo button, you can “undo the undo” by clicking the
Redo button (which is next to the Undo button and shows a blue arrow curving to the right, so it bends forward).

The Redo button appears just after you click the Undo button. At other times, you see a Repeat button instead (which is an arrow making a circle). If you click the Repeat button, the computer repeats the last thing you typed.

Instead of clicking the Redo button or Repeat button, you can use this shortcut: while holding down the Ctrl key, tap the Y key (which stands for “Yes, I do want it, very much”).

Your Quick Access Toolbar might include other buttons, too!

Office button

At the screen’s top-left corner, you see the Office button (a circle with the Microsoft Office symbol inside it). Click it. Then you see the Office menu:

New

Open

Save

Save As

Print

Prepare

Send

Publish

Close

                                                            Word Options               Exit Word

From that menu, choose whatever you wish (by clicking it). Here are the most popular choices.…

Save

If you choose Save from the Office menu (by clicking the word “Save” after clicking the Office button), you get the same result as clicking the Save button that’s on the Quick Access Toolbar.

Save As

Suppose you’ve already saved a document then edited it some more, but you’re not sure you like the new editing. Try this experiment.…

Choose Save As from the Office menu (by clicking the phrase “Save As” after clicking the Office button); when you do that, make sure you click the phrase “Save As”, not just the arrow next to it.

Then invent (and type) a new name for the document. At the end of the new name, press Enter.

The computer will copy the new, edited version of the document onto the hard disk. That new, edited version will have the new name you invented.

The old original version of the document will be on the disk also and keep its old original name. The disk will contain both versions of the document.

Print

Here’s how to print the document onto paper. Make sure you’ve bought a printer, attached it to the computer, turned the printer’s power on, and put paper into the printer. Then choose Print from the Office menu (by clicking the word “Print” after clicking the Office button); when you do that, make sure you click the word “Print”, not just the arrow next to it.

The computer assumes you want to print just 1 copy of the document. If you want to print several copies, type the number of copies you want.

Press Enter. The computer will print the document onto paper.


How to finish

When you finish working on a document, choose Exit Word or Close from the Office menu.

Exit Word If you choose Exit Word, the computer will stop using Microsoft Word.

Close If you choose Close instead of Exit Word, the computer will let you work on another document, and your next step is to say “new document” or “old document”. Here’s how.…

If you want to start typing a new document, choose New from the Office menu then press Enter.

If you want to use an old document, click the Office button, so you see the Office menu. To the right of the Office menu, you see a list of the 17 documents you used most recently: that list starts with the most recent. Click whichever document you want to use. If you want to use a different document, which is not on that list of 17, do this:

Choose Open from the Office menu (by clicking Open).

The computer starts showing you a list of all documents in the Documents folder (unless you’ve requested a different folder instead). To see the rest of the list, either “click in that list then rotate the mouse’s wheel toward you” or “repeatedly click the down-arrow that’s to the right of that list”.

If you want to use one of those documents, double-click the document’s name; the computer will put that document onto the screen and let you edit it. If instead you want to delete one of those documents, click the document’s name then press the Delete key then the Enter key; the computer will move that document to the Recycle Bin.

Didn’t save? If you didn’t save your document before doing those “how to finish” procedures, the computer asks, “Do you want to save?” If you click “Yes”, the computer copies your document’s most recent version to the hard disk; if you click “No” instead, the computer ignores and forgets your most recent editing.

How to erase the recently-used list To the right of the Office menu, you normally see a list of the 17 documents you used most recently. That list might annoy you, for two reasons:

One of the documents might be embarrassing (perhaps because it’s pornographic or a private letter), and you want to hide it from your colleagues and family.

Even after you’ve deleted a document, that document’s name might still be on that list.

If the document list annoys you, delete documents from it, as follows.…

The recently-used list shows just the names of the last 17 Microsoft Word documents you mentioned. Go use other Microsoft Word documents; they’ll go onto recently-used list and bump off the older documents.

Another way to get a document off the recently-used list is to erase that entire list from the Office menu. Here’s how. Choose Word Options from the Office menu then click “Advanced”. Scroll down to the “Display” category. Double-click in the box labeled “Show this number of Recent Documents”, type a zero, and press Enter. That erases the entire recently-used list from the Office menu. Afterward, let the computer create a new recently-used document list in the Office menu, as follows: choose Word Options again from the Office menu, click “Advanced”, scroll down to the “Display” category, double-click in the box labeled “Show this number of Recent Documents”, type 17, and press Enter.

 

 

 

Font group

To make sure your computer is acting normally, click the word “Home” (which is near the screen’s top-left corner).

Then you see these 5 words: Clipboard, Font, Paragraph, Styles, Editing. Above each word, you see a group of icons. I’ll explain how to use each group. Let’s start with the Font group, which looks like this:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Underline

Here’s how to underline a phrase (like this).

Activate the Underline button (which says U on it) by clicking it. Activating the button makes the button turn orange. Then type the phrase you want underlined. Then deactivate the Underline button (by clicking it again).

Go ahead: try it now! Practice using the underline button before you progress to more advanced buttons!

Shortcut Instead of clicking the Underline button, you can use this shortcut: while holding down the Ctrl key, tap the U key.

Fancy underlines The computer assumes you want each underline to be a simple horizontal line. If you want the underline to be fancier (such as a double underline, a thick underline, a dotted underline, a dashed underline, or a wavy underline), do this instead of clicking the Underline button: click the Underline button’s down-arrow then the kind of underline you want. The computer will remember which kind of underline is your favorite and automatically choose that kind for all future underlines — until you tell the computer otherwise or exit from Microsoft Word.

Bold

Here’s how to make a phrase be bold (like this). Activate the Bold button (which says B on it) by clicking it. Then type the phrase you want emboldened. Then deactivate the Bold button (by clicking it again).

Here’s how to make a phrase be bold and underlined (like this). Activate the Bold and Underline buttons (by clicking them both). Then type the phrase. Then deactivate those buttons (by clicking them again).

Instead of clicking the Bold button, you can use this shortcut: while holding down the Ctrl key, tap the B key.

Italic

Here’s how to italicize a phrase (like this). Activate the Italic button (which says I on it) by clicking it. Then type the phrase you want italicized. Then deactivate the Italic button (by clicking it again).

Instead of clicking the Italic button, you can use this shortcut: while holding down the Ctrl key, tap the I key.

Superscript

Here’s how to make a phrase be tiny and raised (like this). Activate the Superscript button (which says x2 on it) by clicking it. Then type the phrase you want superscripted. Then deactivate the Superscript button (by clicking it again).

The superscript button helps you type math formulas, such as the Pythagorean Theorem (a2 + b2 = c2).

Subscript

Here’s how to make a phrase be tiny and lowered (like this). Activate the Subscript button (which says x2 on it) by clicking it. Then type the phrase you want subscripted. Then deactivate the Superscript button (by clicking it again).

The subscript button helps you type math formulas, such as the Fibonacci Series (Fn+2 = Fn + Fn+1) and the Slope Formula: m = (y2 - y1) / (x2 - x1).

Strikethrough

Here’s how to make a phrase be crossed out (like this). Activate the Strikethrough button (which says abc on it) by clicking it. Then type the phrase you want crossed out. Then deactivate the Strikethrough button (by clicking it again).

The Strikethrough button helps you type semi-censored sentences, such as “You’re an asshole showing little sympathy for the team’s needs.”

Font size

Look at the Font Size box (which has a number in it). Usually that box contains the number 11, so you’re typing characters that are 11 points high.

