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David Denney's World of Trivia
(Well, okay... Maybe it's not a world of trivia, but there's quite a bit of stuff here!)

(Last updated October 31, 2014)




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This page contains various trivia that I've collected (and am still collecting) over the past several years.  It may be in the form of lists, tables, etc.  In general, it follows no theme, topic, and/or category (it's farraginous!).  I plan to add to this page as time permits.  I've tried to attribute each "factoid" to a reliable source, but there are a few that I can't be positive about.  If you see anything that you could give a more reliable source to, please e-mail me at ddenney@gmail.com.  It will be highly appreciated.  Hope you enjoy!


Zzzzzzz...

Back to my main page...
Home page

"Ya know, it's a little known fact that...." —Cliff Claven, fictitious postal worker


TarshRedeye Publishing

official... maybe?











From this point on, I haven't "HTML-ized" the remaining text yet, nor have I proofread it or given sources to all, but please be patient. I'm working on it!


Chris Evert is the only American women's tennis champion to have
won at least one Grand Slam singles title each year for thirteen
consecutive years.

--Source unknown

There are approximately 17,000 commercial flights per day in the US.
At any given time, there are more than 60,000 people flying over
the United States. (prior to September 11, 2001)
--Source unknown

The buffalo -- largest mammal in the state of Missouri -- 30 to 60
million once roamed North America. Also, they're very unpredictable
in behavior.
--Source unknown

D-Day, Normandy, 6/5/44.
--PBS

Virginia Beach, VA EMS squad - largest in US with 635 volunteer
rescue people.
--Rescue 911, TV Show

--The following list of facts (in green) is from the 1993 PBS Nova quiz.
Rockets were invented in China.
The largest reflecting telescope in the world is the Keck
  telescope, with a diameter of 396" (that's 33 feet!).
Vision requires more brain power than the other four senses.
There are 108 known elements.
The Xerox copier was commercially open to the public in 1959.
The opossum is the only marsupial native to North America.
A gill equals 4 ounces (1/2 cup).
The world's tallest waterfall is Angel Falls in Venezuela --
  3,212 feet high.
DDT was stopped being used in the late 1960's because it almost
  caused extinction of the peregrine falcon.
The only even prime number is 2.
Vanilla is a member of the orchid family.
--End of info from Nova quiz

Walla Walla, Washington state prison is the toughest in the US.
--"Hillside Stranglers", Movie

Every 22 minutes a person is killed by an alcohol related auto
accident.
--State Farm

One out of thirty children in the US are abused.
--Unsolved Mysteries, NBC series

Every 27 seconds a divorce takes place in the US.
--CBN

One billion trees are used per year just for disposable diapers.
If all the disposable diapers used in the US were stacked up, in
18 months it would reach the moon! (And it would stink to "high
heaven"!)
--Source unknown

Peanut butter was invented in 1890 by a St. Louis physician for a
protein substitute for old folks. Americans consume 800 lbs. per
year! (The "as of" date is unknown.)
--Source unknown

In 1862, the confederate congress passed a bill exempting anyone
owning 20 (or more) slaves from military service.
--Jeopardy!

Though it originated in South America, the potato came to North
America from Ireland.
--Jeopardy!

There are 332 different species of parrots, including parakeets,
cockatoos, and macaws.
--Source unknown

The German dirigible, "Hindenburg" was almost 3 football fields
long and weighed over 200 tons, the largest rigid airship ever
constructed. It was an 804 feet long (245 meters) airship of
conventional Zeppelin design that was first launched at
Friedrichshafen, Germany, in April 1936. It had a maximum speed
of 84 mph (135 kph) and a cruising speed of 78 mph (126 kph). In
1936, the Hindenburg inaugurated commercial air service across the
North Atlantic by carrying 1,002 passengers on ten scheduled round
trips between Germany and the US. On May 6, 1937, while landing
at Lakehurst, NJ, on the first of its scheduled 1937
transatlantic crossings, the hydrogen-inflated Hindenburg burst
into flames and was completely destroyed. Thirty six of the 97
persons aboard were killed. The fire was generally attributed to
a discharge of atmospheric electricity in the vicinity of a
hydrogen gas leak from the airship, though it has also been
speculated that the dirigible was the victim of an anti-Nazi act
of sabotage. The Hindenburg disaster marked the end of the use of
rigid airships in commercial air transportation. It contained 7
million cubic feet of hydrogen.
--Encyclopaedia Britannica & World Almanac

