Thursday Night Hikes: Western Summit Avenue Hike Architecture Notes, Part 2

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Thursday Night Hikes: Western Summit Avenue Hike Architecture Notes, Part 2


Observations on Architectural Styles

Western Summit Avenue Hike

Assembled by

Lawrence A. Martin

Webpage Creation: October 20, 2003

General. Summit Avenue in St. Paul, Minnesota, is one of the best preserved upper-class Victorian promenade boulevards in America. It is a monumental boulevard of houses, churches, synagogues, and schools that stretches four-and-one-half miles from the Cathedral of St. Paul, just north and west of downtown, to the Mississippi River. Summit Avenue Historic District map

Additional Specific Structures. The following presents available information on the housing styles of specific structures located along the hike:

1700 Summit Avenue: Ramsey Junior High School; Original building built in 1926 (1951 according to Ramsey County property tax records) and gymnasium addition built in 1978; Collegiate Gothic/Art Deco in style; St. Paul City Architect, architect, and Perry A. Swanson, builder. The school building originally cost $256,000 and the gymnasium addition cost $841,000. The school is a three story, eight bay, 115863 square foot, brick building with a flat roof. It has elliptical arched entrances and a brick interior chimney. Bruce Maeda is the Principal at the school and about 800 students attend the school. The current owner of record of the property is Independent School District No. 625.

1695 Summit Avenue: Chris Hanson, Jr., House; Built in 1920; very restrained Georgian Revival in style; H. A. Sullwold, architect, and Lange & Krengel, builder. The structure is a 2 1/2 story (two story according to Ramsey County property tax records,) 2669 square foot, nine room, five bedroom, one bathroom, one half-bathroom, wood, stone, and brick-sided (brick according to Ramsey County property tax records) house, with an attached garage and a detached garage. The house cost $17,000 to build. The house is a symmetrical, five bay, building with a gabled, clay shingled, roof that has three pedimented gabled dormers. It has a curved entrance porch with slender Tuscan columns. It also has two brick chimneys. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Anna Hansen (1846-1921,) the wife of Christian Hansen, who was born in Denmark to parents born in Denmark and who died of mitral stenosis of the heart, resided at this address in 1921. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Christian Hansen and Mr. and Mrs. Christian Hansen, Jr., all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Christian Hansen, Sr., an auditor employed by the Northern Pacific RailRoad, his wife, Rosemarie Hansen, and Christian Hansen, Jr., all resided at this address and that the Christian Hansen Realty Company, operated by Christian Hansen, Jr., was located at this address. Chris Hanson, Jr., was an electrical engineer. Chris Hanson ( -1931) died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is the trustee of Anne Kristine Beaulieu. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mrs. Bertha McCord resided at the former nearby 1690 Summit Avenue. [See note on the Northern Pacific RailRoad.]

1683 Summit Avenue: Orville Helgeson House; Built in 1911; Tudor Villa in style; Gust Anderson, architect. The 1920 city directory indicates that David Bergman was the president of D. Bergman & Company and resided at this address. The structure is a two story, 1810 square foot, eight room, three bedroom, one bathroom, one half-bathroom, brick (masonry and frame according to Ramsey County property tax records) house, with a detached garage. The cost to build the house was $4,500. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Rebecca Kline (1857-1914,) the wife of John Kline, who was born in the United States to parents also born in the United States and who died of an obstruction of the intestines, resided at this address in 1914. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. David Bergman resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that David Bergman, the president of D. Bergman & Company, a dealer in hides, resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. David Bergman resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that David Bergman, who officed at 360 Robert Street, and his wife, Nellie V. Bergman, resided at this address. In 1972-1973, Mark A. van der Ploeg, a Junior at Macalester College, resided at this address. The current owner of record of the property is Ruth V. Mammenga. Ruth Mammenga, with Fred Burke, founded the Pommern (Pomerania) Regional Group of Minnesota, which exists to research Pomeranian ancestry.

1671 Summit Avenue: St. Paul Area Council of Churches; Built in 1952. The structure is a one story, 12968 square foot, building. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints was located at this address from 1955 to 1967 and that the St. Paul Area Council of Churches was located at this address from 1968. The Saint Paul Area Council of Churches connects 168 Saint Paul area congregations from 23 denominations and has been in existence since 1905, the successor to the Ramsey County Sunday School Association. Reverend Grant Abbott, former rector of St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church, became the executive director of the organization in 2003. Tara Mattessich, from Immanuel Lutheran, is the Board President. The organization had a $1.3 million annual budget in Fiscal Year 2003. The current owner of record of the property is St. Paul Area Council of Churches. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that James Gordon Robertson resided at the nearby former 1668 Summit Avenue from 1913 to 1926 and that the house was moved to 1747 Summit Avenue in 1926. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. G. Robertson and H. A. Robertson all resided at the former nearby 1668 Summit Avenue. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. G. Robertson and H. A. Robertson all resided at the former nearby 1668 Summit Avenue.

1665 Summit Avenue: William B. Harris House; Built in 1924; Tudor Villa in style; H. M. Elmer, architect and builder. The structure is a 2 1/2 story (two story according to Ramsey County property tax records,) 4143 square foot, 11 room, six bedroom, three bathroom, one half-bathroom, stucco and half timbered (stucco according to Ramsey County property tax records) house, with an attached garage, which was last sold in 1997 for $382,500. The house cost $17,000 to construct. The house has a large projected gabled wing and a slate roofed intersecting gabled roof that has three shed dormers and one wall dormer. It has one chimney with chimney pots. It also has seven leaded glass windows. The 1930 city directory indicates that Harry L. Bratnober and his wife, Jule Bratnober, resided at this address. William B. Harris was the secretary of the H. Harris Company. William B. Harris ( -1927) died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Maria H. O'Phelan and Timothy C. O'Phelan. Maria O'Phelan is a Second Vice President, Group Customer Service and Technology, with Minnesota Life, which is a member of the Securian Financial Group, Inc. Timothy O'Phelan established Minnesota Video Productions in 1982 and currently is producing the Explore Minnesota television program on Fox Sports Net North. Timothy O'Phelan was a financial supporter of Cretin-Derham Hall High School in 2005-2006 and was a member of the Cretin-Derham Hall High School Parents' Association. Tim and Maria O’Phelan are the parents of Timmer O’Phelan, an award winning movie producer, with 2005 regional student Emmys for the Upper Midwest for his videos "Hold On Boy," "It Broke" and "Protection," a 2006 honorable mention for his video titled "Lose You," and a 2006 regional Emmy for "Attack of the Space Zombies."

1652 Summit Avenue: Macalester Park Presbyterian Church/Stella Louise Woods Children's Center; Original church built in 1889 and the replacement church built in 1925, with a 1956 expansion; Queen Anne in style; Charles A. Wallingford, architect, and Taylor-Craig Corporation, builder. The original building cost $8,500, the subsequent building cost $73,000, and the expansion cost $230,000. The church is a brick building with a limestone foundation that is "L" shaped with a steeply pitched gabled roof and which has a hipped dormer. There are rose windows on the gabled ends, which project over the first floor. Originally, there was a square entrance tower at the crossing arms of the "L", which has since been removed. The building was moved from the corner of Summit Avenue and Cambridge Street to its present site. The church is the oldest extant church on Summit Avenue. In the early days of 1887, less than five months after Macalester College opened its door, a petition to organize a church at Macalester College was placed before the Presbytery to St. Paul. After years utilizing the college chapel, Macalester Presbyterian Church moved into its own building in 1890, located at Summit and Cambridge. The college asked the church to consider building a sanctuary on property dedicated to be used also as a college Chapel and donated by George Dayton, a college trustee. This new building, the present church, was dedicated in 1925. In 1956, an expansion program was implemented to accomodate a growing congregation. The sanctuary was remodeled, the manse adjoining the Chuch was purchased, space was found for a little chapel and for a library, and a new addition, Westminster Hall, to be used as Sunday School rooms and activities building, was erected. The Plymouth Congregational Church and Macalester Presbyterian Church, in Fall 1968, became the Macalester-Plymouth United Church, with full relationship to both the United Church of Christ and the United Presbyterian Church in the USA. In Summer 2000, Macalester Plymouth and Merriam-Lexington Presbyterian Church merged. [See note for the fifth entry after the entry for 1605 Summit Avenue for information on Macalester College.]

1649 Summit Avenue: Fred Anderson House; Built in 1922; British American Renaissance in style; Lund Wirth, architect. The structure is a two story, 3590 square foot, ten room, five bedroom, three bathroom, two half-bathroom, brick house, with a detached garage. The cost to build the house was $20,000. The 1930 city directory indicates that Frederick B. Anderson and his wife, Agda Anderson, resided at this address. Robert Goff, of Goff & Rosenthal, art dealers with galleries in New York and Berlin, indicates that his family lived at this address for nearly 30 years, that the house was built by the first president of Weyerhauser, and that each tree in the yard represented one of the varieties of pine in their timber operations at the time. Mr. Goff also indicates that a notable event occurred at this address when his family sponsored a fundraiser for Senator Ted Kennedy (D-Massachussets,) when he was running unsuccessfully for the Democratic nomination for president in 1980, and the boulevard out front was completely overrun with protesters, an event that aggravated the Enestvedt family, who were Republicans, at 1645 Summit Avenue. The property was last sold in 2001 for a purchase price of $1,060,000. The current owners of record of the property are Brian J. Bona and Jacqueline K. Bona. Brian and Jacqueline Bona were financial supporters of Cretin-Derham Hall High School in 2005-2006. The 1930 city directory indicates that the Macalester College Conservatory of Music was located at the former nearby 1648 Summit Avenue. [See note for the fifth entry after the entry for 1605 Summit Avenue for information on Macalester College.]

1645 Summit Avenue: Dr. Robert Earl House; Built in 1922; Georgian Revival/Colonial in style; J. O. Cederburg, architect. The structure is a 2 1/2 story (two story according to Ramsey County property tax records,) 3612 square foot, 11 room, six bedroom, four bathroom, one half-bathroom, two fireplace, brick house, with a detached three car garage. The house cost $18,000 to construct. The house has a gabled roof with three gabled dormers and one shed dormer. The house has a symmetrical facade. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Robert Earl resided at this address from 1923 to 1948. Robert Earl and George Earl were two well known doctors who were surgeons at the Mounds Park Sanitarium. The 1920 city directory indicates that Dr. Robert O. Earl, a physician and a partner with Dr. George Earl in the Earl Doctors medical practice at the Lowry Building, resided at this address and May L. Earl, a student, boarded at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Dr. and Mrs. Robert Earl and their daughter resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Robert O. Earl, a partner with George Earl, Robert M. Burns, Archibald Leitch, James J. Swendson, Benjamin B. Souster, J. Richards Aurelius, John C. Farrell, J. A. Johnson, J. Allen Wilson, and Warren R. Schram in the Earl Clinic, and his wife, Clara Earl, resided at this address. In 1934, Dr. Robert Earl, Clara Swanstrom Earl, and their son, John Earl, resided at this address and were members of the St. Paul Town & Country Club, the St. Paul Athletic Club, and the Women's City Club of St. Paul. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Miss Woods' School, operated by Macalester College, was located at this address from 1949 to 1953. In 2007, Michele DeYoung applied for a building permit to remove the existing one-story rear addition and construct a two-story addition and the application was reviewed by the St. Paul Heritage Preservation Commission. Dr. Robert Earl was a graduate of the University of Minnesota Medical School in 1896 and John Earl was a graduate of the Harvard University Medical School. Dr. Robert O. Earl (1872-1948,) the son of Peter O. Earl and Hannah Anderson Earl, was born in Elon, Allamakee County, Iowa, was educated in the public schools of Iowa, moved to Minnesota in 1882 with his parents, moved to Minneapolis in 1882, attended Minneapolis public schools, graduated from the Minneapolis Academy, graduated from the University of Minnesota with a medical degree in 1896, did post graduate work in New York, interned at Bethesda Hospital, was a member of the State Board of Health, was a member of the St. Paul anti-Tuberculosis Committee, was the president of the East Side Commercial Club, was a member of the St. Paul Park Board, was a surgeon at Bethesda Hospital, was the attending surgeon at the State Hospital for Ruptured and Crippled Children, was appointed by the Legislature (General Laws of Minnesota 1905, Chapter 78) a commissioner, with Arthur Gillette and Stephen Mahoney, of the State Hospital for Ruptured and Crippled Children, was a Baptist, was the president and a member of the board of directors of the Scandinavian Savings Bank, was a member of the board of directors of the East St. Paul State Bank, was the president and a surgeon of Mounds Park Sanitarium, was a member of the St. Paul Park Board, was a member of the American Medical Association, was a member of the Minnesota Medical Society, was a member of the Ramsey County Medical Society, was a member of the editing and publishing committee of the Ramsey County Medical Society in 1917, was a Baptist, was a Republican, was a member of the Norden Club, was a Mason, was a member of the Modern Woodmen fraternity, officed at 883 Payne Avenue and had a Summer residence at the corner of Forrest Avenue, Phalen Avenue, and Como Avenue in 1907. Robert O. Earl married Clara/Clare Swanstrom in 1900 and the couple had two children, Mary Lillian "May" Earl (1901- ) and John Robert Earl (1908- .) The Mounds Park Sanitarium, built in 1906 at 200 Earl Street, near Indian Mounds Park, later became Mounds Park Hospital. In 1910, R. O. Earl was the president of the Mounds Park Sanitarium Association, Magnus Larson was the secretary-treasurer of the association, and Supt, Mrs. Bertha Morris was the superintendent of the Mounds Park Sanitarium. The Mounds Park Sanitarium was replaced by a new Mounds Park Hospital located just to the east of the old one in the 1960's. The site of the old hospital became a parking lot for the new hospital. The new Mounds Park Hospital was closed in 1987 and has since become the Marian Center of Saint Paul. Clara S. Earl (1879-1968) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Olson, and died in Hennepin County. The previous owners of record of the property were C. Thomas Enestvedt and M. Alison Enestvedt and the current owner of record of the property is Jeffrey R. Deyoung. C. Thomas Enestvedt was a financial supporter of Cretin-Derham Hall High School in 2001 and 2006. Alison Enestvedt was a member of the Guild of Catholic Women in 2004 and 2005. C. Thomas Enestvedt and M. Alison Enestvedt were Class of 1965 financial supporters of St. Johns University. Jeffrey R. Deyoung is the managing partner for the Minneapolis region of Virchow, Krause & Company, LLP.

