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From left: A.Q. Porter, Eli Cupit, J.S. Burns, Emery Summers & O.T. Synnott. Masthead (c) 2003 David E. Godbold. USE BY PERMISSION ONLY.
 
Battles & Engagements
Biographies & Photos
A Brief Synopsis of the 33rd's History
1862 Chronology
1863 Chronology
1864 Chronology
1865 Chronology
Letters & Diaries
Original Officers
Rosters & Enlistment History
 
 

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"The color-bearer of the Thirty-third was killed some fifteen paces from the works, when Lieutenant H.C. Shaw, of Company K, carried them forward, and when in the act of planting them on the works was killed, his body falling in the trench, the colors falling in the works."

--- Brigadier-General W.S. Featherston report

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Special thanks to Mary Duck Pallon for her assistance with so many bios for Company K.

Be sure and visit her web site for more info on Amite County.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This section
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Many thanks
to those
who have contributed!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Special thanks to Mary Duck Pallon for her assistance with so many bios for Company K.

Be sure and visit her web site for more info on Amite County.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This section
is made
possible by you.

Many thanks
to those
who have contributed!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



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Biographies, Photos and Anecdotes
Company K

1st Sgt./Brev. Lt. Henry Clay Shaw

Henry Clay Shaw was born ca. 1844 in Liberty, Amite Co., MS. He was the son of Richard Dowley Shaw (ca.1799 in Scotland-pre-October 11, 1869 in MS) and Mary Gillespie Carle/Gayle (ca. 1812 in LA-after1870).

H. C. enlisted in the "Amite Defenders," Co. K of the 33rd Mississippi Infantry Regiment on March 10, 1862 and was promoted to 1st Sergeant on February 6, 1863. At the battle of Franklin, TN on November 30, 1864, he was killed in action.

Brig. Gen. W.S. Featherston stated in his official report:

"The color-bearer of the Thirty-third was killed some fifteen paces from the works, when Lieutenant H.C. Shaw, of Company K, carried them forward, and when in the act of planting them on the works was killed, his body falling in the trench, the colors falling in the works."

He is buried in McGavock Confederate Cemetery, Franklin, TN, Section 25.

[RETURN TO TOP]                                                                                                                        Courtesy of Mary Pallon

Pvt. John S. Shaw

John S. Shaw born about 1847 in Liberty, Amite Co., MS. He was the son of Richard Dowley Shaw (ca.1799 in Scotland-pre-October 11, 1869 in MS) and Mary Gillespie Carle/Gayle (ca. 1812 in LA-after1870).

Enlisted in Co. K, the "Amite Defenders" of the 33rd Mississippi Infantry Regiment on May 3, 1864 at Montevallo, AL. He was wounded at some point in time, and later paroled at Meridian, MS.

[RETURN TO TOP]                                                                                                                        Courtesy of Mary Pallon

Pvt. James Smiley

James Smiley was born 1845 in Amite Co., Mississippi as the eldest son of James M. Smiley and Rebecca Carroll. His father was a lawyer and later became a judge. His grandparents were Nathaniel Smiley* and Margaret Smith. In the 1860 census James Smiley, age 15, can be found with his siblings living with their uncle, Robert P. Smiley. This uncle was a very wealthy planter with several children of his own. It is unknown why his nephew James and siblings were living with him given that their father was still alive. James Smiley was a teenager when he enlisted in the 33rd and turned twenty at the end of the war.

At the age of 64, Friday, October 8, 1909, James Smiley died in his sister's home. The following is taken from his obituary found in the Amite Courthouse.

"[He] . . . was a well read man, of rare intellect, of peaceable, quiet disposition, and a man of most gentle nature that we ever knew, and had the highest regard for law and civic duty. He was a member of Co. K, 33d. Miss Reg., and is said to have been one of the best soldiers in his command. He never married but leaves quite a number of near relatives. We regret his death, and may the voices of nature that he loved so well sing an eternal requiem over his last sleeping place."

Funeral services for James Smiley were held at 10:00 am October 9th, 1909 in Liberty City Cemetery, Amite Co., Mississippi. A Confederate marker was placed at his grave.

*Note that the Smiley surname is also spelled Smylie.

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Pvt. Nathaniel Frances Smiley

Nathaniel Frances "Nat" Smiley* was born November 19, 1842 in Amite Co., Mississippi the eldest child of Robert Patterson Smiley and Eliza Aletha Wren. His father was a very wealthy plantation owner that had eleven children. The 1860 census lists Robert Patterson Smiley with his brother's children even though his brother was still living possibly so as to aide in the children's education. Nathaniel Frances Smiley served in the 33rd beside one of these children, his first cousin James Smiley.