US infant mortality rate per 1,000 births: nine white, 18 black.
--NBC news

Willis Carrier invented air conditioning in 1902.
--Jeopardy! (World Almanac says 1911)

IBM invented the floppy disk in 1970.
--World Almanac

The USS Pueblo and 83-man crew seized in Sea of Japan Jan. 23,
1968 by North Koreans; 82 men released Dec. 22, 1968.
--World Almanac

An estimated 100 trillion cells in the human body.
--Jeopardy!

The Khmer Rouge killed an estimated 1 million fellow Cambodians--
possibly 2 million.

--Source unknown

1935--the year of the dust bowl--effected Kansas, Oklahoma, and
Colorado.
--Source unknown

The Sahara, the largest desert in the world, is 3,500,000 square
miles, just under the gross area of the US including land and
water (3,618,770).
--World Almanac

Cost of flying the space shuttle back to Cape Canaveral from
Edwards Air Force Base mounted on top of a 747 jet-- $1,000,000.
--Source unknown

The Great Pyramid of Giza covers 13 acres, the equivalent of 7
blocks of Manhattan. It contains well over 2 million blocks of
stone, some weighing as much as 15 tons. It stretches 755 feet
along each of its four sides. It is so close to geometric
perfection that the difference between the longest and shortest
sides is only 7 inches. Each side is aligned with one of the true
directions of the compass. As a matter of fact, it is within a
few arc-seconds of being perfect. It rises at an angle of 52
degrees to a height of 481 feet, about the size of a 40 story
office building.
--Nova, PBS, "Pyramid"

A grizzly bear can run as fast as a horse.
--Beakman's World

There are over 2 million cases of child abuse reported every year in US.
--PBS as of 1994

23% of US children live in poverty.
--PBS, 1994

Since 1980, divorce has torn 18 million families apart.
--PBS, 1994

The following paragraphs are from "Nova--Aircraft Carrier"
     The USS Independence has 80 planes-- a combination of fighters,
bombers, and reconnaissance aircraft-- the equivalent of a small air
force. It was commissioned in 1959. There are four catapults, steam
powered by the engine's boilers, that launch planes into the air
reaching 150 mph in just under three seconds! A plane can be launched
every 45 seconds. The ship picks up speed to create a 20-knot wind
over the flight deck, giving the heavy planes the best possible wind
speed for takeoff. A 20-ton plane landing at 120 mph is brought to a
halt in 200 feet. The "wire" that catches the hook on the plane to
stop it is used exactly 100 times at which time it is replaced. If
that wire breaks, it can easily cut through flesh, even steel, like
butter. Every landing is actually a "controlled crash". It costs 5
million dollars to train a pilot, and he/she is required to have at
least 500 flying hours before landing on a carrier.
     It's one of the largest warships afloat. 5,000 men live beneath
the flight deck in 8 cramped and artificially lit decks. They are
mostly teenagers around 19 years old, maybe 20 years old that work
16-17 hours per day. The men sleep and work around the clock (in
shifts). There are three TV channels that show news, sports, and
movies. There are 3 miles of corridors and over 2,000 separate
compartments. The kitchen bakes between 1200 and 1600 loaves of bread
per day, and 800 sandwiches last only about three to four hours.
     At least two carriers in our navy are deployed 365 days a year,
and another three or four are in home waters constantly practicing.
During the Gulf War, 36 planes were shot down by Iraqi missiles. The
USS Independence was deployed to govern and maintain the "no-fly"
zone over Iraq for 23 days. During that time, pilots would strap a
gun to their side, as well as a radio beacon, and a leaflet in Arabic
in case of being shot down. In the 6 months they were at sea, the
crew conducted 8,752 launches and arrested landings. In the 23 days
that the Independence operated in support of operations over Iraq,
there were 1,349 missions, an average of 58 a day.
--"Aircraft Carrier", Nova, PBS Series

Alexander Joy Cartwright, Jr., the "father of modern baseball".
...set bases 90 feet apart.
...established nine innings as game and nine players as team.
...organized the Knickerbocker Baseball Club of NY in 1845
...carried baseball to the Pacific coast and Hawaii in pioneer days.
First game was June 19, 1846, 1st match of baseball was played on the
Elysian Fields... Knickerbockers vs. the New Yorks.
--Source unknown

In 1881, there were three US presidents: R.B. Hayes, Garfield, and
Chester A. Arthur.
--Jeopardy!