1644 Summit Avenue: Former Macalester College President's House/Hugh S. Alexander Alumni House; Built in 1926; Georgian Revival in style; P. Steenberg, architect and builder (William M. Ingemann, architect, according to the Council of Independent Colleges.) The house is a two story brick house with a gabled slate roof and symmetrical columns. The Hugh S. Alexander Alumni House was named for a former professor of geology (1906-1948) and was built by department store pioneer and early Macalester benefactor George Draper Dayton. It served as a home for Macalester presidents between 1926 and 1984. The 1930 city directory indicates that John C. Acheson, the president of Macalester College, and his wife, Mary V. Acheson, resided at this address. In 1934, John C. Acheson and Mary Berry Acheson resided at this address and were notable members of St. Paul society. George Draper Dayton was a self-educated, highly principled, and energetic man who came to Minnesota in 1880 at age 24. Dayton was the son of a small town physician in upstate New York. George Draper Dayton married Emma Willard in 1878 in Geneva, New York. While overseeing investors' interests in Worthington, Minnesota, he purchased a bank and became one of Worthington's leading citizens. After building a store in 1890 on the corner of Seventh and Nicollet in Minneapolis, leasing it to a dry goods merchant, Goodfellows, and watching the merchant go bankrupt, Dayton became a retailer in 1902. The store, a partnership with his son, Draper Dayton, became profitable by 1903 and remained so thereafter. Draper Dayton died unexpectedly in 1923. His brother, Nelson Dayton, developed a management team to operate the company. His five sons, Donald Dayton, Bruce Dayton, Wallace Dayton, Kenneth Dayton, and Douglas Dayton, assumed leadership, each holding a 20 percent share in the company. The company expanded to other cities and to the suburbs. It also established links with J. L. Hudson of Detroit and Marshall Fields of Chicago. Target, launched in 1963, initiated discount marketing. By 2000, the successor Target Corporation, operated 1,243 stores, with 281,000 employees in 44 states and had a gross sales of $33.1 billion. George Draper Dayton (-1938) died in Hennepin County. George Draper Dayton (1907-1988) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Winchell, and died in Hennepin County. Former U. S. Senator Mark Dayton (1947- ) is the son of Bruce Dayton and Gwendolen Brandt Dayton and has two sons from his former marriage to Alida Rockefeller, sister of Senator Jay Rockefeller of West Virginia, Eric Dayton and Andrew Dayton.

1635 Summit Avenue: W. N. S. Ivins House/Macalester College School of Journalism/Macalester College International Center/Current Macalester College President's House; Built in 1907 (1910 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Simplified Rectilinear/Arts and Crafts in style; Clarence H. Johnston, Sr., architect. The structure is a two story, 3976 square foot, ten room, five bedroom, three bathroom, two half-bathroom, masonry and frame house, with a detached garage. The house was initially built for $11,000 (Larson.) The brick and stucco house includes a wrap-around front porch and is dominated by a tall front gable with bracketed eaves. The 1910 city directory indicates that Lillian Hall was a student who boarded at this address. William Ivins and Margaret Ivins sold the house in 1917. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. W. N. S. Ivins resided at this address. World War I veteran Herbert E. Sands resided at this address in 1919. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Katherine D. Sands (1868-1921,) the wife of Edward F. Sands, who was born in Pennsylvania to parents born in Germany and who died of cancer of the uterus, resided at this address in 1921. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Sands, Mrs. E. F. Sands, and Robert Sands all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Edward F. Sands, president of Robinson Cary & Sands Company, resided at this address. In 1934, Edward F. Sands, Robert A. Sands, Herbert E. Sands, Sr., Pauline Fryburg Sands, and Herbert E. Sands, Jr., all resided at this address. Two other owners had the property before Macalester College purchased it in 1960. The college sold the property to Christopher Arlandson, a structural engineer and a Clarence Johnston buff, in 2002, but the college bought it back in 2003 for $1.35 million as the house for the new college president, Brian Rosenberg, formerly of Lawrence University in Appleton, Wisconsin. Arlandson intended to restore the house to its original condition as a single-family home and, with designer and contractor Michael Rose, undertook a full restoration and updating of the house. The house now has new windows, redashed stucco, tuckpointed brickwork, and a splendidly restored interior. Macalester College repurchased the house through its High Winds Fund, which specializes in commercial and residential redevelopment aimed at improving the area around the campus. The prior president's residence, at 1750 Summit Avenue, did not work well for receptions and other large gatherings. Local folklore has it that Alex Haley frequented this house when he was at Macalester College in the 1960's and that Malcolm X worked on his autobiography in the house's third floor study in 1962-1963. The Sands family were members of the Somerset Club and the Minikahda Country Club in 1934. Edward F. Sands (1902-1988) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Dindorf, and died in Ramsey County. Herbert E. Sands ( -1953) died in Ramsey County. Pauline M. Sands (1907-1994) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Pearson, and died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is Macalester College. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mrs. J. Mc. Johnson resided at the former nearby __?__. The 1924 city directory indicates that Edward Sands resided at the former nearby 1631 Summit Avenue. The 1930 city directory indicates that Wallace Hall was located at the nearby former 1632 Summit Avenue. [See note on Johnston.]

1632 Summit Avenue: Wallace Residence Hall; Built in 1906 and renovated in 2003; Bell & Detweiler, architects. Wallace Hall is a residence hall for 192 students. The brick building with an asphalt shingle roof is the oldest residence hall on campus. The building is known for its hardwood floors, marble staircases, the formal lounge, and old charm. The residence hall originally was occupied solely by women, but is now a co-ed residence hall. The 1915 Woman's Who's who of America, compiled by John William Leonard and published by The American Commonwealth Company of New York, indicates that Julia Macfarlane (Mrs. Richard W.) Johnson, a college professor, resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Alice M. Clough, a matron for Wallace Hall, resided at this address. Julia Macfarlane Carson Johnson (1860/1862-1935,) the daughter of James Clinton Carson (1811-1870,) a Presbyterian minister, and Julia Ann Macfarlane, was born at Delmont/Salem, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, graduated from Mount Holyoke College in 1885, also attended the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Cincinnati, received a master's degreee from the University of Minnesota, married General Richard W. Johnson, U. S. Army, in 1894, taught at Coates College, Terre Haute, Indiana, from 1891 until 1894, was chair of the English Department and Dean of Women at Macalester College from 1897 to 1917, was involved in the woman's suffrage, temperance and peace movements, was a Presbyterian, was a Republican, was a member of the International Peace Association, was a member of the Christian Association, was a member of the Association of Collegiate Alumnae, was a member of the New Century Club, was a member of the Civic League, and was a member of the Mount Holyoke Alumnae, had the hobbies of horseback riding, canoeing, and tramping, was active in committee work of the St. Paul Welfare League, died of pancreatic cancer in St. Paul, and is buried in Oakland Cemetery. Richard W. Johnson (1827-1897,) the son of Dr. James Johnson ( -1837) and Louisa Luna Bingham Johnson ( -1837,) was born in Smithland, Livingston County, Kentucky, was nominated to West Point by Congressman Willis Green of the Second Congressional District for Kentucky, graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York, in 1849, 30th or 33rd in a class of 43, was assigned to Fort Snelling as a Second Lieutenant in 1849, married Rachael Elizabeth Steele/Rachel E. Steele (1826-1891) in 1850, was reassigned to Texas from 1851 until 1861, served under Robert E. Lee in 1855, escaped the state to Carlisle, Pennsylvania, with his military company upon Texas seccession, became a Brigadier General in the U. S. Army at the start of the American Civil War, was promoted a brevet Major General, participated in battles at Falling Waters, Virginia, Shiloh, Corinth, Liberty Gap, Murfreesboro, Tullahoma, Stone's River, Chickamauga, Chattanooga, Missionary Ridge, Dalton, Georgia, Resaca, Georgia, Kennesaw Mountain, Atlanta, Pulaski, and Nashville, was captured at Hartsfield, Tennessee, by Confederate troops under John Hunt Morgan, and was exchanged in 1862, was severely wounded in the hip and liver by a cannon shell fragment at New Hope Church, Dallas, Georgia, was a Major in the Fourth Cavalry, was provost-marshal-general, and was a judge advocate after the American Civil War, retired from the U. S. Army in 1867, was a professor of military science at the University of Missouri from 1868 until 1869, was a professor of military science (and one of the original nine faculty members) at the University of Minnesota from 1869 until 1870, owned the Thomas Andrews House, 527 5th Street South East in Minneapolis in 1869, moved to St. Paul in 1870, was a member of the Minnesota Historical Society, was engaged in the real estate business as a partner of Colonel D. A. Robertson, was a Ramsey County Commissioner in 1878, was the author of Memoir of Major General George H. Thomas, published by J. B. Lippincott & Company in Philadelphia in 1881, and A Soldier's Reminiscences in Peace and War, published by J. B. Lippincott Company in 1886, was a Democratic candidate for Governor of Minnesota in 1881, losing to Lucius F. Hubbard by 27,857 votes (36.37% to 63.63%,) was a brother-in-law of Franklin Steele and was the executor of his estate, was a member of the St. Paul Chamber of Commerce, was a member of the House of Hope Presbyterian Church, invested in the Imperial Gold Mining Company, Denver, Colorado, a confidence scheme, married Julia Ann MacFarlane Carson in Catasauqua, Pennsylvania, in 1894, was plagued by debtors in the last years of his life, was considered by the U. S. Army for court martial as a retired officer for conduct unbecoming an officer, and died of acute pneumonia in St. Paul. John Milton Johnson, Richard W. Johnson's brother, was a surgeon in the Confederate Army. James Leeper Johnson (1818-1877), a Kentucky State Representative in 1844, a U.S. Representative from Kentucky from 1849 until 1851, a candidate for U.S. Representative from Kentucky in 1857, and a Circuit Court Judge in Kentucky in 1867 also was a brother of Richard W. Johnson. Richard W. Johnson and Rachael Elizabeth Steele Johnson had three children, Alfred Bainbridge Johnson (1853-1897,) Richard Woodhouse Johnson, Jr., (1855-1929,) and Henry Sibley "Harry" Johnson (1859- .) Richard W. Johnson and Julia Macfarlane Carson Johnson had one child, John Macfarlane Johnson (1896- .)

1623 Summit Avenue: D. Simon House; Built in 1914; B. Schmuckler, architect. The structure is a two story, 2579 square foot, nine room, five bedroom, four bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage, which was last sold in 2000 for $390,000. The cost to build the house was $5,000. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. David Simon resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. M. F. Rosacker resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Marcus F. Rosacker, the vice president of E. E. Atkinson & Company, and his wife, Mae Rosacker, resided at this address. Benjamin A. Schmuckler ( -1950) died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Anna Maria Gaylord and John W. Gaylord. Anna Maria Gaylord is a Middle School mathematics teacher at Minnehaha Academy and was a math coach for Minnehaha Academy for the 2005 Math Counts Chapter Competitions.

