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SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY NEWS

HP camera 'can't see' black faces

A video comparing a webcam's facial recognition response to a white woman and a black man is a YouTube hit.

"Black Desi" in the YouTube video

"Black Desi" in the YouTube video

A YouTube video suggesting that face recognition cameras installed in HP laptops cannot detect black faces has had over one million views. The short movie, uploaded earlier this month, features "Black Desi" and his colleague "White Wanda". YouTube post leads to deal   Face scanners at airport

Scientists map speed of climate change   Sun, moon cause small tremors in California: researchers   BlackBerry service back for some after outage    Nortel makes asset sale deal with Genband    Libel landscape alters for bloggers, PR advisers   Turn over Facebook history, judge orders   Digital cameras: a decade of revolutionary pictures    Microsoft loses Word patent appeal    Facebook messages to contact dead friend 'creepy'     Canadian's Nobel disputed by ex-colleagues   All Technology & Science Headlines »

Ban on sales of Microsoft Word upheld

Word logo

Word 2003 and 2007 are the most common versions on the market

Microsoft has failed in its attempt to dismiss a court case that would stop it selling Word. The software giant appealed against a ruling which found it infringed a patent owned by Canadian company i4i. With the failure of the appeal Microsoft must now pay i4i damages of $290m (£182m) and comply with an injunction ending the sales of some versions of Word. The injunction is scheduled to go into effect on 11 January. Judge bans Microsoft Word sales Microsoft Office takes to the web

Digital cameras: a decade of revolutionary pictures   Court orders woman to turn over Facebook history   Microsoft loses Word patent appeal    Canadian's Nobel disputed by ex-colleagues   AECL wins 1st Japan contract     First Jesus-era house discovered in Nazareth    N.B. group seeks UNESCO geopark status   Toronto promises to lead way for electric cars    Citigroup denies report of hacker attack    Bird-like dinosaur was venomous: scientists    All Technology & Science Headlines »

Bird-like dinosaur was venomous: scientists   Astronauts blast off for Christmas space mission   Police warn of email scam   How to keep some privacy on Facebook   Online buyers need protection: security expert    Ardi named 'breakthrough' of 2009    No damage to hacked U.S. drones: admiral   Olive-sided flycatcher threatened in N.L.   Google convicted in French copyright case   Scientists view deepest undersea volcano yet seen    All Technology & Science Headlines »

How to keep some privacy on Facebook    Ardi named 'breakthrough' of 2009    No damage to hacked U.S. drones: admiral   Olive-sided flycatcher threatened in N.L.   Google convicted in French copyright case   Scientists view deepest undersea volcano yet seen    Canada part of Copenhagen climate deal     Stone Age diet included processed grains   RIM reports sharp profit increase   Leprosy-linked genes identified   All Technology & Science Headlines »

Warning as climate deal emerges

A deal is emerging at the UN climate change talks, but there are fears it will not contain a catastrophic rise in temperatures.

Sculptures stand in water outside the conference venue in Copenhagen, 17 December

Sculptures of emaciated humans stand outside the talks venue

A deal appears to be in sight for the final day of the UN climate change talks, but there are fears it may not prevent a 3C (5.4F) temperature rise. Denmark 's prime minister spoke of "very fruitful" talks as Copenhagen prepared to receive US President Barack Obama and 118 other world leaders. Both the US and China , the two largest emitters of greenhouse gases, have indicated they may make concessions. It is hoped these may help overcome sharp divisions at the two-week talks. The talks in quotes   Richard Black: Break a deal?   Q&A: Copenhagen summit   Beijing 'now has 4m vehicles'    Fight to control climate fund

Human Stone Age diet included processed grains    Ardi named 'breakthrough' of 2009   RIM reports sharp profit increase    Scientists view deepest undersea volcano yet seen    Leprosy-linked genes identified    2 cancer codes cracked     Candu reactor division to be sold   Former Nortel exec seeks $1B protection from lawsuits   Mosquitoes may double in Moncton after causeway opened   Unexpected roaming charges vex consumers     All Technology & Science Headlines »

  YouTube post leads to movie deal

How a producer from a small company in Uruguay caught the eye of Hollywood directors with a YouTube animation.