Here’s how to type characters that are bigger or smaller.…

Method 1: click the Font Size box. In that box, type a size number from 8 to 72. The number can end in .5; the number can be 8 or 8.5 or 9 or 9.5 or 10 or bigger. (Theoretically, you can pick a number even smaller than 8 or even bigger than 72, but those extreme numbers create ugly results.) When you finish typing the number, press the Enter key.

Method 2: click the down-arrow that’s to the right of the Font Size box. You see this list of popular sizes: 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 14, 16, 18, 20, 22, 24, 26, 28, 36, 48, and 72. That list of popular sizes is called the Font Size menu. Click the size you want.

Method 3: click the Grow Font button (which says A5 on it). That makes the font be slightly bigger (the next popular size). To make the font grow even bigger than that, click the Grow Font button again.

Method 4: click the Shrink Font button (which says A6 on it). That makes the font be slightly smaller (the next popular size down). To make the font shrink even smaller than that, click the Shrink Font button again.

Any new characters you type afterwards will be the size you chose. (Characters typed earlier don’t change size.)

The popular sizes look like this:

This text is 8 points high, 9 points high, 10 points high, 11 points high, 12 points, 14 points, 16 points, 18 points, 20 points, 22 points, 24 points, 28 points, 36 points, 48pt., 72pt.


When you finish typing the enlarged or reduced characters, here’s how to return to typing characters that are normal size (11 points high): click the down-arrow that’s to the right of the Font Size box, then click 11.

Font

You see a box saying “Calibri”. That’s called the Font box.

Next to that box is the symbol 6. Click it.

You’ll start seeing the Font menu, which is a list of fonts in alphabetical order. (To see the rest of the list, press the down-arrow key or rotate the mouse’s wheel toward you.)

Click whichever font you want. Though Microsoft likes the font called “Calibri”, the best fonts are “Times New Roman”, “Tahoma”, “Comic Sans MS”, and “Courier New”. Here’s how they look:

This font is called “Times New Roman”. It’s the best for typing long passages of text, such as paragraphs in books, newspapers, magazines, and reports. It squeezes lots of words onto a small amount of paper but remains easy to read. You can make it plain or bold or italic or bold italic.

 

If you make it big & bold, like this, it imitates an old-fashioned news headline.

 

This font is called “Tahoma”. It’s simple. It resembles Calibri and Arial but has several advantages, such as a better capital “I”. You can make it plain or bold or italic or bold italic. It’s best for typing short phrases that attract attention. For example…

 

If you make it big & bold, like this, it’s good for titles, signs, and posters.

 

If you make it small, like this, it’s good for footnotes, photo captions, classified ads, telephone books, directories, and catalogs.

 

This font is called “Comic Sans MS”. It resembles Tahoma but looks hand-drawn, like the words in a funny comic book. You can make it plain or bold or italic or bold italic. It’s best for typing short phrases that draw attention and giggles. For example…

 

If you make it big & bold, like this, it’s good for funny titles, signs, and posters.

 

This font is called “Courier New”.

 

If you make it 12 points high, like this, it resembles the printout from a typewriter.

 

It makes each character have the same width: for example, the “m” has the same width as the “i”. It’s a good font for typing tables of numbers, since the uniform width lets you line up each column of numbers easily.

 

Choose plain, bold, italic, or bold italic.

To avoid hassles, choose a font that has “TT” in front of it. The “TT” means it’s a TrueType font (or OpenType font). For example, “Times New Roman”, “Tahoma”, “Comic Sans MS”, and “Courier New” are all TT OpenType fonts.

After you’ve clicked a font, any new characters you type will be in that font. (The characters you typed earlier remain unaffected.)

When you finish typing in that font, here’s how you can return to typing characters in the Calibri font: click the Font box’s down-arrow then click “Calibri”.

Font Color

Normally, the characters you type are black. Here’s how to make them a different color, such as red.

Look at the Font Color button, which has an underlined A on it. Notice the color of the A’s underline. If it’s the color you want, click the underline. If it’s not the color you want, do this instead:

Click the down-arrow that’s to the right of the A’s underline. You see 70 colors.

If you like one of those colors, click it.

If you don’t like any of those colors, click “More Colors” then “Standard”, which shows you 142 colors: double-click your favorite.

Afterwards, whatever characters you type will be in the color you chose. (The characters you typed earlier remain unaffected.)

When you finish typing in that color, here’s how to return to typing characters that are normal (black): click the down-arrow that’s to the right of the A’s underline, then click “Automatic” (which means “normal”).


Select text

Here’s how to dramatically change a phrase you typed.

Point at the phrase’s beginning, then drag to the phrase’s end (while holding down the mouse’s left button). The whole phrase turns blue. Turning the phrase blue is called selecting the phrase.

Then say what to do to the phrase. For example, choose one of these activities:

To underline the phrase, activate the Underline button (by clicking it).

To make the phrase be bold, activate the Bold button (by clicking it).

To italicize the phrase, activate the Italic button (by clicking it).

To make the phrase be tiny and raised, activate the Superscript button (by clicking it).

To make the phrase be tiny and lowered, activate the Subscript button (by clicking it).

To make the phrase look crossed out, activate the Strikethrough button (by clicking it).

To prevent the phrase from being underlined, bold, italicized, superscripted, subscripted, or crossed out, deactivate those buttons (by clicking them again).

To change the phrase’s point size, choose the size you want from the Font Size menu.

To change the phrase’s font, choose the font you want from the Font menu.

To make the phrase’s characters be colored (instead of black), click the Font Color button’s down-arrow then your favorite color.

To make the phrase’s background be colored (such as yellow) as if you had a highlighting pen, find the Text Highlight Color button (which is in the Font group and shows “ab” with a highlighting pen): click that button’s down-arrow then your favorite color.

To change how the phrase is capitalized, click the Change Case button (which is in the Font group and shows “Aa6”) then click “UPPERCASE” (which capitalizes all letters) or “Capitalize Each Word” (which capitalizes just the first letter of each word) or “Sentence case” (which capitalizes just the first letter of each sentence) or “lowercase” (which uncapitalizes all letters) or “tOGGLE cCASE” (which capitalizes what was uncapitalized and uncapitalizes what was capitalized).

To cancel all the formatting you did to the phrase (so the phrase returns to being plain, unformatted 11-point Calibri), click the Clear Formatting button (which is in the Font group and shows “Aa” with an eraser).

To delete the phrase, press the Delete key.

To replace the phrase, just type whatever words you want the phrase to become.

Go ahead! Try it now! It’s fun!

Other ways to select

The usual way to select a phrase is to point at the phrase’s beginning, then drag to the phrase’s end. But sometimes other methods are faster!

To select a phrase, choose one of these methods.…

Method   1:  point at the phrase’s beginning, then drag to the phrase’s end.

Method   2:  click the phrase’s beginning; then while holding down the Shift key, click the phrase’s end.

Method   3:  by using your keyboard’s movement keys

                    (such as up-arrow, down-arrow, left-arrow, and right-arrow), move to the phrase’s beginning;

                    then while holding down the Shift key, use the movement keys to move to the phrase’s end.

Method   4:  to select just one sentence, click in its middle while holding down the Ctrl key.

Method   5:  to select just one line, click in its left margin.

Method   6:  to select several lines, click in the first line’s left margin;

                    then while holding down the Shift key, click in the bottom line’s left margin.

Method   7:  to select just one word, double-click in its middle.

Method   8:  to select just one paragraph, triple-click in its middle (or double-click in its left margin).