1621 Summit Avenue: Built in the 1920's (1919 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Tudor Rectilinear in style. The structure is a two story, 2778 square foot, 11 room, five bedroom, two bathroom, two half-bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage, which was last sold in 1996 for $275,000. Construction of the house cost $11,000. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. G. Tagner resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that John G. Tegner, a credit man, and his wife, Nannie Tegner, resided at this address. The 1964 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Joseph C. Harris, a member of the Class of 1940, resided at this address. The current owners of record of the property are Annika M. Crosby and Shawn P. Crosby. Annika M. Crosby, M.D. is an internal medicine doctor with Allina Hospitals & Clinics. Annika Crosby ran in the 2001 and 2005 Twin City Marathons. Shawn P. Crosby was the inventor, with David C. Roeker and Edward L. Manor, of United States Patent #5469623, a mechanical cutting device, that was assigned to the Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Company. [See the note for the St. Paul Academy.]

1617 Summit Avenue: W. S. Gilliam/Mrs. May/Mary Mather Gilliam House; Built in 1906 (1910 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Simplified Rectilinear in style; A. Koerner, architect. The structure is a two story, 2778 square foot, 11 room, four bedroom, three bathroom, one half-bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage. Construction cost for the house was $7,000. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Charles Cotton Mather (1832-1909,) the widower father of Mrs. William S. Gilliam, who was born in the United States to parents who were also born in the United States and who died of heart disease, resided at this address in 1909. R. J. Wood resided at this address in 1916. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. R. J. Wood and their daughter resided at this address. Elmer W. Wood and Robert E. Wood were World War I veterans who resided at this address in 1919. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. D. J. Kerr resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Duncan J. Kerr, assistant to the vice president of the Great Northern RailRoad, and his wife, Elizabeth M. Kerr, resided at this address. In 1934, Duncan J. Kerr, Elizabeth Hendrie Kerr, Alexander Kerr, William Kerr, John Kerr, Douglas Kerr, and Elsie Kerr all resided at this address. The 1964 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Louis Villaume, Jr., a member of the Class of 1931, resided at this address. The Kerr family were members of the Minikahda Country Club. In 1939, Duncan J. Kerr was the author of The Story of the Great Northern Railway Company--and James J. Hill. William S. Gilliam (1857- ,) the son of Thomas F. Gilliam and Elizabeth Ann Shields Gilliam, was born in Dubuque, Iowa, was educated in the Dubuque, Iowa, public schools, graduated from the Dubuque, Iowa, high school in 1876, was employed as a salesman and creditman employed by Poole, Gilliam & Company, wholesale grocers in Dubuque, Iowa, from 1876 until 1893, moved to St. Paul in 1893, was engaged in the general insurance business after 1893, was a member of the St. Paul Commercial Club, resided at 113 South Victoria Street in 1907, and officed at the Pioneer Press Building in 1907. William Shields Gilliam ( -1926,) William S. Gilliam ( -1935,) and Mary Mather Gilliam ( -1944) all died in Ramsey County. Robert J. Wood ( -1934) and Robert E. Wood ( -1954) both died in Ramsey County. Elmer E. Wood (1888-1983) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Dissmore, and died in Ramsey County. Alexander Castle Kerr (1899-1992) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Baker, and died in Lyon County, Minnesota. William A. Kerr ( -1945) died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are John C. Morley, Jr., and Lydia A. Morley. Lydia A. Morley is an attorney and is a member of the Hennepin County Bar Association. [See note on the Great Northern RailRoad.]

1605 Summit Avenue: Samuel A. Anderson House; Built in 1905 (1906 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Tudor Revival/Queen Anne Rectilinear in style; E. F. Klinkerfues, architect and builder. The structure is a 2 1/2 story (two story according to Ramsey County property tax records,) 3849 square foot, 11 room, six bedroom, three bathroom, two half-bathroom, wood frame house, with a detached garage, which was last sold in 2002 for $780,000. The house cost $10,000 to construct. The house has an intersecting gable roof and a porch. It has a symmetrical facade. The 1906 Jubilee Manual of the House of Hope Presbyterian Church indicates that Samuel A. Anderson and Marion (Mrs. S. A.) Anderson, members of the church since 1879 and 1888 respectively, resided at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. S. A. Anderson, their daughters, and Miss M. J. Anderson all resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Samuel A. Anderson, a lawyer who officed at the Exchange Bank Building, resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. S. A. Anderson and their daughters all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Samuel A. Anderson, a lawyer who officed at the New York Building, and his wife, Mary Anderson, resided at this address. In 1934, Samuel A. Anderson, Marian Palmer Anderson, and Marian J. Anderson all resided at this address and were notable members of St. Paul society. Samuel Anderson (1862-1950) was born in Illinois and was a lawyer in St. Paul. Samuel A. Anderson graduated from the University of Michigan Law School and was the Ramsey County Attorney from 1897 to 1899. Samuel A. Anderson represented Mark M. Kline in the U. S. Supreme Court case Minnesota Iron Company v. Mark M. Kline, 199 U.S. 593 (1905), a case successfully brought on behalf of an injured worker against the employer under a Minnesota law overturning the exception as to the negligence of fellow servants from the general law of master and servant in the case of railroads for completed railroad lines, where the federal constitutionality of the statute was challenged. Samuel A. Anderson also successfully represented Michael A. Popplar in the U. S. Supreme Court case Minneapolis, St. Paul, & Sault Ste. Marie Railway Company v. Michael A. Popplar, as Administrator of the Estate of Richard S. Popplar, 237 U.S. 369 (1915), a case brought on behalf of the estate of a deceased brakeman against the employer under the the Federal Safety Appliance Act and determining the role of alleged company rule disobedience as contributory negligence. The opposing counsel in the 1915 Supreme Court case was M. D. Munn, who was a former Assistant Ramsey County Attorney in 1890. The 1897 Catalogue of the Legal Fraternity of Phi Delta Phi, edited by George Anthony Katzenberger and published by the Inland Press of Ann Arbor, Michigan, indicates that Samuel Archibald Anderson, an 1885 graduate of Knox College of Galesburg, Illinois, an 1887 graduate of the University of Michigan Law School, and a member of the Adelphi Society, was a member of the law firm of Chamberlain & Anderson, which officed at the Gilfillan Block. Samuel Archibald Anderson ( -1950) died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Tammy L. Meister and Christopher J. Schirber. Tammy L. Meister graduated from Gustavus Adolphus College in St. Peter, Minnesota, in 1983, graduated from the University of Minnesota Dental School in 1987, completed a one-year General Practice Residency at Hennepin County Medical Center - Minneapolis, completed the Master's Program in TMJ and Craniofacial Pain at the University of Minnesota, worked at the Minnesota Head and Neck Pain Clinic-Minneapolis, completed a Master's degree in orthodontics at the University of Minnesota in 1992, then practiced orthodontics as an associate for three years, and purchased the Grand Avenue Orthodontic practice in 1995. The 1930 city directory indicates that George W. Davis and John P. Hall resided at the former nearby 1596 Summit Avenue.

Summit Avenue: Macalester College Wallace Residential Hall; Built in 1907. Wallace Hall is the oldest residence hall on the Macalester College campus and is now a coed hall. Wallace Hall once housed only women. The exterior of the building was renovated in 1976 and it is popular for its hardwood floors, marble staircase, its formal lounge, and its old charm. The hall is named after Dr. James Wallace, Macalester professor of religion, Greek, and political science from 1887 to 1939, Macalester College's acting President from 1894 to 1900, and Macalester College's fifth president from 1900 to 1906. James Wallace (1850-1939,) the son of Benjamin Wallace and Janet Bruce Wallace, was born near Wooster, Ohio, was educated at the Canaan Academy for two years, was educated at the Ohio Central College for two years, graduated from Wooster University in 1874, studied in Athens, Greece, for one year to improve his Greek, was a tutor and professor of Greek at Wooster University until 1887, moved to Minnesota in 1887, was a professor of Greek at Macalester College until 1890, then was dean of Macalester College from 1891 until 1894, was the president of Macalester College from 1894 until 1906, was the president of the Minnesota branch American Peace Society, resided at 1596 Summit Avenue in 1907, and officed at Macalester College in 1907.

Summit Avenue: Macalester College Doty Residential Hall; Built in 1964. Doty Hall houses students living in singles, doubles, and triples on single-sex floors. Margaret McGregor Doty graduated with the Macalester class of 1914 and was the dean of women at the college from 1924 to 1960. Doty Hall was renovated with new furnishings in 2001. Margaret Doty (1891-1975) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Smith, and died in Ramsey County.

Summit Avenue: Macalester College Dupre Residential Hall; Built in 1962. Dupre Hall was renovated in the summer of 1994 by a student design team. Dupre Hall is named after J. Huntley Dupre, a history professor at the college from 1946 to 1964 and Dean of the College from 1951 to 1961. Huntley Dupre (1892- ) was the author of Edward Duffield Neill, Pioneer Educator, published in Saint Paul by the Macalester College Press in 1949. He also authored "The Kentucky Gazette Reports the French Revolution" in the Journal of American History in 1939, Lazare Carnot: Republican Patriot in 1940, "The French in Early Kentucky" in Filson Club History Quarterly in 1941, Rafinesque in Lexington, 1819-1826, published by the Bur Press in Lexington, Kentucky, in 1945, and Two Brothers in the French Revolution: Thomas and Robert Lindet. Huntley Dupre corresponded, between 1921 and 1924, with Ruth Rouse relating to Czechoslovakia and involving the World Student Christian Federation. The World Student Christian Federation, formed in 1895, was an ecumenical cooperation organization, with purely Protestant origins, that worked through conferences and committee meetings, publications, exchanges of literature, and visits to national movements by its secretaries and agents, and that expanded its membership in 1911 to include Orthodox Christians. The World Student Christian Federation played a key role in the formation of the World Council of Churches in 1948. Ruth Rouse (1872-1956) was a missionary, a student evangelist, and an ecumenical pioneer.