A producer from Uruguay who uploaded a short film to YouTube in November 2009 has been offered a $30m (£18.6m) contract to make a Hollywood film. The movie will be sponsored by director Sam Raimi, whose credits include the Spiderman and Evil Dead films. Fede Alvarez's short film "Ataque de Panico!" (Panic Attack!) featured giant robots invading and destroying Montevideo , the capital of Uruguay . It is 4 mins 48 seconds long and has had more than 1.5 million views so far. "I uploaded (Panic Attack!) on a Thursday and on Monday my inbox was totally full of e-mails from Hollywood studios," he told the BBC's Latin American service BBC Mundo.  Susan Boyle tops YouTube moments   Web makes Tajik migrant a star

Wind Mobile launches service   Bell can't make 'most reliable' claim: B.C. court    Another Earth-like planet found orbiting nearby star   Unexpected roaming charges vex consumers     European space telescope reveals newborn stars    Susan Boyle tops YouTube's most-watched list     FTC slaps Intel with antitrust suit     Giant wind turbines pose no health risk: study    Web developer donates bus info service    Internet competition blamed for slow service   All Technology & Science Headlines »

Deal in Microsoft-EU browser war

Microsoft reaches agreement with European Union anti-trust regulators to allow European users a choice of browsers.

Microsft logo

Microsoft agreed to support other browsers on its operating system

Microsoft has reached agreement with European Union anti-trust regulators to allow European users a choice of web browsers. The accord ends 10 years of dispute between the two sides. Over that time, the EU imposed fines totalling 1.68bn euros ($2.44bn, £1.5bn). The European Union said Microsoft's legally binding agreement ended the dispute and averted a possible fine for the company. Microsoft in new browser offer     Ballmer sees slower growth    Microsoft increases search share

Vint Cerf: we've only scratched internet's surface     New planets found around sun-like stars   Australian government to introduce internet filter     Rogers charges for 'free' text messages     Octopus builds home in coconut shells     Climate-change skeptics gain from Ottawa funding    Giant iceberg off Australia breaking up    Ottawa teen's pirate radio silenced     Wind to announce cellphone pricing Wednesday    Google testing its own mobile phone   All Technology & Science Headlines »

Australia introduces web filters

Australia intends to introduce filters which will ban access to websites containing criminal content. The banned sites will be selected by an independent classification body guided by complaints from the public, said Communications Minister Stephen Conroy. A seven month trial in conjunction with internet service providers found the technology behind the filter to be 100% effective. However, there has been opposition from some internet users.   Measures target child web safety      China clarifies web filter plans

Wind to announce cellphone pricing Wednesday     Google testing its own mobile phone    New NASA space telescope launched     Cruel euthanization of endangered species alleged     DNA map shows pandas may lack meat taste buds     Darwin had inherited illness: professor     Yes Men take credit for fake climate releases     Email scam uses Windsor, Ont. woman's account     Open-access internet rules take hits    Globalive says wireless network launch imminent     All Technology & Science Headlines »

Genetic 'map' of Asia's diversity

An international scientific effort has revealed the genetics behind Asia 's diversity.

Map of Asia

The study indicates that all of Asia was populated through one migration event

An international scientific effort has revealed the genetics behind Asia 's diversity. The Human Genome Organization's (HUGO) Pan-Asian SNP Consortium carried out a study of almost 2,000 people across the continent. Their findings support the hypothesis that Asia was populated primarily through a single migration event from the south. The researchers described their findings in the journal Science. They found genetic similarities between populations throughout Asia and an increase in genetic diversity from northern to southern latitudes. Africa's genetic

Open-access internet rules take hits    Globalive says wireless network launch imminent     UN climate draft sets tougher emission targets    Intense meteor shower to peak this weekend    Facebook phone app collects non-users' contact information    Massive iceberg spotted off Australia     European leaders pledge cash for climate change     Study debunks caffeine's sobering effects    Discovery of early meat-eating dinosaur redraws family tree   Canadian, 2 Americans receive physics Nobel     All Technology & Science Headlines »

Most of the UK missing out on HD

Despite a majority of UK households having HD televisions, very few people are actually watching content in full HD.

HD TVs in a shop

An HD TV is not the only piece of equipment you need

A staggering majority of UK consumers are not getting the best out of their high-definition (HD) televisions, according to a survey. Although 56% of UK households now have an HD television, 91% still watch standard DVDs and get their television through standard set-top boxes. Full HD broadcasting can be viewed from Sky, Virgin and Freesat but will eventually be available on Freeview. For full HD, films must be played on an HD-DVD or Blu-Ray player.

Discovery of early meat-eating dinosaur redraws family tree    Canadian, 2 Americans receive physics Nobel    1,700 U.K. scientists back climate science    1st high-energy collisions seen at Large Hadron Collider    Woods scandal spikes internet traffic     Kids in hospital connect online     Animal-to-human transplant trials OK'd in Australia    Female birds competing for mates resemble males    IMF could fund climate adaptation: Soros    Exempt northerners from emission cuts: Inuit leader   All Technology & Science Headlines »

Facebook faces privacy criticism

Facebook members, rights groups and bloggers line up to criticise the social network site's revamped privacy policy.

