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ALLEN/KIPP FAMILY LETTERS AND POSTCARDS

Allen Family - L-R: Fannie Allen Sprague; May Allen (wife of Rob't Jr.); Joyce Sprague? (in front); Minnie Stacy Ferguson?; Ruth Sprague?; Robert Allen, Jr.; Ellen Scribner Stacy Allen (second wife of Robert Allen); Bessie Stacy Holtz, Robert Henry Allen, Sr.

These letters were in a shoebox of things loaned to me by Bonnie Dugan Miller, who was a great grand-daughter of Sarah Louise Allen Kipp. The spelling and punctuation is as it was in the letters. The first address is the address on the front of the envelope, followed by the return address. Mention of Mother in these letters, is the step-mother of Robert, Fannie, Cora (my great grandmother) and Sarah Louise. Her name was Ellen Scribner Stacy Allen. The first wife of Robert, Sr., the childrensí actual mother, was Emma Riggs Allen, and she passed away 29 Oct. 1895. The first two letters pre-date the wedding of Sarah Louise Allen to Edward Adrian Kipp on 3 June 1909. Any notes by me are in italics. I have tried to put them in chronological order, but some of them did not have dates on, or the dates were not readable, so I did my best to guess where they went. If you have reason to believe there are some out of order, please contact me and give the reason why you came to that conclusion. Enjoy! ĖSusan Gates Davis


Mr. Edd Kipp
104 Ĺ Lake Ave.
Grand Rapids, Mich
Macatawa Park, August 15/07
Dear Ed
Well Dearie how are you. I thought sure I could see you tonight but was disappointed. Mrs. Adams Sister, her Husband and Son came tonight. They go back tomorrow thank goodness. I canít possibly come Sunday because she expects company Saturday to spend Sunday. Canít you come here. Please say yes. I will be so lonesome if I have to spend Sunday alone. Would like to come to the Rapids tomorrow night if she doesnít have company again. I certainly am lonesome proper. I hardly know what I am writing. Grandma Turner is sitting on the porch talking every minute. The rest are out in the drink, fine expression donít you think. Saw by the paper Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Rozema have a new daughter. Good luck to them. Must now close and go get supper. I certainly hope to see you soon. Yours with love, Louisa Excuse haste.

Miss Louisa Allen
131 Grand Ave
Grand Rapids, Michigan
GAP
11 Washington St.
Rockville Centre, N.Y.
Mar 1st/07
My very dear child,
Will you forgive me for my long silence for I have not written you since Christmas, and to think you have been so sick and your Auntie not to write you, but I have thought about you daily and look often on the pretty Calendar you and dear Cora sent me. I really do think it beautiful and the pictures well worth framing, and if I did not thank you in my last letter, please accept thanks now. I did not know how the Christmas holidays passed or what I had until afterward, for I was over to Aldoms? (Aldous?) so much. I just put my things right away, and it was a week or two before I looked them over.
I was so glad to get your nice long letter dear and to hear the news of yourself & family. How much I should like to see Cora & her little girl. Does she live with a family the same as you do or what is she doing? I shall live in hopes of seeing you again and also dear Cora. If you do not come this way I shall have to come there. Do not hesitate to mention the Paterson folks all you want dear. I know it is a relief to write if we cannot talk, but I wish we could see each other for there is lots I could tell you that perhaps it would not be best to write. Some day if we meet I will tell you.
How is your Father now. As usual I never hear from him, it is a year now I guess.
I do so hope you are feeling allright again now, no cold or rheumatism. We are all pretty well here now. I keep busy as I generally do. The Fortnightly keeps me a little that way, but we have had some very interesting meetings, especially the Art & Music days. The meeting on Jan 29 was more like a fine Musicale than anything else. Vocal & instrumental music, and about 70 people there. It rather took my breath away to have to speak before so many people, but I lived through it, but rather dread ďGuest dayĒ when there will be so many, but that does not come until May, and I can think up something in the meantime.
Now dear please write soon again and ask Cora to write me, for I should so much like to hear from her. Fanny has never answered my letter which I wrote in answer to hers, but I suppose her babies keep her busy.
Did I tell you Mrs. Tracy had moved to Richmond Hill. I miss her so much.
Now I must stop with fond love.
I am as ever Your loving Auntie, Grace
Nana & Uncle J.H.P. would send love if they knew I was writing.


Postcard from Boyne Falls, Mich.
Apr. 7, 1916
Mrs. Ed Kipp
57 E. Fulton Pl.
Grand Rapids
Dear Sister,
Intended writing you have been sewing. Sorry you have had a bad time with your heart. Hope you are feeling better and the little people are well. We want to come down again this summer. Wish you could come up here. Want to make a dress for Louise. Making one for Ruth. Love from All, Sister

Postcard to: Mrs. A. Kipp, 57 E. Fulton Plc., Grand Rapids, Mich.
Jun 10, 1916
Dear Aunt Louise, I received your letter and am hoping to get it sent and am writing a card to tell you I sent you a letter 2 days after I received your letter and was waiting for an answer. Didnít you receive it. I sent you a real long letter stating I would crochet you a yoke as soon as I got it from you. You did not get the other letter although I sent one. Better get the thread at G.R. and send it so you can get what you want. Send the thread and I will crochet the yoke. Send 5 or 6 spools of thread. Send your bust measure. Send the thread as soon as you can and I will hurry and crochet the yoke for you. Better send about 5 or 6 spools of thread and if thereís any left over Iíll let you know. Edna

Postcard from Conklin, Mich.
Jun 15, 1916
Mrs. A. Kipp
57 E. Fulton Plc.
Grand Rapids, Mich.
Dear Aunt,
I received the thread and think is also the nicest thread I ever saw. I shall not start the yoke till I get my instruction book which I am intending to get next Tues or Wed. but it is going to be a pretty one after it is done. Canít you come to Conklin some time this summer. I wish you could come. Say, Aunt Louise will you please write and tell me the price of the thread from where you got it. I want to get some like it. Think it is very pretty. Say if there is any thread left over Iíll return it or make you some other little article. Write some time and come out when you can. From Edna.


Postcard to Mrs. Adrian Kipp, 57 E. Fulton Pl. S.E., Grand Rapids, Mich.
Conklin, Mich.
Jun 25, 1916
Found all well at the home of Marcus Umlor. Will remain here until Monday, coming to G.R. and leaving for LeRoy Tuesday. Best love, Papa

Postcard to Miss Emma Kipp, 57 E. Fulton Place, Grand Rapids, Mich.
Grand Rapids
Aug 3, 1916
Dear Emma,
Do you play with your doll. What do you want for your birthday. Good bye from Edna

Postcard to: Master Robert Kipp, 57 E. Fulton Place, Grand Rapids, Mich.
Grand Rapids
Aug 8, 1916
Dear Robert, I looked for a baby doll and I could not get any. I will look again. Good bye from Edna.

Postcard to: Mr. Adrian Kipp, 909 Zeeland Ct., Grand Rapids, Mich.
(No Postmark)
Dear Adrian, What do you do now days. The picture on the other side is a church something like ours inside. Good bye. From Edna

Postcard to: Mrs. A. Kipp
57 E. Fulton Plc.
Grand Rapids, Mich.
Conklin, Mich.
Aug. 9, 1916
Dear Sister,
In case letter should not come as only 1 stamp was on. Other money left in box. Come out on 6 oíclock car but let me hear from you again if possible. All well. Best love. Cora


Postcard to: Mrs. A. Kipp, 57 E. Fulton Plc., Grand Rapids, Mich.
Conklin, Mich.
Sept. 20, 1916
Letter and pattern tomorrow. Cora


Postcard to: Mrs. Adrian Kipp, 57 E. Fulton Pl. N.E., Grand Rapids, Mich.
Conklin, Mich.
(Canít read date.)
Transferred from Leroy to Conklin then to you. All well. Will arrange for a longer visit soon. Sister Cora

Mrs. Adrian Kipp
57 E. Fulton Pl. N.E.
Grand Rapids, Mich
R.H. Allen
LeRoy, Mich
Sept. 28, 1916
My Dear Ed and Louisa,
Say, Louisa of course your letter reached here or we would not have known anything about it. Sorry your spells continue to trouble you. Take it as easy as you can and do your best to get rid of them. Use your own judgement about asking Holts. It would of course show the proper spirit to ask them. They would no doubt feel better over it, and they may not come at all and then you would feel better for having asked them. But donít you go to any trouble for them for am sure Bill wouldnít want you to, and if they donít like your style let them say soówhen they get back to Paterson and you canít hear it. I wrote Will Holt and directed as follows:--Will G. Holt, Cleveland Telephone Co, Cleveland, Ohio, Care R.G. Pate. They live at 1341 E. Boulevard, Cleveland, Ohio. So if you write Grace perhaps you had better address the house. But do as you think best. Write your name and address on corner of envelope so if they donít get it it will be returned to you. Then you will know what to do. They may have left Cleveland for all I know. Weather here cold and cloudy. Have had plenty of rain the past ten days. We understand that potato vacation harvest will begin one week from next Monday and continue two weeks. During vacation, as we understand it, the walls and ceilings of the school house will be alabastered and perhaps the woodwork varnished and the floors oiled. Hope so at least. We are on the second month of school and the same old storyógetting along fine. Like our work, teachers and pupils. Expect to help at the school in the repairs made. Best love and trusting all are well.
Your loving Father, R.H. Allen.