Summit Avenue: Macalester College Summit House. Summit House is a residence for 17 students and is located on the corner of Summit and Snelling Avenues. The building was renovated in 1999. The house is three stories high, including a ground level. Students live on the ground, second & third floor. Common living space, a full kitchen, and two sun porches are located on the first floor. There are hardwood floors throughout the house. Macalester College is a privately supported coeducational liberal arts college. Macalester College opened at its present site on September 15, 1885. The College's founder was the Rev. Dr. Edward Duffield Neill (1823-1893.) Neill was born in Philadelphia, was graduated from Amherst College in 1842, studied theology at Andover, Massachusetts, and in Philadelphia, moved to St. Paul in 1849, was a pioneer Presbyterian clergyman and educator in Minnesota from 1851 until his death, served as the first Superintendent of Schools for the Minnesota Territory and as Chancellor for the University of Minnesota, was the chaplain of the First Minnesota Regiment from 1861 until 1864 during the American Civil War, was the U. S. Consul in Dublin, Ireland, from 1869 until 1871, was the president of Macalester College in 1873, was a professor at Macalester College from 1884 until 1893, was the secretary of the Minnesota Historical Society from 1851 until 1863, and died in St. Paul. He was also the founding pastor of two St. Paul Presbyterian churches, the House of Hope Presbyterian Church and the First Presbyterian Church. Macalester College is the successor of two academies founded by Neill. One of these schools was founded in St. Paul in 1853 and the other was established in Minneapolis in 1873, after Dr. Neill returned to Minnesota after having served as a secretary under President Abraham Lincoln. Both academies were named after M. W. Baldwin, a famous locomotive builder, who was a close friend of Dr. Neill and who was a financial supporter of his first educational undertaking. In 1873, Dr. Neill sought aid from Charles Macalester (1798-1873,) a prominent businessman and philanthropist from Philadelphia, for the purpose of developing the Baldwin School into a college. Charles Macalester donated a noted summer hotel at St. Anthony Falls in Minneapolis, known as the Winslow House, to the Baldwin school. With that, the new institution was named Macalester College, and was chartered by the Minnesota Legislature in 1874. In order to secure an adequate endowment, Dr. Neill asked the Synod of the Presbyterian Church of Minnesota to adopt Macalester College as a denominational institution. The trustees of the College, in 1883, donated forty acres of land to the institution and sold the Winslow House. With the proceeds of that sale, they erected the original Old Main building in 1884 (the current Old Main was a larger wing added two years later.) Also in 1884, the Presbyterian Synod completed an endowment of $25,000 for the president's chair, and in 1885, the College was opened to students. The College first admitted women in 1893. Dr. James Wallace (1849-1939,) who was acting president from 1894 to 1900 and as president from 1900 to 1906, secured the College's lasting reputation for scholastic excellence in its programs and among the faculty and students. During the 1940's, the Scottish heritage of the College's early benefactor, Charles Macalester, became a living force at the College. In 1948, the Chief of the Clan of MacAlister in Scotland, Lt. Colonel Charles Godfrey Summerville McAlister of Loup and Kennox, adopted the College into the Clan. Mr. and Mrs. DeWitt Wallace, co-founders of the Reader's Digest and the College's major recent benefactors, enabled the College to advance markedly. DeWitt Wallace ( -1981) was the son of President James Wallace and was a member of the College's class of 1911. DeWitt Wallace and Lila Acheson Wallace founded the Reader's Digest magazine in 1922 with $5,000 in borrowed money and now has 95 million readers each month. The Wallace Foundation, with $1.25 billion in assets, is the successor in 2003 to the DeWitt Wallace-Reader's Digest Fund and the Lila Wallace-Reader's Digest Fund, both founded in the 1950's and have donated money to the college. Macalester College's Fall 2001 enrollment was 1,769 full-time students and 53 part-time students, served by 148 full-time and 57 part-time faculty members. The Baldwin Locomotive Works were founded in 1831 by Matthias Baldwin, with the original plant on Broad Street in Philadelphia, and replaced in 1912 by a new plant in Eddystone. Baldwin built steam locomotives for the Pennsylvania Railroad, the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe RailRoad, and for overseas railroads in England, France, India, Haiti, and Egypt. The Lima-Hamilton Company (a combination of the Lima Machine Works and the General Machinery Corporation of Hamilton, Ohio) merged with Baldwin in 1950 to become the Baldwin-Lima-Hamilton Corporation, but by 1956, BLH ceased production of common carrier size steam locomotives. The 1918 city directory indicates that Prof. and Mrs. H. S. Alexander resided at the former nearby __?__. Wendell S. McRae (1890- ), a First Lieutenant, was a World War I veteran who resided at 1596 Summit Avenue in 1919. The records of the 1919-1920 Minnesota World War I Soldier's Bonus Board indicate that Wendell S. McRae (1896- ,) a 1917 enlistee and a First Lieutenant in the Marine Corps, who was born in Metropolis, Illinois, who moved to Minnesota in 1907, and a student upon the completion of service, resided at 1596 Summit Avenue with his father, Farquhar D. McRae. The 1920 city directory indicates that Farquhar D. McRae, professor, resided at the former nearby 1596 Summit Avenue. The 1924 city directory indicates that Dr. and Mrs. G. W. Davis, Cuyler McRae, and W. S. McRae all resided at the former nearby 1596 Summit Avenue. Mary S. McRae was the mother of Wendell S. McRae. Farquhar D. McRae and Mary S. McRae resided at 41 Macalester Avenue in 1917. Janet Davis Wallace ( -1916), the wife of James Wallace, died in Ramsey County. The Janet Wallace Fine Arts Center at the college is named after DeWitt Wallace’s mother.

1591 Summit Avenue: Frank J. Waterous House; Built in 1904; Craftsman/Queen Anne Rectilinear in style; Thomas Ivey, architect and builder. The structure is a 2 1/2 story (two story according to Ramsey County property tax records,) 3644 square foot, 11 room, six bedroom, three bathroom, one half-bathroom, wood frame and clapboard (frame according to Ramsey County property tax records) house, with a detached garage, which was last sold in 1998 for $274,000. It cost $6,500 to build the house. The house has an intersecting gable roof and two gabled dormers. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. F. J. Waterous resided at this address. World War I veteran Fred A. Waterouse resided at this address in 1919. The records of the 1919-1920 Minnesota World War I Soldier's Bonus Board (#7201) indicate that Fred Augustus Waterous (1895- ,) a 1917 enlistee and a First Lieutenant in the Signal Corps, who was born in St. Paul, served in the American Expeditionary Force in France, including the Somme Offensive and the Meuse-Argonne Offensive, was a student after the completion of service, and was unmarried, resided with his father, Frank J. Waterous, at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. F. J. Waterous and F. A. Waterous all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Frank J. Waterous, president of the Waterous Company, manufacturers of motor driven fire apparatus, rotary pumps, fire hydrants, and water works supplies, resided at this address. In 1972-1973, Chris L. Cook, a Freshman at Macalester College, resided at this address. In 1881, Frank J. Waterous opened the Winnipeg branch of the Waterous Engine Works Company, formerly the P. C. Van Brocklin Foundry in Brantford, Ontario, Canada, and purchased by Charles Waterous in 1855, and was joined by his twin brother, Fred L. Waterous, two years later. In 1886, Fred Waterous and Frank Waterous moved the fire engine manufacturing plant from Winnipeg to South St. Paul, Minnesota. In 1898, Waterous revolutionized firefighting with the first gasoline-engine-driven fire pump. In 1929, the Waterous Company built its last complete piece of fire apparatus and began specializing in the manufacture of fire pumps, hydrants, valves and accessories. In 1989, the American Cast Iron Pipe Company purchased the Waterous Company. Donald J. Haugen is the President and CEO of the Waterous Company. Frank J. Waterous ( -1940) died in Ramsey County. Fred Jos. Waterous ( -1919) died in Ramsey County. Frederick A. Waterous (1895-1980) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Steele, and died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is David C. Anderson. The 1906 Jubilee Manual of the House of Hope Presbyterian Church indicates that Jessie (Mrs. John) Pringle, a member of the church since 1898, resided at the nearby former 1586 Summit Avenue.

1583 Summit Avenue: M. A. Tschida House; Built in 1925; Early Modern Georgian Revival in style; Joseph Tierz, architect. The structure is a two story, 2609 square foot, ten room, three bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided house, with a detached garage, which was last sold in 2002 for $485,000. The cost to build the house was $10,000. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Michael A. Tschida resided at this address in 1926. The 1930 city directory indicates that Michael A. Tschida, a restaurateur located at 618 Como Avenue and 464 Wabasha Street and a soft drink vender located at 497 Wabahsa Street, and his wife, Ann Tschida, resided at this address. Michael A. Tschida (1883-1966) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Gardner, and died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Daniel S. McGrath and Carolyn M. Will. Daniel S. McGrath graduated from the University of Minnesota in 1984 and from the William Mitchell College of Law in 1988, is an attorney, and is a member of the law firm Steingart, McGrath & Moore, P.A.

1576 Summit Avenue: Hugo Hurschman House/Macalester College International Center; Built in 1914; Tudor Revival/Tudor Villa/Maison Francaise in style; Peter J. Linhoff, architect, and Lindstrom & Anderson, builder. The house was a 2 1/2 story, 5830 square foot, 18 room, 14 bedroom, three bathroom, one half-bathroom, brick and stucco (stucco according to Ramsey County property tax records) house with an intersecting gable roof and one segmental arched dormer. The construction cost for the house was $15,300. The 1918 and 1924 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. Hugo Hirschmann resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Hugo Hirschman, the president of Bannon's Inc., a department store, his wife, Selma Hirschman, and Julian Hirschman, secretary of Bannon's, Inc., all resided at this address. Hurschman was the president of J. Rothschild & Company, a wholesale millinery company. The current owner of record of the property is Macalester College. The 1879 city directory indicates that William H. Leib, a teacher of vocal culture with a studio located on the Odd Fellows Block, resided in the Reserve Township at the nearby corner of Snelling Avenue and Summit Avenue. William H. Leib (1842-1923,) the son of Benjamin F. Leib and Nancy Schmidt Leib, both of Pennsylvania, was a tenor and a professor of music at the University of Minnesota who resided in Quincy, Illinois, and, in the 1880's, in St. Paul, who was the father of Fred Leib (1866-1871) and of Charles H. Leib, who was a member of the Minnesota Music Teachers Association, who was the Vice President for Minnesota of the Music Teachers National Association from 1882 until 1885, who was the first representative of the State of Minnesota to the Music Teachers National Association in 1883, and who died in Joplin, Missouri. William H. Leib was the director of the House of Hope choir, arrived in the Twin Cities in 1875, and departed in 1885 to go to Kansas City, Missouri. In Kansas City, Leib established an oratorio society and an endowment fund for sick or aged musicians, the Leib Honor Fund. He was well-known as a soloist and performed at the Great Musical Festival at Minnetonka Park in 1879, when Dr. W. O. Perkins of Boston trained a large group to sing Haydn's Creation and Leib sang the part of Uriel. Leib formed the Gale-Leib Opera Comique Company with Harlow A. Gale and they performed H.M.S. Pinafore with Seibert's Orchestra. In 1879, Leib also performed a part in Queen Esther, a work presented in full Median, Persian and Jewish costume. Leib retired in 1915 at his brother's home in Joplin, Missouri, where he died, and was buried in Fairview Cemetery in Joplin, Missouri. Fred Leib was kidnapped in Cook County, Illinois, and was never recovered. Charles H. Leib lived in Minneapolis in 1923. [See note on Linhoff.]

1575 Summit Avenue: Harry Drauger House; Built in 1908 (1909 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Colonial Revival/Mission/Georgian Rectilinear in style; C. M. Brettschneider, architect and builder. The house cost $18,000 to construct. The house is a 2 1/2 story, 4444 square foot, 11 room, five bedroom, three bathroom, one half-bathroom, brick house, with a multiple hip roof and two hipped dormers. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. A. M. Atkinson resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Alf M. Atkinson, the treasurer of E. E. Atkinson & Company, resided at this address and that Selma Felt was a cook at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. A. M. Atkinson resided at this address. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Hannah Lundgren (1901-1926,) the unmarried employee of Mrs. A. M. Atkinson, who was born in Sweden to parents born in Sweden and who died of tubercular meningitis, resided at this address in 1926. The 1930 city directory indicates that Alfred M. Atkinson, the secretary-treasurer of E. E. Atkinson & Company, womens and misses outfitters, and his wife, Dorothy Atkinson, resided at this address. In 1934, Alfred J. Jennings resided at this address and was a member of the Minikahda Country Club, the St. Paul Athletic Club, the Somerset Club, and the University Club. In 1972-1973, Richard Wilson, a Senior at Macalester College, and Bruce Conway, a Senior at Macalester College, both resided at this address. The property was last sold in 1998 for $430,500. Drauger was a partner in Clement, Drauger, & Company. The current owners of record of the property are David D. Dorris and Louis G. Stanfield. In 2004, David D. Dorris was granted a variance by the City of St. Paul to build a 41' X 24' detached garage in the rear yard at this address. In 2003, the Minnesota Board of Architecture issued a cease and desist order and fine against David D. Dorris for holding himself out to the public as an architect in the State of Minnesota, although unlicensed, in a written communication to the City of St. Paul Deputy Mayor and to the City of St. Paul Director of License, Inspections & Environmental Protection. [See note on the University Club for 420 Summit Avenue.] [See note for the fifth entry after the entry for 1605 Summit Avenue for information on Macalester College.]

1568 Summit Avenue: F. M. Wheeler House/Macalester College Residence; Built about 1920; Georgian Revival in style; Peter Dowling, architect and builder. The house is a 2 1/2 story brick house, with a gabled roof and two gabled dormers with returns. The house has symmetrical design. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Mrs. Edith Pierson Wheeler resided at this address in 1914. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Elizabeth Wheeler (1830-1917,) the widowed mother of Edith P. Wheeler, who was born in Connecticut to parents born in Ireland and in the United States and who died of apoplexy, resided at this address in 1917. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mrs. Francis M. Wheeler resided at this address. The records of the 1919-1920 Minnesota World War I Soldier's Bonus Board (#19624) indicate that Cecil Theron Spear (1893- ,) a 1918 draftee and a Corporal in Company F of the 311th Engineers, who was born in Greeley, Colorado, moved to Minnesota in 1912, had blue eyes, light hair, and a light complexion, was 5' 9" tall, was a railroad worker at induction, was unemployed after the completion of service, and was unmarried, resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Trenholm, their daughter, and G. T. Trenholm all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that John H. Burr, a salesman employed by the Waldorf Paper Company, and his wife, Elizabeth Burr, resided at this address. The 1939 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that John Humbird Burr (1907- ,) who attended the school from 1917 until 1921, was a 1928 graduate of Princeton University, and was employed by the Waldorf Paper Company, resided at this address. John Humbird Burr married Elizabeth Gifford of Tarrytown, New York, in 1928, and the couple had three children, Jane Burr (1929- ,) John Burr, Jr. (1932- ,) and George Burr (1935-.) Francis Melville Wheeler (1864- ,) the son of Frederick F. Wheeler and Elizabeth A. Hanain Wheeler, was born in Norwalk, Connecticut, was educated at Selleck School of Norwalk, Connecticut, attended Trinity College from 1879 until 1880, was a member of the Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity, was engaged in the wholesale business in New York, New York, from 1880 until 1888, moved to Minnesota in 1888, was engaged in insurance, was in insurance in St. Paul for 18 years, was the general agent of the accident and liability department of the Aetna Life Insurance Company of Hartford, Connecticut, for nine years, was a state agent for the U. S. Mutual Insurance Company at St. Paul, married Edith May Pierson in 1908, was a Mason, was a Shriner, was a member of the White Bear Yacht Club, was a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, was a member of the St. Paul Commercial Club, resided at the Dakota Apartment in 1907, and officed at the Globe Building in 1907. Wheeler was an insurance agent for the Aetna Life Insurance Company. Peter Dowling ( -1915) died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is Macalester College. According to Ramsey County property tax records, the property in 2005 was a vacant residential lot. [See note on the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks for 334 Cherokee Avenue.] [See note on the White Bear Yacht Club for 18 Kenwood Parkway.] [See the note for the St. Paul Academy.]