Following the war Nathaniel Frances "Nat" Smiley married Martha Ann "Annie" Andrews January 27, 1869 in Amite Co., Mississippi. By 1870 their first child a daughter had been born with nine more children to follow. Their youngest child, George McAllister Smiley became a Presbyterian minister as was the Smylie/Smiley family tradition. Nat and Annie would spend over 50 years together and are found in the 1920 census living with two of their grown children and grandchildren.

Remembrances of Nathaniel Frances Smiley come from his grandson James Malcolm Smiley.

Nat joined the confederate cause and participated in the Battle of Vicksburg, where he was captured, released and sent home. Following his release he joined forces in Georgia where he was at the end of the war. The family remembers stories of the aging Nat retreating to the front gallery of his home late in the afternoon giving a loud Rebel Yell, lifting his hands to his ears listening for a reply.

On August 26, 1922 Nathaniel Frances Smiley passed away and was buried in Bethany Presbyterian Cemetery in Amite Co., Mississippi where so many of his family are buried. There is no mention of his Confederate service on his marker. His wife Annie died on Jan 13, 1934 and was buried close to her husband.

*Note that the Smiley surname is also spelled Smylie.

Contributing researcher, Frances Phares
[RETURN TO TOP]                                                                                       Bio written and partially researched by Mary Pallon

NOTE: The 33rd Mississippi was not engaged in the siege of Vicksburg, although several members were captured following Champion Hill and later paroled from Vicksburg.  Webmaster

Commissary Sgt. Thomas Batchelor Smylie

Thomas Batchelor Smylie* was born on February 26, 1830 in Amite Co., Mississippi. He was the son of the nationally known Reverend James Smylie II and Mary Anne Harriet Batchelor. He was the grandson of adventurous Thomas Batchelor an earlier settler, wealthy plantation owner, first clerk of Amite and Rebecca Gayden who also came from the Amite elite. However, it is his father the Presbyterian James Smylie II that is the most intriguing and controversial.

Reverend James Smylie II was born 1780 in Richmond Co., North Carolina the son of Scottish emigrants. He was educated in Guilford Co., North Carolina by Dr. David Caldwell and ordained to preach in 1804. As was common for Presbyterian ministers he was well versed in Latin, Greek, and thus supportive of several early educational institutes in Amite and surrounding region. Presbyterian history of Mississippi places him as a prominent influence in this region as he arrived early in Mississippi and founded churches in Adams and Amite counties. However, he was a large and very wealthy slaveholder, mainly from his three profitable marriages, and it was his writings in support of slavery from scripture that gained him notice nationally. Thomas Batchelor Smylie was the only child of his father's third marriage and he married Eliza Jane Montgomery on April 27, 1848 in Lauderdale Co., Mississippi. By the time of the war he had 3 children with one additional child arriving in 1865.

After the war Thomas Batchelor Smylie left the United States with his family for Belize, Honduras. Things did not go well for the family and they returned to the United States in poverty, which was a drastic change from their previous lifestyle. They are reported to have settled in Arkansas. Some of his children returned to Amite and are buried in Oaklawn Cemetery located in Centreville on the border of Wilkinson Co. & Amite Co.

*Note that the Smylie surname is also spelled Smiley.

Contributing researcher, Frances Phares
[RETURN TO TOP]                                                                                       Bio written and partially researched by Mary Pallon

Sgt.-Major Charles Napoleon Batchelor Street

Charles Napoleon Batchelor Street was born about 1843 in Street, Amite Co., Mississippi. His baptism is recorded in the Unity Presbyterian church notes as November 26, 1843. He was the son of wealthy slaveholders, Henry Goodall Street and Victoria Caroline Batchelor. His lineage was impressive by Amite standards as the grandson of Thomas Batchelor one of the very earliest settlers and wealthiest planters of Amite and the first clerk of the county. His grandmother was Rebecca Gayden and her family had traveled with Thomas Batchelor from Virginia and the Carolinas.