Critics say people could accidentally share too much information

Digital rights groups and bloggers have heaped criticism on Facebook's changed privacy policy. Critics said the changes were unwelcome and "nudged" people towards sharing updates with the wider web and made them findable via search engines. The changes were introduced on 9 December via a pop-up that asked users to update privacy settings.  Facebook boosts privacy control    Websites 'keep deleted photos'

Bionic fingers restore man's dexterity    Researchers block fearful memories    China shuts down file-sharing site   N.S. rural broadband delayed months    Developing nations decry Danish climate plan     Cable, satellite revenue still rising: StatsCan   Halifax university to dismantle nuclear reactor   Testosterone leads to fairness, not aggression: researchers   Shellfish catch off Nova Scotia plummets   Time running out on internet access appeals   All Technology & Science Headlines »

Hubble sees most distant galaxies

Nasa's Hubble Space Telescope captures its deepest view of the Universe, revealing never-before-seen galaxies

Astronomers installed Wide Field Camera 3 during a servicing mission

Nasa's Hubble Space Telescope (HST) has captured its deepest view of the Universe, producing images of galaxies that have never been seen before. The pictures were acquired by the HST's new Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3). This highly sensitive camera can see starlight from far-off objects - light that has been "stretched" by the expanding Universe. Scientists who have analyzed the new images say the galaxies they reveal could be the most distant yet observed. By Victoria Gill, Science reporter, BBC News

New TV set has built-in internet

A new TV set which offers people the chance to view the BBC iPlayer directly, has launched. The iViewer, from British firm Cello, has built-in internet access, and requires a broadband or wifi connection in order to view net channels It will be sold exclusively in Marks and Spencer stores until March 1 2010 . Currently the BBC catch-up service is only available on television via set top boxes, games consoles or a digital TV subscription with Virgin Media. Catch-up TV moves onto Freesat    XBox beating Sky Player problems

Time running out on internet access appeals    Testosterone leads to fairness, not aggression: researchers   Video game aims to teach teens biology    Time, WSJ, Cosmo publishers plan Kindle rival     Feds to fund Northwest Passage marine park study    Google launches Chrome browser for Mac, Linux    Zenn to close Quebec electric car plant    Police investigate online threats to student    Alberta wants 'ambitious' Copenhagen deal   Jet-setting swan takes off for blind date    All Technology & Science Headlines »

Measures target child web safety

Lessons in using the internet safely are set to become a compulsory part of the curriculum for primary schoolchildren in England from 2011. The lessons are one element of a new government strategy being unveiled called "Click Clever, Click Safe". Children will also be encouraged to follow an online "Green Cross Code" and block and report inappropriate content. The measures have been drawn up by the UK Council on Child Internet Safety, a new body comprising 140 organizations. By Jonathan Fildes, Technology reporter, BBC News  Websites 'need help buttons'   Can schools solve all problems?    At a glance: Byron Review

Virgin Galactic unveils commercial spaceship    Immediate climate action needed, summit hears    Coin toss not random: UBC researchers   CRTC begins hearing into TV's future   Missing DNA link found in 'very hungry' kids   FAA issues new airworthiness directive for offshore choppers   Sask. musician promoted via Google Street View   UN to probe stolen climate data emails    Ares launch successful despite parachute failure   Hepatitis C drug tested in chimps   All Technology & Science Headlines »

iPhone orchestra ready for debut

Smartphone symphony: a group of US students have built music applications and written scores for their iPhones.

University of Michigan iphone orchestra

A group of US students has created an entire orchestra out of separate iPhone applications.

As part of their studies, the group from the University of Michigan built the applications themselves and composed music for them. While some of the applications sound similar to traditional instruments, others make unique noises. The iPhone handsets are attached to speakers which the performers wear around their wrists. A live concert of the students' original compositions is planned for 9 December. It will mark the end of their three-month course, run by Austrian computer scientist and musician Georg Essl. By Zoe Kleinman,Technology reporter, BBC News How to hack a handset   Apps 'to be as big as internet'

UN to probe stolen climate data emails    Ares launch successful despite parachute failure   Hepatitis C drug tested in chimps   Polar bear sculpture shapes climate change concern   Feeding birds can affect evolution: study   U.K. military shuts down UFO hotline   Expert panel recommends new isotope reactor    THQ opening Montreal video game studio   Ottawa boy ordered to shut down his radio station     User-controlled camera debuts on Hockey Night    All Technology & Science Headlines »

Glacier threat to Bolivia capital

Fears grow for the future of water supplies in Bolivia 's sprawling, fast-growing capital of La Paz and its twin El Alto.

