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The Buddha's general advice to lay followers

Extracts from the Sutta Pitaka


Lay Follower

"Venerable Sir, to what extent is one a lay follower?"

"Jivaka, when one has gone to the Buddha for refuge, has gone to the Dhamma for refuge, and has gone to the Sangha for refuge, then to that extent is one a lay follower."

"And to what extent, venerable sir, is one a virtuous lay follower?"

"Jivaka, when one abstains from taking life, from stealing, from sexual misconduct, from lying, and from fermented and distilled drinks that lead to heedlessness, then to that extent is one a virtuous lay follower."

"And to what extent, venerable sir, is one a lay follower who practices both for his own benefit and the benefit of others?"

"Jivaka, when a lay follower himself is consummate in conviction and encourages others in the consummation of conviction; in virtue and encourages others ; in generosity and encourages others .; desires to see the monks and encourages ; wants to hear the true Dhamma and encourages others ; habitually remembers the Dhamma he has heard and encourages ; explores the meaning of the Dhamma he has heard and encourages ; knowing both the Dhamma and its meaning, practises the Dhamma in line with the Dhamma and encourages others : then to that extent he is a lay follower who practices both for his own benefit and the benefit of others."

Anguttara Nikaya VIII.26 (Jivaka Sutta)

Removing Annoyance

"Bhikkhus, there are these five ways of removing annoyance, by which annoyance can be entirely removed by a bhikkhu when it arises in him. What are the five?

"Loving-kindness can be maintained in being towards a person with whom you are annoyed: this is how annoyance with him can be removed. Compassion can be maintained in being Onlooking equanimity can be maintained in being . The forgetting and ignoring of a person can be practiced . Ownership of deeds in a person can be concentrated upon thus: 'This good person is owner of his deeds, heir to his deeds, his deeds are the womb from which he is born, his deeds are his kin for whom he is responsible, his deeds are his refuge, he is heir to his deeds, be they good or bad.' This too is how annoyance with him can be removed.

Anguttara Nikaya V.161 ( Aghatapativinaya Sutta)

Five Daily Reflections

"There are these five facts that one should reflect on often, whether one is a woman or a man, lay or ordained. Which five? ‘I am subject to aging, have not gone beyond aging.’ This is the first fact that one should reflect on often, whether one is a woman or a man, lay or ordained. ‘I am subject to illness, have not gone beyond illness.’ ‘I am subject to death, have not gone beyond death.’ ... ‘I will grow different, separate from all that is dear and appealing to me.’ ... ‘I am the owner of my actions (kamma), heir to my actions, born of my actions, related through my actions, and have my actions as my arbitrator. Whatever I do, for good or for evil, to that will I fall heir.’ This is the fifth fact that one should reflect on often, whether one is a woman or a man, lay or ordained."

Anguttara Nikaya V-57 (Upajjhatthana Sutta)

Handling Anger

"Monks, there are these three types of individuals to be found existing in the world. Which three? An individual like an inscription in rock, like an inscription in soil, and like an inscription in water.

"And how is an individual like an inscription in rock? There is the case where a certain individual is often angered, and his anger stays with him a long time. Just as an inscription in rock is not quickly effaced by wind or water and lasts a long time, in the same way a certain individual is often angered .

"And how is an individual like an inscription in soil? There is the case where a certain individual is often angered, but his anger doesn't stay with him a long time. Just as an inscription in soil is quickly effaced by wind or water and doesn't last a long time, in the same way a certain individual is often angered .

"And how is an individual like an inscription in water? There is the case where a certain individual - when spoken to roughly, spoken to harshly, spoken to in an unpleasing way - is nevertheless congenial, companionable, & courteous. Just as an inscription in water immediately disappears and doesn't last a long time, in the same way a certain individual - when spoken to roughly, .

"These are the three types of individuals to be found existing in the world."

Anguttara Nikaya III.133 (Lekha Sutta)

Simile of the Dhamma Chariot (Dhammayana)

Its qualities of faith and wisdom
Are always yoked evenly together.
Shame is its pole, mind its yoke-tie
Mindfulness the watchful charioteer.

