THEOLOGY;

EXPLAINED AND DEFENDED,

IN A

  

SERIES OF SERMONS;

By

  

TIMOTHY DWIGHT, S. T. D. LL. D.

LATE PRESIDENT OF YALE COLLEGE.

 

WITH A

  

MEMOIR

OF

  

THE LIFE OF THE AUTHOR.

IN FOUR VOLUMES.

 

VOL. 2.

  

1836.

  

[ 2 ]

 

DISTRICT OF CONNECTICUT, ss.

BE it remembered, that on the fifth day of January, in the forty second year of the Independence of the United States of America, Timothy Dwight, and William T. Dwight, both of said District; Administrators of the Rev. Timothy Dwight, now deceased, and late of the said District, have deposited in this office the title of a book, the right whereof they claim as Administrators as aforesaid, and Proprietors, in the words following, to wit:

Theology; explained and defended, in a Series of Sermons; by Timothy Dwight, T. D., LL. D. late President of Yale college. With a Memoir of the Life the Author,. in five Volumes. Vol 2.

In conformity to the Act of the Congress of the United States, entitled, " An Act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of Maps, Charts, and Books, to the authors arid proprietors of such copies, during the times therein mentioned."

R.I. INGERSOLL,

Clerk of the District of Connecticut.

 

A true copy of Record, examined and sealed by me.

R.I. INGERSOLL,

Clerk of the District of Connecticut.

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Sermon LXXXII [ 82 ]

In Heaven, for all Eternity.

An extract from Vol. 2, pp505-506

 

John 13: 3-4

A new commandment I give to you, that you love one another.

In that glorious world which is Heaven, a vast and immortal Church, formed of those who are all brethren, inhabits the delightful regions, destined to be its eternal residence. With innumerable millions, of which this great assembly, this nation of brethren, this kingdom of Jehovah, is composed, Brotherly love is the commanding principle of action. In Angels it has glowed, and brightened, ever since the morning of creation dawned over the vast abyss of darkness and solitude. In the general assembly of the first-born it is made a test of their character, and a foundation of their admission into heaven. In as much as you have done good unto one of the least of these my brethren, is by Christ himself announced, as the peculiar term of admission: and Inasmuch as you did it not, as the term of final exclusion. In the cold and dreary region of this world, the spark was scarcely kindled; and prolonged its existence with difficulty.

The flax, in which it was kept from final extinction, smoked merely without rising into a flame. But it was never finally quenched. At the great examination, it was found still a living spark; and its existence was seen, acknowledged, and proclaimed. Transferred to Heaven, it began there to kindle with new and immortal lustre; and was set in that constellated firmament of living and eternal splendours; which are all glorious with inherent light, although one star differs from another star in glory.

Of that brilliant world, Heaven, that region where all things shine, and live, and flourish, and triumph, for ever, the beauty, the glory, the excellence, is eminently this divine affection. All are brethren; all are loved as brethren. All are divinely amiable and excellent friends. Every one possesses the virtue, which is loved; and the complacency, by which it is loved. Every one, conscious of unmingled purity within, approves, and loves, himself for that divine image, which in complete perfection, and with untarnished resemblance, is instamped on his character. Each, in every view which he casts around him, beholds the same glory shining, and brightening, in the endless train of his companions: One in nature, but diversified without end, in those forms and varieties of excellence, by which the original and eternal Beauty delights to present itself to the virtuous universe.

Here every one, conscious of being entirely lovely, and entirely loved, reciprocates the same love to that great multitude, which no man can number, of all nations, kindreds, and tongues, and which fills the immeasurable regions of heaven. Out of this character grows a series ever varying, ever improving, of all the possible communications of beneficence, fitted in every instance only to interchange, and increase the happiness of all. In the sunshine of Infinite complacency, the light of the New Jerusalem, the original source of all their own beauty, life, and joy, all these happy nations walk for ever; and, transported with the life-giving influence, unite in one harmonious and eternal hymn to the great Author of their enjoyment: Blessing, and honour, and glory, and wisdom, and thanksgiving, be unto him that sits on the throne, and to the Lamb, for ever and ever. Amen.

Timothy.Dwight, D.D., Vol. 2, pp505-06 Spirits in heaven. Edited by R.C.