Postcard to: Mrs. Ed Kipp, 57 E. Fulton Plc., Grand Rapids, Mich.
(Cannot read postmark at all.)
Dear Sis: Am sending hoarse redish. Grind and add vinegar and cream. Will be down thursday if it does not rain. Could not send stuff ground for fear of the can being broke so it wont take you long to grind it.
Best love, Cora

Postcard to: Mrs. Ed Kipp, 57 E. Fulton Pl., Grand Rapids, Mich.
(Canít read postmark or date.)
Dear Sister. We arrived at Leroy O.K. Have not seen papa yet. We are mailing you pr. shoes Harlie got for himself. Now they are not alike. He has a tag on one he wants you to match. They sent one a $1.98 & one $2.48, and he wants a pair of the 2.48. If you canít mate the shoes get one just like it or an 8. Be sure they match. Fannie

Mrs. Ed Kipp
57 E. Fulton Rd.
Grand Rapids, Mich
Boyne Falls, Mich
Sept 28, 1916
Dear Sister,
We got the shoes O.K. will enclose postage. Many Thanks for your trouble. They are all right and Daddy is wearing them. I have my towels all madeó24 in all. I will use some for the table and put hangers on 12. I did a big washing Monday and was 2 days ironing now I expect to wash today. I hope Louise that you are feeling better again, also hope the children are well. Nearly time for the 1st bell to ring so will have to hurry have the dishes to wash. We found everything all right love to All.
Sister Fannie

Postcard to: Mrs. A. Kipp, 57 E. Fulton Plc., Grand Rapids, Mich.
Conklin, Mich.
Oct. 5, 1916
Dear Sister. Had potatoes down about two weeks ago so have more now. Clayton has a bad dislocation of left arm. Fell from west porch Tuesday. Dr. said worse than a break. Lots to think about now. Donít think I can come now. Best Love, Cora

Postcard to: Mrs. A. Kipp, 57 E. Fulton Plc., Grand Rapids, Mich.
(Date unknown) Dear Sister. Glad for you that at last potatoe trouble is over. Lucky Marcus seen Edd. Either way you mentioned will be all right. Lucky fall for Robert and so far Clayton only fell from west porch. If every thing goes all right will send another sack soon. Best love, Cora

Mrs. Adrian Kipp
57 E. Fulton Pl. N.E.
Grand Rapids, Mich.
R.H. Allen
LeRoy, Mich
October 6, 1916
My Dear Ed and Louisa,
Was surprised when reading your letter to think of forty cent potatoes at Cadillac. Am sure the price has not been below one dollar. They are one dollar here at present but liable to drop. Creamery butter is thirty four cents a pound. Eggs 30 cents. Flour 8.50, though we bought a barrel at $8.00. We have our potatoes in the back lot dug and in the cellar. Our share was twelve bushels. Ad took his twelve bushels and sold them for 12.00. We had three bushels in the garden making us fifteen bushels in the cellar. We have our potato of red ones yet to dig but am not counting of those as we intend them for seed. Considering the weather we had an excellent garden and are well satisfied. We had chicken for dinner yesterday our own raising. We now have 32 left. Enough for us maybe. Had intended selling them and buy an automobile but have changed our mind. Two weeks vacation at school beginning next Monday. During vacation we alabastine walls and ceilings and expect to have the floors oiled and wainscoating varnish. Hope so for the improvements are necessary. Have heard no more from Holt or Grace nor about their coming, but it is not yet November. Shall make no preparation. Beans are ten cents a pound. We have our picked and shelled and had all told 25 pounds of large white beans. We do really raise a lot of stuff in our garden. In a letter from Bill Saturday we learn that an uncle Tom died in England August 29. He was my fatherís brother and that takes the last of that family. Do not know how old he was, but do know that he and his wife had planned to celebrate the 50th anniversary of their wedding on October 11. That Grand Rapids murderer James Allen was no relation of ours so far as known. Glad the children are well and going to school
Best love and God bless you all.
Your Loving Father, R.H. Allen

Postcard to: Mrs. A. Kipp, 57 E. Fulton Plc., Grand Rapids, Mich.
Oct 17 (Canít read year on postmark.) Late potatoes are not dug yet so cannot tell you. If there is a crop so we have any to sell you may have some. Cora


Postcard to: Mrs. Ed Kipp, 57 E. Fulton Pl., Grand Rapids, Mich.
Boyne Falls, Mich.
Nov 7, 1916
Dear Sister. Potatoes are 1.40 per bu. it will cost 1.07 freight for 10 bu. and if you want some let us know at once & Harlie will get them for you. We are well. Expect the finish ďcoverĒ today. Donít dou dread to think of winter. Hope all are well. Love to all, Fannie


Postcard to: Mrs. Ed Kipp
57 E. Fulton Pl.
Grand Rapids, Mich
Boyne Falls, Mich.
Nov. 14, 1916
Dear Sister,
I am sending package. Hope it will fit. Only card I have. Hope you are all well. Little snow here. We are all well. Hope it will be all right I got the yoke wrong side out & did not notice till had it all sewed on. Lovingly, Fannie

Postcard to: Mrs. A. Kipp, 57 E. Fulton Plc., Grand Rapids, Mich.
Conklin, Mich.
1916? (Canít read rest of date, but Bernard was b. Nov. 20) Mrs. A. Kipp, 57 E. Fulton Plc., Grand Rapids, Mich. Say Sis, Canít you manage to squeeze in with Vally Ave. folks Sunday. They are coming here. Little blow out for Baby. All well. Hope Robert is all right. Think $1.75 is what he got that day. Expect my new carpet today. Try and come. I know they would be willing. How was the rooster? Best love, Cora


Merry Christmas to Edd & Louisa from Marcus & Cora
(No postmark or date)

Mrs. A. Kipp
57 E. Fulton Pl.
Grand Rapids, Mich.
LeRoy, Mich
Jan. 19, 1917
Free Paper

My Dear Ed and Louisa,

You tell Ed, Louisa, that it is quarter after seven, or 7:15, and that this is being written in the den at the school house. That the lines on this paper are dull or my lantern does not give sufficient light or my eyes are poor; one of the six. Yes, that was Mrs. Anderson, wife of the undertaker and barber, that had the boy baby. And they think it is just right. This is their only child. They had a little girl some eight or ten years ago that died on the day of its birth. A long time between acts, you see. Say, Louisa, donít mention to anyone what I am going to write now, for if our good fortune becomes known generally there would be so many after us for our wealth. But on Sunday, January 12, 1917, we got two eggs. Monday, January 15, 1917, we got three eggs. Tuesday, January 16, 1917, we got four eggs. Wednesday, January 17, 1917, we got three eggs. Total number in the four days one dozen eggs. Total cost of production $1.97 Ĺ. Present market value of eggs 36 cents dozen. When on our way to Paterson in our new automobile will stop and see you. The cause of the increased production of eggs is no doubt due to feeding the chickens horse flesh. Some two weeks ago Ad Stacy killed a horse for Robert Thompson, a part of the hind quarter of which he brought and put near the door of our chicken coop. At first the chickens acted shy, apparently afraid. After a time they begin to pick at and eat the meat. Happening to be at home thought to watch their actions. After eating a little while one of the pullets began to sing, making a noise like an old hen that wanted to lay, and her comb became red as though it were inflamed and swollen. Soon the singing became louder and more constant and the pullet left the meat and went into the coop. In a few moments a cackling was heard. Going to the coop the pullet was seen leaving the nest where she had actually laid an egg. Her cackling over she went back to the meal and again began eating. In a very short time the singing began and the noise made like a hen that wanted to lay, and then the visit to the coop, the cackling, etc. and another egg was laid. This was repeated three times and fearing so much laying would work injury to the pullets the meat was removed. Not wishing to overdo in this matter or cause unnecessary strain on the pullets we feed the meat in small quantities two or three times a week. Just enough to keep the pullets in laying condition. Should this secret become known generally owners of horses would kill the animals and engage in the poultry business. So keep it to yourself. But should you at any time want to try the ďSpeerimentĒ will send a chunk of horse flesh by parcel post.