Vanishing glaciers imperil La Paz

Fears are growing for the future of water supplies in one of Latin America 's fastest-growing urban areas - Bolivia 's sprawling capital of La Paz and its twin El Alto. Scientists monitoring the glaciers high in the Andes mountains - a key source of water - say the ice is showing signs of shrinking faster than previously forecast. Faced with a booming population and a combination of glacial retreat and reduced rainfall, the governor of the La Paz region is even contemplating moving people to other parts of Bolivia . Water is already in short supply among the poorest communities and has become a cause of tension. Mixed picture in Himalayas   Glaciers suffer record shrinkage

THQ opening Montreal video game studio   Feeding birds can affect evolution: study   University to probe possible climate data bias     Mutations link autism, schizophrenia: study   Common weed killer gives male frogs sex change    Google takes aim at browser redirection    Prairie-chicken wiped out in Canada   Economy, swine flu top spam topics of 2009   Google Street View adds 9 Canadian cities    Top court orders new trial in internet luring case    All Technology & Science Headlines »

Intel unveils 48-core cloud chip

A chip that fits a "data centre" onto a piece of silicon the size of a postage stamp has been unveiled by Intel.

Intel prototype chip, Intel

The chip is likely to find a role in data and hosting centres

Intel has unveiled a prototype chip that packs 48 separate processing cores on to a chunk of silicon the size of a postage stamp. The Single-chip Cloud Computer (SCC), as it is known, contains 1.3 billion transistors, the tiny on-off switches that underpin chip technology. Each processing core could, in theory, run a separate operating system. Currently, top-end chips for desktop computers typically contain four separate processors. Intel details new core chip line   Tech Know: How low can you go?

Robotic hand controlled by thought    Astronomers ID violent supernova   Google Street View adds 9 Canadian cities    Facebook fine-tunes privacy controls    First butterflies in space emerge    Google to limit free access to some news content     Canadian copyright law to trump ACTA, Clement says   U.K. climate scientist under investigation   Monkey still traumatized after sister's abduction    Michael Jackson tops Google, Yahoo searches   Canadian copyright law to trump ACTA, Clement says    U.K. climate scientist under investigation    Michael Jackson tops Google, Yahoo searches   Nokia alleges price fixing among LCD makers    Astronaut Thirsk back on Earth    Thirsk's Canadian experiments in space    Funds to fuel study into child brain disorders    Stem cell scientists share concerns    Rogers launches Hulu clone   Mathematical formula predicts the perfect toy     All Technology & Science Headlines »

Solar panel costs 'set to fall'

The cost of installing and owning solar panels will fall even faster than expected according to new research.

Photovoltaic panels

The fall in cost is due to the increased lifetime, the institute says

The cost of installing and owning solar panels will fall even faster than expected according to new research. Tests show that 90% of existing solar panels last for 30 years, instead of the predicted 20 years. According to the independent EU Energy Institute, this brings down the lifetime cost. The institute says the panels are such a good long-term investment that banks should offer mortgages on them like they do on homes. At a conference, the institute forecast that solar panels would be cost-competitive with energy from the grid for half the homes in Europe by 2020 - without a subsidy.

Astronaut Thirsk back on Earth   New evidence for early life on Mars: NASA    Rogers launches Hulu clone    Atom-smasher breaks proton acceleration mark    N.Z. company fires rocket    Brains 'listen' to speech through skin: researchers    Thirsk's Canadian experiments in space    Avatar game designed along with movie    Pregnant pipefish dads cannibalize young    Shuttle, 7 astronauts back on Earth   All Technology & Science Headlines »

In UK Lawyers target 'pirates' for cash

Around 15,000 suspected pirates may soon get letters accusing them of illegally sharing movies and games and asking for cash.

Software is used to track down the suspected pirates

Around 15,000 suspected pirates may soon get legal letters accusing them of illegally sharing movies and games. ACS:Law plans to send notes to the accused in the new year offering a chance to settle out of court for "several hundreds of pounds". A lawyer who has defended people who have received similar letters described it as a "scattergun approach" that would catch "innocent people". ACS:Law said it was "unaware" of anyone who had been wrongly sent a letter. By Jonathan Fildes, Technology reporter, BBC News Government lays out digital plans   Net pirates to be 'disconnected'

Avatar game designed along with movie   Brains 'listen' to speech through skin: researchers   Pregnant pipefish dads cannibalize young   Shuttle, 7 astronauts back on Earth   Assassin's Creed 2 beats sales forecasts   Hackers skewed climate-change emails: scientists   Device translates theatre into 8 languages   Facebook page lands Mount Pearl student in trouble   Nortel approves more exec raises    Battling climate change offers health benefits   All Technology & Science Headlines »

Hammerhead shark mystery solved

A hammerhead shark's unusual shape gives it outstanding vision, according to a study which may solve a centuries-old mystery.

Scalloped hammerhead shark

A head start when it comes to eyesight

Why do hammerhead sharks have such a famously strange-shaped head? One hypothesis is that having eyes on either side of such a wide 'hammer' allows the sharks to see better. But even this idea divides scientific opinion, as researchers argue over whether the hammerhead design makes it more or less difficult to see. The mystery may now be solved by a study showing that a hammerhead gives sharks outstanding binocular vision and an ability to see through 360 degrees.