The chariot’s ornament is virtue,
Its axles meditation, energy its wheels;
Equanimity keeps the burden balanced,
Desirelessness its uphosttery.
Good will, non-harming, and seclusion:
These are the chariot’s weaponry,
Forbearance its armour and shield,
As it rolls towards security from bondage.

This divine vehicle unsurpassed
Originates from within oneself.
The wise depart from the world in it,
Inevitably winning the victory.

Samyutta Nikaya IV.4 (The Supreme Vehicle)

Abandoning Bad Kamma

A disciple has faith in that teacher and reflects: ‘The Blessed One in a variety of ways criticizes and censures the taking of life, and says, "Abstain from taking life." There are living beings that I have killed, to a greater or lesser extent. That was not right. That was not good. But if I become remorseful for that reason, that evil deed of mine will not be undone.’ So, reflecting thus, he abandons right then the taking of life, and in the future refrains from taking life. This is how there comes to be the transcending of that evil deed.

Samyutta Nikaya XLII.8 (Sankha Sutta – The Conch Trumpet)

Simile of the Ocean

"Just as the great ocean, bhikkhus, gradually shelves, slopes and inclines, and there is no sudden precipice, so also in this Dhamma and Discipline there is a gradual training, a gradual course, a gradual progression, and there is no sudden penetration to final knowledge.

"Just as the great ocean has one taste, the taste of salt, so also this Dhamma and Discipline has one taste, the taste of liberation."

Udana V.5 (Sona Sutta - The Observance Day)

Simile of The Sea-Turtle and The Yoke in The Ocean

"Suppose a man threw into the sea a yoke with one hole in it, and the east wind carried it to the west, and the west wind carried it to the east, and the north wind carried it to the south, and the south wind carried it to the north. Suppose there were a blind turtle that came up once at the end of each century. What do you think, bhikkhus? Would that blind turtle put his neck into that yoke with one hole in it?

"He might, venerable sir, sometime or other at the end of a long period.

"Bhikkhus, the blind turtle would take less time to put his neck into that yoke with a single hole in it than a fool, once gone to perdition, would take to regain the human state, I say. Why is that? Because there is no practising of the Dhamma there, no practising of what is righteous, no doing of what is wholesome, no performance of merit. There mutual devouring prevails, and the slaughter of the weak.

Majjhima Nikaya 129.24 ( Balapandita Sutta)

Arising of A Fully Enlightened One

It is impossible, monks, it cannot come to pass, that in one world-system, at one and the same time, there should arise two arahants who are Fully Enlightened Ones.

Anguttara Nikaya - Book of The Ones Chapter XV 1-28

Then certain gods exclaimed: "Oh, if only four fully enlightened Buddhas were to arise in the world and teach the Dhamma just like the Blessed Lord! That would be for the benefit and happiness of the many, out of compassion to the world, for the benefit and happiness of devas and humans!" And some said: "Never mind four fully enlightened Buddhas – three would suffice!" and others said: "Never mind three – two would suffice!"

At this Sakka said: "It is impossible, gentlemen, it cannot happen that two fully enlightened Buddhas should arise simultaneously in a single world-system. That cannot be. May this Blessed Lord continue to live long, for many years to come, free from sickness and disease! That would be for the benefit and happiness of the many, out of compassion to the world, for the benefit and happiness of devas and humans!"

Digha Nikaya 19:13-14 (Mahagovinda Sutta)

Four Kinds of Bliss

"There are these four kinds of bliss that can be attained in the proper season, on the proper occasions, by a householder enjoying the pleasures of the senses. Which four? The bliss of having, the bliss of [making use of] wealth, the bliss of debtlessness, the bliss of blamelessness."

Anguttara Nikaya IV.62 (Anana Sutta)

The Nature of Dhamma

"Whether or not there is the arising of Tathagatas, this property stands, this steadfastness of the Dhamma, this orderliness of the Dhamma: All fabrications are inconstant ."