1567 Summit Avenue: John J. Dobson House; Built in 1906 and altered in 1914 (1914 according to Ramsey County property tax records); Tudor Revival/Prairie Influence/Tudor Villa in style; Mark Fitzpatrick, original architect, and C. J. Buell, original builder, and Lindstrom & Anderson, alteration builder. The house cost $6,500 to construct. The house is a 2 1/2 (two story according to Ramsey County property tax records) story, 5324 square foot, 12 room, six bedroom, three bathroom, two half-bathroom, brick and frame (masonry and frame according to Ramsey County property tax records) house, with an intersecting gable roof and four dormers, two gabled, one hip, and one shed, and with one four room, one bathroom, 940 square foot bungalow-style attached carriage house/garage and one detached garage. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Mundy resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Evelyn V. Bhuber, a clerk employed by the Tri-State Telephone & Telegraph Company, boarded at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Mundy resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Harry L. Mundy, the president-treasurer of A. Guthrie & Company, and his wife, Lota Mundy, resided at this address. Dobson was the manager of the Northwestern Newspaper Union, which was part of the St. Paul Pioneer Press. Harry L. Mundy lived at this address in 1912 and undertook the 1914 alterations. In 1934, Harry L. Mundy, Lota McMillan Mundy, Harry Mundy, Guthrie Mundy, and Anne Mundy resided at this address. In 1908, Arthur W. Mundy, a superintendent of the Golden Rule Department Store, boarded at 676 Summit Avenue, that Clara E. Mundy, the widow of Edward O. Mundy, resided at 676 Summit Avenue, and that Harry L. Mundy, an employee of A. Guthrie & Company, boarded at 676 Summit Avenue. Anne Mundy was a graduate of Vassar College. The Mundy family were members of the Minikahda Country Club, the Schubert Club, and the Women's City Club of St. Paul in 1934. Clara E. Mundy ( -1920) died in Ramsey County. John J. Dobson ( -1934) died in Hennepin County. The current owners of record of the property are Allan L. Lange and Hella L. Lange. Allan Lange is a psychology instructor at Normadale Community College in Bloomington, Minnesota. Hella L. Lange is a psychology instructor and psychology department chair at Normadale Community College in Bloomington, Minnesota. [See note on Fitzpatrick.]

1559 Summit Avenue: Celia Friedman House; Built in 1920; Early Modern Rectilinear in style; Peter J. Linhoff, architect. The structure is a two story, 4204 square foot, 14 room, six bedroom, four bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage, which last sold in 1994 for $241,250. The house cost $15,000 to construct. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Lampert and Leonard Lampert all resided at this address. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Mary E. Monkhouse (1860-1926,) the widowed mother of Marjorie Monkhouse, who was born in Minnesota to parents born in England and in the United States and who died of edema of the lungs and myocarditis, resided at this address in 1926. The 1930 city directory indicates that Samuel Bronstien, Sr., the president-treasurer of the U. S. Bedding Company, his wife, Ann Bronstein, Samuel Bronstien, Jr., the vice president of the U. S. Bedding Company, and his wife, Celia Bronstien, all resided at this address. In 1934, Ursula Stewart Wheaton, the widow of Charles A. Wheaton, and Ursula S. Wheaton resided at this address and summered in Brule, Wisconsin. The 1950 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Edward P. Davis (1912- ,) who attended the school from 1923 until 1930, who graduated from Harvard University in 1934, who was an instructor at Harvard University from 1934 until 1935, who was employed as a physicist by the Minnesota Mining & Manufacturing Company, and who pursued the hobbies of canoeing, tennis, skiing, and home fix-it projects, resided at this address. The 1964 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Roland M. Earl, a member of the Class of 1928, resided at this address. Ursula Stewart Wheaton ( -1943) died in Ramsey County. Celia Friedman (1908-1987) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Colevsky, and died in Ramsey County. The property was last sold in 1994 and the sale price was $241,250. The previous owner of record of the property is Nemat Abdul Al and the current owner of record of the property is Pamala J. Attia. [See note on Linhoff.]

1550 Summit Avenue: Immaculate Heart of Mary Catholic Church and School/The Art Academy; Built in the 1950's (1949 according to Ramsey County property tax records). The church is a three story, 48324 square foot, building. The church was founded in 1949 and is staffed by priests of the Jesuit (Society of Jesus) religious order and Chuck Burns, S.J., is the pastor of the church. The church partners with St. Like's Catholic Church, located at 1079 Summit Avenue. The Society of Jesus is a religious order founded in 1540 by Inigo Lopez de (Ignatius) Loyola y Onaz (1491-1556,) a Basque nobleman and soldier who had his right leg shattered by a French cannon ball in defending the Spanish border fortress of Pamplona in 1521, who, after some troubles with the Spanish Inquisition, studied for the priesthood in Paris and Venice, and who wrote the Spiritual Exercises. The title of the religious order was Latinized into "Societas Jesu" in the Bull of Pope Paul III approving its formation and the first formula of its Institute in 1540. The term "Jesuit" is of 15th Century origin and meant a person who too frequently used or who appropriated the name of Jesus, was first applied to the Society of Jesus in reproach during the period 1544 to 1552, was never employed by its founder, but was eventually accepted by members and friends of the Society in time as a conventional name in its better use sense. The Society ranks among religious institutes as a mendicant order of clerks regular or a body of priests organized for apostolic work, following a religious rule, and relying on alms for their support under the Bull of Pope Pius V, "Dum indefessae", in 1571, and the Bull of Pope Gregory XIII, "Ascendente Domino", in 1585. The Society was not founded with the avowed intention of opposing Protestantism, but Saint Ignatius Loyola's early plan was rather the conversion of Mohammedans. The early Jesuits were sent by Ignatius first to pagan lands or to Catholic countries. The early Jesuits were sent to Protestant countries only at the special request of the pope and were sent to Germany, the cradle-land of the Reformation, at the urgent solicitation of the imperial ambassador. From the very beginning of the order, the missionary labours of the Jesuits among the pagans of India, Japan, China, Canada, Central America, and South America were an important activity. In the course of the propagation and the strengthening of the Catholic faith, the Jesuits naturally came to endeavor to counteract the spread of Protestantism and became the main instruments of the Counter-Reformation, the re-conquest of southern and western Germany and Austria for the Church, and the preservation of the Catholic faith in France. Michael Accolti (1807-1878,) Charles Albanel (1613/1616-1696,) Claude Allouez (1620-1689,) Jean-Pierre Aulneau (1705-1736,) Robert Bellarmine (1542-1621,) Pierre Biard (1576-1622,) Francis Borgia (1510-1572,) Jean de Brebeuf (1593-1649,) Edmund Campion (1540-1581,) Noel Chabanel (1613-1649,) Claude-Godefroi/Godefroy Coquart (1706-1765,) Antoine Daniel (1601-1648,) Peter DeSmet (1801-1873,) Gabriel Druillettes (1610-1681,) Charles Garnier (1606-1649,) Aloysius Gonzaga (1568-1591,) Réne Goupil (1607-1642,) Isaac Jogues (1607-1646,) Eusebio Francisco Kino (1645-1711,) Gabriel Lalement (1610-1649,) Jean de la Lande ( -1646,) Jacques Marquette (1636-1675,) Ennemond Massé (1574-1646,) Paul Miki (1562-1597,) John Nobili (1812-1856,) Charles Van Quickenborne (1788-1857,) and Francis Xavier (1506-1552) are famous Jesuits. The Highland Park Montessori preschool is also located at this address. The Art Academy is located at the old IHM school and is a school offering drawing and painting lessons for children ages 5-18 and for adults. The current owner of record of the property is Immaculate Heart of Mary Catholic Church.

1543 Summit Avenue: Charles F. Phillips House; Built in 1913; Tudor Villa in style; __?__ Sjostrand, architect. The structure is a two story, 5277 square foot, 12 room, six bedroom, four bathroom, one half-bathroom, masonry and frame house, with an attached garage. The cost to build the house was $12,500. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Charles F. Phillips resided at this address from 1914 to 1946. The 1918 and 1924 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. C. F. Phillips resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Frances V. Phillips, the widow of Charles F. Phillips, resided at this address. Charles Franklin Phillips ( -1927) died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is Immaculate Heart of Mary Catholic Church.

1537 Summit Avenue: Leonard Lampert, Jr. House; Built in 1925; Georgian Revival in style; Gust Anderson, architect. The house cost $15,000 to construct. Leonard Lampert, Jr. (1891-1985) was born in Mankato, Minnesota, was a lumberman in St. Paul, and died in Minneapolis. He was married to Geraldine O'Shaughnessey (1899-1978) in 1922. Their son, John Richard (Jack) Lampert (1923- ) studied Engineering at Yale University and was the President And CEO of Lampert Lumber Company until it was sold in 1989. He was married to Judith Ballinger. Originally founded in 1887 by two brothers, Jacob Lampert and Leonard Lampert, Sr., in Sleepy Eye, Minnesota, Lampert Yards retail lumber business currently operates 37 lumber yards in Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa and South Dakota. Jacob Lampert managed the initially purchased lumber yard at Sleepy Eye, while Leonard Lampert, Sr., next ran a lumber yard purchased in 1890 in Mankato, Minnesota. Since Lamperts was dealing in large quantities of lumber, it was decided that its headquarters should be moved closer to the source of supply, which was primarily in northern Minnesota and Wisconsin. In 1900, the General Office was moved to the Twin Cities. Jacob Lampert and Leonard Lampert each thought his son was the most qualified to run the company. Because of this, a major development occurred in 1924, with the splitting of the company. Leonard Lampert, Sr., retained all properties west of a line from Duluth to Mankato, to approximately Sioux City, Iowa. Leonard Lampert, Sr.’s, company eventually became known as Lampert Lumber. Jacob Lampert kept those yards east and south of that line. His company became known as Lampert Yards. In addition to lumber, Lampert Yards sells a full line of building materials such as windows, doors, paint, and carpeting and provides customized assistance for remodeling projects, decks and gazebos, storage sheds and specialty buildings. Leonard Lampert ( -1927) died in Ramsey County. Leonard Lampert (1891-1985) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Schwartz, and died in Hennepin County. Geraldine Antoinette Lampert (1899-1979) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Sullivan, and died in Hennepin County.

1531 Summit Avenue: Built in 1925. The structure is a two story, 4193 square foot, 11 room, six bedroom, three bathroom, one half-bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. The 1930 city directory indicates that Leonard J. Lampert and his wife, Geraldine Lampert, resided at this address. The 1950 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Forrest L. Daniels (1919- ,) who attended the school from 1929 until 1933, who attended Yale University, who served as a Lieutenant Commander in the U. S. Navy during World War II, who was employed as the Feed Department manager by the Archer-Daniels-Midland Company, who was a vestryman at St. Paul's Church, who was a 32nd degree Mason, who was a Shriner, who was a member of the Board of Governors of the University Club, who was a member of the Somerset Country Club, and who pursued the hobbies of writing, photography, gardening, and hunting, resided at this address. Forrest L. Daniels married Nancy Clarkson in 1941 and the couple had two children, Thomas Truman Daniels (1942- ) and William Clarkson Daniels (1946- .) The 1964 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that William J. O'Brien, Jr., a member of the Class of 1947, resided at this address. The current owners of record of the property are Eugene D. Richards and Jane H. Richards. Eugene Richards was a 1948 graduate of Cretin High School and is a financial supporter of Cretin Derham Hall High School in 2005-2006. Jane and Eugene Richards were financial supporters of the Fairview Foundation and the Ebenezer Foundation in 2000 and Guild Incorporated in 2004. The 1930 city directory indicates that Leon G. Bigelow, the president of the Bigelow-McGill Company, an envelope manufacturer, and his wife, Hazel Bigelow, resided at the former nearby 1529 Summit Avenue.