Weather here has been bitter cold for past week or two. Snug winter weather and no mistake. Very little snow, however, though there is fair sleighing; none too good as the snow is dry, being so cold. Today pompletes one half the school yearó4 Ĺ months. How time flies. Same old story at schoológetting along fine. I get up every morning at twenty minutes to four; breakfast at 4:30 and leave for school at 15 to 20 minutes to five. Have as yet--in two years four and one half monthsóhad no trouble in keeping the building properly heated and free from smoke. The school has not been closed for lack of heat and too much smoke as it used to be before we took hold. Township board of registration meets at our place tomorrow. Special election, Tuesday, Jan. 30. Primary election March 7. Village election March 12. Township and general election first Monday in April. So you see we are well fixed for elections this spring. In two of them, village and township, we may be interested if they want us to again be township and village clerk. That remains to be seen. Shall take them if we can get them. Eggs 36. Butter, creamery, 42; home made 35. Potaotes $1.50. Other stuff high enough. But under ordinary conditions you will never starve as long as you have enough to eat. Best love to all.
Your Loving Father, R.H. Allen



Mrs. Adrian Kipp
57 E. Fulton Pl. N.E.
Grand Rapids, Mich.
R.H. Allen
LeRoy, Mich.
January 23, 1917
My Dear Ed and Louisa,
Would willingly bet four thousand dollars that if it is as cold in Grand Rapids today as it is here that you will not stand very long on a street corner. The thermometer has been much lower this seasonó16 belowóthough the cold was not felt like this morning, when a strong and bitter wind was blowing from the southwest with thermometer at zero. The bitter cold weather of the past few weeks, like the high prices, may be attributed or even due to the war so far as we know. But what have we got to grumble about when we got two dozen eggs last week, and 4 Sunday and 4 yesterday. We hope they wont lay enough to injure their constitution, for they are only young pullets donít you know. Nearly time for school to let out for noon so will lay this aside and complete it when its finished. This is Wednesday morning 7:30 so we will proceed. Have just got my morning work done which consisted of dusting the four large rooms, sweeping and dusting the class room, cleaning blackboards in all the rooms, putting up the flag, sweeping out the two closets, carrying nine pails of water and keeping up steam. Last night worked from 3:30 to five sweeping. Days are getting longer which will be a great help to us in our work. Only got three eggs yesterday, but even at that will make a small payment on our car. Weather more wild this spring. Really a spring-like morning, especially when compared with what we have put up with the past few weeks. Enclose you letter received yesterday from Bob. Read, then burn unless you send it to Cora. We have the last of our coal in the house but as Ray Smith got a car load yesterday we will put in a supply today. Caught us just in time. How are you. Do the children go to school. Best love and trusting all are well.
Your Loving Father, R.H. Allen

Mrs. Adrian Kipp
57 E. Fulton Pl. N.E.
Grand Rapids, Mich.
R.H. Allen
LeRoy, Mich.
January 31, 1917
My Dear Ed and Louisa,
Your letter received this forenoon. Main reason for not mentioning motherís illness was the fact that we knew you had trouble of your own and did not want to burden you unnecessarially with ours. And, too, we did not want to make much ado about nothing so awaited results of attack before worrying you. Mother had been grunting around for few days with bad cold or grip but nothing was thought of it as so many are suffering from that. But on Saturday forenoon at the grange hall when she was suddenly taken worse those around knew she was sick. And when Dr. Holm spoke of a threatened attack of the pneumonia we bacame alarmed. Then Saturday noon until Sunday morning she took medicine every hour administered by me. Did not go to lodge or bed that night. Her fever was as high as 104. She had quite a time all week but of course would not go to bed. Would lie down on lounge when exhausted. Became very weak utterly unable to do anything, and that made her mad. Something unusual for her to be idle. Mother is doing nicely now and fast gaining in strength. Still taking medicine and has not been out of the house since first taken. No danger now that we know of. Have heard from Grace twice. Do not write her very often as she sees the letters sent to Bill which partly answers the purpose. Yes, our chickens do fairly well. They more than keep us in eggs. Sent some today by parcel postum to Bill. Fun if they hatch on the road. Mother said she was going to sell eggs and buy groceries. At that rate we will not get an automobile. Farmers or anyone else having them to sell are getting 1.75 per bushel for potatoes. Never such a price here before. Creamery butter 36. Eggs we are told have dropped to 30. This week completes five months of school. Four months more we have a vacation. Shall apply for and expect to get the position as janitor another year. We like it first rate and it fits in nicely with our other work. Shall take the two clerks offices if given me but having held them sever years do not feel hoggish enough to get out and beg for them. Am borrowing no trouble and shall have no sore spots if not elected. The little man that Bob referred to is Mayís sister boyóshe has twoówho are at present staying at Bobís home. The little fellow has been ill with pneumonia. Bob seems to have become greatly attached to and passionately fond of the one boy. Donít know about the other. Am inclined to believe Bob is doing well and with May getting alone fine. Would very much like to see him for a few moments. And may some day. Weather today cloudy and dark with a damp north east wind. Friday the ground hog will tell us what the weather will be the next several months. Then you wont have to look at the weather report in the Press thus giving you more time to read ďConfessions of a WifeĒ. At the special election held yesterday it was decided to bond the township in the sum of $13,000 to construct and maintain the 5 Ĺ miles of trunk line road through the township. We have two miles built. The federal government pays one half the cost of the road, the state one quarter and the township one quarter. The vote yesterday was 145 yes and 6 no. What do you think of my new stationary. Glad you are well. Best love to all. We paid $10.00 for hard coal.
Your Loving Father, R.H. Allen

Mrs. Adrian Kipp
57 E. Fulton Pl. N.E.
Grand Rapids, Mich.

R.H. Allen
LeRoy, Mich
April 17, 1917
My Dear Ed and Louisa,
Your letter received this morning and really we did not like its contents. Too gloomy altogether. For a fact we feel sorry for you, especially when the had of the family is cut off. Do sincerely hope that Ed was fortunate enough to continue his insurance, which we feel sure that he did. Hope you are all on the mend by this time. Poor little Robert. Wonder if he would like to take a ride on grandpaís back. If I had a dollar for every time your family is mentioned in our house could afford an automobile. Hope your extra work, Louisa, do not get you down for the others will surely need a motherís care. Do your best and keep a stiff upper lip. Yes, Louisa, stuff seems to be high but not so bad if so much was not said and written about it. Nothing here but what has gone up in price. Potatoes in the farmers hands now bring 2.50 to 2.75 per bushel. Beans 15 cents pound, flour $14.00 barrel, salt pork 20, lard 25, butter creamery 46, dairy butter from 25 up. Corn to feed chickens 2.90 per hundred pounds, and so on through the list. We got 18 eggs Sunday. Mention that because Sunday was ďegg dayĒ with the M.E. Aid Society. One day each year the members of this society set aside a day usually Sunday which they designate ďEgg DayĒ and ask the people to donate the eggs laid on that day. Members of the society having no chickens are asked to give a quarter. Sunday our pullets laid eighteen eggs which we gave the society. We get from 12 to 18 a day. Last Saturday we sold six dozen at 31 cents dozen, now they are 32. We could not use all the hens laid so had to sell them. We ate so many eggs in the hopes of saving meat and other stuff, that our combs got red and our actions were like unto those of a common fowl until we got ashamed and quit eating eggs. We have one hen setting and in her nest some of the other chickens lay every day until now she has about forty eggs under her. Listen, we are going to keep that hen on the job all summer. As fast as the chickens hatch we will take them from under her and let her continue setting on the remaining eggs. We are not saying much about this not wanting the society for the prevention of cruelty to chickens to hear of it. On my way to school at about 10:30 George Kellogg offered me 2.50 for a bushel of potatoes. Not many more potatoes left in this country any more already. Seed potatoes will be scarce. We shall likely planted our back lot to potatoes and corn and beans. Some potatoes in our garden proper and plow up the front yard north of the sidewalk leading to the house and plant that to potatoes. It is a good sod, never has been plowed but once since we had it and ought to produce good potatoes. Think we will try it anyway. Five weeks more of school after this week. Had a sty on my right eye that busted Sunday and have evidently caught cold in it for the eye and surroundings are badly swollen and inflamed. Have fared pretty well this winter though mother for a while was terrible sick with grip. May write again. Best love and hoping you are all better.
Your Loving Father,
R.H. Allen



Mrs. Adrian Kipp
57 East Fulton Place
Grand Rapids, Mich.