Method   9:  to select several paragraphs, triple-click in the first paragraph’s middle;

                    then while holding down the Shift key, click in the last paragraph’s middle.

Method 10:  to select the entire document (all!), tap the A key while holding down the Ctrl key.

To select several phrases at once, do this procedure:

Drag across the first phrase. While holding down the Ctrl key, drag across the second phrase. While holding down the Ctrl key, drag across any extra phrases you wish to manipulate.

Then tell the computer what to do to all those phrases. For example, if you want to underline them all, click the Underline button.


Document vanishes

While you’re typing a document, if the whole document suddenly disappears, you accidentally deleted it. Here’s why:

You tried to type a capital A, but instead of pressing the Shift key you accidentally pressed the Ctrl key. “Ctrl with A” tells the computer to “select the whole document”, so the whole document becomes highlighted. The next character you type replaces the highlighted text, so the highlighted text is all lost.

Cure:

Immediately say “undo” (by clicking the Undo button or pressing Ctrl with Z). That undoes your last action. Say “undo” several times, until you’ve undone enough of your actions to undo the calamity.

Drag a phrase

To move a phrase to a new location, just “select the phrase, and then drag from the phrase’s middle to the new location.” Here are the details.…

First, select the phrase you want to move, so the phrase turns blue.

Then take your finger off the mouse’s button. Move the mouse’s pointer to the phrase’s middle (so you see an arrow).

Finally, hold down the mouse’s button (which makes a vertical dotted line appear at the arrow); and while you keep holding down the mouse’s button, drag that line to wherever you want the phrase to move. (Drag the line anywhere you wish in the document, or drag to the document’s end. The computer won’t let you drag past the document’s end.)

When you finish dragging, lift your finger from the mouse’s button. Presto, the phrase moves where you wished!

 


Clipboard group

The Clipboard group looks like this:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Cut and Paste

Here’s another way to move a phrase to a new location.

Select the phrase (by dragging across it with the mouse, so the phrase turns blue). Click the Cut button (which looks like a pair of scissors). The phrase will vanish from its original location.

Click the new location where you want the phrase to reappear. Then click the Paste button’s picture of a clipboard (not the word “Paste”). The phrase will appear at that new location.

Ctrl key Here are shortcuts:

Instead of clicking the Cut      button,

you can press Ctrl with X    (which means “X it out”).

Instead of clicking the Paste  button,

you can press Ctrl with V    (which stands for “Velcro”).

Copy

Here’s another way to copy a phrase, so the phrase appears in your document twice.

Select the phrase (by dragging across it with the mouse, so the phrase turns blue). Click the Copy button (which looks like a pair of dog-eared pages). Click where you want the copy of the phrase to appear, and click the Paste button’s clipboard. The copy will appear at the new location, so the phrase will be in your document twice.

If you want the phrase to appear in your document a third time, click where you want that additional copy to appear, then click the Paste button’s clipboard again. If you want the phrase to appear in your document a fourth time, click where you want that additional copy, then click the Paste button’s clipboard again.

Here’s a shortcut: instead of clicking the Copy button, you can press Ctrl with C.

Format Painter

Suppose one part of your document looks pretty, and one part looks ugly. Here’s how to make the ugly part look as pretty as the pretty part:

Drag across the pretty part, so you’ve selected it and it’s turned blue. Click the Format Painter button (which is a paintbrush).

Then drag across the ugly part. The computer will make the ugly part look as pretty as the pretty part. For example, the ugly part will have the same font and font size as the pretty part; it will be underlined, boldfaced, and italicized the same way as the pretty part.

If you do the procedure incorrectly and wish you hadn’t pressed the Format Painter button, just click the Undo button, which makes the document return to its previous appearance.

If one part of your document looks pretty, here’s how to make several other parts look as pretty:

Drag across the pretty part, so you’ve selected it and it’s turned blue. Double-click the Format Painter button.

Drag across the first ugly part; the computer will make it look pretty. Then drag across the second ugly part; the computer will make it look pretty. Drag across each additional ugly part; the computer will make each look pretty.

When all the ugly parts have turned pretty, deactivate the Format Painter button (by clicking it again or pressing the Esc key).

Paragraph group

The Paragraph group looks like this:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Alignment buttons

While typing a line, you can click one of these alignment buttons:

 

 

 


   Align    Center     Align   Justify

   Text                       Text

   Left                      Right

Clicking the Center button makes the line be centered,

like this line

Clicking the Align Text Right button makes the line be at the right margin,

like this line

Clicking the Align Text Left button makes the line be at the left margin,

like this line

Clicking one of those buttons affects not just the line you’re typing but also all other lines in the same paragraph.

Clicking the Justify button makes the paragraph be justified, so the paragraph’s bottom line is at the left margin, and each of the paragraph’s other lines is at both margins (by inserting extra space between the words),

like                                    this                                    line

When you click one of those alignment buttons, you’re activating it. That button deactivates when you click a different alignment button instead.

When you start typing a new document, the computer assumes you want the document to be aligned left, so the computer activates the Align Left button. If you want a different alignment, click a different alignment button instead.

Examples:

If you’re typing a title or headline and want it to be centered, click the Center button.

If you’re typing a business letter and want it to begin by showing the date next to the right margin, click the Align Text Right button.

If you’re typing an informal memo or letter to a colleague or friend, and want the paragraph to look plain, ordinary, modest, and unassuming (like Clark Kent), click the Align Text Left button.

If you’re creating something formal (such as a newspaper or textbook) and want the paragraph to have perfectly straight edges (so it looks official, uptight, and professional, like Robocop), click the Justify button.


Clicking one of those alignment buttons affects the entire paragraph you’re typing, but the paragraphs you typed earlier remain unaffected, unless you do this:

To change the alignment of a paragraph you typed earlier, click in that paragraph’s middle then click the alignment button you wish.

When you start typing a new paragraph, the computer gives that paragraph the same alignment as the paragraph above, unless you say differently (by clicking one of the alignment buttons).

Centered title Here’s how to type a centered title, using the techniques you’ve learned so far.…

Press the Enter key twice (to leave a big blank space above the title).

Next, click the Center button (so the title will be centered) and the Bold button (so the title will be bold). Type the words you want to be in the title and press the Enter key afterwards.

Congratulations! You’ve created a centered title!

Next, make the paragraph underneath the title be normal: make that paragraph be uncentered (click the Align Text Left button or Justify button) and make it be unbolded (deactivate the Bold button, by clicking it).

Shortcuts Here are shortcuts:

Instead of clicking the Justify                  button, you can press Ctrl with J.

Instead of clicking the Align Text Left    button, you can press Ctrl with L.

Instead of clicking the Align Text Right  button, you can press Ctrl with R.

Instead of clicking the Center                 button, you can press Ctrl with E

                                                                (which stands for “Equidistant”).

Line Spacing

While typing a paragraph, you can click the Line Spacing button (which has an up-arrow and down-arrow on it), which makes this menu appear:

1.0

1.15

1.5

2.0

2.5

3.0

Line Spacing Options

Add Space Before Paragraph

Remove Space After Paragraph

Clicking “2.0” makes the paragraph be double-spaced (so there’s a blank line under each line). Clicking “3.0” makes the paragraph be triple-spaced (so there are two blank lines under each line). Clicking “1.0” makes the paragraph be single-spaced (without extra space under the lines). Clicking “1.15” makes the paragraph have a little extra space between each pair of lines; that’s what the computer assumes you want if you don’t say otherwise.

The computer assumes you want a 10-point-high blank space under the paragraph, to separate that paragraph from the paragraph below. If you don’t want that space, click “Remove Space After Paragraph”.