Carson City, Nevada is actually west of Los Angeles, California (by
about 100 miles or so).
--Jeopardy!

Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis died of cancer May 19, 1994 at age 64. She
suffered from a non-- Hodgkin's lymphoma, a cancer of the lymph
system that eventually spread to her liver. She was only 31 years old
when JFK became president.
--Associated Press and CBS News

The average elevation of New Orleans, LA is 2 ft. below sea level.
--Nova (Jeopardy! says 4 ft.)

May 21st in history:
1506 Christopher Columbus dies in poverty in Spain.
1845 First legislative assembly convenes in Hawaii.
1861 NC secedes, Confederacy capital moves from Montgomery to Richmond
1874 Levi Strauss markets his blue jeans with copper rivets, priced at
     $13.50 A DOZEN.
1902 The United States ends its occupation of Cuba
1926 Thomas Edison says Americans prefer silent movies over talkies.
1927 At 7:40am, Lindbergh takes off from New York to cross Atlantic.
1932 Amelia Earhart leaves Newfoundland, first woman fly solo across
     the Atlantic.
1939 Pan Am begins transatlantic passenger and air mail service.
1956 Atomic fusion (thermonuclear) bomb dropped from plane -
     on the Bikini Atoll in the Pacific.
1961 White mob attacks `Freedom Riders' in Montgomery, Alabama
1974 Russians' Soyuz 14 returns to Earth
1985 FBI arrests John A. Walker Jr, convicted of spying for the USSR.
1985 The US begins broadcasts to Cuba on Radio Marti.
--KCYFC BBS

May 21, 1956 (my birthday), the United States exploded the first
airborne hydrogen bomb over Bikini Atoll in the Pacific.
--Source unknown

On May 21, 1927, Charles Lindbergh landed his Spirit of St. Louis
near Paris, completing the first solo airplane flight across the
Atlantic Ocean.
--AP News

May 21, 1881, Clara Barton founded the American Red Cross.
--AP News

Every day, 20,000 letters pour into Bill Clinton's White House --
three times the mail that arrived during George Bush's term.
--US News & World Report, May 30, 1994

Only 4 nucleotides exist in DNA, and every living thing is created
out of these 4 building blocks.
--"X-Files", TV series, pending a more reliable source

MAY 21 in History
1761 First life insurance policy in the US, issued in Philadelphia
1807 Townsend Speakman begins making and selling fruit-flavored
     carbonated drinks - in Philadelphia.
1846 First steamer arrives in Hawaii
1856 Violence in Senate, SC rep Brooks uses a cane on Mass Sen Sumner.
1868 Great Train Robbery. Seven men make off with $98,000 in cash.
1939 Hitler and Mussolini sign `Pact of Steel.'
1947 First ballistic missile fired.
1947 The "Truman Doctrine" goes into effect aiding Turkey & Greece.
1963 Mickey Mantle hits a ball off Yankee Stadium's facade
1967 Egyptian president Nassar closes the Straits of Tiran to Israel.
1970 Arab terrorists kill 9 children and 3 adults on a school bus.
1972 Ceylon becomes Republic of Sri Lanka.
1981 Russians' Soyuz 40 returns to Earth
--Source unknown

The Douglas Fir isn't a fir, but actually a member of the pine family.
--Jeopardy!

