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John Roderick Cameron

BRIEF CURRICULUM VITAE

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John Roderick Cameron, Emeritus Professor University of Wisconsin-Madison and Visiting Professor, University of Florida was born on a farm in northern Wisconsin USA in 1922.

His education: B.S. University of Chicago 1947 (mathematics); MS (1949) & Ph.D. University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1952 in Nuclear Physics After six years in nuclear physics he changed to medical physics in 1958 and spent the remainder of his career at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in the Departments of Radiology and Physics. In 1981 he was the founding chair of the Department of Medical Physics at UW-Madison. One of the first such departments in a medical school in the US. His research interests have often involved ionizing radiation. He

developed in the early 1960s an accurate technique (photon absorptiometry) to measure the mineral content of bones in vivo. It is useful for the diagnosis of osteoporosis. Also in the 1960s he developed thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) for measuring radiation. In the 1970s he developed devices for quality control of diagnostic x-ray units to reduce radiation to the patient and improve the image. He is the author of three books dealing with thermoluminescent dosimetry (1968), medical physics (1978) and physics of the body (1992).

He was the founder of Radiation Measurements, Inc. in 1974. RMI was a nonprofit, tax-exampt corporation to manufacture and sell QC test tools developed at the University of Wisconsin. It was sold in 1987 and the money was used to support research and education in medical physics. On Oct. 15, 1985 he founded Medical Physics Publishing. MPP is a nonprofit, tax-exempt publisher that has published over 100 books in medical physics and related fields. He continues to serve as the President of MPP.

Since his retirement in January 1986 he has sought to educate the public and radiation scientists about the potential health benefits of ionizing radiation. He believes that large amounts of radiation can increase the incidence of cancer but that low to moderate levels are without risk and are beneficial for many people.