Shuttle prepares for Friday landing    Assassin's Creed 2 beats sales forecasts    Hackers skewed climate-change emails: scientists   Cellphones may replace credit cards    Mininova removes links to copyrighted files   Rogers cuts 900 jobs   China pledges to slow emissions growth    Sony betting big on 3D TV   Australian territory to cull 6,000 wild camels   Gore predicts climate treaty by next year   All Technology & Science Headlines »

Boost for spin-based electronics

The field of "spintronics" - a future means of computing - is shown to work at room temperature for the first time.

Silicon wafer (SPL)

The effect was shown in silicon, the standby of the semiconductor industry

The next generation of computers may make use of the "spin" of electrons instead of their charge. Spintronics relies on manipulating these spins to make them capable of carrying data. The technique has been shown in a number of materials at low temperatures before. But researchers writing in Nature have made use of these "spin-polarised" electrons in silicon at room temperature for the first time. IBM races to make hi-tech memory   Spintronics

China pledges to slow emissions growth    Gore predicts climate treaty by next year   Snails given mirror-image shells    Canadian astronaut eager to return to Earth   Shuttle departs space station for Friday landing    Obama to attend global climate summit    Ericsson, Kapsch win Nortel GSM auction    Daredevil's winged flight across Gibraltar strait fails    Large Hadron Collider's 1st collisions recorded    Food waste has environmental impact: scientists    All Technology & Science Headlines »

Tesco to offer iPhone in the UK

Supermarket giant Tesco joins a growing number of UK firms and network operators offering Apple's popular iPhone.

iPhone

The handset has boosted sales for O2

Supermarket giant Tesco has joined a growing number of UK firms offering Apple's popular iPhone. A spokesperson for the firm said that it hoped to offer the phone "in time for Christmas". Although Tesco has not revealed tariffs, the spokesperson said that its prices were "competitive". In September, it was revealed that O2 had lost its exclusive deal to sell the phone, which had been in place since its launch in 2007. O2 'to get iPhone contract in UK'   Vodafone unites social networks

Shuttle departs space station for Friday landing    Large Hadron Collider's 1st collisions recorded    Food waste has environmental impact: scientists    Rogers can't claim to be 'most reliable' network, court rules    ISP owners could face jail under child porn bill     Origin of Species 1st edition fetches $174K     Banks lost millions on digital cheque project   U.S., Canada will share refugee fingerprints    Enforce environmental laws at oilsands: report     New dad in space focuses on shuttle job    All Technology & Science Headlines »

Strange creatures found in deep, dark ocean     ISPs to monitor child porn under proposed bill    Skin germs aid in normal healing: researchers    Earth's greenhouse gases reach record highs     Large Hadron Collider sends beams in 2 directions     MSNBC to take over breaking news Twitter account    Ciena winning bidder for Nortel businesses    Atlantis astronauts on 3rd spacewalk    News Corp. may pull out of Google News: reports    Quebecer's Facebook photo fight a cautionary tale    All Technology & Science Headlines »

Restart for 'Big Bang' experiment

The Large Hadron Collider experiment, designed to shed light on the cosmos, restarts after 14 months of repairs.

Cheers of relief at Cern HQ

The Large Hadron Collider experiment has re-started after a 14-month hiatus while the machine was being repaired. Engineers have made two stable proton beams circulate in opposite directions around the machine, which is in a tunnel beneath the French-Swiss border. The team may try to increase the £6bn ($10bn) collider's energy to record-breaking levels this weekend. The LHC is being used to smash together beams of protons in a bid to shed light on the nature of the Universe. It is the world's largest machine and is housed in a 27km-long circular tunnel. By Paul Rincon, Science reporter, BBC News   In pictures: Machine reboots   Large Hadron Collider: Guide

Bell quietly drops system access fee   Beam sent around Large Hadron Collider    Asian carp close to Great Lakes    Billy Bragg, NDP push for new law on music downloads   Cigarette butts toxic to fish, say researchers   Google to launch Chrome netbooks next year    Crocodile ancestors found in Sahara    Home 3D ready for prime time: Panasonic   Corn's genetic code uncovered   Depressed woman loses benefits over Facebook photos    All Technology & Science Headlines »

Google previews operating system

Internet search giant Google previews its Chrome OS operating system, to be available to users by the end of 2010.

Internet search giant Google has lifted the lid on its operating system, known as Chrome OS.