If you click “Add Space Before Paragraph”, the computer will add a 12-point-high blank space above the paragraph, to separate that paragraph from the paragraph above.

Indentation buttons

Before typing a paragraph, you can press the Tab key. That makes the computer indent the paragraph’s first line, half an inch.

If you want to indent all lines in the paragraph, do this instead of pressing the Tab key: while typing the paragraph, click the Increase Indent button (which shows a right-arrow pointing at lines). That makes the computer indent all lines in the paragraph. (The paragraphs you typed earlier remain unaffected.)

When you start typing a new paragraph, the computer indents that paragraph if the paragraph above it was indented.

If you indented a paragraph by clicking the Increase Indent button but then change your mind, here’s how to unindent the paragraph: click in the paragraph, then click the Decrease Indent button (which shows a left-arrow pointing from lines).

Example Suppose you start typing a new document. Here’s how to make just paragraphs 3, 4, and 5 be indented.

Type paragraphs 1 and 2 normally (without pressing the Increase Indent button).

When you start typing paragraph 3, press the Increase Indent button. That makes the computer start indenting, so paragraphs 3, 4, and 5 will be automatically indented.

When you start typing paragraph 6, here’s how to prevent the computer from indenting it: click the Decrease Indent button at the beginning of paragraph 6.

Changing your mind To indent a paragraph you typed earlier, click in the middle of that paragraph and then click the Increase Indent button. To unindent a paragraph you typed earlier, click in its middle and then click the Decrease Indent button.

Extra indentation If you click the Increase Indent button twice instead of just once, the computer will indent the paragraph farther. After typing that doubly indented paragraph, if you want the paragraph below to be unindented you must click the Decrease Indent button twice.

Each time you click the Increase Indent button, the computer indents the paragraph a half inch farther. Each time you click the Decrease Indent button, the computer indents the paragraph a half inch less.

Bullets Here’s a different way to indent an entire paragraph: while typing the paragraph, activate the Bullets button (which is the first button in the Paragraph group) by clicking it. That makes the computer indent the paragraph and also put a bullet (the symbol ·) to the left of the paragraph’s first line. That’s called a bulleted paragraph. The bullet symbol is indented a quarter inch; the paragraph’s words are indented a half inch.

After you’ve typed a bulleted paragraph, any new paragraphs you type underneath will be bulleted also — until you request an unbulleted paragraph (by deactivating the Bullets button).

Numbering Here’s another way to indent an entire paragraph: while typing the paragraph, activate the
Numbering button (which has 1 and 2 and 3 on it) by clicking it. That makes the computer indent the paragraph and put “1.” to the left of the paragraph’s first line. That’s called a
numbered paragraph. The number is indented a quarter inch; the paragraph’s words are indented a half in.

When you type a new paragraph underneath, that paragraph will be numbered “2.”, the next paragraph will be numbered “3.”, etc. Any new paragraphs you type underneath will be numbered also — until you request an unnumbered paragraph (by deactivating the Numbering button).

Shading

Here’s how to make a whole paragraph’s background be colored (instead of white).

Click in the paragraph. Click the down-arrow of the
Shading button (which looks like a paint bucket). Click one of the 70 colors (or click “More Colors” then “Standard” then double-click your favorite of the 142 colors).

Show/Hide ¶

The symbol for “Paragraph” is ¶, which looks like a backwards P.

One of the buttons has a ¶ on it. Microsoft calls it the Show/Hide ¶ button, but most folks call it just the ¶ button.

If you activate that button (by clicking it), the screen will show a ¶ symbol at the end of each paragraph, so you can easily tell where each paragraph ends. The screen will also show a dot (·) wherever you pressed the Space bar and show a right-arrow (ž) wherever you pressed the Tab key, so you easily tell how many times you pressed those keys.

For example, if you typed “I love you” correctly, the screen will show “I·love·you”. If you see “I·love···you” instead, you know you accidentally pressed the Space bar three times after “love” instead of just once, so you should delete the two extra spaces (by moving there then pressing the Delete key twice).

When you finish examining the ¶ symbols and dots and right-arrows, and you’re sure you’ve put just one space between each pair of words, here’s how to make those special symbols vanish: deactivate the ¶ button (by clicking it again).

Sort

Here’s how to alphabetize a list of names (or words or phrases).

Type each item on a separate line, like this:

Zelda

Al

Pedro

If the list is the whole document, click in the list. If the list is just part of the document, select the list by doing this:

Triple-click in the list’s first line.

While holding down the Shift key, click in the list’s last line.

Click the Sort button (which shows an A over a Z, with a down-arrow). Then press Enter.

That makes the computer alphabetize the lines, so the document looks like this:

Al

Pedro

Zelda

Border

After you’ve typed a paragraph, here’s how to put a box around it:

Click in the paragraph. Click the “6” at the Paragraph group’s right edge. Click “All Borders”.

If you change your mind, here’s how to remove the box:

Click in the paragraph. Click the “6” at the Paragraph group’s right edge. Click “No Border”.

 

Styles group

The Styles group looks like this:

 

 

 

 

 

 


Visible styles

You see 4 styles, called Normal, No Spacing, Heading 1, and Heading 2. Click whichever style you prefer. Here’s how they differ:

Normal is good for typing a short business memo. It’s the style that Microsoft assumes you want, unless you say otherwise. It uses 11-point Calibri (which resembles Arial and Tahoma), puts extra space between the lines (so the paragraph has 1.15 line spacing instead of single spacing), and puts a 10-point blank space below each paragraph.

No Spacing resembles Normal (it uses 11-point Calibri) but wastes less space: it puts no extra space between the lines (they’re single spaced) and puts no blank space below each paragraph.

Heading 1 is good for typing a heading. It uses 14-point bold Cambria (which resembles Times New Roman), is dark blue (instead of black), puts a 24-point blank space above the heading, and makes the paragraph below the heading be Normal. If the paragraph below is too long to fit on the same page as the heading, the computer moves the heading and paragraph together to the next page, so the heading stays immediately above the paragraph.

Heading 2 resembles Heading 1 but is more modest: it’s slightly smaller (13-point instead of 14-point), has somewhat less space above it (10 points instead of 24 points), and is a lighter shade of blue.

Table of styles

Those 4 styles are just the top row of a table of styles. To see the whole table (which includes 5 rows, making a total of 20 styles), click the down-arrow that has a dash over it. Here’s a quick summary of each style:

Style                    Main features

Normal               11-point Calibri, 10-point space below paragraph

No Spacing         11-point Calibri

Heading 1           14-point blue Cambria, bold, 24-point space above par.

Heading 2           13-point blue Cambria, bold, 10-point space above par.

Title                   26-point blue Cambria, underline, 15-point space below par.

Subtitle               12-point blue Cambria, italic

Subtle emphasis   italic, gray

Emphasis            italic

Intense Emphasis   italic, blue, bold

Strong                 bold

Quote                 11-point Calibri, italic, 10-point space below paragraph

Intense Quote     11-point blue Calibri, italic, underline, indent,

                           10-point space above paragraph, 14-point space below par.

Subtle Reference smaller-font capitals, underline, red

Intense Reference  smaller-font capitals, underline, red, bold

Book Title          smaller-font capitals, bold

List Paragraph    11-point Calibri, indent, 10-point space below paragraphs group

If you click one of those 20 styles, the computer will choose it — and its row of the table will become the main row that you see on the screen (until you choose a different row instead by clicking the up-arrow or dashed down-arrow).