Anguttara Nikaya III.137 (Dhamma-niyama Sutta)

Unconjecturable

"There are these four unconjecturables that are not to be conjectured about, that would bring madness & vexation to anyone who conjectured about them. Which four?

The Buddha-range of the Buddhas The jhana-range of a person in jhana . The (precise working out of the) results of kamma . Conjecture about (the origin, etc., of) the world "

Anguttara Nikaya IV.77 (Acintita Sutta)

Four Ways to Answer Questions

"There are these four ways of answering questions. Which four? There are questions that should be answered categorically [straightforwardly yes, no, this, that]. There are questions that should be answered with an analytical [qualified] answer [defining or redefining the terms]. There are questions that should be answered with a counter-question. There are questions that should be put aside. These are the four ways of answering questions."

Anguttara Nikaya IV.42 (Panha Sutta)

Samsara

And the Lord addressed the monks: "It is, monks, through not understanding, not penetrating four things that I as well as you have for a long time fared on round the cycle of rebirths. What are the four? Through not understanding the Ariyan morality, through not understanding the Ariyan concentration, through not understanding the Ariyan wisdom, through not understanding the Ariyan liberation, I as well as you have for a long time fared on round the cycle of rebirths. And it is by understanding and penetrating the Ariyan morality, the Ariyan concentration, the Ariyan wisdom, and the Ariyan liberation, that the craving for becoming has been cut off, the tendency towards becoming has been exhausted, and there will be no more rebirth."

Digha Nikaya 16:4.2 (Mahaparinibbana Sutta)

Pilgrimage Sites

"Lord, formerly monks who had spent the Rains in various places used to come to see the Tathagata, and we used to welcome them so that such well-trained monks might see you and pay their respects. But with the Lord’s passing, we shall no longer have a chance to do this."

"Ananda, there are four places the sight of which should arouse emotion in the faithful. Which are they? "Here the Tathagata was born" is the first. "Here the Tathagata attained supreme enlightenment" is the second. "Here the Tathagata set in motion the Wheel of Dhamma" is the third. "Here the Tathagata attained the Nibbana-element without remainder" is the fourth. And, Ananda, the faithful, monks and nuns, male and female lay-followers will visit those places. And any who die while making the pilgrimage to these shrines with a devout heart will, at the breaking up of the body after death, be reborn in a heavenly world."

Digha Nikaya 16:5.7-5.8 (Mahaparinibbana Sutta)

Arahants Incapable of Transgressing Nine Principles

"And any monk who is an Arahant, whose corruptions are destroyed, who has lived the life, done what has to be done, laid down the burden, gained the true goal, who has completely destroyed the fetter of becoming, and is liberated by supreme insight, is incapable of doing nine things: he is incapable of (1) deliberately taking the life of a living being; (2) taking what is not given so as to constitute theft; (3) sexual intercourse; (4) telling a deliberate lie; (5) storing up goods for sensual indulgence as he did formerly in the household life; (6) acting wrongly through attachment; (7) acting wrongly through hatred; (8) acting wrongly through folly; (9) acting wrongly through fear. These are the nine things which an Arahant, whose corruptions are destroyed, cannot do "

Digha Nikaya 29.26 (Pasadika Sutta)

 

"It is impossible for a monk whose mental fermentations are ended to intentionally deprive a living being of life. .to take, in the manner of stealing, what is not given. .to engage in sexual intercourse. to tell a conscious lie. to consume stored-up sensual things as he did before, when he was a householder .. to follow a bias based on desire . to follow a bias based on aversion . to follow a bias based on fear to follow a bias based on delusion.

"Both before and now I say to you that an arahant monk whose mental fermentations are ended, who has reached fulfillment, done the task, laid down the burden, attained the true goal, totally destroyed the fetter of becoming, and who is released through right gnosis, cannot possibly transgress these nine principles."