Glass is an amorphous substance made by heating a mixture of such
materials as sand, soda (sodium carbonate), and limestone to a
temperature of about 1,300 deg C (2,400 deg F). Temperatures only
slightly lower than this can be achieved with a wood fire, which was
the traditional fuel for glass melting. Today glass is made
continuously in large tanks. Powdered raw materials are fed in at one
end, and a molten strip or plate of glass emerges at the other end.
The glass is heated by oil or gas flames over the melt, but since
these fuels are becoming more expensive, the electrical glass-melting
process, which employs metal electrodes in the melt to generate heat,
is becoming more widely used. Windows, containers, light bulbs,
optical instruments, and many specialty items of glass are an
essential part of modern life.
--Grolier's Academic American Encyclopedia

1742 First indoor swimming pool opens at Goodman's Fields, London.
1774 First Continental Congress convenes in Virginia.
1926 United States Customs Court created by Congress.
1929 First all color talking picture "On With The Show" exhibited, NYC
1946 First night game at Yankee stadium.
1953 Premier of first animated 3-D cartoon in Technicolor - "Melody."
1959 First animals fired into space and rescued, Cape Canaveral.

--YFC BBS

Born May 29, 1826, Ebenezer Butterick invented the tissue paper
dress pattern.
--YFC BBS

Born May 29,1903 Leslie Townes (Bob) Hope, famous profile.
--YFC BBS

June 1, 1971 Ed Sullivan's final show.
--YFC BBS

June 2, 1835 P.T. Barnum and his circus begin their first tour
             of the U.S.
June 2, 1886 First president to wed during presidency- Grover
             Cleveland.
June 2, 1910 Pygmies are discovered in Dutch New Guinea.
--YFC BBS

Americans open the refrigerator an average of 22 times per day.
--Fox Television

June 4, 1896 -- Road test of the first Ford car is delayed an hour
                because the car is wider than the door of the shed in
                which it is built.
June 5, 1933 -- The United States leaves the gold standard.
--YFC BBS

June 5th in history:
     In 1783, Joseph and Jacques Montgolfier publicly demonstrated
their hot-air balloon in a 10-minute flight over Annonay, France.
     In 1967, war erupted in the Middle East when Israel, convinced
an Arab attack was imminent, raided Egyptian military targets. Syria,
Jordan and Iraq entered the conflict.
     In 1968, Sen. Robert F. Kennedy was shot and mortally wounded
just after claiming victory in California's Democratic presidential
primary. Gunman Sirhan Bishara Sirhan was immediately arrested.
--AP Online News

Born June 5, 1900 Dennis Gabor, inventor of holography (3D laser
photography).
--YFC BBS

June 6 in history:
1946 Henry Morgan is first to take off his shirt on TV.
2012 Transit of Venus (between Earth and Sun) will occur.
--YFC BBS

June 8 in history:
1786 First commercially-made ice cream sold in New York.
1869 IW McGaffey receives patent for vacuum cleaner.
1889 Cable Cars begin service in Los Angeles.  LOS ANGELES!
--YFC BBS

June 9, 1869 Charles Elmer Hires sells his first Root Beer, in
Philadelphia.
--YFC BBS

There's a pyramid in Rome! The pyramid of Gaius Cestius, the only
pyramid in Rome, has a burial chamber inside.
--Jeopardy!

Peppermint was the flavor of the first LifeSaver candy, introduced
in 1912.

--Jeopardy!

The word "Buccaneer", a 17th century pirate who raided Spanish ships,
derived from the French word for "barbecuer".
--Jeopardy!

To check the accuracy of an 18% photographic gray card, with the sun
out and the aperture on f/16, the shutter speed should equal the ASA
(speed) of the film.
--Source unknown

Harry Luce, president of Time (or LIFE), is the son of a presbyterian
minister.
--700 Club

The slang word "geek" derives back as far as 1611, referring to the
scorn of others' villainy.
The slang word "cool" derives back as far as 1825.
--Random House Dictionary of Slang

June 16, 1903, Ford Motor Co. was incorporated.
--AP News

June 17th in history:
1885 Statue of Liberty arrives in NYC aboard the French ship `Isere.'
1953 Supreme Court Justice William O. Douglas stays executions of
     spies Julius & Ethel Rosenberg scheduled for the next day
     because it's their 14th anniversary.
1963 Supreme Court strikes down rule requiring recitation of the
     Lord's Prayer or reading of Biblical verses in public schools.
1987 NY Yankees and KC Royals Manager Dick Howser dies at 51 of
     brain cancer.
--YFC BBS

In 1979, President Carter apologized to Australia for pieces of
Skylab falling on their country.
--Jeopardy!