1525 Summit Avenue: Dr. Arthur Sweeney House; Built in 1910 (Sandeen; 1909 according to Ramsey County property tax records; 1910-1911 according to Larson); Georgian Revival in style; Clarence H. Johnston, Sr., architect; Minnesota Investment Company, builder. The house was built for $15,000 (Sandeen and Larson.) The house is a 2 1/2 story, 4535 square foot, 11 room, five bedroom, four bathroom, one half-bathroom, brick house with an intersecting gable roof, which has three pedimented gabbled dormers. It also has fluted Corinthian columns and two detached garages. The 1918 city directory indicates that Dr. and Mrs. Arthur Sweeney and their daughter resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Dr. and Mrs. Arthur Sweeney and Miss J. V. Sweeney all resided at this address. In 1934, Herbert H. Bigelow, Frances Gillette Bigelow, and Leon G. Bigelow resided at this address and were notable members of St. Paul society. The 1939 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Herbert H. Bigelow II, a member of the Class of 1931 or 1935, resided at this address. The 1950 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that David Butler (1930- ,) the son of Hazen E. Butler, who attended the school from 1941 until 1944, resided at this address. Arthur Sweeney (1858-1928) was born in Lawrence, Massachusetts, and graduated from the Harvard Medical School in 1886. He was a medical jurisprudence expert and taught at the University of Minnesota Medical School for 34 years. He was a neurologist and was a founder of the St. Paul Science Museum. Arthur A. Sweeney ( -1928) died in Ramsey County. Herbert Hase Bigelow ( -1933) died in Lake County, Minnesota. Herbert H. Bigelow (1918-1960) was born in Minnesota and died in Rice County, Minnesota. Frances Gillette Bigelow ( -1933) died in Ramsey County. Leon G. Bigelow ( -1935) died in Ramsey County. The previous owners of record of the property were Anne H. Nickoloff and Robert S. Nickoloff and the current owners of record of the property are Kathryn D. Kennedy and Simon James Kennedy. In 2003, Anne Nickoloff was a financial supporter of the Randy Kelly for St. Paul Mayor campaign and resided at this address. Robert S. Nickoloff is an attorney, is a member of the Minnesota State Bar Association Range District Bar Association, and is Chief Legal Officer of Venturi Group, LLC. Robert S. Nickoloff graduated from Wesleyan University in Middletown, Connecticut, and from the University of Michigan Law School, was a platoon commander with the First Marine Division in Korea in 1951-1952, recently retired as a director of Minnesota Power, has been a general partner of Medical Innovation Partners since 1988, served as chairman of the Board of Governors of the University of Minnesota Hospital and Clinic, was a member of the University's Office of Research and Technology Transfer Evaluation Council, and is currently a director of Northeast Ventures. [See note on Johnston.]

1524 Summit Avenue: St. Paul's Church on the Hill (Episcopal)/El Santo Nino Spanish Episcopal Mission; Church Built in 1913; Additional buildings built in 1922 and 1952; English Gothic Revival church in style; Emanuel L. Masqueray, church architect. Construction of the church building cost $65,000. The 1930 city directory indicates that the St. Paul Episcopal Church on the Hill was located at this address. The church was the third Protestant Episcopal church founded (1856) in Minnesota. The church, originally located at Ninth and Olive Streets, moved in 1912 to its present location on Summit Avenue and Saratoga Street. The nine-tenths of one acre property contains three buildings. The church is a one story 13960 square foot, stone building with a gabled roof that has a large rose window that was designed by Carl Hagedorn. Much of the church's interior was salvaged from the first church building. The second building is a two story, 4800 square foot building and the third building is a one story 4100 square foot building. Currently, Theodore Neuhaus is the Rector and Ernest Lottsfeldt is the Assistant Priest for St. Paul's Church on the Hill. St. Paul's Church on the Hill has approximately 200 members. Rev. Joel Almono is the Vicar for the El Santo Nino Spanish Episcopal Mission. El Santo Nino Spanish Episcopal Mission has approximately 100 members. The current owner of record of the property is the Vestry of St. Paul's Church. [See note on Masqueray.]

1516 Summit Avenue: Walter F. Lindeke House; Built in 1908; Queen Anne Rectilinear in style; Peter J. Linhoff, architect. The structure is a two story, 3097 square foot, nine room, five bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage. The construction cost for the house was $7,000. The property was last sold in 2003 with a sale price of $650,000. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Walter F. Lindeke (1879-1912,) the husband of Ethel Xanten Lindeke, who was born in Minnesota to parents born in Germany and in the United States and who died of pneumonia, resided at this address in 1912. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mrs. W. F. Lindeke resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Dr. and Mrs. A. W. Whitney resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Clara V. Whitney resided at this address. Walter Frank Lindeke ( -1912) died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are James G. Wieland and Jennifer M. Wieland. [See note on Linhoff.]

1515 Summit Avenue: Arthur W. Wallace House; Built in 1906; Classical Revival/Colonial Revival/Queen Anne Rectilinear in style; Louis Lockwood, architect, and Baumeister Brothers, builder. The house is a 2 1/2 story, 3724 square foot, 11 room, five bedroom, one bathroom, two half-bathroom, wood frame and clapboard structure, with an intersecting hip and gable roof and one pedimented dormer and with a detached garage. It also has leaded arched windows. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Wallace resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Arthur W. Wallace, in real estate, resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Wallace resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Arthur W. Wallace and his wife, Bertha A. Wallace, resided at this address. Arthur Wallace was a real estate broker. Walter H. Baumeister was born in Minnesota in 1906 and died in 1958. William Baumeister (1874-1946) was born in Germany. Arthur Wilson Wallace ( -1950) died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Cynthia A. M. Schufman and Joseph L. Schufman. Joseph Schufman is amember of Nativity Church, Stanford Avenue at Prior Avenue South, is a financial supporter of Cretin-Derham Hall High School in 2005, and also owns land in the Town of Naples, Buffalo County, Wisconsin. [See note on Lockwood for 1118 Summit Avenue.]

1510 Summit Avenue: Dr. Charles R. Ball House; Built in 1907; Colonial Revival/Queen Anne Rectilinear in style; Charles E. Johnson, architect. The cost to build the house was $7,000. The house is a 2 1/2 story, 3029 square foot, ten room, five bedroom, three bathroom, wood frame and clapboard structure with an intersecting hip and gable roof and two gabled dormers and with a one car detached garage. The house has a symmetrical facade. It also has a large open porch. The 1909 University of Minnesota Catalogue indicates that Charles R. Ball, M.D., a clinical instructor in nervous and mental diseases, resided at this address. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Charles Joseph Ball (1901-1910,) the son of Charles R. Ball, who was born in the United States to parents also born in the United States and who died of scarlet fever, resided at this address in 1910. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. R. Ball resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Charles R. Ball, M. D., a partner with Dr. Edward J. Engberg in the physicians' office of Ball & Engberg, located at the Lowery Building, resided at this address and that Josephine Ball, a student, boarded at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Dr. and Mrs. C. N. Ball and their daughter resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Charles R. Ball, a physician associated with the St. Paul Nervous Clinic, located at 350 St. Peter Street, his wife, Frances Ball, and Elmer M. Fink all resided at this address. In 1934, Elmer M. Finck and Josephine Ball Finck resided at this address. In 1919, World War I veteran Elmer M. Finck (1898- ), a Seaman, resided at 1672 Lincoln Avenue. Charles R. Ball (1867/1869-1930,) the son of Joseph Ball and Hannah Ball, was born in Bryan, Ohio, graduated in 1891 from Ohio Wesleyan University, Delaware, Ohio, was a reporter on a Columbus, Ohio, newspaper, graduated in 1894 from the University of Minnesota Medical School, did postgraduate studies at Harvard University, at Johns Hopkins University, and in Vienna and in Berlin, was a physician and surgeon after 1894, served in the Army Medical Corps in France during World War I, was a partner of Dr. Edward Engberg and Dr. Joel C. Hultkrans, was a member of the Ramsey County Medical Society, was a member of the Minnesota Medical Society, was a member of the American Medical Association, was a neurologist at Bethesda Hospital, was a neurologist at St. Joseph's Hospital, was a neurologist at Midway Hospital, was a member of the staff of the Gillette State Hospital for Crippled Children, was chief of staff of the Mounds Park Sanitarium, was associated with the St. Paul Free Dispensary, resided at 747 Burr Street in 1907, was an assistant in nervous and mental diseases at the University of Minnesota Medical School from 1898 until 1907, and was a clinical instructor in nervous and mental diseases at the University of Minnesota Medical School after 1907, was the president of the Minnesota Neurological Society, was the president of the Central Neuropsychiatric Association, was a member of the American Neurological Society, was a member of the American Psychiatric Association, was a 32nd degree Mason, was a charter member of the Ohio Wesleyan Chapter of the Sigma Alpha Epsilon Fraternity, was a member of the Nu Sigma Mu Medical Fraternity, was a member of the Sons of the American Revolution, was a member of the Minnesota Club, was a member of the St. Paul Town and Country Club, was a member of the Midland Hills Country Club, and died of sudden heart failure at San Diego, California. Charles R. Ball married Frances Snodgrass in 1897 and the couple had two children, Josephine Ball (Mrs. Elmer F.) Finck and Charles R. Ball, Jr. In 1913, Charles R. Ball translated the 1909 edition of Syphilis and the Nervous System: for Practioners, Neurologists and Syphilologists, authored by Max Nonne (1861-1959.) Frances May Ball ( -1935) died in St. Louis County, Minnesota. Elmer M. Finck (1898-1973) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Morton, and died in Ramsey County. Josephine B. Finck (1899-1980) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Snodgrass, and died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is Roger A. Christianson. Roger A. Christianson is an attorney, focuses on criminal law, especially defending against driving while intoxicated charges, and is a member of the District 2 Association of the Minnesota State Bar Association.

1509 Summit Avenue: M. M. Seward House #2; Built in 1922; Early Modern Rectilinear in style; __?__ Palmer, architect. The construction cost for the house was $12,000. The house is a two story, 3474 square foot, 14 room, six bedroom, four bathroom, brick and frame (masonry and frame according to Ramsey County property tax records) structure with a multiple hipped roof. It also has a chimney with chimney pots and a detached garage. It is the mirror image of the house at 1501 Summit Avenue. The 1930 city directory indicates that Andrew W. Hilger, a physician and surgeon who officed at the Lowry Medical Arts Building, his wife, Winnifred Hilger, Meyer Paper, and his wife, Gertrude Paper, all resided at this address. In 1934, Dr. Andrew W. Hilger, Winifred Stockwell Hilger, Winifred Hilger, Andrew W. Hilger, Jr., and Rothrock Hilger resided at this address. The Hilger family were members of the Minikahda Country Club. Andrew William Hilger (1879-1958) was born outside of Minnesota and died in Olmsted County, Minnesota. Winifred S. Hilger (1894-1981) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Clune, and died in Hennepin County. The previous owner of record of the property was Audrey M. Votel, who resides at 1493 Summit Avenue, and the current owners of record are Judith Jordan and Mark E. Snow. Audrey M. Votel was a financial supporter of AMICUS in 2003, of the Minnesota Medical Foundation in 2003, and of the Friends of the St. Paul Public Library in 2004 and in 2005. Tom and Audrey Votel were financial supporters of Historic St. Paul in 2006. AMICUS is a Minnesota not-for-profit organization established in 1967 that seeks to improve public safety by helping inmates and ex-offenders through positive relationship-building, restorative justice practices and individualized transition services, training mentors to visit inmates and assist them with transition back to the community and helping inmates and ex-offenders reshape their lives, reach their goals, and make successful transitions from prison into the community. Historic Saint Paul was founded in 1998 to help strengthen the city by celebrating our cultural heritage and acting as a catalyst for the conservation of neighborhoods, business districts and local landmarks, working in partnership with private owners, community organizations, and public agencies to utilize Saint Paul’s cultural and historic resources as assets in economic development and community building initiatives.

1507 Summit Avenue: Built in 1922. The structure is a one story, 1410 square foot, seven room, three bedroom, two bathroom, masonry and frame house, with a detached one car garage. The current owners of record are Judith Jordan and Mark E. Snow, who reside at 1509 Summit Avenue.