The free and open source system is initially aimed at low-cost netbooks and does away with many of the features of a traditional program. All applications are designed to run in a web browser and all the user's data is stored on Google's servers. Engineers from the firm said the first computers running the system would be available before the end of 2010. By Jonathan Fildes, Technology reporter, BBC

Google to launch Chrome netbooks next year   Crocodile ancestors found in Sahara    Home 3D ready for prime time: Panasonic    Corn's genetic code uncovered    Depressed woman loses benefits over Facebook photos     Atlantis astronauts on 1st spacewalk    Ontario reviews flat-screen TV standards    MPs fight online predators who counsel suicide     Warnings issued about online drugs     British woman finds her attacker on Facebook    All Technology & Science Headlines »

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China military site draws hackers

A website set up by China 's Ministry of National Defense attracts 2.3million hack attempts in its first four weeks online.

The official website includes news, photos and videos.

The Chinese military defence website was subjected to 2.3 million hacking attempts in its first month online according to officials. "When there were major events taking place related to the military and national defense, the number of (cyber) attacks rose," said editor Ji Guilin. The website, launched in August 2009, has so far attracted 1.25bn visitors from around the world. Ji Guilin was talking to Chinese state-run newspaper the People's Daily.  US urges China military dialogue   China to ban beating web addicts

Telus warns against letting Globalive compete   Webby Awards name decade's top internet stories    Telus sues Rogers over ads    Shuttle Atlantis docks with space station    Google to launch own smartphone: report    Spain makes broadband a universal right    Activists, UN call attention to reproductive health   Winnipeg teen's climate blog wins kudos    Net erupts over video of fish eaten alive   Pole problem topples osprey nest site    All Technology & Science Headlines »

Network sites 'need help buttons'

Social networking websites are criticized for failing to introduce a help button for children being bullied online.

Major social networking websites have been criticised for not introducing a help button for children to report concerns about grooming and bullying. Jim Gamble, from the Child Exploitation and Online Protection Centre (Ceop), hit out at the sites as one site, Bebo, adopted the button. He said there was "no legitimate reason" why other sites like MySpace and Facebook had not done the same. MySpace 'suicide bully cleared'

Shuttle Atlantis to dock with space station    Kindle comes to Canada without browser     Carbon emissions from fossil fuels rise    Australian marsupial soaks up sun like a lizard   Climate conference needs targets: Danish PM    Quebec spending $650M to cut waste    P.E.I. says no to wind turbine firm   CAE wins Chinese contract    Atlantis carries Canadian trees into space    Twitter to scrap suggested user list    All Technology & Science Headlines »

Age of cyber warfare is 'dawning'

Many nations are now arming to defend themselves in a cyber war and readying forces to conduct their own attacks, says a report.

Increasingly, hackers fight alongside ground troops

Cyber war has moved from fiction to fact, says a report. Compiled by security firm McAfee, it bases its conclusion on analysis of recent net-based attacks. Analysis of the motives of the actors behind many attacks carried out via the internet showed that many were mounted with a explicitly political aim. It said that many nations were now arming to defend themselves in a cyber war and readying forces to conduct their own attacks.

Atlantis carries Canadian trees into space    Twitter to scrap suggested user list    Oldest trees grow faster because of warming    Internet rights poster sparks UN fight    Loosen internet control, Obama urges China     Anti-apartheid activist named Greenpeace head    Cancer rates linked to industrial activity    Canadian skiers use 'Stealth' technology     Inuit leaders demand action at climate-change conference    Quebec lab simulates crashes to improve road safety    All Technology & Science Headlines »

NASA's moon crash reveals 'lots of water'    EBay flooded with net-banned Xbox consoles   Online drug ads under review in U.S.   Long toes may give sprinters more speed   Swiss privacy watchdog to sue Google Street View    Google's digital book plan rides on revised deal   Links between oil activity, Alberta quakes studied    Ottawa 'star' researcher mourned after H1N1 death    Apple won't be at CES, despite rumours   Dinosaurs were warm-blooded runners, skeletons hint    All Technology & Science Headlines »

Big profit from nature protection

Money invested in protecting nature can bring huge financial returns, according to a study backed by the UK .

  Fire clearing Amazon forest for cattle

Societies gain financially from leaving forests intact rather than clearing them

Money invested in protecting nature can bring huge financial returns, according to a major investigation into the costs and benefits of the natural world. It says money ploughed into protecting wetlands, coral reefs and forests can bring a hundredfold return on capital. The Economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity study (Teeb) is backed by the UN and countries including the UK . The project's leader says governments should act on its findings at next month's UN climate summit.   World 'still losing biodiversity'    Nature loss 'dwarfs bank crisis'

Apple won't be at CES, despite rumours   Gene seems key to evolution of speech   Dinosaurs were warm-blooded runners, skeletons hint   Call of Duty sets sales record    Intel pays $1.2B to settle antitrust claims    New dinosaur species found in South Africa    Duffy aims to stop Twitter impostor    Boreal forests ignored in climate change fight   Apple passes Nokia as most profitable cellphone maker   Britain to hold DNA of innocents for 6 years   All Technology & Science Headlines »

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Bing teams up with Wolfram Alpha

Microsoft joins forces with a web tool once hailed as a rival to Google to provide results for its search engine Bing.