Anguttara Nikaya IX.7 (Sutava Sutta)

No Lack for Arahants in the Noble Eightfold Path

"In whatever Dhamma and Discipline the Noble Eightfold Path is not found, no ascetic is found of the first, the second, the third, or the fourth grade. But such ascetics can be found, of the first, second, third or fourth grade in a Dhamma and Discipline where the Noble Eightfold Path is found. Now, Subhadda, in this Dhamma and Discipline the Noble Eightfold Path is found, and in it are to be found ascetics of the first, second, third or fourth grade. Those other schools are devoid of [true] ascetics; but if in this one the monks were to live the life to perfection, the world would not lack for Arahants

Twenty-nine years of age I was
When I went forth to seek the Good.
Now over fifty years have passed
Since the day that I went forth
To roam the realm of wisdom’s law
Outside of which no ascetic is
[First, second, third or fourth degree].
Other schools of such are bare,
But if here monks live perfectly,
The world won’t lack for Arahants.

Digha Nikaya 16:5.23-5.27 (Mahaparinibbana Sutta)

Criteria for The Buddha’s True Teaching

"Suppose a monk were to say: ‘Friends, I heard and received this from the Lord’s own lips: this is the Dhamma, this is the discipline, this is the Master’s teaching’, then, monks, his words and expressions should be carefully noted and compared with the Suttas and reviewed in the light of the discipline. If they, on such comparison and review, are found not to conform to the Suttas or the discipline, the conclusion must be: ‘Assuredly this is not the word of the Buddha, it has been wrongly understood by the monk’, and the matter is to be rejected. But where on such comparison and review, they are found to conform to the Suttas or the discipline, the conclusion must be: ‘Assuredly this is the word of the Buddha, it has been rightly understood by the monk.’

Digha Nikaya 16:4.8 (Mahaparinibbana Sutta)

Rebirth in the Brahma World

"Here a bhikkhu abides pervading one quarter with a mind imbued with loving-kindness, likewise the second, likewise the third, likewise the fourth; so above, below, around, and everywhere, and to all as to himself, he abides pervading the all-encompassing world with a mind imbued with loving-kindness, abundant, exalted, immeasurable, without hostility and without ill will. . This is the path to the company of Brahma.

"Again, a bhikkhu abides pervading one quarter with a mind imbued with compassion with a mind imbued with appreciative joy with a mind imbued with equanimity, likewise the second, likewise the third, likewise the fourth; so above, below, around, and everywhere, and to all as to himself, he abides pervading the all-encompassing world with a mind imbued with equanimity, abundant, exalted, immeasurable, without hostility and without ill will. . This too is the path to the company of Brahma.

Majjhima Nikaya - Subha Sutta (99:24-27)

Mirror of Dhamma: Criteria for Stream Entry

" Therefore, Ananda, I will teach you a way of knowing Dhamma, called the Mirror of Dhamma, whereby the Ariyan disciple, if he so wishes, can discern of himself: "I have destroyed hell, animal-rebirth, the realm of ghosts, all downfall, evil fates and sorry states. I am a Stream-Winner, incapable of falling into states of woe, certain of attaining Nibbana."

"And what is this Mirror of Dhamma by which he can know this? Here, Ananda, this Ariyan disciple is possessed of unwavering confidence in the Buddha, possessed of unwavering faith in the Dhamma, possessed of unwavering confidence in the Sangha, And he is possessed of morality dear to the Noble Ones, unbroken, without defect, unspotted, without inconsistency, liberating, uncorrupted, and conducive to concentration. This, Ananda, is the Mirror of Dhamma, whereby the Ariyan disciple can discern of himself: "I have destroyed hell I am a Stream-Winner certain of attaining Nibbana."

Digha Nikaya 16:2.8-2.9 (Mahaparinibbana Sutta)

Nibbana

At that time the Lord was instructing, rousing, inspiring, and gladdening the bhikkhus with a Dhamma talk connected with Nibbana, and those bhikkhus, being receptive and attentive and concentrating the whole mind, the Lord uttered on that occasion this inspired utterance:

-- There is, bhikkhus, a not-born, a not-brought-to-being, a not-made, a not-formed. If, bhikkhus, there were no not-born, not-brought-to-being, not-made, not-formed, no escape would be discerned from what is born, brought-to-being, made, formed. But because there is a not-born, a not-brought-to-being, a not-made, a not-formed, therefore an escape is discerned from what is born, brought-to-being, made, formed.