1504 Summit Avenue: G. E. Routh House; Built in 1911; Early Modern Georgian Revival in style; Hartford & Jacobson, architects. The structure is a two story, 3593 square foot, 11 room, five bedroom, four bathroom, one half-bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage, which was last sold in 2002 for $785,000. The Routh family resided at 448 Ashland in 1890. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. G. E. Routh, Jr., resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. F. H. Ramer resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that George A. Mairs, Jr., the treasurer of the Gyro Club, and his wife, Jean Mairs, resided at this address. In 1934, George A. Mairs, Jr., Jean McLeod Mairs, Nancy Mairs, George A. Mairs III, and Jean Mairs resided at this address. George Edward Routh (1847-1934,) the son of Dr. James Winbourn Routh and Margaret Ferguson Routh, was born at Cincinnati, Ohio, attended school at Springfield, Illinois, and Decatur, Illinois, graduated from the Miami (Ohio) Medical School, in Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1874, was a physician, after graduation, practiced medicine a short time in Decatur, Illinois, married Mary Webb, moved to Austin, Texas, practiced medicine in Texas from 1875 until 83, was a member of the Board of Health of Austin, Texas, was the secretary of the Board of Medical Examiners for 16th Judicial District of Texas, moved to Minnesota from Texas in 1883, resided in St. Paul, has since been engaged in the practice of his profession, was a medical partner with his brother, Dr. J. W. Routh, Jr. ( -1886,) until 1886, owned a medical library unsurpassed by any other doctor in the State of Minnesota in 1897, resided at 537 Holly Avenue in 1907, officed at the Chamber of Commerce Building in 1907, and died of myocarditis, bronchio-pneumonia, and arteriosclerosis in St. Paul. George Edward Routh and Mary Webb Routh had three children. George A. Mairs, Jr., was a graduate of Lafayette College in Pennsylvania in 1923 and of Wilson College in 1925. The Mairs family were members of the Women's City Club of St. Paul in 1934. Mairs & Power was founded in 1931 by George A. Mairs, Jr., ( -1980), a St. Paul native who, at the age of 28 determined that the field of investment management was under-represented in the Twin Cities and with a Master's degree in corporate finance from the University of Minnesota, who became Minnesota's first independent professional investment counsel. In 1944, George C. Power, Jr., a graduate of Carleton College and a former research affiliate of First Bank Stock Corporation, joined the firm, which then became known as Mairs & Power, Inc. In 1952, George A. Mairs III, who graduated from St. Paul Academy in 1946, attended Yale University 1946-1948, and graduated from Macalester College in 1950, entered the firm. With the recent retirement of George A. Mairs III, the firm is now operated by William B. Frels, a graduate of the University of Wisconsin. George A. Mairs III is the First Vice President of the Ramsey County Historical Society. Perry Dilworth, a member of the St. Paul Central High School Class of 1987, resided at this address in 1997. George E. Routh ( -1934,) George Alexander Mairs ( -1944,) and Mary Webb Routh ( -1951) all died in Ramsey County. George A. Mairs (1901-1983) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Paradise, and died in Dakota County, Minnesota. Jean McLeod Mairs ( -1936) and George C. Power ( -1912) both died in Ramsey County. George C. Power (1889-1974) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Smith, and died in Ramsey County. George Center Power (1914-1995) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Dawson, and died in Dakota County. The current owners of record of the property are Brian A. Milberg and Laura J. Milberg. Brian Millberg, an engineer with FW Engineering, was a contributor to the Howard Dean for President campaign in 2004. Laura Milberg was an employee of the Minnesota Office of Environmental Assistance in 2003. [See note on Jacobson.]

1501 Summit Avenue: M. M. Seward House #1; Built in 1922; Early Modern Rectilinear in style; __?__ Palmer, architect. The house was built for $12,000. The house is a two story, 3474 square foot, 14 room, six bedroom, four bathroom, brick and frame (masonry and frame according to Ramsey County property tax records) structure with a multiple hipped roof. It also has a chimney with chimney pots and has a detached garage. It is the mirror image of the house at 1509 Summit Avenue. The 1930 city directory indicates that Charles D. Coddon, president of L. D. Coddon & Brothers, Inc., his wife, Jessie Coddon, Justus Ohage, Jr., a physician officing at 350 St. Peter Street, and his wife, Esther R. Ohage, all resided at this address. The 1939 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Abbott Skinner (1917- ,) who was born in St. Paul, who attended the school from 1927 until 1934, who graduated from Carlton College in 1938, and who attended the Harvard University Medical School, resided at this address. The current owner of record of the property is Gary A. Reetz. Gary A. Reetz, AIA, is a graduate of Iowa State University and was Vice President of HGA (Hammel, Green & Abrahamson) Museum Architects in Minneapolis in 2006 and attended the 2006 meeting of the American Association of Museums. Gary A. Reetz was a financial supporter of the the Minnesota AIDS Project in 2002 and to the Philanthrofund Foundation in 2005. Gary Reetz and Barbara Stone Reetz were financial supporters of the Michigan State University School of Music in 2004.

1500 Summit Avenue: Built in 1997. The structure is a two story, 3664 square foot, ten room, four bedroom, four bathroom, stucco house, with a detached masonry garage (attached garage according to Ramsey County property tax records,) which was last sold in 1998 for $670,000. The current owners of record of the property are Lance D. Henderson and Ann M. Meany. Lance Henderson, an Insurance Executive with Allianz Life, was a contributor to the Howard Dean for President campaign in 2004 and to the John Kerry for President campaign in 2004 and Ann Meany, a teacher with the Minnesota Waldorf School, was a contributor to the Howard Dean for President campaign in 2004. Lance D. Henderson and Ann M. Meany were Saint Paul contributors to Fifth District Congressional candidate and newly elected Congressman Keith Ellison. Lance Henderson worked on Maria Ruud’s successful suburban race for the Minnesota House of Representatives through the Legacy Project. Lance Henderson was named Vice President, Program and Impact, by the Skoll Foundation and leads the Skoll Foundation's strategic program development, execution and evaluation, with primary emphasis on grantmaking investments and services that advance the field of social entrepreneurship.

1494 Summit Avenue: Joseph D. Tyler House; Built in 1885; R. H. Tyler, architect. Construction cost for the house was $900.

1493 Summit Avenue: George D. Taylor House; Built in 1909 (1912 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Period Revival/Tudor Villa in style; O. H. Round, architect, and Harrison & Schmidt, builders. The structure is a 2 1/2 story (two story according to Ramsey County property tax records,) 3527 square foot, 11 room, six bedroom, three bathroom, two half-bathroom, brick house, with an attached garage and a detached garage (a single detached garage according to Ramsey County property tax records.) The house cost $6,500 to construct. The house is a brick structure which has a half timbered upper section and has a hipped roof with intersecting gables. The 1910 city directory indicates that George D. Taylor, proprietor of a wholesale woodenware, glassware, and bottle firm, resided at this address. In 1916, Isaac Summerfield was a member of the Minnesota Historical Society and resided at this address. The 1918 and 1924 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Summerfield resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Isaac Summerfield and his wife, Irene Summerfield, resided at this address. The 1939 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that David N. Summerfield (1915- ,) who was born in St. Paul, who attended the school from 1926 until 1933, who graduated from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1937, and who was a test engineer employed by General Motors in Dayton, Ohio, resided at this address. The 1987 St. Agnes Catholic Church directory indicates that Thomas Votel and Andre Votel resided at this address. In 1924, Isaac Summerfield was a member of the American Jewish Committee from St. Paul representing the Sixth District on the executive council. George D. Taylor ( -1944) died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are A. M. Votel and Thomas W. Votel. Thomas W. Votel, MD, was the inventor of the On3 lateral transfer device that allows a single healthcare worker to move a patient from bed to cart in about 20 seconds. Thomas F. Votel is the inventor's son and president and CEO of Ergodyne, which is the distributor and manufacturer of the On3. Ergodyne was launched as the Comp Equipment Corp. in 1983 by Thomas W. Votel, a doctor specializing in occupational medicine, but the fledgling back-support firm lost its entire management team within three years and was unable to find a proper distribution network until Thomas F. Votel, a holder on an MBA, took it over. Dr. Thomas W. Votel, a self-employed doctor, was a contributor to the George W. Bush for President campaign in 2004. [See note on Olin H. Round.]

1490 Summit Avenue: Dr. H. E. Hunt House; Built in 1911; Tudor Revival/Tudor Rectilinear in style; Ernest M. Hartford and Silas Jacobson, architects, and J. R. Schmit, builder. Construction of the house cost $5,900. The house is a 2 1/2 story, 3392 square foot, 14 room, six bedroom, four bathroom, wood frame and stucco (stucco according to Ramsey County property tax records) structure which has a gabled roof with one double gabled dormer and a detached garage. The 1918 city directory indicates that Dr. and Mrs. H. E. Hunt resided at this address. Eugene M. O'Neill was a World War I veteran who resided at 552 Dayton Avenue in 1919. The 1920 city directory indicates that Mary Fischbein, the widow of Haskell G. Fischbein, and Katherine Fischbein, a student, boarded at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Dr. and Mrs. H. E. Hunt, Mrs. H. G. Fischbein, and her daughter all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Harry E. Hunt, a physician who officed at 350 St. Peter Street, and his wife, Irma Hunt, resided at this address. In 1934, Eugene M. O'Neill, Helen McGrath O'Neill, Judith O'Neill, and Jean O'Neill resided at this address. The 1950 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that James P. Brown (1929- ,) who attended the school from 1942 until 1947, who attended Williams College, and who was a member of the U. S. Marine Corps Reserve, resided at this address. Silas Jacobson ( -1943) first appeared in St. Paul around 1910 and maintained a partnership with Ernest Hartford until about 1914. For many years, Jacobson was a senior draftsman in the Minnesota State Architect's Office, beginning about 1916. In 1929, he moved to Madison, where he assumed a similar position in the Wisconsin State Architect's Office. Jacobson died in Madison, Wisconsin. The O'Neill family were members of the Minikahda Country Club. Henry E. Hunt (1878-1959) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Panzer, and died in Dodge County, Minnesota. Ernest Hartford ( -1913) and John R. Schmit ( -1949) both died in Ramsey County. Eugene M. O'Neill (1895-1986) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Tracy, and died in Ramsey County. The property was last sold for $693,500 and that sale occurred in 2003. The current owners of record of the property are Gregory Brown and Mary Forte Brown. [See note on Jacobson.]

1489 Summit Avenue: Built in 1960. The structure is a two story, 2200 square foot, eight room, four bedroom, one bathroom, two half-bathroom, brick house, with a detached garage, which was last sold in 1997 for $195,000. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Fred E. Mahler (1877-1919,) the husband of Harriet Mahler, who was born in Minnesota to parents born in Germany and in the United States and who died of a gun shot wound to the head, resided at this address in 1919. The current owner of record of the property is Catherine M. Guinan. Catherine Guinan was a volunteer for Women's Advocates, Inc., a shelter for the victims of domestic abuse in 2006. Catherine Guinan was the chair of the 2005 Summit Avenue Garden Stroll and Tea event. In 2006, Catherine Guinan applied to the St. Paul Heritage Preservation Commission for a preliminary review and approval to construct new front and rear porches and to make alterations at this 1960's house, a project previously rejected by the Commission.

1487 Summit Avenue: F. E. Mahler House; Built in 1910; Georgian Revival Variant in style; Morton Fenstad, architect. The structure is a two story, 2832 square foot, 11 room, six bedroom, three bathroom, one half-bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided house, with a detached garage. Building the house cost $5,000. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. F. E. Mahler resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Dr. George Earl, a physician and partner with Dr. Robert Earl in the Earl Doctors medical practice at the Lowry Building, resided at this address. Dr. George Earl resided at this address in 1924. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. George Earl resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that George A. Earl, a physician who was a partner in the Earl Clinic, and his wife, Lillian F. Earl, resided at this address. In 1934, Dr. George Earl, Lillian Nodell Earl, Roland Earl, and Carolyn Earl resided at this address. The Earl family were members of the St. Paul Athletic Club in 1934. George Earl was the son of Mr. and Mrs. P. O. Earl, graduated from the University of Minnesota in 1906, graduated from the University of Minnesota Medical School in 1909, and was the president of the University of Minnesota Alumni Association from 1943 to 1946. Dr. George Earl, the brother of Dr. Robert Earl, also was the founder of the Mounds Park Sanitarium, Midway Hospital, and the Mounds Park Bank. The house at 935 Hudson Road was built in 1913 for Dr. George Earl. Fred E. Mahler ( -1919) died in Ramsey County. George Arthur Earl (1884-1974) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Anderson, and died in Ramsey County. Lillian N. Earl (1887-1968) was born in Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Dale R. Neumann and Sheran A. Neumann. Dale R. Neumann is a professional freelance reporter and a notary public in Ramsey County. Sheran Neumann is associated with NeuDesign and is an allied member of the the American Society of Interior Designers.

