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APA Feb 2004 newsletter

Photograph of Kuan Yin Statue in the snow with budding bulbs
by Paula Swaney

Editress; Ginger Strivelli

Well, Ginger has left me to the chat report. Ginger, Carrin and I were the only three to arrive. Ginger and I discussed redecorating her house ( I am trying to work a deal of a lifetime of free haircuts, if I help with the ordeal) We also discovered that Carrin does not like living in Alabama, and is looking forward to moving to N.C. We touch lightly on politics …of course me being the Republican naturally made me wrong.

We did have a topic to discuss which was Spring Equinox Rites &Lefts ( private joke for those who did attend the chat session). Although as usual we were unsuccessful in staying on topic. And then quicker than buckwheat through a bear, we all were blessed with the Yahoo Gremlins. They bounced us out of the room and locked the door. So we all retired to our respective corners logged off for the evening. Ginger in her Empress way directed me to send out the report…If I had known this ahead of time I would have kept minutes on it. Alas I am always the last to know these things.



(From the Jack Tale 'Jack and King Marlock)

When being chased to escape your foe throw a thorn over your right shoulder as you flee saying the incantation; "Good Roads before us --- vines and briars behind us!" (This works well as a figurative 'escape' as it does for a literal one, so this can be used to 'escape' any 'foe' that is 'chasing' you be it an actual being actually running after you, or a streak of bad luck you can't seem to shake, a storm headed your way, or just about anything a-troubling you, that you are trying to get rid of. Luckily most of us don't get into as much trouble as ole jack, but 'tis a mighty useful little spell when one does.

The Blessing of the Moon Goddess Ritual chant
(Oral tradition ancient incantation as quoted in the book Aradia published in 1890 By C. Leland)

"Se la Luna adorerai Tutto tu otterai"
(or in English; "If you adore Luna then what you desire, you shall obtain.")

In a common Hindu daily ritual a member of each household (generally the wife, who is thought to have more power to intercede with the Gods than the men or children) makes offerings Called 'puja,' often fruit or flowers, on a small household altar.

Hawaiian Chant addressed to the Goddess Pele (Traditional)
Lauahi Pele i kai o Puna One`ä kai o Malama Mälama i ke kanaka A he pua laha `ole

(Or in English -roughly it can be translated to this rhyming chant)

Madam Pele burns Her way to Puna, and on to Malama, Heaping cinders. Take care of your people They are your best treasures.

Cherokee New Moon Ceremony

Traditional Cherokees fast until sundown every month on the New Moon Small children fast only until noon. The sacred day is started by going to a creek, stream, spring or other natural water site that morning and then fasting until sundown, Eating only once the dark moon is in the sky.

By Beth Langley

Brighid's Flame: The Shrine at Kildare
Since before recorded history, Brighid (said to be daughter to Danu) had a shrine at Kildare, Ireland, where a perpetual flame was kept in Her honor. Brighid is the ruling Goddess over fire, sun, childbirth, domestic activities, and war. Her warriors were called "brigands", and the warriors often said a prayer before war to ask protection from her magickal green mantle.

The Temple housed a perpetual flame that was traditionally tended by 19 virgin Druid priestesses, and on the twentieth day, Brighid Herself kept the flame alive. This continued for many years until the Romans came to Ireland and began converting local customs and gods into Christian forms; Brighid was canonized as St. Brighid, and decannonized in the 1960's, yet people still visit the shrine and celebrate Her feast day. The flame is still kept alive by 19 priestesses, so the tradition and the sacred site have persisted through history ad much turbulence. If you feel an affinity for Brighid, definitely research and visit this shrine!

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