Udana VIII.3 (Patali Village) 8.3

The Buddha only shows the Way

"Master Gotama, since Nibbana exists and the path leading to Nibbana exists and Master Gotama is present as the guide, what is the cause and reason why, when Master Gotama's disciples are thus advised and instructed by him, some of them attain Nibbana, the ultimate goal, and some do not attain it?"

"As to that, brahmin, I will ask you a question in return. . Suppose a man came who wanted to go to Rajagaha, and he approached you and said: 'Venerable sir, I want to go to Rajagaha. Show me the road to Rajagaha.' Then you told him: 'Now, good man, this road goes to Rajagaha. Follow it for awhile and you will see a certain village, go a little further and you will see a certain town, go a little further and you will see Rajagaha with its lovely parks, groves, meadows, and ponds.' Then having been thus advised and instructed by you, he would take a wrong road and would go to the west. Then a second man came who . Then having been thus advised and instructed by you, he would arrive safely in Rajagaha. Now, brahmin, since Rajagaha exists and the path leading to Rajagaha exists and you are present as the guide, what is the cause and reason why, when those men have been thus advised and instructed by you, one man takes a wrong road and would go to the west and one arrives safely in Rajagaha?"

"What can I do about that, Master Gotama? I am one who shows the way."

"So too, brahmin, Nibbana exists and the path leading to Nibbana exists and I am present as the guide. Yet when my disciples have been thus advised and instructed by me, some of them attain Nibbana, the ultimate goal, and some do not attain it. What can I do about that, brahmin? The Tathagata is one who only shows the way."

Majjhima Nikaya 107:12-14 (Ganakamoggallana Sutta)

What is a Buddha?

" Those asavas whereby, if they are not abandoned, I should be a deva, . a gandharva, a yakka, a human being, those asavas in me are abandoned not to rise again in future time. Just as, brahmin, a lotus, blue, red or white, though born in the water, grown up in the water, when it reaches the surface stands there unsoiled by the water, just so, brahmin, though born in the world, grown up in the world, having overcome the world, I abide unsoiled by the world. Take it that I am a Buddha, brahmin."

Anguttara Nikaya IV-36

The Dhamma as Refuge

"Therefore, Ananda, you should live as islands unto yourselves, being your own refuge, with no one else as your refuge, with the Dhamma as an island, with the Dhamma as your refuge, with no other refuge.

Digha Nikaya 16:2.26 (Mahaparinibbana Sutta)

Gradual Path

"Bhikkhus, I do not say that final knowledge is achieved all at once. On the contrary, final knowledge is achieved by gradual training, by gradual practice, by gradual progress.

Majjhima Nikaya - Kitagiri Sutta (70:22-23)

"Just as the great ocean, bhikkhus, gradually shelves, slopes and inclines, and there is no sudden precipice, so also in this Dhamma and Discipline there is a gradual training, a gradual course, a gradual progression, and there is no sudden penetration to final knowledge.

Udana V.5 (The Observance Day)

Difficult for Followers of Other Teachers to Understand Dhamma

"It is enough to cause you bewilderment, Vaccha, enough to cause you confusion. For this Dhamma, Vaccha, is profound, hard to see and hard to understand, peaceful and sublime, unattainable by mere reasoning, subtle, to be experienced by the wise. It is hard for you to understand it when you hold another view, accept another teaching, approve of another teaching, pursue a different training, and follow a different teacher..."