Microsoft has teamed up with a web tool once hailed as a rival to Google to provide results for its search engine Bing. Wolfram Alpha aims to answer questions directly, rather than display a list of links like a search engine. The "computational knowledge engine" is the brainchild of British-born physicist Stephen Wolfram. It will be used to bolster Bing's results in areas such as nutrition, health and mathematics. Microsoft Bing adds visual search   Wolfram Alpha goes live

Boreal forests ignored in climate change fight   New dinosaur species found in South Africa   Apple passes Nokia as most profitable cellphone maker    Britain to hold DNA of innocents for 6 years    Website offers free online concerts    Call of Duty kicks off cautious holiday season    EU objects to Sun-Oracle deal    Assassins Creed 2: the pride of Montreal    LightSail-1 solar sail spacecraft planned for 2010   Electronic Arts job cuts hit Burnaby   All Technology & Science Headlines »

Microsoft disconnects Xbox gamers

Microsoft confirms it has cut off a number of gamers from its Xbox Live service for modifying their consoles to run pirated games.

Halo 3 screenshot, Microsoft

Xbox Live allows gamers to play against one another

Thousands of gamers may have been cut off from Microsoft's online gaming service Xbox Live for modifying their consoles to play pirated games. Online reports suggest that as many as 600,000 gamers may have been affected. Microsoft confirmed that it had banned a "small percentage" of the 20 million Xbox Live users.  Hackers target Xbox Live players   Xbox Live in youth voting drive

New PC to encourage older users

A computer designed for people aged over 60 who have never used the internet before is launched. A new computer aimed at people aged over 60 who are unfamiliar with PCs and the internet has been unveiled. The simplified desktop - called SimplicITy - has just six buttons directing users to basic tasks such as e-mail and chat. The computer comes pre-loaded with 17 video tutorials from television presenter Valerie Singleton More than 6 million people over the age of 65 have never used the internet, according to government figures. 'Social benefit' - Each made-to-order computer takes two weeks from request to delivery and can be ordered by post.

Call of Duty kicks off cautious holiday season     EU objects to Sun-Oracle deal    Assassins Creed 2: the pride of Montreal    LightSail-1 solar sail spacecraft planned for 2010    Electronic Arts job cuts hit Burnaby    Human DNA in animal experiments studied   Winnipeg enviro-car design gets international nod    Google book deal deadline extended    Google buys AdMob in $750M US all-stock deal    Gene behind vaccine 'memory' revealed    All Technology & Science Headlines »

Modern Warfare 'set for record'

Analysts predict that first week sales of computer game Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2 will break current records in the UK .

Call Of Duty: Modern Warfare 2

The widely-anticipated video game Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2 has been tipped to be the biggest selling video game in history. Hundreds of gamers gathered at shops around the world ahead of its release at 00:00 GMT. Retailer HMV has predicted more than 1m UK sales in the first week, 20% more than previous record holder Grand Theft Auto 4 (GTA4). Online shop Amazon said the pre-order sales were 50% higher than GTA4. Play.com say that in the run up to launch it was getting more than 150 pre-orders per minute. MPs row over Modern Warfare

Assassins Creed 2: the pride of Montreal    Google book deal deadline extended    Google buys AdMob in $750M US all-stock deal    Gene behind vaccine 'memory' revealed    Computer virus victims framed for child porn    Russian H-bomb developer dead at 93    Possible meteor spotted in B.C. sky    Micro-injector could speed drug development    Videotron ideal suitor for Globalive: analyst    Caribbean, Gulf spared widespread coral damage    All Technology & Science Headlines »  

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eBay in Skype deal with founders

eBay settles a lawsuit with the founders of Skype, ending uncertainty over the future of the internet phone company.

Skype user

Skype is used by millions to make free calls over the internet

Online auction site eBay has settled a lawsuit with the founders of Skype, ending uncertainty over the future of the internet phone company. The case was about whether the software of the site was owned by the founders via their firm, Joltid, or by eBay. In a complicated deal, the founders will drop their lawsuit against eBay and take two seats on the board of Skype. Skype will still be sold to a group of investors for about $2bn (£1.2bn).