If you click Heading 2, the computer expands the table by including a Heading 3. If you click Heading 3, the computer expands the table by including a Heading 4. Here are the differences:

Style              Main features

Heading 1     14-point blue Cambria, bold, 24-point space above par.

Heading 2     13-point blue Cambria, bold, 10-point space above par.

Heading 3     11-point blue Cambria, bold, 10-point space above par.

Heading 4     11-point blue Cambria, bold, 10-point space above par., italic

Headings 5, 6, 7, etc., all have the same main features as Heading 3.

Traditional fonts

Microsoft made Calibri the normal font for Microsoft Word 2007 because Calibri’s easy to read even on a blurry screen. But to print on paper and high-quality screens, you should make the normal font be Times New Roman instead, which is the easiest font to read if you’re not in a fog. Here’s how to make that switch:

Click Change Styles then “Fonts” then “Office Classic”.

That changes the normal (body) font from Calibri to Times New Roman — and changes all headings from Cambria to Arial — so Calibri and Cambria are eliminated from that document. (Other documents are unaffected.)

Traditional styles

Microsoft made “10-point gap below each paragraph” the normal style for Microsoft Word 2007 so people writing business letters, e-mails, and Websites wouldn’t have to press the Enter key twice at the end of each paragraph. But publishers of books, newspapers, and magazines want a more traditional format where each paragraph’s first line is indented and there’s no extra space between paragraphs, since “extra space” means “wasted paper”. Here’s how to make that switch:

Click Change Styles then “Style Set” then “Traditional”.

That switch affects the whole document. (Other documents are unaffected.)

If you’re smart enough to make both of those changes (changing fonts to Office Classic and changing Style Set to Traditional), here’s what the 20 styles become:

Style                    Main features

Normal               11-point Times NR, first line indented

No Spacing         11-point Times NR

Heading 1           12-point blue Arial, underline, 30 pt. above, 4 pt. below, bold

Heading 2           12-point blue Arial, underline, 10 pt. above, 4 pt. below

Title                   30-point blue Arial, green underline, blue overline, center

Subtitle               12-point Arial, italic, 10 pt. above, 45 pt. below, align right

Subtle emphasis   italic, gray

Emphasis            italic, gray, bold

Intense Emphasis   italic, blue, bold

Strong                 bold

Quote                 11-point Arial, italic, gray, first line indented

Intense Quote     12-point white-on-blue Arial, italic, green underline,

                           indent, 16 pt. above, 16 pt. below

Subtle Reference Times NR, green underline

Intense Reference  green Times NR, underline

Book Title          Arial, italic, bold

List Paragraph    11-point Times NR, indent all lines but indent first line farther

Invent your own style

Here’s how to invent your own paragraph style:

In your document, create a paragraph whose appearance thrills you (by using the Font, Paragraph, and Styles groups). Right-click in the middle of the paragraph’s first word. Click “Styles” then “Save Selection as a New Quick Style”.

Invent a name for your style (such as “Wow”): type the name, and at the end of the name press the Enter.

The style you invented (“Wow”) will appear in the Styles group as the 2nd style.

Go ahead and use it! For example, while you’re typing another paragraph, you can make that paragraph’s style be “Normal” or “Wow”: just click the style you want.

The style you invented (“Wow”) is part of the computer’s repertoire just while you’re using that document, not while you’re using other documents.

Here’s how to improve that style later:

Click in a paragraph written in that style. Improve that paragraph’s appearance (by using the Font, Paragraph, and Styles groups). Right-click in the middle of the paragraph’s first word. Click “Styles” then “Update”.

Editing group

In the Editing group, you see 3 choices: Find, Replace, and Select.

Find

Here’s how to make the computer search through your document to find whether you’ve used the word “love”:

Click where you want the search to begin. (For example, if you want the search to begin at the document’s beginning, click in the middle of the document’s first word.) Click Find (or press Ctrl with F). Type the word you want to find (“love”), and press Enter.

The computer will search for “love”. If the computer finds a “love” in your document, it will highlight that “love” so it turns blue. (If the “Find and Replace” window covers the part of your document that says “love”, drag that window out of the way, by dragging “Find and Replace”.)

If you want to find the next “love” in your document, press Enter; if you do not want to search for more “love”, click the “Find and Replace” window’s X (or press the Esc key).

The previous-page and next-page arrows (at the screen’s bottom right corner) turn blue. Afterwards, clicking them makes the computer find the previous or next “love” (instead of the previous or next page).

Suppose you’ve written a history of America and want to find the part where you started talking about Lincoln. If you forget what page that was, no problem! Just put the cursor at the beginning of the document, click Find, type “Lincoln”, and press Enter.

Replace

You can search for a word and replace it with a different word. For example, here’s how to change each “love” in your document to “idolize”:

Click Replace. Type the old word you want to replace (“love”), then press the Tab key, then type the new word you want instead (“idolize”), then click the Replace All button. That makes the computer change each “love” to “idolize”. Then press the Esc key twice.

The computer preserves capitalization. For example, if the document said —

I love you. Love you! LOVE YOU! I want to kiss your glove!

the computer changes it to:

I idolize you. Idolize you! IDOLIZE YOU! I want to kiss your gidolize!

Notice that when told to change “love” to “idolize”, the computer unfortunately also changes “glove” to “gidolize”.

The Replace command helps you zip through many chores:

For example, if you write a letter that talks about Fred, then want to write a similar letter about Sue, tell the computer to replace each Fred with Sue.

If you write a book about “How to be a better salesman” and then a feminist tells you to change each “salesman” to “salesperson”, tell the computer to replace each “salesman”.

If you’re writing a long ad that mentions “Calvin Klein’s Hot New Flaming Pink Day-Glo Pajamas” repeatedly, and you’re too lazy to type that long phrase so often, just type the abbreviation “Calnew”. When you’ve finished typing the document, tell the computer to replace each “Calnew” with the long phrase it stands for.

Select

To select everything in the document (so the whole document is highlighted in blue), use one of these methods:

Method 1: click Select then “Select All”.

Method 2: while holding down the Ctrl key, tap the A key (which means “All”).

If you formatted a phrase (such as by underlining or bolding or italicizing or making the font bigger), here’s how to find all other phrases that have been formatted the same way:

Click in the formatted phrase’s middle. Click Select then “Select Text with Similar Formatting”. The computer will select (highlight in blue) all phrases that have been formatted the same way.

For example, suppose your document’s only formatting is that you underlined some words. Here’s how to make all those underlined words become bold also:

Click in the middle of one of the underlined words. Click Select then “Select Text with Similar Formatting”. The computer will highlight all the underlined words (so they turn blue). Then click the Bold button (which is in the Font group): that makes the computer embolden all the highlighted words (which are the underlined words). Then click anywhere in the document (to turn off the blue highlighting).

 

Tab bar

Near the screen’s top, you see this tab bar:

Home   Insert   Page Layout   References   Mailings   Review   View   ?

Each word or phrase on that tab bar is called a tab.

If you click the Home tab, you see the 5 groups I discussed (Clipboard, Font, Paragraph, Styles, and Editing). If you click a different tab instead, you see different groups:

Tab             Groups you see

Home           Clipboard, Font, Paragraph, Styles, Editing

Insert           Pages, Tables, Illustrations, Links, Header & Footer, Text, Symbols

Page Layout Themes, Page Setup, Page Background, Paragraph, Arrange

References   Table of Contents, Footnotes, Citations & Bibliography,

                    Captions, Index, Table of Authorities

Mailings       Create, Start Mail Merge, Write & Insert Fields,

                    Preview Results, Finish

Review         Proofing, Comments, Tracking, Changes, Compare, Protect

View             Document Views, Show/Hide, Zoom, Window, Macros

Page Layout tab

Click the Page Layout tab.

