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APA MAY 2002 newsletter

Appalachian Pagan Alliance Newsletter- May 2002

Editress; Ginger Strivelli

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During May the APA held our 3rd annual "APA May Day Celebration" We also began planning our 2nd annual Vacation Witchcraft School. The yahoogroups list has become unusually quiet, perhaps the lure of Mother Nature's Summertime beauty outside has gotten some of us APA members out of cyberspace for a change.

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May 4th was the APA's 3rd annual Beltane gathering at Lake Julian. As usual, the weather was rainy.

About twenty people attended to enjoy the potluck picnic and traditional maypole dancing--and the many children who attended enjoyed the not-so-traditional mermaid pinata.

The next APA event is Vacation Witchcraft School, scheduled for July 13th.
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BOOK OF SHADOWS:

beauty spell (Submitted by Nessa McNelly)

holding hand mirror repeat 3 times... any beauty I see in the is reflected from inside of me though time will crone the fairest maid what shines from within time cannot fade. so mote it be

No-fuss May pole:

Take one tall fallen tree branch; saw a flat end on the top. Use a Curtain rod finial, to top the pole, adding ribbons over the screw of the finial (use hole punchers to make a hole for the screw to go through.) before screwing it onto the top of the pole. This may be held, or placed in a concrete filled tire or pot for a base, if you can not dig a hole and plant the pole.

Healing With Poppets 1993 by Raymond Buckland

The Poppet can be used for healing purposes--in fact that is probably its primary use. The Poppet can also be used for love magick.

The same construction method is used: two outlines cut from cloth, sewn together and marked with identifying symbols and characteristics (all whilst concentrating your thoughts on the person it represents). You should stuff the Poppet with the herb appropriate for the person's ailment. (That information is available in many fine texts, or check our "Herbalism" section) If ever in doubt as to what to use, stuff the Poppet with Calendula (also called Marigold, Marybud, Holibud--Calendula officinalis), which is a cure-all.

You should name the Poppet (as in love-magick, to symbolically represent the person who is to benefit from the healing spell), sprinkling and censing it, then lay it on the altar.

Should you be working for someone who has had surgery, then make an incision in the Poppet in the appropriate place. Then, taking it up from the altar, concentrate on the healing and direct your power into the patient as you sew up the incision.

You can do Auric and/or Pranic healing using the Poppet in lieu of the actual person. Once you have named and consecrated the Poppet, then anything you do to it, of course, you do to that person.

Hawaiian Offering Spell to the Goddess Pele;

break the ('ohelo) branch throw one part down the precipice, saying:

E Pele, eia ka 'ohelo 'au;

(Oh, Pele, here are your branches)

e taumaha aku wau 'ia 'oe

(I offer some to you)

e 'ai ho'i au tetahi

(some I also eat)."

MERRY MEET THE GODS-Section P

Pan- Greek God of shepherds, the forest, animals, hunting, wildness, and playfulness.

Pele- Hawaiian Volcano Goddess

Parvati- Hindu Mother Goddess

Pugu- Siberian Sun God

Ptah-Egyptian God of Crafts

Pax-Roman Goddess of peace

Pudicita-Roman Goddess of chastity

Poxolom- Mayan God of diseases

Prenda- Albanian God of love

Pluto- Roman God of the underworld

Poleramma- Hindu Goddess of small pox and other plagues

Parasurama- Hindu God who saved the world from an army of demons, an avatar of Vishnu whose name means 'Rama with an ax.'

Pakhet-Egyptian Goddess of the hunt

Parjanya- Hindu Rain God

Paca Mama- Incan Earth Goddess

Pap nigin gara- Babylonian God of War

Pellon Pekko- Finnish God of beer, and farming

Poseidon- Greek God of the Oceans, sailors, and sealife

Pomona- Roman Goddess of Orchards

Persephone- Greek Goddess of death, sadness, and suffering

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