G.A. Holt
774 E. 22nd St.
Paterson, NJ
May 1, 1917
My Dear Louisa,

I suppose you are wondering what has happened to me. I have thought of you all very often and was so pleased to get your letter and the childrenís picture. It is real cute but not as nice as they really are. I certainly fell in love with Emma. Mary went back to School after the Easter vacation and likes it very much. She hasnít been this week as she has had a bad attack with her stomache but I hope she will be able to go again by Thursday. She is in the first grade and seems to be doing alright. She was seven years old on the fifteenth and we gave her a trycycle and of course she is crazy over it.

Will is still in Philadelphia and probably will be until the first of July. The next places they go to will be St. Louis and Los Angeles. I certainly hate to think of the latter place as it is such a distance. Yesterday was Fatherís birthday. He was sixty-six years old. He isnít very well but tries so hard to keep up. Jim seems to be improving and is much more cheerful than he was. How is your little family getting along? Write when you can and tell me all about them. As I havenít any more news shall say Good night with love to all.
I am lovingly yours, Grace



Postcard to: Mrs. Ed Kipp, 57 E. Fulton Plc., Grand Rapids, Mich.
(No date) Dear Aunt Louise,
I got my report today and have passed it with an average of 88. Will graduate June 8 at Ramona theatre. How are the children and Edís arm. We are all well. Who were thoes people we talked to as you came out of that store? I mean that lady with the adopted baby. I am your niece, Edna


Postcard to: Mrs. A. Kipp, 57 E. Fulton Plc., Grand Rapids, Mich.
Conklin, Mich.
Jun 5 (Canít read date.)
Dear Sis & All. Received word Friday morning that car would be ready for our trip home if we would go Saturday morning. Kept me busy you bet but we left here about 8:30 and reached Papaís home about 4. Found both well and had a fine time. Came back yesterday. Edna will come Thursday afternoon on 3 oíclock or if it is rainy Friday on 9. Meet her at Interurban station. Cora

Postcard to: Mrs. A. Kipp, 57 E. Fulton Plc., Grand Rapids, Mich.
Conklin, Mich.
Jun 18, 1917
Dear Sister.
Hope all will go as I have planned but be sure and be ready in time. You will hear from Lidvinia in a day or so. Best love to all. Sister Cora


Postcard to:
Mrs. Adrian Kipp
57 E. Fulton Pl. N.E.
Grand Rapids, Mich.
June 27, 1917
The asparagus has not been washed. Here in LeRoy we clean it by a very liberal use of water. Papa.

Mrs. Adrian Kipp
57 E. Fulton Pl. N.E.
Grand Rapids, Mich.
R.H. Allen
LeRoy, Mich.
July 1, 1917
My Dear Ed and Louisa,
This is to me a lonesome day due no doubt to the fact that I am alone. Just happened to think you was quite a hustler Friday morning. Bet four thousand dollars that mother was pleased to get away on so early a train. Had some more rain last night and again this morning. It is surprising the amount of rain we have had in past two months and at times such hard rain, too. It has greatly interfered with the work of the farmers the ground being too wet to get on to do anything. Have been able to do but little in our garden. Heavy rains Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and again last night. Monday and Thursday were regular cloud bursts. Never saw such wash outs in my life. Clear and bright this afternoon with a heavy wind which will have a tendency to dry the ground. Glad you liked your asparagus as I knew you would. Donít never than me for anything; simply acknowledge receipt so that we may know you got it; for anything sent you are welcome to or you would not get it. We have a bed of asparagus that supplies us with more than we can use. Now of course it is about all gone, being out of season; for like everything else it has its season. Got ten eggs yesterday. Price is now 27 cents. Shall take four dozen down tomorrow and get some groceries. Could get same price in cash but we need the groceries. We have sold a lot of eggs this season. They are not profitable to us with feed at 3.00 to 3.40 a hundred. Our twenty six little ones are doing nicely. Best love and hoping all are well.
Your Loving Father, R.H. Allen

Postcard to: Mrs. Ed Kipp, 57 E. Fulton Pl., Grand Rapids, Mich.
1917 (Canít read rest of postmark.)
Dear Sister. Donít know when we can come down. Would be glad to have you come and visit us this summer. Hope this finds all well. Did you see Cora? Father sent picture the other day. Come now if you can. Suppose Robert is quite a boy this summer. Love from All. Fannie


Postcard to: Master Robert Kipp, 57 E. Fulton Place, Grand Rapids, Mich.
Paterson, N.J. July 9, 1917
With love and best wishes for many happy birthdays
from Mary Jane Holt


Postcard to Mrs. Adrian Kipp, 57 E. Fulton Pl. N.E., Grand Rapids, Mich.
July 19, 1917
Mother arrived home at seven last night. Gone to Cadillac this forenoon called by illness of Fredís wife. R.H.A.

Postcard to: Mrs. A. Kipp 67 E. Fulton Plc. Grand Rapids, Mich.
Conklin, Mich.
Aug 8, (Canít read year.) Dear Sister, Glad to get letter and got one from Fannie to. Sorry you can not come out. No I am not coming down. Polly is coming out some Sunday. Best love. Sister, Cora


Postcard to Mrs. A. Kipp
57 E. Fulton Plc.
Grand Rapids, Mich.
(Canít read date on postcard.)
Dear Sister,
Found Polly all right. Say Edna should go in that store to Berlin and ask for that what she lost. Fellow was out side and did not have sense enough to go in and look when I asked him. Best love and donít bother to much. Got home 8:30. Cora


Postcard to:
Mrs. A. Kipp
57 E. Fulton Plc.
Grand Rapids, Mich.
Conklin, Mich. Sep. 20, 1917
Dear Sister. Sorry to hear you are not well but hope you soon feel better. Will write about potatoes soon. Forgot to tell Marcus but the early ones we have now are not ripe but work nice. Canning plums. Love,
from Cora


Postcard to:
Mrs. Ed Kipp
57 E. Fulton Pl.
Grand Rapids, Mich.
Nov. 16, 1917
Dear Sister,
You get off at lower Big R. The store where Harlie works is about 1 block from depot on left side. We donít live far. I was so worried I never thought to write in letter. Hope you get it in time Wish you could come too.
Lovingly, Fannie


Postcard: My Valentine
Mrs. A. Kipp
57 E. Fulton Plc.
Grand Rapids, Mich.
Conklin, Mich. Nov. 22, 1917
Say Louisa, Marcus has to bring chickens tomorrow (Friday) so will bring potatoes then. Cannot send pumpkins as they are all rotted. Not a good year for them but will send few cabbage and turnips.
Best love, Cora

Mrs. A. Kipp
57 E. Fulton Plc.
Grand Rapids, Mich.
Pontiac, Mich.
1917 (Canít read postmark date.)
Well here I am All OK arived at 11:30 Girls met me at Depo and carried my suit case all Well here Love to all. Mother

Mr. & Mrs. Kipp & family
57 East Fulton Place
Grand Rapids, Mich
From New York, N.Y., Hudson Term Sta.
December 21, 1917
Christmastide Greetings
May this Christmas bring you pleasures and Friendship more and more
And the New Year bring you Happiness You never dreamed before
With love to all,
from Will, Grace & Mary