Margins Normally, Microsoft Word 2007 leaves a 1-inch margin at all 4 edges of your paper. If you want margins that are wider or narrower, click “Margins” (in the Page Setup group). Then click one of these popular choices:

Choice       How big the margins are

Normal        1 inch at all 4 edges

Narrow        ½ inch at all 4 edges

Moderate     1 inch at top & bottom,  ¾ inch       at left & right

Wide           1 inch at top & bottom,  2 inches at left & right

Mirrored      1 inch at 3 edges, 1¼ inches at stapled edge (left edge on odd
                    pages, right edge on even)

Office 2003 1 inch at top & bottom, 1¼ inches at left & right

Size In the U.S., a normal sheet of paper is 8½ inches wide and 11 inches tall. Microsoft Word 2007 assumes your paper is that size. If you want to print on paper that’s a different size, click “Size” (in the Page Setup group) then the paper’s size. (To see all the choices, point at the scroll bar, which is below the up-arrow, and drag that scroll bar down.)

In the U.S., these sizes are the most popular:

Letter                   8½  inches wide and 11 inches tall

Legal                     8½  inches wide and 14 inches tall

Statement             8½  inches wide and   5½  inches tall

Executive          7¼  inches wide and 10½  inches tall

Double Width 17     inches wide and 11 inches tall

#10 Envelope      9½  inches wide and 41/8      inches tall

Pick a size your printer can handle!

Orientation When an artist paints a portrait of a face, the canvas’s height is usually bigger than its width. That situation (height bigger than width) is called portrait orientation.

When an artist paints a landscape (showing many trees and hills), the canvas’s width is usually bigger than its height. That situation (width bigger than height) is called landscape orientation.

The computer assumes you want portrait orientation (height bigger than width). For example, if you tell the computer to print on paper that’s 8½ inches by 11 inches, the computer assumes you want the height to be bigger than the width, so it assumes you want height to be 11 inches and the width to be 8½ inches.

You can force the computer to do landscape orientation instead, so the width is bigger than the height, and so the width is 11 inches and the height is 8½ inches. That makes the paper wide, so you can fit more words on each line. To do that, click “Orientation” (in the Page Setup group) then “Landscape”.

To accomplish landscape printing, the computer & printer rotate the paper or words 90 degrees.

For example, to print on a Statement (8½ inches wide and 5½ inches tall) or a #10 Envelope (9½ inches wide and 41/8 inches tall), tell the computer to do landscape printing (by clicking “Orientation” then “Landscape”).

Columns In a newspaper, text is printed in many narrow columns. In a business letter, text is printed in a single wide column.

The computer assumes you want a single wide column. If you want several narrow columns instead (like a newspaper or magazine), click “Columns” (in the Page Setup group). Then click one of these popular choices:

Choice    How many columns you get

One              1 wide column (like a business letter)

Two          2 narrow columns

Three       3 very narrow columns

Left             2 columns (left column is very narrow, right column is wider)

Right        2 columns (right column is very narrow, left column is wider)

The gap between each pair of columns is a half-inch wide.

After you’ve finished typing a paragraph (and pressed Enter), try this experiment: while holding down the Ctrl and Shift keys, press Enter again. That creates a column break: it makes the next paragraph be at the top of the next column. (If you change your mind here’s how to remove the column break: click at the beginning of the paragraph you’ve put at the top of a column, then press the Backspace key.

Breaks Here’s how to divide your document into two sections and give each section its own margins and its own number of columns:

Click where you want the second section to begin. Click “Breaks” (in the Page Setup group). Click either “Continuous” (to start the second section on the same page as the first section ended) or “Next Page” (to start the second section on a separate page from the first section). Afterwards, any margin or columns command you give will affect just the section you’re clicking in, not the other section.

If you wish, create extra sections: for each extra section, click where you want the section to begin, then click “Breaks” then either “Continuous” or “Next Page”.

Line Numbers If you plan to mail the document to a friend and then chat about it by phone, you should number each line, so you can ask your friend “What do you think about line 27?” To make the computer number the lines for you (by writing the numbers in the left margin), click “Line Numbers” (in the Page Setup group). Then click either “Continuous” (which makes the computer number the lines 1, 2, 3, etc., until the document’s end) or “Restart Each Page” (which makes each page’s first line be numbered 1, each page’s second line be numbered 2, etc.).


When you finish chatting with your friend and don’t need the line numbers anymore, here’s how to erase them: click “Line Numbers” then “None”.

Watermark If you click “Watermark” (in the Page Background group), you see a menu that includes these phrases: “CONFIDENTIAL”, “DO NOT COPY”, “DRAFT”, “SAMPLE”, “ASAP”, “URGENT”. (To see all those phrases, point at the scroll bar, which is below the up-arrow, and drag that scroll bar down.) If you click one of those phrases, the computer will stamp that phrase on every page of your document. The phrase will be in huge gray letters, in the middle of every page, so it’s stamped across each page’s paragraphs. The phrase is called a watermark.

If you don’t like any of those phrases, make up your own! Here’s how:

Click “Watermark” then “Custom Watermark” then “Text watermark”. Double-click in the Text box. Type the phrase you want (such as “COPY”, “ORIGINAL”, “PERSONAL”, “TOP SECRET”, “I LOVE YOU”, “PRETEND YOU’VE NEVER READ THIS”, or “DON’T SHOW TO BOSS YET”). Click “Horizontal” (if you want the phrase to appear straight across the paper) or “Diagonal” (if you want the phrase to appear on a slant). Click “OK”.

If you change your mind and want to remove the watermark, click “Watermark” then “Remove Watermark”.

Insert tab

Click the Insert tab.

Symbol If you click “Symbol” (which is in the Symbols group), you see the symbols you used recently. If you haven’t used any symbols yet, you see these:

€        £        ¥        ©      ®

™      ±        ¹       £        ³

¸        ´       ¥          m        a

b        p        W      S       J

If you want to use one of those symbols now, click it. If you want a different symbol instead, do the following.…

Click “More Symbols”. You see the Symbol window.

You see many symbols. If you want one of those symbols, double-click it. If you don’t like any of those symbols, view different symbols by using the scroll arrows or clicking “Special Characters” or the Font box’s down-arrow.

If you click the Font box’s down-arrow, you see a list of different fonts. Scroll down to see the different font choices. For best results, click one of these 6 fonts:

(normal text)

Symbol

Webdings

Wingdings

Wingdings 2

Wingdings 3

For example, if you click “Wingdings” you see these pictorial characters:

 

!

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#

$

%

&

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(

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+

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-

.

/

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1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

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A

B

C

D

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F

G

H

I

J

K

L

M

N

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P

Q

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S

T

U

V

W

X

Y

Z

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^

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a

b

c

d

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f

g

h

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j

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m

n

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p

q

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u

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x

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{

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

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

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

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š

œ



ž

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¡

¢

£

¤

¥

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§

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ª

«

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®

¯

°

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²

³

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¼

½

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¿

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Ä

Å

Æ

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Ì

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Î

Ï

Ð

Ñ

Ò

Ó

Ô

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Ö

×

Ø

Ù

Ú

Û

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Ý

Þ

ß

à

á

â

ã

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æ

ç

è

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ë

ì

í

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ò

ó

ô

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ö

÷

ø

ù

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þ

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(To see them all, scroll down by clicking that window’s first down-arrow.)

If you click “Wingdings 2” instead, you see these:

 

!