4th Annual Tour of Duty Gala raised over $80,000 for Perley Rideau Veterans Health Centre and Canada Aviation Museum Foundation
 
A ‘sold out’ crowd of 400 guests was at the Canada Aviation Museum , Saturday evening to celebrate the Canadian centennial of flight while helping to raise funds for two worthy local charities.  The 4th Annual Tour of Duty Gala raised over $80,000 dollars to be shared in support of the therapeutic music program for the residents at the PRVHC and to support educational programs and accessibility initiatives at the Canada Aviation Museum . The evening’s program featured co-hosts Kevin Newman of Global Television News and Jeff Douglas with the television program, Ancestors in the Attic and included presentations by both the Chief of the Defence Staff Walt Natynczyk, veteran Bill McCrea, a former Spitfire pilot and Museum volunteer as well as Gerald Haddon, the grandson of Canada’s first pilot, J.A.D. McCurdy.  Guests were entertained by The Perley Chicks and The Canadian Forces’ String Ensemble and Central Band. “The Canada Aviation Museums’ programs and facilities connect with communities, locally and nationally,” said Denise Amyot, President and CEO of the Canada Science and Technology Museum Corporation, “With the proceeds raised by the Tour of Duty, we can ensure that we continue to offer the best in educational programs and make our dynamic Museum experiences accessible to as many Canadian as possible.” The Tour of Duty was made possible with the generous support and commitment of its corporate sponsors including: The Perley and Rideau Veterans’ health Centre Foundation is the fundraising arm of the Health Centre. Each year the Foundation allocates funds for the purchase of the urgently needed equipment and resident programs. The Day Program for people with dementia is funded in part by the foundation. The Foundation is also spearheading the drive for the “Home Sweet Home” Project, designed to make the Perley Rideau as cozy and home-like as possible. The Music and Dance Therapy Program for residents is being supported by the Foundation. The Canada Aviation Museum Foundation promotes private sector philanthropic support for the Canada Aviation Museum . With core operations of this national treasure provided by the Government of Canada through the Department of Canadian Heritage and through earned revenues, private sector support is valued as evidence of the importance that citizens place in their national museums. Foundation funds are used for special programs and projects, new initiatives and seed funding, acquisition of artifacts to complete collections, outreach initiatives to extend the Museum to a wider audience, and unique capital investments beyond the scope of normal funding. Media Contact: Christina Lucas, Director, Public Affairs, Canada Aviation Museum , Tel. : 613-447-7631 clucas@technomuses.ca

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Bare Necessities

F1 designer unveils electric car

A new sustainable electric car designed for city or town use is the result of a £9m investment program.

T.27 electric car

Science and Innovation Minister Lord Drayson test drives the T.27

An electric car created by the McLaren F1 'supercar' road car designer Gordon Murray has been unveiled. Three prototypes of the T.27 model will be developed over the next 16 months. The manufacturing process, called iStream, has received £9m of investment, half of which came from the government's Technology Strategy Board. iStream plants can be just one fifth of the size of a conventional car factory, as the cars are not made from stamped steel. 'Eco cars' race across Australia

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EU offers hope to file-sharers

The European Parliament has put together a reform package that would offer more protection to those accused of illegal file-sharing.

Computer keyboard and CD

New Telecoms Reform Package is less severe on file-sharers

Internet users throughout Europe accused of illegal file-sharing are to receive more protection from being cut off by their service provider. The European Parliament and Council is due to make a decision on its Telecoms Reform Package in late November. The package will entitle users in all 27 EU states to be put through a "fair and impartial procedure" before being disconnected. The outcome is a compromise agreed during all night negotiations. Some members of the European Parliament felt nobody should lose their connection until after they had been prosecuted in a court for illegally downloading content. by Nigel Cassidy, Europe Business Reporter   Europe mulls file-sharing plans

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Microsoft reveals new-look MSN

Microsoft has announced a major redesign of its MSN.com web portal, designed to drive traffic to search engine Bing.

New look MSN.com preview

UK users will see the new-look homepage in 2010.

Microsoft's web portal MSN.com has been given an extensive revamp for the first time in almost ten years. New features include fewer links, a column dedicated to social networking sites Twitter and Facebook, and a large search engine box. The company hopes the new look will drive more traffic to its Bing search engine, launched as a competitor to Google in June 2009. It will roll out in 2010 with a small group of US users getting access now.   Real-time search rivalry heats up    Microsoft increases search

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English wine gets help from space

English vineyards have signed up to use a harvest optimization scheme based on data gathered from satellites.

Oenoview view and aerial photo

The system can help to optimise harvests, and hopefully wine quality

A number of English vineyards have signed up to make use of a satellite imaging service to boost harvests. The satellite measures a vineyard's reflectivity in a number of colours in the visible and infrared.   The Oenoview system, first launched in France last year, analyses the images to determine vine leaf density, soil water content and grape bunch sizes.   The English Wine Producers trade group said that wines made using the system could be available as early as 2011.  Oenoview was developed by the Institut Cooperatif du Vin in France along with Infoterra, a subsidiary of aerospace firm EADS Astrium.

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