The human small intestine is approximately 21 feet long.
--Jeopardy!

In 1981, Pres. Reagan fired nearly 12,000 air traffic controllers of
the PATCO union after they called an illegal strike.
--Jeopardy!

In 1993, Pres. Clinton lifted the ban that Reagan put into effect
regarding the permanent freeze of hiring ex-PATCO union workers from
any aviation related jobs.
--Jeopardy!

June 18, 1812 -- War of 1812 begins - US vs. Great Britain
June 18, 1877 -- James Montgomery Flagg, illustrator, is born. He's
best known for his "I want you" Uncle Sam recruiting poster.
--YFC BBS

The blink of an eye takes approximately one fourth of a second.
--Source unknown

According to GE, a twinkling of an eye is about 1/700th of a second.
--Brother Bob, pastor, Plaza Heights Baptist Church

Only 15% of people past age 18 get converted to Christianity.
--ibid.

There are over 500,000 hymns written. (as of the early 1990's)
--ibid.

June 23, 1868 The typewriter is patented.
--YFC BBS

June 25th in history:

1178 Five Canterbury monks report something exploding on the Moon
     (only known observation). These monks had NO winery of their own.
1630 The Fork is introduced to American dining by Gov. Winthrop.

1835 Pueblo founded with construction of first building (start of
     Yerba Buena, later to be called San Francisco).
1876 Lt. Col. Custer and 7th Cavalry are wiped out by Sioux and
     Cheyenne Indians.
1929 President Hoover authorizes construction of Boulder (Hoover) Dam.
1950 El Al airlines begins air service.
1950 North Korea invades South Korea - Korean War begins.
1951 First color TV broadcast - CBS' Arthur Godfrey from NYC. Four
     cities see the show in color.
1962 Supreme Court rules use of unofficial non-denominational prayer
     in New York State public schools is unconstitutional.
--YFC BBS

July 4th in history:
In 1826, John Adams and Thomas Jefferson -- the second and third
   presidents of the United States -- both died, 50 years to the
   day after the Declaration of Independence was adopted.
In 1831, the fifth president of the United States, James Monroe, died
   in New York City.
In 1862, English clergyman and mathematician Charles L. Dodgson,
   better known as Lewis Carroll, began inventing the story of
   "Alice in Wonderland" for his friend Alice Pleasance Liddell
   during a boating trip.
--YFC BBS

In 1984, The Statue of Liberty's torch, symbol of freedom to tens of
millions of new Americans for almost a century, was removed from the
statue's outstretched hand to be replaced with a new one the
following year.
--Source unknown

July 14, 1916, Boeing Company, originally known as Pacific Aero
Products, was founded in Seattle by William Boeing.
--AP Online News

July 16, 1935 Oklahoma City becomes first in U.S. to use parking meters.
July 17, 1954 Construction begins on Disneyland ...
July 17, 1955 ... Disneyland opens its doors in rural Orange County.
July 18, 1940 First successful helicopter flight, Stratford, CT.
July 18, 1968 Intel Corporation is incorporated.
July 18, 1969 Mary Jo Kopechne and Sen Ted Kennedy plunge off bridge
     in a car.

--YFC BBS

July 19, 1969, Apollo 11 and its astronauts, Neil Armstrong, Edwin
"Buzz" Aldrin and Michael Collins, went into orbit around the moon.
July 24, 1969, Apollo 11 returns to Earth.
--AP Online News

July 19, 1975, the Apollo and Soyuz space capsules that were linked
in orbit for two days separated.
--AP Online News

July 20, 1969, Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin "Buzz"
Aldrin became the first men to walk on the moon. At 10:56 p.m. EDT,
Armstrong stepped onto the moon from Apollo's lunar module and
declared, "That's one small step for (a) man, one giant leap for
mankind."
--AP Online News

July 20, 1976, America's Viking One robot spacecraft made a
successful, first-ever landing on Mars.
--AP Online News

July 19, 1961 First in-flight movie is shown (on TWA.)
--YFC BBS

July 21 in history:
1873 World's first train robbery, by Jesse James.
1925 John Scopes found guilty for teaching evolution.
1959 First atomic merchant ship, Savannah, christened, Camden, NJ.
1961 Gus Grissom aboard Liberty Bell 7 is launched .
1966 Gemini X returns to Earth.
1976 "Legionnaire's Disease" kills 29 in Philadelphia, Pa.