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%

&

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(

)

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+

,

-

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/

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1

2

3

4

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7

8

9

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A

B

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D

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F

G

H

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K

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M

N

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P

Q

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T

U

V

W

X

Y

Z

[

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a

b

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f

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If you click “Wingdings 3” instead, you see these:

 

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$

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+

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-

.

/

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1

2

3

4

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9

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F

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U

V

W

X

Y

Z

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If you click “Webdings”, you see fancier drawings:

 

!

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#

$

%

&

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(

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*

+

,

-

.

/

0

1

2

3

4

5

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8

9

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F

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V

W

X

Y

Z

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For fun with young kids, point at those Webdings and play a game of “Do you know what this is?”

If you click “Symbol”, you see math, Greek, and card suits:

 

!

"

#

$

%

&

'

(

)

*

+

,

-

.

/

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

:

;

<

=

>

?

@

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

K

L

M

N

O

P

Q

R

S

T

U

V

W

X

Y

Z

[

\

]

^

_

`

a

b

c

d

e

f

g

h

i

j

k

l

m

n

o

p

q

r

s

t

u

v

w

x

y

z

{

|

}

~

 

 

¡

¢

£

¤

¥

¦

§

¨

©

ª

«

¬

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®

¯

°

±

²

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Ä

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Î

Ï

Ð

Ñ

Ò

Ó

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×

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Ù

Ú

Û

Ü

Ý

Þ

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à

á

â

ã

ä

å

æ

ç

è

é

ê

ë

ì

í

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ï

 

ñ

ò

ó

ô

õ

ö

÷

ø

ù

ú

û

ü

ý

þ

 

 

Whenever you see a character you like, double-click it. That makes the computer put the character into your document. Then double-click any other characters you like.

When you finish using the Symbol window, make it disappear by clicking the button that says “Close” on it.

Warning: your printer might be too stupid to print those symbols, especially if the font is “(normal text)”. Instead of printing a symbol, the printer might just leave a blank space. Before giving the printout to a friend, look at the printout yourself to make sure the symbols printed correctly and clearly.


Date & Time To type the date or time, click Date & Time (which is in the Text group). The computer will show a list of formats, like this:

12/25/2008

Thursday, December 25, 2008

December 25, 2008

12/25/08

2008-12-25

25-Dec-08

12.25.2008

Dec. 25, 08

25 December 2008

December 08

Dec-08

12/25/2008 11:57 PM

12/25/2008 11:57:20 PM

11:57 PM

11:57:20 PM

23:57

23:57:20

Click the format you want. Press Enter. The computer will type the date or time in the format you requested.

In that procedure, just before you press Enter, you might wish to put a check mark in the “Update automatically” box. Here’s how that box works:

Suppose you type a document on Monday, but you print the document the next day (Tuesday). Which date will the computer print on paper? The computer will print the date that the document was typed (Monday), unless you put a check mark in the “Update automatically” box, which makes the computer print the “date printed” (Tuesday).

If you put a check mark in the “Update automatically” box, the computer will automatically update the date & time whenever the document is printed (or print-previewed or opened).

Page Number To make the computer put a page number on each page, click Page Number (which is in the Header & Footer group). Then click “Top of Page” (if you want the number to be in each page’s top-margin area called the header) or “Bottom of Page” (if you want the number to be in each page’s bottom-margin area called the footer).

Click “Plain Number 2”. That makes the page number have plain style #2 (centered instead of near the paper’s left edge or right edge).

You see the page number, on the current page. (The computer has automatically put page numbers on all the other pages also.)

Do you want any words to appear to the left of the page number? If so, type them then press the Space bar. For example, if you want the 2nd page to say “This is page 2” instead of just “2”, type “This is page” then press the Space bar.

Do you want any words to appear to the right of the page number? If so, press the right-arrow key then the Space bar then type those words. For example, if you want the 2nd page to say “This is page 2 of the great American novel” and you’ve already typed “This is page ”, press the right-arrow key (to move past the page number) then the Space bar (to leave 1 blank space after the page number) then type “of the great American novel”.

Whatever words you put to the left and right of the page number appear on all the other page numbers also.

When you finish editing the page number’s line, double-click in the screen’s middle. Then you can continue editing your document’s paragraphs.

If you want to edit the page number’s line again, double-click in the middle of that line.


Table To type a table of numbers in the middle of your document, click where you want the table to appear then click Table (which is in the Tables group).

You see 100 little boxes (called cells), arranged to form a table having 10 rows and 10 columns. How many rows and columns do you want in your table? Point at the first cell (box) and drag down and to the right, until your desired number of rows and columns turns orange. For example, if you want just 3 rows and 4 columns, drag down and to the right until 3 rows and 4 columns turn orange, so you see 12 orange cells altogether.

When you take your finger off the mouse’s button, you’ll see the table you requested.

Then just fill in the cells, with whatever numbers and words you wish. To move from cell to cell, click with the mouse, or press the Tab key (which moves right to the next cell), or press Shift with Tab (which moves left to the previous cell), or press the arrow keys repeatedly.

In a cell, you can type a number, word, sentence, or even an entire paragraph! If you start typing a paragraph in a cell, the computer will automatically make the cell and its row taller, so the entire paragraph will fit in the cell. You can even type several paragraphs in a single cell: just press the Enter key at the end of each paragraph. If you want to indent the first line of one of those paragraphs, press the Space bar several times or press Ctrl with Tab.

Here’s how to make the table have more cells.

To create an extra row at the bottom of the table:

click in the table’s bottom right cell, then press the Tab key.

To insert an extra row into the middle of the table:

right-click in the row that’s under where you want the extra row to appear, then click “Insert” then “Insert Rows Above”.

To create an extra column at the table’s right edge:

right-click in last column, then click “Insert” then “Insert Columns to the Right”. (To fit the extra column, the computer will make the previous columns narrower.)

To insert an extra column into the middle of the table:

right-click in the column that’s right of where you want the extra column to appear, then click “Insert” then “Insert Columns to the Left”. (To fit the extra column, the computer will make the other columns narrower.)

The computer assumes you want the table’s columns to all be the same width. Here’s how to change that assumption:

For example, here’s how to adjust the width of the table’s left column (column 1). Move the mouse until its pointer is on the vertical gridline that separates column 1 from column 2, and the pointer’s shape turns into this symbol: . Then drag the vertical gridline to the right (to make the column wider) or left (to make the column narrower).

If you make a column wider, the computer makes room for it by shrinking the next column. If you make a column narrower, the computer compensates by expanding the next column.

If you want to fine-tune the widths of all columns, work from left to right: adjust the width of column 1 (by dragging the gridline that separates it from column 2), then adjust the width of column 2 (by dragging the gridline that separates it from column 3), then adjust the width of column 3 (by dragging the gridline that separates it from column 4), etc.

If a column contains mostly numbers, here’s how to make that column look prettier, so the numbers are aligned properly:

Move the mouse until its pointer is at the very top of the column and is centered on the gridline above the column, so the pointer’s shape turns into this symbol: È. Then click. The entire column turns blue.

Click “Home” (on the tab bar) then the Align Text Right button (on the formatting toolbar). That makes all cells in that column be aligned right, so the numbers are aligned properly.


When you’ve finished typing numbers and words into all the cells, here’s how to make the computer adjust the widths of all the columns, so each column becomes just wide enough to hold the data in it:

Right-click in the table. Click “AutoFit” then “AutoFit to Contents”.