Mrs. Adrian Kipp
57 E. Fulton Pl. N.E.
Grand Rapids, Mich.
R.H. Allen LeRoy, Mich.
January 3, 1918
My Dear Louisa and Ed,
Should have acknowledged receipt of loaf of bran bread as soon as received to have been honest and do to others as I would be done by, but that fatal trait ďneglectĒ caused me to put it off. The bread was very good and we enjoyed it. It was the first I had ever tasted to my knowledge. Mother, however, has partaken thereof before, the Swedes using that kind of bread in their menus. Did you make it? If so kindly send recipe and mother will try her luck at making bran bread till the boys come home. We got two eggs yesterday bot none today. Mother uses what eggs she wants and yet we have eleven in a dish in the cupboard. Please do not publish this as we do not care to advertise our wealth. I went to the school house about eight oclock yesterday morning and Ed Glerum came shortly afterward and we together fixed or repaired the steam guage which had not been in working order for two weeks before school closed. Then I went to the house where mother had a lunch in readiness. After eating I returned to school happy in the thought that now the steam guage was in working order all else would be in good shape. In this I was disappointed for the pump used to put water into the boiler from a barrel in the basement, refused to work. After working at it without avail for two hours went again and got Ed Glerum and together we took the pump apart, tightened up the loose place, packed the valves, etc., and after much exertion our labor was rewarded by seeing the darn thing work all right. By this time it was well into afternoon and it was up to me to pump fifteen barrels of wateró40 strokes to the pailóto fill the boiler. Yes, sir, I went at it and by four oclock had the boiler filled and fire started and at ten minutes to five had steam up. It was then for me to remain there until the steam had circulated through all the pipes to see if all the valves were in working order and everything all right. Mother came over about the time I started to pump out doors and she went into the basement and pumped nearly all the water from the barrel to the boiler, which proved a wonderful help to me. Then about the time I had fire started mother went home and got supper and brought it to the schoolhouse where we both enjoyed a meal for we were hungry. For supper we had mashed potatoes, fried eggs, bread and butter, raw onion and tea and let me tell you it was good. By seven oclock everything being in working order I ďbankedĒ the fire and we both went home. This morning I went to school shortly after six oclock and found everything all right except four pipes frozen. Soon had those thawed out, fire going and everything ready for a dayís work. Mother came to school about 7:30 and during the day mopped the two lower rooms, one lower hall and clothes room, one upper hall and stairway on east side, the class room and cleaned a lot of desks and woodwork, while I did nothing but pump about three barrels of water into the basement, made warm water for mother, kept fire going and oiled the floor in the primary room and nearly all of the intermediate room floor. We quit at 3:30 and after going home and washing our faces and hands, and mother putting on a clean dress we went to the home of Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Peterson, on the Merrill place, to a ten cent tea. The Swedish peoplesí ten cent teas are far better good square meals than you would get at many good hotels. We aim to miss none of them. Mr. and Mrs. Peterson wanted us to be there so badly that they sent one of their boys to our house today at noon to remind us of it and telling us to be sure to be there. They certainly wanted us. After coming from Petersonís and doing the chores, filling lamps, getting coal, etc. mother went to reading and me to writing. Hence this letter to you. Tomorrow no preventing Providence, we both to to school early prepared to do our best which means that we shall get a lot of work done. Mother will have to be at the grange hall all day Saturday, while I will complete the school work ready for school Monday. It is installation of officers at the grange hall with the usual dinner, except that in this particular case it will be a fish dinner. If at all possible to get away from school you will find the hired man about noon eating a fish dinner at the grange hall. They tell me that this morning the thermometer registered twenty two degrees below zero. Did not see the thermometer but do know it was bitter cold. Best love to all and again thanking you for the breading and trusting all is well.
Your Loving Father, R.H. Allen

Mrs. A. Kipp
57 E. Fulton Pl.
Grand Rapids, Mich.
Mrs. Marcus Umlor
Rt 1 Box 65
Conklin, Mich.
Jan. 3, 1918
Dear Sister,
Your letter received yesterday and say I donít know what to say. Have had enough worry and care with that girl to about drive anyone crazy and the talking I have done seems to do no good whatever. I told her and have wrote her more than once to do as she should and try to show that she appreciated what you were doing for her. Told her to take care of her bed mornings as she had plenty time if she got up when you called her. Has always been a great notion for her to lay and be called but why she does as she does now is more than I can see into. No indeed she has not be brought up to go without washing but it seems to be in her to be stubborn & headstrong. Could have cried had it done any good to think the way she spends her money. I told or wrote her when she came home the last time to come to Conklin and get her shoes there, then leave the others to be fixed as the cobbler there repairs the shoes bought from him real reasonable. But that done no good. I also told her to give you $1 every week. Has she give you any yet? (Now Louise ask her for the pay for her trouble.) It is not right to let her do as she does by you and I think the best thing I can do is to tell Mrs. S. not to pay her wages to her. If she has the money and gets out she will spend every cent where no need of.
Told here when she was home not to spend for such foolish stuff when she would some day see the time she would be glad to have it. If she doesnít do different I shall write to the Evangeline Home or some place and put her there for 3 months. Some thing has to be done.
Now let her read this if you want to and you read what I wrote her.
Best love and hope you feel better. Let me know if she pays you. She can and must do different.
Loving Sister, Cora

On the 7th of January, 1918, Robert Henry Allen passed away.

(No Date)
The Grim Reaper has entered our Grange and taken from our midst into the Great Beyond our Worthy brother R.H. Allen. Whereas. In his death we feel our Grange has lost a valuable and respected brother, who was ever ready to faithfully discharge any duty placed with him therefore be it
Resolved. That we as a Grange pause in our duties and offer up a tribute to his memory, and extend to his family our heart felt sympathy while they mourn the loss of a kind husband and father we mourn the loss of a faithful and loyal brother whose cheerful presence and ready hand shake we shall greatly miss; therefore, be it
Resolved. That our charter be draped for sixty days and a page be set apart in our records in his memory and be it further
Resolved. That a copy of these resolutions be sent to each member of the family.
Mrs. Orah Thacker
L.P. Lindquist
Mrs. Nella Bowker
committee


Postcard to Mrs. A. Kipp, 57 E. Fulton Plc., Grand Rapids, Mich
Postmarked Conklin, Mich Feb 15, 1918
Dear Sister,
Your letter came yesterday. Sorry to know you have been sick and would like to come down but cannot for a while. Roads are very bad. Snow so deep and thawing now so horses go down. Let us hear if you get worse as Fannie comes. Then I sure would plan if roads get better. Baby a month old yesterday (13th). Love to all, Sister Cora

Mrs. Ed Kipp
57 E. Fulton Pl.
Grand Rapids, Mich.
Big Rapids, Mich.
Mar. 5, 1918 (postmarked Mar. 7)
My Dear Sister,
I was glad to get your letter cause I did worry some I tell you. Harlie thought prehaps you were quarantined. Glad you are feeling so much better. Hope the little arms are better. I never have been vacinated on either of the children. It is a wonder they have not had it done in the schools as there has been several cases of small pox at the institute and across from the Central where Ruth & Joyce go.
Got a letter yesterday (Monday) from Mother. The first one and I did wonder why she hadnít written. I did not write to her because I did not know her address. I was glad to hear from her and must answer right away. No Harlie isnít working yet. He helped wash last week & again yesterday did nearly all rubbing. It isnít so I can hang under clothes & night gown out today raining and so foggy. Yesterday was a bad day to dry clothes. Did some ironing last night before time to get supper. Must try and dry underwear in the house I guess and not leave them in the water. I donít know what he intends to do. He had rather talk to his mother about that.
Yes, I got a letter from the Grange. Did you write back? It certainly was very nice. Colosuet has raised here the last Harlie knew it was 28Ę per lb. I wonder if they sent one to Uncle Bill. Do you know if Uncle Billís folks ever got a paper. I got one from Mother did you? I wrote and asked them if they ever got one but havenít heard from them for some time. The last I got was from Grace and they were worried about Uncle Bill. Mother said in her letter that she wrote a letter to Uncle Bill, Bob, Ad and Cora. I am waiting for irons to get hot to finish. Just take things quite and not overdo so you can get your strength back.
I have been making oat meal bread and we like it very much. Yes I have good luck with it. Harlie got 100 lbs. from Ray S. and some flour. Have made rye bread the first batch I made was a failure the last 2 times it was good.
We got a sugar card but we only could get 2 lbs. They have only been giving a lb. and 1 ounce to customers 2 lbs with large families. But you are entitled to Ĺ# for each person or 3 lbs. with our family. Joyce said there was a girl in the store the other night that wanted 5#. We have a sugar card. The girl did not get 5# however.
It gives in the Tustin Dept of Reed City paper as follows ďChrist Krupp was called to Grand Rapids Monday by the death of his grand son Alvin KruppĒ. There is a funeral here nearly every day, so guess they didnít notice. How I would like to see the children.
Marlie was at Leroy Monday after Mother left Friday and the chickens were there then. Ad was taking care of them. I donít know if they are there yet or not. But I donít care either we would not get one any way. We got 3 eggs today have been getting one & 2 nearly every day. Did most of the ironing have 2 aprons yet besides underwear, and I donít iron that any way. Mother was saying in her letter that Edna has appendicitis. The Dr. thít she would pull thru all right. Have been looking for receipt for oat meal bread but canít find it but it is-
3 cups oat meal
Ĺ cup molasses or not
ľ cup sugar little salt or less sugar
scald your oat meal and when cool add your yeast. I make a potato yeast. When light make like white bread. The last I made I did not use the molasses, and sugar as for white bread and our folks like it as wel as with molasses. Got a letter from Bob this afternoon.(There is no closing on this letter, but is from Fannie Allen Sprague.)

Mrs. Ed Kipp
57 E. Fulton Pl.
Grand Rapids, Mich.
520 3rd Ave.
San Francisco, Calif.
3/14/18 Postmarked Mar. 15, 1918
Dear Sister & Family:
Very sorry dear to hear of your sickness. Must try to stop your worrying dear as it does you no good. I tell you what to do just take a trip out to our state and I bet the climate would do you a lot of good. Would take you for nice long rides in the machine and would entertain you right smart. Say sis no joking it would be find, just try thinking of a trip like that rather than your present troubles and see what a great difference it will make. I am a good one to give advice you will perhaps say, but honest sis just stop your worrying.
We sure are having a beautiful spell of weather now. Just like a summerís month. In fact the orchards are in blossom and it makes the trip on the road real nice. Had the car out tonight for a little spin the first in nearly two weeks. I have been like you a little under the weather hence the reason for not being out before. Had a rather severe pain in my stomach and side.
How is Ed and the babes. How often papa use to mention Ed especially when he use to be there on hunting trips. He often said how much he seemed to enjoy it and how much good it done him to get away from work for a few days. Now sis take good care of yourself and family and try and stop your worry as much as is possible. Think of the trip to California when you get the blues. Try it once.
Love to all. Your brother Bob.