His father, Henry Goodall Street, was a respected Amite lawyer, planter, and ardent supporter of the Confederacy according to historical notes found in Louisiana: Comprising Sketches of Parishes, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Vol. 3, pp. 665-666. Unity Presbyterian Church was founded by prosperous planter women of the region in 1832 with Victoria Caroline Batchelor signing her name to the charter. The Street, Batchelor, Gayden families continued to play prominent rolls in the church history well into the 1900's. The church moved in 1859 so as to be able to reach out better to the poor white farmers in the area. This tradition of trying to help their less fortunate white neighbors was well ingrained into the Street family with oral stories related to their educating, arranging loans, etc. These same stories have been passed down to several families and documented with deeds in my own Duck line.

Charles Napoleon Batchelor Street died November 30, 1864 at the Battle of Franklin. He is buried in the McGavock Cemetery at Carnton Plantation, Franklin, TN, section 48. He never married and was without heirs. His brother Thomas Parke Street that served briefly in the 33rd, Company K had a son born January 31, 1866. This son was named Charles Napoleon Street in memory of his uncle.

[RETURN TO TOP]                                                                                                                        Courtesy of Mary Pallon

Sgt. Thomas Parke Street

Thomas Parke Street was born November 16, 1839 in Street, Amite Co., Mississippi. He was the son of wealthy slaveholders, Henry Goodall Street and Victoria Caroline Batchelor. His lineage was impressive by Amite standards as the grandson of Thomas Batchelor one of the very earliest settlers and wealthiest planters of Amite and the first clerk of the county. His grandmother was Rebecca Gayden and her family had traveled with Thomas Batchelor from Virginia and the Carolinas. While not as much is known on his Street grandparents he was named after his grandfather Parke Street also an early Amite settler.

From Louisiana: Comprising Sketches of Parishes, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Vol. 3, pp. 665-666 one can gain more insight into the life of Thomas Parke Street. Before the war, Thomas Parke Street attended Oakland College near Rodney, Jefferson Co., Mississippi and graduated in 1858. At Oakland he gained a reputation as a debater with one of his strongest speeches against the secession of Mississippi from the Union. Nevertheless he joined the 33rd only to have a substitute* replace him according to this account due to poor health. His brother Charles Napoleon Batchelor Street would remain in the 33rd and die at the Battle of Franklin. Thomas Parke Street later would serve briefly in the 9th Louisiana Battalion Calvary and then in the commissary at Liberty until the end of the war. He is recorded as receiving his parole in Clinton, Mississippi.

In 1896 & 1898 he served in the Mississippi legislature.

On September 20, 1860 in East Feliciana Parish, Thomas Parke Street married Emily Kate Norwood, d/o Judge Abel J. Norwood. Her father settled the town of Norwood, Louisiana. After the war years Thomas Parke Street would go into business with a store named T.P. Street & Co., and then become a part of the well respected Norwood Mercantile Co., Ltd., a prominent corporation in Louisiana.
Thomas Parke Street died February 26, 1917 and is buried in Street Family Cemetery, Amite Co., Mississippi.

[RETURN TO TOP]                                                                                                                        Courtesy of Mary Pallon

* He was discharged by substitute, John Boggs, in March 1863 Webmaster

1st Sgt. Silas Hale Thompson

From "History of Confederate Soldiers of Amite County 1861-1865" pg. 80
1st Sgt. S.H. Thompson
Rev. Silas Hale Thompson was born near Liberty, Miss. March 15, 1824, was a first class farmer before the war and was living on his farm when the war commenced and being a man of great courage and indomitable will he joined the Amite Defenders in February, 1862 which company became Co. "K" 33d Regiment Mississippi Volunteers; the Regiment was formed at Grenada, Miss. Capt. D.W. Hurst being elected Colonel.

Comrade Thompson was the Orderly Sergeant of his company and being a very robust man was always at his post and discharged all his duties as an officer with fidelity and true courage, he was ever in the front ranks when a fight was on and his cry was "Come Boys we drive them back or whip the whole yankee army."

When the war closed he came home and resolutely set to work to retrieve his fortune and for several years he plowed and hoed that was so necessary to do to help bring up this part of the South.
About the year 1871 or 1872 a sermon by the Rev. A.Z.Young convinced him that he was not doing what he should in expecting the Lord's Kingdom; he resolved to preach the gospel.

The following is his Obituary.

Mr. Thompson was converted at the age of 14 uniting with New Providence Church in 1844 and was baptized by Rev.Chas. Felder. For nearly forty years he was a soldier in the cause of our Anointed Savior and in this cause he saw and endured much hard service; it was his call toward long distances to preach in destitute places and to organize new churches; he labored in Amite, Franklin, Pike, Wilkinson counties and also in St. Helena Parish, La. For a number of years he was the Missionary of the Mississippi Baptist Association, working for a small compensation and his reports to the association were well received by his brethren.