Majjhima Nikaya 72.18 (Aggivacchagotta Sutta)

Progressive Instructions in Dhamma

Then the Blessed One gave the householder Upali progressive instruction, that is, talk on giving, talk on virtue, talk on the heavens; he explained the danger, degradation, and defilement in sensual pleasures and the blessing of renunciation. When he knew that the householder Upali's mind was ready, receptive, free from hindrances, elated, and confident, he expounded to him the teaching special to the Buddhas: suffering, its origin, its cessation, and the path. Just as a clean cloth with all marks removed would take dye evenly, so too, while the householder Upali sat there, the spotless immaculate vision of the Dhamma arose in him: "All that is subject to arising is subject to cessation." Then the householder Upali saw the Dhamma, attained the Dhamma, understood the Dhamma, fathomed the Dhamma; he crossed beyond doubt, did away with perplexity, gained intrepidity, and became independent of others in the Teacher's Dispensation.

Majjhima Nikaya 56.18 (Upali Sutta)

Five Factors of Striving

"So too, prince, there are these five factors of striving. What five? Here a bhikkhu has faith, he places faith in the Tathagata's enlightenment he is free from illness and affliction he is honest and sincere . he is energetic in abandoning unwholesome states and in undertaking wholesome states . he is wise These are the five factors of striving."

Majjhima Nikaya 85:58 (Bodhirajakumara Sutta)

Meditation Praised by The Buddha

"And what kind of meditation did the Blessed One praise? Here, brahmin, quite secluded from sensual pleasures, secluded from unwholesome states, a bhikkhu enters upon and abides in the first jhana With the stilling of applied and sustained thought, he bhikkhu enters upon and abides in the second jhana With the fading away as well of rapture he bhikkhu enters upon and abides in the third jhana With the abandoning of pleasure and pain he bhikkhu enters upon and abides in the fourth jhana The Blessed One praised that kind of meditation."

Majjhima Nikaya 108.27 (Gopakamoggallana Sutta )

Undeclared by the Buddha

"And what have I left undeclared? 'The world is eternal', 'The world is not eternal', 'The world is finite', 'The world is infinite', 'The soul is the same as the body', 'The soul is one thing and the body another’, 'After death a Tathagata exists', 'After death a Tathagata does not exist’, 'After death a Tathagata both exists and does not exist', 'After death a Tathagata neither exists nor does not exist' - I have left undeclared."

"Why have I left that undeclared? Because it is unbeneficial, it does not belong to the fundamentals of the holy life, it does not lead to disenchantment, to dispassion, to cessation, to peace, to direct knowledge, to enlightenment, to Nibbana. That is why I have left it undeclared."

Majjhima Nikaya 63: Culamalunkya Sutta (63:7-10)

Dhamma Taught by the Buddha

"But what things have I pointed out as certain? "This is suffering, this is the origin of suffering, this is the cessation of suffering, this is the path leading to the cessation of suffering." Why? Because they are conducive to the purpose, conducive to Dhamma, the way to embark on the holy life, they lead to disenchantment, to dispassion, to cessation, to calm, to higher knowledge, to enlightenment, to Nibbana. That is why I have declared them as certain.

Digha Nikaya 9.33 (Potthapada Sutta)

Loving-Kindness (Metta)

... Let none deceive another,
Nor despise anyone anywhere
Nor, with thoughts of ill-will and hate,
Wish for another to suffer.
But as a mother would protect her only child,
Even at the risk of her own life,
Even so, towards all beings,
One should cultivate a limitless heart;
With loving-kindness towards the whole world,
One should cultivate a limitless heart,
Above, below and all around,
Unbounded, without ill-will, without hate.

Karaniyametta Sutta

The Supreme Blessings

... Not to associate with fools,
To associate with the wise;
And honour those worthy of honour:
This is the supreme blessing.

The support of father and mother,
The cherishing of wife and children,
Ways of work without conflict:
This is the supreme blessing.

Mangala Sutta

Five Daily Reflections

I am subject to aging, have not gone beyond aging.

I am subject to illness, have not gone beyond illness.&I am subject to death, have not gone beyond death.

I will grow different, separate from all that is dear and appealing to me.

I am the owner of my actions (kamma), heir to my actions, born of my actions, related through my actions, and abide supported by my actions. Whatever I do, for good or for evil, to that will I fall heir.

These are the five facts that one should reflect on often, whether one is a woman or a man, lay or ordained.