Mrs. A. Kipp
57 E. Fulton Plc.
Grand Rapids, Mich.
Conklin, Mich.
Mar. 15, 1918
Dear Sister & All,
Saturday morning and lots of work but while I am holding baby I can write a few lines. Have enough on my mind to make anyone feel as thou life was not worth living but then I am not the only mother with a family.
So glad when the roads are so I can get out then I am going to take a day off and come down there. If I could only take baby and go away where it was quiet for a while. I get so nervous I could just cry most of the time.
Mother is coming as soon as it gets warm. Does she write you? Say now Fannie wrote the deed was in Motherís name but I donít believe she can hold more than 1/3 if we just stick to what should be ours. I would just like to see the papers. Papa told Marcus the property belonged to us four. Donít believe it would cost each one much to find out. Some times I have a notion to write to Mr. Watson and see what he says.
Baby is not as well as he should be. I cannot get his bowels regular. No matter what I give he goes 2 or 3 days without passage. He is fat but I worry about him when he gets those spells of colic. He cries just awful. Just think your baby soon is four years old.
How much was Ednaís fare? Let me know as I want it settled. A shame to have her dirty clothes left for you to wash.
Have you got all your sewing done for summer. No I have not but maybe I will get done some time. Made baby some dresses out of white waists (some that buttoned in the back) and they are real cute. Put lace on bottom to make longer. Mrs. Saxton sent him a white wool sweater trimmed with pink, Sarah crocheted a little jacket white & pink, Polly made him a outing ______? gave him a pair of white woolen stockings Lidonia? sent him a pair woolen stockings red & black also two bibs and the girl that worked here got him a white kimona with cord on. And this week he got a pair of knit booties from his Aunt Isabel (Mrs. Swartz). She said she was knitting socks for the big soldier so thought she would knit a pair for the little soldiers to.
Must stop and get to work as children are in school so I am alone. Saturday school here.
Best love and hope you are well again.
Loving Sister Cora
Did you go the the bank as Bob wrote? And say do you want the other 5 bushel of potatoes? Edna was over today where she worked last summer and the lady gave her a pair of white woolen stockings. Now it seems baby gets his Christmas gifts even if he had no Xmas. Write when you can.

Mrs. Ed Kipp
57 E. Fulton Pl.
Grand Rapids, Mich.
March the 31
My Dear Louise and all
I received your ever Welcome letter last nite and must Say I feel ofell sory for you Poor girl But donít git discouraged. I try not to. If you knew all the Disapointments I have to go through you say What the use of Woring as We all goto have our trubles in this World of ours. Now you think it funy that I am at Home. So it is for I thought Bessie and I Wrote and Swared all there was to be Sworn to But I got a letter from Mrs. Parker that I had some Papers there that I had to sine and she Wanted to go away on Saturday and So I Wrote her to see if Ada could not Sine them as I wanted to Stop and See you girls But Mr. WatsonSaid he could not So I got a Special letter Wensday and Started Thursday morning so not to hinder Mrs. Parker from Starting Saturday as she Been ofell good to me. Now I Will stop of there When I go Back that Wont Be long. I donít think I Will Rent this Sumer I think I cant Stay here a lone yet. Oh Louise it is to lonesome to look around and see What Pa has don I cant stand it. So Will git every thing Setled up and go and Stay With Minnie this Sumer I gess every Body so good to me Mrs. Watson Come over the nite I Come Home and Wanted me to Stay With her and the next nite Dell come and staid With me. But he had company so I Staid to Mr. Watsons last nite and am going Back to Diner today. I Caught an ofell cold coming Home so they donít Want me to stay a long But I am beter to day Ada cant stay with me as he Exposed to Small Pox so is afraid to as his time is up to come down With it now.
Louise donít think you cant Write to me eny thing you Want for I am always ready to share all your Troubles and always Will be.
Love to all, Mother Write
Hope you are lot Better When you get this.

Louise Kipp
Dear Sister,
Just a line will send by Harlies. No I was not surprised to hear she was back to Leroy. Just as I expected. I did not know it tho until you wrote.
Harlieís Father was at Leroy the last of the week and she told him she was coming down to see me Sat. but Ruth went to the afternoon train and evening train but she did not come. Intend to go up there soon if I can. Will let you know if she comes and results. I really donít believe tho she intends to come. She ought to be ashamed not to come and see us. I wrote to Uncle Bill to see if what she told me was true, but I havenít heard. Think she just said it to smooth things over.
Joyce was sick Friday and Sat. and had a high fever when Harlie got home and had been talking everything. She is better today, donít know whether she will be able to go to school tomorrow or not. It is a cold dreary day today. Harlie and Harold are over to his motherís. Louise hope you will feel better when it gets warmer. Wish Harlie was nít going back to G.R. let me know if he is well or not. I hope the children are well. Must close now.
With Love from All Lovingly Your Sister(Fannie)
Will write you during the week. Do you hear from Cora? She owes me a line but suppose she has her hands full.

(No envelope)
San Francisco
April 10/18
Dear Sister:
Your letter enclosing the one recíd from Hersey at hand this date. It goes to show dear that she (our step-mother) ws just as bad as the rest of her family. She in my opinion is a crook, God forgive me, but it is the truth. How smart she was to have it first transferred to another then to her thus protecting her, at least so she thinks, from being held responsible. How I would like to be near enough to see her if I wouldnít tell her a thing or two my name is not Bob. It seems a shame that papa would be influenced by her in doing such a thing knowing full well that he was depriving us children of any claim to the property. If he was in his right mind when he did it he must have had a very unfavorable after thought to know he was signing away the rights of his own children to some who did not care a little bit regards his happiness. If she comes to see you dear use your own judgement regards asking questions, but I would rather see the house in ashes that the property of that bunch. Deciteful and treacherous in their actions to gain. I tell you if I was there they would be given a merry chase before we were deprived of everything as I would have asked papa how he wanted things settled. I never thought he would do such an unreasonable thing as that. But we must not be to severe on him as I guess he was made to do it by that chick. She wrote and said the box was sent me by freight and that I was to pay the charges at this end. If she is that close, we donít figure at all. Gee, sis it makes me so mad when I think of such doings. I could write her a letter that would make her bald-headed but it is bad to write to much. Could talk more in a minute than I could write in half an hour, and could get immediate reply. It shows her sneaky ways by staying away from you girls. Now that we know the conditions of the transfer of the property to her we know for a fact, I dare say, by now it is transferred to her bunch. I hope she sees her mistake but hardly see how a person of her deceitful ways can change much. All she looks forward to is her click and robs others of their just rights. Our lives from the date of her entering into our home was full of unhappiness. What has she ever done for us children. Name one thing.
Have been home today to get rid of a very severe cold. Thought that a day at home would be better than try and work when I fealt so miserable. Last Sunday we had a very long auto ride it was over mountain roads and I tell you the strain was rather severe just a continuous grind up-hill and down around sharp curves and etc. It was a beautiful trip and enjoyed by those with us but I did not get much of a chance to see the country the roads being so dangerous. We started from home about 12 or 12:30 and rode until after three. Then ate our lunch, would have eaten before but it was a new road to me and I was not sure where I was; after lunch we again started out riding until about 5:30, we then stopped to rest a while and wait for some of the cars to get off the road, as at that time a day the machines are very thick on the road. Thousands of machines seems a great many but the truth as it is on the highway the only main road out of the city seeing we are on a peninsula. We arrived home about 8:30 so you see we had some trip. Shall not attempt such a long trip again starting so late. It is beautiful scenery around the mountains but one driving the car cannot enjoy the scenery as well but I think one enjoys the riding more when they drive the car. At least I do. It was a dear letter you got from Mrs. Engstrom. She sure is a good girl. Her brother I understand is an officer in the army. Hardly seems possible as he did not have much of an education. Well sis if I write much more you will not have time to care for your dear little ones, which I hope are all well. Let us hope for the best.
With love to all, Bob
The road I mention where we waited until the taffic cleared is where we run on to the highway after coming out of the mountains. A great many people were trout fishing in the mountain streams.