July 25 in history:
1909 First airplane flight across the English Channel.
1946 First bikini is shown at a Paris fashion show.
1952 Puerto Rico becomes a commonwealth of the US.
--YFC BBS

The toucan is a relative of the woodpecker.
--Jeopardy!

July 27 in history:
1866 Atlantic telegraph cable successfully laid (1,686 miles long.)
1940 Billboard magazine starts publishing best-seller's charts.
1953 Korean War ends.
--YFC BBS

Guyana--The Peoples' Temple--Nov. 1978--Led by Jim Jones. Ambush on
four journalists and a California congressman, plus mass suicide...
total 911 dead.
--World's Great News Photos

Three Mile Island--March of 1979
--World's Great News Photos

July 30, 1946 First rocket to attain 100-mile altitude, White Sands, NM.
--YFC BBS

Aug. 1, 1790, the first U.S. census was completed, showing a
population of nearly 4 million people.
--AP Online News
Aug. 1, 1936, the Olympic games opened in Berlin with a ceremony
presided over by Adolf Hitler.
--AP Online News
Aug. 1, 1981, the rock music video channel MTV made its debut.
--AP Online News

August 4th in history:
1693 Champagne is invented by Dom Perignon.
1777 Retired British cavalry officer Philip Astley establishes the
     first circus.
1790 United States Coast Guard founded.
--AP Online News

Aug. 12th in history:
1851 Isaac Singer granted a patent for his sewing machine.
1888 Bertha, wife of inventor Karl Benz, makes the first motor tour.
     Without her husband's knowledge, she borrow one of his cars and
     travels 180km to visit relatives for 5 days.
1934 Babe Ruth's final game at Fenway Park, 41,766 on hand.
1972 Last combat troops leave Vietnam.
1977 First test of the Space Shuttle Enterprise.
--AP Online News

March 1989 -- Exxon Valdez spills 11 million gallons of crude oil.
--AP Online News

By age 65, the human heart will have beat about 2 1/2 billion times.
--Source unknown

Rain forests get between 100 and 400 inches of rain per year, as
opposed to Missouri, which gets 33.91 yearly.
--1991 World Almanac

One US gallon of pure water is about 8.345 pounds. One inch of
rainfall over one acre of ground would equal 27,143 gallons of water.
--1991 World Almanac

Feb. 1, '68 -- famous Loan shooting of suspected Viet Cong soldier
photographed by Eddie Adams-- AP photographer.
--Source unknown

Aug. 31, 1895 John Brailier becomes the first "professional"
football player when he receives $10 for expenses in a game
at Latrobe, Pennsylvania.
--YFC BBS

The first commercial product to use transistors was the hearing aid
in 1952. The radio used transistors two years later.

--Jeopardy!

Sep. 13, 1977-- First TV viewer discretion warning used-- "Soap"
--YFC BBS

Sep. 30, 1452-- First book published, Johann Guttenberg's Bible.
--YFC BBS

Sep. 30, 1960 "The Flintstones" premieres. Yabba Dabba Doo!
--YFC BBS

ONE VOTE...

In 1649, one vote caused Charles I of England to be executed.
In 1776, one vote gave America the English language instead of
     German.
In 1836, one vote elected Marcus Morton governor of Massachusetts.
In 1845, one vote brought Texas into the Union.
In 1868, one vote saved President Andrew Johnson from impeachment.
In 1875, one vote changed France from a monarchy to a republic.
In 1876, one vote gave Rutherford B. Hayes the United States
     presidency.
In 1923, one vote gave Adolf Hitler control of the Nazi party.
In 1941, one vote saved the selective service system just 12 weeks
before Pearl Harbor.
--Chuck Swindoll quoting from some book on his radio program

As of 3-7-95, there are 11,638 taxi drivers in New York, NY.
--NYC cab driver on David Letterman