He died at his home about five miles West of Liberty Monday, June 23d in the 90th year of his age, his wife preceded him several years to her heavenly home, by whose side he was laid in the family grave yard, Rev. Elisha Gardner conducting the funeral services.


It is said that he organized more churches than any other minister.

[RETURN TO TOP]                                     Photo courtesy of Kathryn Schultz                              Item courtesy of Virgil Roberts

2nd Lt. Andrew Jackson Whittington

Andrew J. Whittington was born November 25 1835 in Amite Co., Mississippi; the fifth2nd Lt. A.J. Whittington of nine children born to Milton Whittington and Polly Louisa Jenkins. On August 21, 1860 he married Emma V. Robertson, the daughter of Joseph C. and Susan (Crenshaw) Robertson of Bolivar Co., Mississippi.

In April 1862 he enlisted in Company K of the 33rd Mississippi Infantry and was elected 3rd Lieutenant. He was later promoted to 2nd Lt., but resigned his command in January 1863.

After the war, he was twice elected sheriff of Amite County and also served several terms as Chancery Clerk. Practically all of his adult life was spent in the public service.

On December 23, 1886, A.J. Whittington died and was buried in Gloster Cemetery, Gloster, Mississippi.

From Genealogy of WILKINSON and KINDRED Families, compiled by M.M. Wilkinson, 1949.              Courtesy of Nora Chucci
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Pvt. John Cain Wilkinson

Pvt. J.C. WilkinsonJohn Cain Wilkinson was born January 16, 1825 in Amite Co., MS. His parents were Elder Rowland Wilkinson (born Feb. 4, 1797, Richmond, GA - died Sept. 24, 1867, Amite Co., MS) and Margaret Cain (born Dec. 12, 1799, Hancock Co., GA - died Jan. 25, 1870, Amite Co., MS).

On January 26, 1845, John Cain Wilkinson married Philadelphia Van Norman (born August 10, 1830 - died: Oct. 28, 1865, Amite Co., MS. Philadelphia was the daughter of Elizabeth Walden and Hiram Van Norman who owned and operated a tannery in Liberty, MS. The tannery provided leather goods to the Confederate Army. John Cain Wilkinson and Philadelphia had six children. After the death of his first wife, in 1865, John Cain Wilkinson married a second time on May 24, 1866 to Mary Eliza Jackson, by whom he had one child. Upon the death of his second wife, he married a third time, to Margaret Jackson Toler on Jan. 23, 1868, by whom he had three children. Margaret Wilkinson died on January 25, 1870.

John Cain Wilkinson patented a section of land in Amite Co., MS, in 1859. Through the years, he bought and sold additional pieces of land much of which he farmed.

On March 10, 1862, John Cain Wilkinson enlisted in the Confederate States of America Army in Amite Co., MS, for a period of three years. His enlisting officer was D.W. Hurst. John Cain Wilkinson served as a private in Company K, 33rd Regiment Mississippi Volunteers under Capt. Moses Jackson and Colonel D.W. Hurst. His military records show service from March 10, 1862 - Feb. 28, 1865. He was wounded at New Hope Church on May 29, 1864 and hospitalized at Augusta, GA. He was admitted to Ocmulgee Hospital, in Macon, GA on July 8, 1864.

John Cain Wilkinson returned to Amite Co., MS, where he followed in his father's footsteps and was ordained as an Elder in the Primitive Baptist Church. He served as pastor of the Plymouth Primitive Baptist Church in Liberty, Amite Co., which had been founded by his father, Elder Rowland Wilkinson in 1857. John Cain Wilkinson served as pastor from Dec. 1871 until his death in May 1911. His son, Zachariah Jefferson Wilkinson, continued in his father and grandfather's tradition as pastor of the Plymouth Baptist Church, serving jointly with Elder W.A. Thornton until 1935.

The home built by John Cain Wilkinson with the help of family members, is still standing outside of Liberty, MS, located in the vicinity of the Church. It is owned by descendants of the Wilkinson family and has been given the designation of a Centennial Farm by the State of Mississippi.

Elder John Cain Wilkinson died on May 9, 1911, Liberty, Amite Co., MS. He is buried along side his first wife, Philadelphia Van Norman Wilkinson in the Van Norman Cemetery, east of Liberty, Amite Co., MS.

[RETURN TO TOP]                                                                                                                                Courtesy of Patricia Ezell

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