Postcard to Mrs. A. Kipp, 57 E. Fulton Plc., Grand Rapids, Mich.
Apr 19, 1918?
Dear Sister. Think of you so much. Hope you feel better. No reason why Mother cannot come. Will come next week if babe is all right. Marcus took potatoes today. Love to all. Cora

(No envelope) Sunday (in April 18?)
Well dear Sister & All. How I wish I would have been with you this long lonesome day but my thoughts were of your and I wish Fannie surely comes this week. No doubt the best change we will have for a talk together and I annot believe we should let all be taken from us for the ones so undeserving. If we three could be together and have a little advice from some one as Edd suggested.
Let me know as soon as Fannie comes so I can plan. Baby is doing fine now I give him one or two feedings a day of condensed milk. Shall get lime water and add a little to his milk. Now say in school we were taught that we could not add two things not of the same kind so I must not say add condensed milk and lime water but you perhaps know my meanings.
Perhaps some day this week Frank & Rose celebrate their tenth anniversary. It is not until May 5 but by that time all is dry so they were to celebrate Apr. 25 Frankís birthday. It may be changed as Roseís Father fell out of the barn or shed a few days ago and is hurt real bad. It seems he was working up stairs in the shed and getting cold tried to close the door with his sonís help but the strong wind got the best of them and Mr. Host was caught in some way on the door, swumg out and thrown quite a distance.
Donít you hate to have cold weather come again? Be careful dear sister and not catch more cold. I know the spring Wilford was born we had snow before he was ten days old and still nice weather before. But the wheat looked better then than it does now. Then it was quite high and wavy like when the wind blew but now the wheat fields only start to look a little green. A good summer is what is needed.
Tomorrow is wash day again and I shall wash rain or shine then I can plan better on my trip to the city again.
Monday morning.
Nice day but a little cool. Did you hear me scold this morning? Hope not or you would surely think me a crank. Must get to washing. Guess I have caught cold in my breasts as they pain just dreadful.
Best love to all, Sister Cora
Let me know who comes.

(This letter was enclosed with the following one from Cora to Louise.) Poor Dear Cora it seams as though you and Mother has more than our Share. Now I got a letter from Mrs. Parker Stating that I ha to Come Home to Sine some papers and so I Wrote her and Ada to See if he couldnít Sine them for me So I Would not haf to go Home yet as I thought I had got through before I Come a Way. But I dat a Specal letter to day Stating that Mr. Watson said that Ada could not So I must go in the morning as much as I Regret to Before I Come to see you girls But Will come Back to you as Soon as I git things setled. But must go at once as Mrs. Parker goes a Way Saturday and Wants me rite of. I hate to go up there now for so many has Small Pox But Bisness is Bisness so I haf to Run my risk as the Papers has goto be fixed rite of and Returned. All Well here the Reason I did not Write I have been to Detroit So to git Ready to start for Louises and then to your Place and then to Fanies and thought I git Home about the first of May. See I received your Ever Welcome letter this after noon and Will Write When I git home. Just think of Poor me When I git there. Oh my What Will I do they donít eny one Know What a Effort it is for me But must go so good By Write often as I need it as ever yours. Mother

(This letter was also enclosed with the following one from Cora to Louise.)
San Francisco
Mar. 26/18
Dear Sister & Family:
You just bet it would be fine to take a trip to see you in our car, but dear it is too great a task to think about. I have not recíd a letter from mother for some time and believe me I lose no sleep over it as if she donít want to write, I should worry. If she does return to the house this spring I dare say she will be alone unless Ad is there. What does Bessies old man do? Gee he is a hell of a looking guy. Papa had no use for him. I feel at times like I would like to have a talk with Mother to see what she intends doing but in letter writing could not get much satisfaction. You can prehaps get a little clearer information should you see her. We will get what the chicken got prehaps but I donít think the gains they get will do them much good, at least not if they have a heart or conscience. Donít worry dear over results. Glad to hear Edna is all O.K. The Nengel girls are both married. One lives I believe in Minneapolis, Minnesota, the other in Benton Harbor, Mich. We were out for a nice long ride last Sunday. We made about 80 or 85 miles. The orchards are in blossom now and it makes a rather fine sight. There were four in our party so we had a nice trip. Yes, I was sick, had a fierce old attack of something that put my stomach on the bum.
Now dear sister take care of your self and family. Give our love to Marcus and the babes. What do you think of the hour a-head business? It will give one a good chance to enjoy the long summer evenings.
Love to all. M & B.

Mrs. A. Kipp
57 E. Fulton Plc.
Grand Rapids, Mich.
Conklin, Mich.
Apr. 15, 1918
Dear Sister & All,
How much I have thought of you today and wished I was there with you. We got home all right and found children glad to see us. Baby went to sleep after we left your place when we were waiting for the car and slept until we were back to Frankís. Today he has had colic again but not so bad as some days. I sent a card to Bob from Berlin. Now dear Sister keep up courage and try and be careful so you get stronger again. Let me know at once if you get worse and donít wait for letterótelephone to Frankís. If Mother should come have her write so I know she is there with you.
I just imagine Fannie comes back with Harley tonight and hope she does, if only for a short stay.
I send letter from Bob also the last one I had from Mother. Remember dear Sister to let me hear from you as often as you can and donít get discouraged.
Best love and all the good wishes for your speedy recovery from your loving Sister Cora & family.

Mrs. Ed Kipp
57 E. Fulton Pl.
Grand Rapids, Mich.
LeRoy, Mich.
Apr. 16, 1918
Monday
My Dear Louise,
Just Received your letter and do hope By this time you are all Rite agin. I am packing and expect to see you Soon. Was there eny thing Peticlar that you Wanted only the clock I Will Keep that and the Dresser as it was Pas top drawer see let me know how you are By this time Mother

Mrs. A. Kipp
57 E. Fulton Plc.
Grand Rapids, Mich.
Conklin, Mich.
Apr. 17, 1918
Dear Sister & Brother,
How glad I was to get Eddís letter today (Tuesday) and hope the next one will bring the news of you being on the gain dear Sister.
Now donít worry about Mother. If she is not at Leroy the letter will be forwarded to her or returned to you and in case she gets it and has any love left for us she will come.
Read Bobís letter over a couple times then burn and gorget the need of his writing as he did. Donít blame him one bit as it is an act not counted by me as a very good show of love on the other side. But a long road without a turn.
Marcus had a load of hay down today for the beer team and had his sister try and call up the lady up near you and find out how you were but Lidvinia could not remember name or number so he could not hear. Dear ones nearly 10:30 and babe has been sleeping since 6 so is not undressed. Must put his nightie on. Hope you are resting good night
Best love to all, Sister Cora
Best regards to Harley and say when you write send Fannieís address. I lost the paper with it on. Let Harlie read Bobís letter.

Mrs. A. Kipp
57 E. Fulton Plc.
Grand Rapids, Mich.
Conklin, Mich.
Apr. 18, 1918
Wednesday evening
Dear Sister & All,
I was so dissapointed today when I did not hear how you were as I was so sure of a letter. Hope you are on the gain and keep on gaining.
You no doubt have the last letter I wrote when I sent Bobís. Now dear ones what do you say if we each stand our share and have some one look up the condition of things. As long as Harlie is there you can talk it over and I know Bob would be willing. If it could be found out some way and we should have a share I would sooner spend it all for advice than see the others have it.
Had a letter from Mother today and she wants to know if there is anything I want as she is going to start to pack up. I am going to write her about the horns. Ella wrote a short time ago that she heard Mother was going to rent or sell the place & go back and keep house for Minnie. Mother wrote she would see me soon but did not mention getting notice of your sickness. Can it be her heart is turning to stone just for the sake of the money. As soon as you are able to talk I am coming down and can tell you some things about how darn close she is. Maybe Fannie will go up if Mother is going to pack. Shewrote in my letter she was going to start to pack yesterday.
I wrote her what I thought she ought to do about coming to you now you are sick and told her you was alone as I mean with out help so Edd could not go to work.
Got condensed milk for Babe today so he may do better now. Was real good toady for a change. Hope you donít catch anymore cold from this rain now as it is getting colder. Marcus was coming down with potatoes tomorrow but do not know for sure now the rain came. But donít worry. I will write you the day he comes so you can sure have them in time before others are gone.
Got 25 pound of flour today and also 10 pounds cornmeal, 5 of rice and 10 of rolled oats. Isnít it awful. We can get Ĺ pound of sugar a week for each one of us so you see we can get 4 Ĺ pounds a week. Some advantage to have a big family.
Well dear ones I must go to bed. Let me know if you decide to get advice on how Papa first got the place. My second letter to Hersey is not answered yet. Best love to all, Sister Cora.
If Harlie will I would like him to take a run or rather ride on the car out here some Saturday night instead of going home. If we had only know the way the place was fixed before Papa died. I cannot see why he did it that way but she had absolute control over him. We must ask for all we can get. Wish I was up home I would make a sweep of stuff.