Collateral Adjectives




COLLATERAL ADJECTIVES

Item

Adjective

dog

canine

cat

feline

cow

bovine

horse

equine

pig

porcine

sheep

ovine

donkey

asinine

goat

capric or hircine

deer

cervine

deer family (deer,elk,
moose, caribou, etc.)

cervid

wolf

lupine

fox

vulpine

bear

ursine

lion

leonine

rabbit and/or hare

leporine

COLLATERAL ADJECTIVES
(Continued)

Item

Adjective

squirrel

sciurine

ape or monkey

simian

mouse or rat

murine

shrew

soricine

bat

chiropteran
(Thanks Russell!),
vespertilian
(Thanks Martha!)

bird

avian

duck

anatine
(Thanks Darniece and Margot!)

goose

anserine

peacock

pavonine

eagle

aquiline

hawk

accipitrine

falcon

falconine

crow or raven

corvine

songbird, sparrow

passerine

thrush (bird)

turdoid

parrot

psittacine
(Thanks Martha!)

pigeon

peristeronic
(Thanks Martha!)

lizard

lacertilian

snake

serpentine, ophidian
and/or colubrine

turtle

testudinal

bee

apian

bees, care of bees

apiarian

wasp or hornet

vespine

COLLATERAL ADJECTIVES
(Continued)

Item

Adjective

whale, dolphin,
and/or porpoise

cetacean

seal

phocine

fish

piscine

mackerel, tuna

scombroid

starfish or sea urchin

apodal

worm

vermicular

slug

limacine

butterfly, moth

lepidopteran
(Thanks Martha!)

having the form
of an animal

zoomorphic

egg

ovoid

people and/or mankind

human

wild

feral

covered with fine
hairs or down

puberulent

sharp, bitter, stinging,
irritating in taste or smell

acrid

bitter or sarcastic
in speech

acrid

shore

littoral

bath

balneal

rod (or beating with a rod)

baculine

teeth

dental

gums (in the mouth)

gingival

lip or lips

labial

cheek, mouth,
mouth cavity

buccal

tongue tip

apical

tongue blade

laminal

tongue body

dorsal

back (spine)

dorsal

arm

brachial

fore part of the head,
forehead

procephalic

sneezing

sternutatory

tears

lacrimal

mint

labiate

berry shaped

bacciform

COLLATERAL ADJECTIVES
(Continued)

Item

Adjective

land (noun)

predial

sandy, growing in sand

arenaceous

sandy, living in sand

arenicolous

root or roots

radical

perpetually cold location

hyperborean

brain

cerebral

mind or intellect

mental

lying flat on back

supine

wife

uxorial

excessively fond of
or submissive to a wife

uxorious

husband

marital

priest, priesthood,
priestly

sacerdotal

alphabet

abecedarian

dreams or dreamy

oneiric

summer

estival

rope or cord under tension

funicular

marble

marmoreal

lead

plumbous

marriage, wedding
ceremony, mating season

nuptial
(Thanks Bob!)

flashing or sudden

fulgurant

swollen, bloated, puffed up;
bombastic, pompous

turgid

drowsiness or sluggishness

lethargic

liberality or generosity

munificent

secret agent

emissary

leap year

bissextile

COLLATERAL ADJECTIVES
(Continued)

Item

Adjective

father

paternal

mother

maternal

uncle

avuncular

aunt

materteral

birth

natal

hook, hooked

uncinate

loud or loud voice

stentorian,
stentorious

morning

matutinal

evening

vespertine

during the day

diurnal

during the night

nocturnal

sleepiness or lethargy

soporific

period of drowsiness
preceding sleep

hypnagogic

clear, see through

transparent

partially transparent

translucent

not letting light
pass through

opaque

swimming

natatorial

flood

diluvial

touch, sense of touch

tactile

zero

zeroth

peace, moderation,
or conciliation

irenic

calm, peaceful

halcyon

an act of
bidding farewell

valedictory

study of meaning and
changes of meaning in words

semantic

earning a living

banausic

flag

vexillary

chin

mental or genial

Middle Ages

Gothic and/or
medieval

family entity

ancestral

kiss and/or kissing

osculatory

love

amative

charity

eleemosynary

dog days of summer

canicular

barber, barbering

tonsorial

thrush (bird)

turdine

threshold

liminal

color, coloring, dyeing

tinctorial

zebra

zebroid

drinking

potatory

nose

nasal, rhinal

ostriches, emus, rheas, etc.