Anguttara Nikaya V-57 (Upajjhatthana Sutta)&

Both Concentration and Wisdom

There is no concentration in one who lacks wisdom,
Nor is there wisdom in him who lacks concentration,
In whom are both concentration and wisdom,
He, indeed, is in the presence of Nibbana.

Dhammapada 372

Mind is The Forerunner

Mind is the forerunner of (all evil) states.
Mind is chief; mind-made are they.
If one speaks or acts with wicked mind,
Because of that, suffering follows one,
Even as the wheel follows the hoof of the draught-ox.

Mind is the forerunner of (all good) states.
Mind is chief; mind-made are they.
If one speaks or acts with pure mind,
Because of that, happiness follows one,
Even as one’s shadow that never leaves.

Dhammapada 1-2

Even as rain penetrates an ill-thatched house,
So does lust penetrate an undeveloped mind.
Even as rain does not penetrate a well-thatched house,
So does lust not penetrate an well-developed mind.

Dhammapada 13-14

The Wise Create Their Own Haven by Own Effort

By sustained effort and earnestness,
Discipline and self-control,
Let the wise man make for himself an island,
Which no flood overwhelms.

Dhammapada 25

One Can Be One’s Greatest Enemy

Whatever foe may do to foe,
Or haters those that they hate,
An ill-directed mind indeed
Can do one far greater harm.

Dhammapada 42

Impermanence of the Body

Before long, alas! And it will lie,
This body, here upon the earth.
Discarded, void of consciousness,
Useless as a rotten log.

Dhammapada 41

The Wise Fool

The fool who knows that he is a fool
Is, for that very reason, a wsie man;
The fool who thinks that he is wise
Is called a fool indeed.

Dhammapada 63

Self-Conquest is the Best of All Conquests

Though thousand times a thousand
In battle one may conquer,
Yet should one conquer just oneself,
One is the greatest conqueror.

Dhammapada 103

Purity and Impurity Depend One Oneself

By oneself, indeed, is evil done;
By oneself is one defiled.
By oneself is evil left undone;
By oneself, indeed, is one purified.
Purity and impurity depend on oneself.
No one purifies another.

Dhammapada 165

The Good Are Rare

Human birth is hard to gain,
Hard for mortals is their life.
To come to Dhamma True is hard,
Rare the Buddha’s Arising.

Dhammapada 182

The Gift of Dhamma Excels All Other Gifts

The gift of Dhamma excels all gifts;
The taste of Dhamma excels all tastes;
Delight in Dhamma excels all delights;
Destruction of craving overcomes all sorrow.

Dhammapada 354

The Noble Eight-fold Path

The best of paths is the Eight-fold Path;
The best of Truths are the four statements (Noble Truths);
Non-attachment is the best of teachings;
The best of humankind is the Seer (Buddha).

Dhammapada 273

Transient Are All Conditioned Things

Transience of conditioned things,
When, with wisdom, one discerns;
Then, wearily from dukkha, one turns,
Treading the path to purity.

Dhammapada 277

The Teaching of The Buddhas

Not to do evil,
To cultivate good,
To purify one’s mind –
This is the Teaching of the Buddhas

Dhammapada 183

Not reviling, neither harming,
Restrained to limit freedom’s ways;
Knowing moderation in one’s food,
Dwelling far in solitude;
And striving in the mind sublime –
This is the Teaching of the Buddhas.

Dhammapada 185

The Wise Are Not Easily Moved

Just as a mighty boulder
Stirs not with the wind,
So the wise are never moved
Either by praise or blame

Dhammapada 81

Self-Examination

Not others’ opposition
Nor what they did or failed to do,
But in oneself should be sought
Things done, things left undone.

Dhammapada 50

Straighten Your Mind

A mind agitated, wavering,
Hard to guard and hard to check,
One of wisdom renders straight
As an arrow-maker with a shaft.

Dhammapada 33

Blessings

Blest to have friends when one is in need,
Blest contentment with whatever is,
Blest is merit when life is at an end,
Abandoning all dukkha is blessedness.

Dhammapada 331

-ooOoo-


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