Mrs. Ed Kipp
57 E. Fulton Pl.
Grand Rapids, Mich.
San Francisco, Cal.
April 20, 1918
Dear Sister & All:
Recíd card from Cora announcing your sickness and am very sorry dear to hear the news. You must try to stop your worry dear as it really does no good, but I know your disposition so it is real severe on you. If you resided near enough dear I would take you out riding and the air would do you Oh so much good. Try and keep strong sis as remember your dear family and they need your care so be as cheerful as possible. You sure have had enough trouble and you have my sincere sympathy. It is sure grand that you have such a good and kind husband, he is all a gentleman and I am sure proud to claim him as a brother, he being so good to you. Papa use to mention him quite often of how he use to enjoy his hunting trips. Good luck to him and you my dears.
Fine weather here now so warm, in fact it is hot. We were out riding last evening and Oh such a fine trip we had. We have some lovely roads here and so close to the ocean the breeze is just grand, so refreshing after a dayís hard work. We took a long trip two weeks ago and the mountain roads were just like this:
(Drawing of many switchbacks) some crooked I guess but really they were nearly that bad. It was just a continuous turn most of the way after we reached the mountains. The scenery was beautiful, one could look down in the valleys below and across the foothills and just imagine dear the sight. I would sure enjoy taking you over such a road as I know you too would enjoy it very much. Well dear I do hope you are better now, in fact well only remember you have had a severe attack and it takes time, but trust in God dear for strength. Have your dear husband let us know how you are and try to keep as cheerful as possible. Your loving brother. R.H.A. Jr.


Postcard to Mrs. Ed Kipp, 57 E. Fulton Plc. Grand Rapids, Mich.
Sparta, Mich.
Apr. 22, 1918
Dear Aunt,
How are you I do hope you are better. Was very sorry to hear of your illness but I wish you much good luck and hope you get better. Will try to come down soon if I can. Best love to all. Edna.

Mr. Ed Kipp
57 East Fulton
Grand Rapids, Mich.
520 3rd Ave.
San Francisco, Cal.
May 26/18 (Postmark May 27, 1918)
Dear Brother & Sister & Family:
Your sad letter recíd this date. Am real sorry to hear of my dear sisterís illness and truly hope she is O.K. She sure has had her share of troubles in this world. If we were only near enough May would be with her and she is some nurse. We could take her when she was able on auto trips But the distance between us is a great draw back. I in fact we both send our heartfelt sympathy to you but that does but little good only to cheer you up. Papaís death had a great deal to do with her present illness I dare say, but her greiving will not bring him back or right the wrong done us children by the crooked work of the old lady. I tell you Ed I sure would like to be there I would find out a few things, but as it is I could write and ask but no telling if I would ever get an answer. I think I have recíd two letters from her since the passing away of my dear father. Please, keep us posted regarding Louisaís sickness and try and keep up courage as best you can. It seems a shame that the old lady does not come to see her but I guess she is too busy with her crooked work to deprive us children out of what justly belongs to us to even think of our comfort. I donít know what Papa could have been thinking of to ever deed her the property knowing right well us children would be forever barred of any claim unless taken to court and then prehaps nothing in the end. Must not be to harsh on him poor fellow as he had his troubles but to think of such a thing makes me rather angry.
Now Ed it may seem impossible to you but when our dear one get strong again why not take a trip out. Hoping that these few lines finds our dear one on the road to health again and that you and the children are all well. We remain yours lovingly, May & Bob


Postcard to Mrs. Edd Kipp, c/o St. Maryís Hospital, Grand Rapids, Mich.
Conklin, Mich.
Apr. 30, 1918
Dear Sister,
Keep up courage. Will see you as often as possible. Best love, Sister Cora.

Mrs. Ed Kipp
57 E. Fulton Pl.
Grand Rapids, Mich.
From E.E. Allen
LeRoy, Mich.
Meat at morning train Sat.

Big Rapids
May 2th
My Dear Sick Louise,
Mother is So Sory for you and Started as soon as I could to help you and got as far as Fanies and found that you Wer in the Hospital the Very Best Place you could be. How I Wished that they taken you there Before so now I am sending you a check of Fifty Dollars So do not Wory only git Well as soon as you can Wont you and trust the good Lord that every thing Will be all rite
With lots of Love to you, Mother

Sarah Louise Allen Kipp passed away in St. Mary's Hospital in Grand Rapids, Michigan May 4, 1918



ST. MARYíS HOSPITAL
No. 8929
Grand Rapids, Mich., May 4, 1918

Received of Mr. Ed Kipp
Eight & no/100 Dollars
For Nurse & Board....$8.00
Sister of Mary


Mr. A. Kipp
57 E. Fulton Pl.
Grand Rapids, Mich.
From Wm. T. Allen
86 Fair St.
Paterson, N.J.
May 9, 1918
Dear Ed:
Telegram received telling us of the death of your dear good wife. We certainly were all very sorry when we knew that poor Louisa was suffering. But we did not think that we would hear such sad news of her so soon. We extend to you our sincerest sympathy in your bereavement.
With love to you and the children.
We remain your sincerely,
Wm. T. Allen & family

Mr. Ed Kipp
57 E. Fulton Pl.
Grand Rapids, Mich.
520 3rd Ave.
San Francisco, California
May 13, 1918
Dear Brother & Family:
Your ever welcome letter received this date. Regarding check, while it is very small I really believe dear boy it is about all we could get even if we were to fight it in court. Although you can ask regards the matter it will sure do no harm. You mentioned in your letter about Robert wanting to see me. I would like very much to see him and if you care to you can send him to us. I am sure the climate here would be just find for him and dear Louisa I am sure would have no objections knowing into whose hands he was being placed. Now Ed think this over and let us know and together we can arrange to have the affair completed. Keep up courage my boy and think about sending us the baby. I guess he would enjoy it out here when he got acquainted with us. It is perfectly satisfactory to May and I and now dear boy it is up to you. How would you like to come out here? Now Ed let us know, after giving this thorough thought.
Kiss the little dears for us and with love to all, we are yours as ever. May and Bob
P.S. Thank your dear brother & sister for their many acts of kindness shown our dear sister. It is sure appreciated.

Mr. Edward Kipp
57 East Fulton Place
City
Gerrit VanStrien
Funeral Director
129 Crescent St., N.W.
Grand Rapids, Michigan
May 7, 1918 (Postmarked May 17, 1918)
Casket and Box 95.00
Grave opening & trimming 8.00
Hearse 8.00
4 Hacks 20.00
Wagon to Hospital 4.00
Press Anouncements 1.00
Services and Embalming $144.00

May 21/18 Received Payment in full
Gerrit VanStrien Thanks


Grand Rapids, Mich.
May 22, 1918

Received of Mr. Ed Kipp
Seventy five Dollars for lot with perpetual care in Fulton St. Cemetery $95.00
John Ringold



(Date unknown, after 1921 - envelope missing.)
Dear Brother & Children,
Have been looking for a card to tell when you were coming. Canít you come Sunday? Guess Edna & Millard will be home to. Was sure surprised when Edna told me Adrain was out there on a wheel. I would like to see them to I tell you.
Write and let me know if you can come.
Best love to all, Sister Cora



L-R Rear: Sarah Louise Allen Kipp, Joyce? Sprague, Ellen Scribner Stacy Allen, Robert Henry Allen, Ruth? Sprague, Fannie Allen Sprague
L-R Front: Emma Kipp, Robert Kipp (in front), Adrian Kipp, Louise Sprague, Harlow Sprague, Jr.
Photo courtesy of Bonnie Miller





ALLEN REUNION IN DETROIT
with William Allen Family on step-grandmaís birthday

Front Row L-R: Boy, Floyd Umlor, Boy, Boy, Boy, Girl, Boy, Girl, Girl, Girl, Girl holding baby, Girl, Boy
Second Row L-R: Cora Allen Umlor, Fannie Allen Sprague, Bessie Holtz, Girl, Minnie Stacy Ferguson, Ellen Stacy Allen, Man, Woman, Ruth Sprague Savage holding baby, Woman, Woman
Third Row L-R: Woman behind Fannie & Bessie, Man holding child, Wilbur Ferguson, Woman, Woman, Fred Savage holding Charles, Woman peeking, Woman ducking, Woman, Woman, Woman
Rear Row L-R: Marcus Umlor, Rita Umlor Schoenborn, Glenn Schoenborn, Man, Bald man, Woman, Man, Woman, White-haired person peeking from behind, Man, Roberta ďLouiseĒ Sprague, Man, Man, Man

If anyone can identify any of these people, or if you have corrections, please contact me at smgdavis@hotmail.com

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