When you’ve finished editing the table, here’s how to put paragraphs below it:

Click below the table by using the mouse, or go below the table by pressing the down-arrow key several times. Then type the paragraphs you want below the table.

Here’s how to delete a row or column:

Right-click in the middle of what you want to delete. Click “Delete Cells”. Click “Delete entire row” (if you want to delete a row) or “Delete entire column” (if you want to delete a column). Press Enter.

Here’s how to delete the entire table:

Click in the table. Click the 4-headed arrow that’s at the table’s top-left corner. Press the Backspace key.

Here’s how to create a table that has a customized shape.

In the middle of your document, press the Enter key several times, to create a blank space for the table. Then click Table (which is in the Tables group) then Draw Table.

Where do you want the table to be in your document? Put the mouse pointer where you want the table’s top left corner to be, and drag to where you want the table’s opposite corner. (While dragging, hold down the mouse’s left button.) You’ll see a box, which is your table. Inside the box, make a grid of rows and columns by drawing horizontal and vertical gridlines. To draw a gridline, put the mouse pointer where you want the line to begin, and drag to where you want the line to end.

If you make a mistake, click the Undo button or do the following.…Click the word “Eraser” (which is near the screen’s top-right corner). That makes the mouse pointer turn into an eraser. Move the mouse until the eraser’s bottom corner touches the line you want to erase; then click (press the mouse’s left button). That makes the line disappear. You can make other lines disappear also, by clicking them. When you finish using the eraser, click “Draw Table” (which is near the screen’s top-right corner) to continue drawing more lines.


References tab

Click the References tab.

Insert Footnote Suppose you’re writing a religious pamphlet in which you want to say “Read it in the Bible tonight!” Suppose you want to add a footnote saying “written by God”, so the main text looks like this —

Read it in the Bible1 tonight!

and the page’s bottom contains this footnote:

1 Written by God.

Here’s how to do it all.…

Type “Read it in the Bible”. Click “Insert Footnote” (which is in the Footnotes group) or, while holding down the Ctrl and Alt keys, tap the F key. Type the footnote (“Written by God.”). Go back to the main text, where you left off, by using one of these methods:

Method 1: double-click the footnote’s number, then press the right-arrow key.

Method 2: climb back up to the main text (by using the keyboard’s up-arrow key), then go right to where you left off typing (by using the End key).

The computer will automatically number the footnote: it will automatically type 1 after “Bible” and type 1 before “Written by God.” If your document contains more footnotes, the computer will automatically number them 2, 3, 4, etc. (Those numbers are easy to read on paper. On the screen, the numbers are easier to read while the Home tab’s ¶ button is deactivated.)

The computer will put the footnotes at the bottom of the page. If the page is divided into newspaper columns, the computer will put each footnote at the bottom of the column it refers to.

The computer will put a 2-inch horizontal line above the footnotes to separate them from the main text.

If you insert extra footnotes, the computer will automatically renumber the other footnotes, so the first footnote appearing in your document will be numbered 1, the second footnote will be numbered 2, etc.

Here’s the easiest way to delete a footnote:

Click the left edge of the footnote’s number in the main text; then press the Delete key twice.


View tab

Click the View tab.

Ruler If you put a check mark in the Ruler box (by clicking there), you’ll see a ruler (saying 1", 2", 3") above the page and another ruler at the screen’s left edge. Those rulers show how many inches will be printed on paper.

Afterwards, you’ll seeing rulers even when you’re viewing other documents and even on other days, until you cancel the rulers (by removing the check mark from the Ruler box).

Split To see two parts of your document at the same time, click Split (which is in the Window group). A fat gray line appears across the middle of your screen and splits your screen’s window into two parts, a top windowpane and a
bottom windowpane.

Move the mouse slightly (which moves the fat gray line slightly up or down), until you’re happy about the line’s position. Then click the mouse’s left button.

Now you can see two parts of your document at the same time!

Each windowpane has its own scroll arrows. You can click those scroll arrows to change what you see in that windowpane, without changing what’s in the other windowpane.

You can also click in one windowpane’s text and then use the keyboard’s movement keys (up-arrow, down-arrow, left-arrow, right-arrow, Page Up, Page Down, Home, and End) to change what’s in that windowpane, without changing what you see in the other windowpane.

Both windowpanes show parts of the same document. If you change a word in one windowpane (by deleting or inserting or revising that word), while the other windowpane happens to show the same part of the document, you see that word automatically change in the other windowpane also, immediately!

Using those two windowpanes, you can compare two parts of your document and copy from one part to the other (by using the Home tab’s Copy and Paste buttons or using Ctrl C and Ctrl V).

When you stop wanting two windowpanes, here’s how to return to a single pane:

Which windowpane do you want to remove? Click in that windowpane. Click Remove Split (which is in the Window group). That windowpane disappears, so the entire screen becomes devoted to the other windowpane.

Arrange All Here’s how to see two documents on the screen at once!

To be safe, make sure both documents have been saved on disk (by using the Save button). Close any documents that are on the screen (by choosing Close from the Office menu), so the screen’s main part is blank.

Open the first document (by using the Office button). You see the document’s words and paragraphs on the screen.

While that first document is still on the screen (without closing it), open the second document. You see the document’s words and paragraphs on the screen; they cover up the first document, so you can’t see the first document at the moment.

Click the View tab then Arrange All (which is in the Window group). Then you see two windows on the screen. The top window shows the second document; the bottom window shows the first document.

Each window is small, showing just a tiny part of the document. A window might seem blank if it’s so small that it shows just the document’s top margin.

Each window has its own scroll arrows. Use them to scroll through the documents and see the parts of the documents that are not blank.

By using those two windows, you can easily compare two documents and copy from one to the other (by using the Home tab’s Copy and Paste buttons or using Ctrl C and Ctrl V).

When you stop wanting one of the windows, close it (by clicking its X button), then expand the other window (by clicking its maximize button, which is next to its X button).

Help button

At the tab bar’s rightmost edge, you see a question mark. To get help about using Microsoft Word, click that question mark or press the F1 key. (You’ll get the best help if you connect to the Internet before doing that, so Microsoft can give you the newest help lessons.)

You see the Word Help window, which contains this list of popular topics:

What’s new                                      Activating Word

Getting help                                     Creating specific documents

Converting documents                    Viewing and navigating

Margins and page setup                  Headers and footers

Page numbers                                  Page breaks and sections breaks

Writing                                                 Formatting

Tracking changes and comments  Lists

Tables                                                  Working with graphics and charts

Tables of contents and other refs   Mail merge

Saving and printing                          Collaboration

File management                                 Customizing

Accessibility                                      Security and privacy

Working in a different language      Automation and programmability

Add-ins                                                Macros

Word Demos                                        Quizzes

(To see all those topics, click the scroll-down arrow at the window’s bottom-right corner).

If one of those topics interests you, click it.

If none of those topics interests you, click in the Search box (the white box at the window’s top) then type the question you want help about (or type your topic’s main words) and press Enter.

Then you’ll see a list of subtopics. (To see them all, click the scroll-down arrow at the window’s bottom-right corner.) Click whichever subtopic interests you. You’ll see a lesson about that subtopic.

The list of subtopics can get bizarre. For example, if you’ve connected to the Internet (to get the best help) and type the question “How do I have sex with a giraffe?” the computer suggests these subtopics: “Negotiation scenario”, “Speech outline”, “Business card”, and “Holiday recipe card” (in case you want to eat the giraffe also).

If you want to return to a previous list of topics or subtopics, click the Back button (the left arrow at the window’s top-left corner). When you finish using the Word Help window, close it (by clicking the X button at its top-right corner).