struthious

moon or planet

gibbous

bloodshed, bloodthirsty,
or containing blood

sanguineous

underground water
above the water table

vadose

extremely cold, icy

gelid

faithlessness,
disloyalty,
treachery

perfidious

great in quantity
or amount

beaucoup

dazzlingly bright,
radiant

fulgent

third in place, order,
degree, or rank

tertiary

clipping or trimming
of live shrubs or trees
into decorative shapes

topiary

tree, trees

arboreal

apathy, dullness,
lethargy

torporific

promoting health
or well-being

salubrious

laughable

risible

partly in existence,
imperfectly formed,
formless

inchoate

bizarre

grotesque

burden

onerous

abrupt or blunt in
manner or speech

brusque

whim; impulsive,
unpredictable;
changeable

capricious,
whimsical

Inclined to fight;
combative; quarrelsome

pugnacious

medicinal;
cure disease;
relieve pain

officinal

edible

comestible

excessively
sentimental

bathetic

of little value

picayune

consisting of a
confused mixture

farraginous

same or equal age,
antiquity, or duration

coeval

a select group,
esoteric

rarefied

abundant trees,
shrubs, woods

bosky

next to the last

penultimate

the time just
before dinner

preprandial

faculty of divination,
prophecy

mantic

acquired or occurring
in a hospital

nosocomial

airtight,
recluse, solitary

hermetic

stubbornly disobedient,
rebellious

contumacious

genuine, authentic,
first-class

pukka

full of whispering,
murmuring, rustling sounds

susurrous

gushing, slobbering, sloppy
(as in enthusiasm)

effusive

standing out conspicuously,
prominent,
of notable significance

salient

celestial, heavenly

ethereal

proud

orgulous

greedy of gain,
greedy

avaricious

handwriting, penmanship

chirographic

hasty

festinate

difficult to comprehend

abstruse

comfortably or conveniently
spacious; roomy

commodious

beginning to exist
or having recently
come into existence

nascent

being with child;
heavy with young or eggs;
pregnant

gravid

supple, marked by
effortless grace

lithe

sound

acoustic

existing outside of nature;
unnatural, nonnatural,
abnormal, unordinary

preternatural

wordy, fluent
or excessive talk

loquacious

wordy, fluent
or excessive talk

garrulous

Capable of perceiving
by the senses; conscious

sentient

indistinct, vague

nebulous

bank of a natural
lake or tidewater

riparian

pleasing to the ear;
agreeable, soothing

dulcet

aristocratic quality
or flavor; stylish

genteel

cowardly; despicable

caitiff

overly optimistic;
viewed favorably

roseate

arrogant self-assurance;
haughty

peremptory

first created or developed;
beginning

primordial

those who habitually
eat together

commensal

guilty of a moral
offense;sinning

peccant

diminutive,
short (human)

homuncular

sickly sentimental

mawkish

barely perceptible

liminal

no sensibility;
unemotional

stolid

flat, dull;
lacking liveliness

vapid

lack of intelligence
stupid, inane

vacuous

dancing

terpsichorean

knowledge, knowing,
cognitive

epistemic

stubbornly persistent in wrongdoing;
hardened in feelings;
resistant to persuasion or
softening influences

obdurate

traveling from place to place

itinerant

marked by fearless
resolution; valiant

doughty

cooking; good eating

gastronomic

difficult to understand

recondite
abstruse

boiling, agitated;
enthusiastic, exuberant

ebullient

vulgar; surly;
lack of civility
or graciousness

churlish

living on the bank
of a river, lake, etc.

riparian

unnecessarily long;
wordy; verbose

prolix

My original list from c.1990






Some other trivia related sites on the web:

Trivia-Library.com - very nice trivia site!
Quibs-- trivia and knowledge base
Miscellaneous Trivia Links
Bible BR>Learn the origins of phrases, idioms, etc.
WorldCupYears - pure information on the history of the World Cup

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