1484 Summit Avenue: Dr. S. N. Mogilner House; Built in 1922; Early Modern Rectilinear in style; Kindy C. Wright and Charles Hausler, architects. The structure is a two story, 3884 square foot, 12 room, six bedroom, three bathroom, one half-bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. The house was constructed at a cost of $15,000. The 1930 city directory indicates that Samuel N. Mogilner, a physician officing at 350 St. Peter Street, and his wife, Sarah Mogilner, and Jacob A. Silverman resided at this address. In August, 1915, the Hansboro, North Dakota, News newspaper reported that Dr. S. N. Mogilner and Dr. N. G. Mortensen were charged in police court with kicking out the false teeth of Emil Freiden, but that the charges were dismissed because of lack of evidence when the false teeth could not be produced in court. The current owner of record of the property is Maureen L. McCarthy, who resides at Manhatten Beach, California. Maureen McCarthy was previously a staff writer and a team leader at the Minneapolis Star Tribune. [See note on Hausler.]

1481 Summit Avenue: John H. Donohue House; Built in 1905; Slightly Tudor Revival/Medieval Rectilinear in style; Edward J. Donohue, architect. The house was built for $6,000. The house is a 2 1/2 story, 4594 square foot, ten room, four bedroom, three bathroom, brick structure which has an intersecting gable roof and one gabled dormer, with a detached garage, which was last sold in 1997 for $575,000. It has a symmetrical facade. The 1910-1911 Directory of the University of Minnesota indicates that Florence M. Donohue, Grace M. Donohue, and J. Nealis Donohue, students, all resided at this address. The 1916 University of Minnesota Alumni Directory indicates that John Nealis Donohue, a 1911 graduate of the University of Minnesota, resided at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Donohue, Neil Donohue, and J. N. Donohue all resided at this address. In 1918, John Nealis Donohue, a Lieutenant in Company D of the 42nd Division (Rainbow Division,) resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Florence M. Donohue, a teacher, Grace M. Donohue, a teacher at Humboldt High School, and Phil F. Donohue, an interne, all boarded at this address and that John H. Donohue, a contractor, resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. John Donohue and Dr. P. F. Donohue all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that John H. Donohue and his wife, Anne D. Donohue, resided at this address. John H. Donohue (1852-1940) was a prominent St. Paul builder. John N. Donohue, Neil Donohue, and Phil F. Donohue were World War I veterans who resided at this address in 1919. John H. Donohue ( -1940) died in Ramsey County. John H. Donohue (1916-1993) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of McQuillan, and died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Christopher W. Peterson and Julie A. Peterson.

1480 Summit Avenue: Harry L. Brown House; Built in 1929; Tudor Revival/Tudor Villa in style; Jay Axelrod, architect and builder. The house was constructed at a cost of $16,000. The house is a 2 1/2 story, 2933 square foot, eight room, five bedroom, two bathroom, two half-bathroom, stucco and brick structure which has an intersecting gable roof and a projecting triangular oreil window at the attic gable peak and with a detached garage. The 1930 city directory indicates that Harry L. Brown, the secretary-treasurer of Brown-Jaspers Inc., a manufacturer of soda fountain fixtures, resided at this address. Harry Brown was the secretary-treasurer of the Brown-Jaspers, Inc. Harry L. Brown ( -1946) died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Barbara J. Bohrer and Edward J. Bohrer. Edward J. Bohrer is an attorney with the law firm of Felhaber, Larson, Fenlon and Vogt, P.A., and was a member of the Minnesota State Bar Association's Labor & Employment Law Section in 2006. Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. Bohrer were financial supporters of St. Thomas Academy in 2003.

1473 Summit Avenue: F. A. Upham House #2; Built in 1904; Queen Anne Rectilinear in style; E. Sekall, architect. Building the house cost $4,000. The structure is a two story, 2806 square foot, ten room, five bedroom, four bathroom, one half-bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage, which was last sold in 1996 for $387,000. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. T. D. Thorson resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that M. Keller Knauff, a physician who officed at 350 St. Peter Street, and his wife, Anna L. Knauff, resided at this address. Frank A. Upham ( -1920) died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Robert E. Harding and Kristina L. Lund. Robert Harding, an attorney with the law firm Gray Plant Moody, was a contributor to the John Kerry for President campaign in 2004. Kristina L. Lund participated in the 1999, 2001, and 2005 Birkebeiner ski races and the 1998 and 2005 Mora Vasaloppet ski races.

1472 Summit Avenue: Built in the 1950's (1958 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Contemporary in style. The structure is a 2342 square foot, ten room, six bedroom, four bathroom, stucco rambler, with a detached garage, which was last sold in 2000 for $182,000. The 1920 city directory indicates that Sallie Chapman boarded at this address. The current owner of record of the property is EMK Holding Company LLC, located at 500 Grand Avenue.

1465 Summit Avenue: Mrs. W. W. Klingman House; Built in 1926 (1925 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Georgian Revival in style. The structure is a two story, 4425 square foot, 13 room, five bedroom, three bathroom, two half-bathroom, brick house, with a detached garage, which was last sold in 2000 for $925,000. The house was built for $27,000. The 1930 city directory indicates that Washington W. Klingman, second vice president of the Home Office Equitable Life Assurance Society of the United States located at the Hamm Building, his wife, Julia Klingman, and Sigvart Terland all resided at this address. The current owner of record of the property is Joan R. Duddingston. Joan Duddingston, a homemaker, was a contributor to the Democratic National Committee in 2004. Joan Duddingston is a member of the Board of the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra in 2007. Joan Duddingston was a financial supporter of the Walker Art Museum in 1999, of Lifetrack Resources in 2002, of Books for Africa in 2002, of the YWCA of St. Paul in 2005 and 2006, of the Minnesota Land Trust in 2005, of the College of Human Ecology at the University of Minnesota in 2005, and of the Minneapolis Institute of Arts in 2004.

1464 Summit Avenue: T. D. Lovering House; Built in 1906 (1907 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Medieval Revival/Medieval Rectilinear in style; Mark Fitzpatrick, architect, and T. D. Lovering, builder. The house was constructed at a cost of $12,000. The house is a three story (two story according to Ramsey County property tax records,) 4560 square foot, 12 room, six bedroom, two bathroom, two half-bathroom, brick structure which has a hipped roof and three hipped dormers and which has one attached garage and one detached garage (only one detached garage according to Ramsey County property tax records.) The 1910-1911 Directory of the University of Minnesota indicates that Harry Douglas Lovering, a student, resided at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. T. D. Lovering and R. W. Lovering all resided at this address. In 1920, the United States Adjutant-General's Office U. S. Army Register, Volume VIII, indicates that Harry Douglas Lovering (1891- ,) a Captain in the Engineering Section of the U. S. Army, resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. H. W. Avery and Mr. and Mrs. F. J. Rosenthal all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Francis J. Rosenthal, a lawyer who officed at the Hamm Building, and his wife, Adelia D. Rosenthal, resided at this address. T. D. Lovering was the Secretary-Treasurer of J. H. Allen, a wholesale grocer. Harry D. Lovering, Reuben W. Lovering, and Thomas S. Lovering were World War I veterans who resided at this address in 1919. Thomas Douglas Lovering (1865- ) was born in Canada, married in Greene, Butler County, Iowa, Estelle Wilcox (1866- ) of Waverly, Bremer County, Iowa, the daughter of Ebenezer Hayden Wilcox (1810- ) and Arabelle Proctor Wilcox (1824- ,) and the couple had three children, Harry D. Lovering (1891- ,) Reuben Lovering (1893- ,) and Thomas S. Lovering (1896- .) Harry Douglas Lovering graduated from the University of Minnesota in 1914, was an associate member of the American Society of Civil Engineers in 1919, was the secretary-treasurer of the Minnesota branch of the American Society of Civil Engineers in 1926, was associated with Lovering-Longbotham, general contractors, was associated with the Associated General Contractors of Minnesota in 1962, and resided in White Bear Lake, Minnesota, in 1965. Estelle Wilcox was a daughter of the American Revolution as a descendant of Deacon Abel Wilcox and of Capt. Martin Lord, of Connecticut. Harry Douglas Lovering was a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers in 1914 and was a Lieutenant in the U. S. Army, assigned to Camp Merritt, Bergen County, New Jersey, in 1918. In 1926, Harry D. Lovering was the secretary-treasurer of the American Society of Civil Engineers-Minnesota and, in 1929, was the president of the American Society of Civil Engineers-Minnesota. In 1931, Harry D. Lovering was associated with Lovering-Longbotham, the general contractors that erected the St. Paul Women's City Club Building. Harry D. Lovering was the honorary chairman of Lovering Associates in 1974. Harry Douglas Lovering (1891-1978,) the son of Thomas Douglas Lovering (1865-1934) and Estelle Wilcox Lovering (1866-1951,) was born in St. Paul, married Margaret R. Rockwell (1892-1953,) the daughter of Philo Arthur Rockwell and Libbie E. __?__ Rockwell, and died in St. Paul. The George Kaplan Hebrew Seminary building was once located at this address. The George Kaplan Hebrew Seminary was founded in 1944 as a branch of the Hebrew Institute and was intended to meet the needs of Conservative families on the Western Side of the city. George Kaplan was a businessman and philanthropist. Thomas Douglas Lovering ( -1934) died in Ramsey County. Harry D. Lovering (1891-1978) and Reuben Wilcox Lovering (1893-1978) both were born in Minnesota, both had a mother with a maiden name of Wilcox, and both died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Diana V. Danielson and Michael R. Danielson. [See note on Fitzpatrick.]

1461 Summit Avenue: John A. "Cooker John" Sagner, a self-employed music producer, resided at this address and was a contributor to the John Kerry for President campaign in 2004. John A. Sagner also was a financial supporter of Courage Center in 2005 and Outside the Dream, an AIDS orphan assistance organization, recently. "Cooker John" Sagner grew up in suburban New Jersey, studyied piano as a kid, took lessons from recording artist Artie Traum at Noah Wolfe's guitar studio in New York City at the age of 12, learning folk songs and fingerpicking, started a band called the Downchildren, was an English major at Columbia College for two years, after an extensive period of dedicated drug abuse that forestalled any creative efforts during the 1980's, returned to an active pursuit of music in 1989 after moving to Minnesota, and released six albums, "Larry's Road Trip" in 1995, "Grocery Store" in 1997, "Life Down Here" in 1999, "Alive and Alone" in 2001, "School of Life" in 2001, "Live at the Turf Club" in 2001, "Cooker John with Dan Neale: Live at Dunn Bros. Coffee" in 2004.

1459 Summit Avenue: Richard Ambrose Walsh House; Built in 1922; Greek Revival in style; John Wheeler, architect. The structure is a two story, 2737 square foot, ten room, five bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, brick house, with a detached garage. Construction of the house cost $12,000. The 1930 city directory indicates that Richard A. Walsh, a lawyer and a partner with Earl F. Jackson, Thomas W. Walsh, and Charles J. Yackel in the law firm of Wash, Jackson, Walsh & Yackel, officing at the Endicott Building, and his wife, Margaret Walsh, resided at this address. Richard Ambrose Walsh (1862-1940) was born either in St. Paul or in Dakota County, Minnesota, was the son of Thomas Walsh and Margaret Wheeler Walsh, read the law at the law firm of Kerr, Wilson, & Benton, was admitted to the practice of law in Minnesota, became a lawyer in practice in St. Paul in 1883, was a Catholic, was a Democrat, was a member of the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Ramsey County (District 28) from 1891 to 1895, was the Populist Party candidate for judge in 1894 and became a municipal judge in 1895, and was appointed to the Minnesota District Court by Governor Floyd B. Olson in 1931. When elected a legislator in 1890, Walsh was the youngest member of the Legislature and was one of only fifteen members of the 1890 Minnesota House of Representatives (out of 114 Representatives) who were born in the State of Minnesota. Richard A. Walsh married Margaret McManus Walsh in St. Paul in 1884 and the couple had 13 children, with nine surviving to 1912, Ambrose R. Walsh, Mary Walsh, Harry Walsh, Rose Walsh, Sarah Walsh, Margaret Walsh, Thomas Walsh, Wilson Walsh, and Theodora Walsh. Margaret M. Walsh (1864-1955) was born in St. Paul, was the daughter of Patrick H. McManus and Rosanna McBride McManus, was a teacher, and died in Ramsey County. In 1912, the Walsh family resided at 20 West Isabel. Thomas Walsh was from Waterford County, Ireland, and immigrated around 1850, settling in St. Paul. Margaret Walsh ( -1939) and Richard A. Walsh ( -1940) both died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Barbara J. McLeod and Thomas J. McLeod. Thomas J. McLeod was a 1956 graduate of Cretin High School, is an attorney, is a member of the District 2 Bar Association of the Minnesota State Bar Association, and was a member of the Collaborative in 2006. Thomas J. McLeod, listed once as an employee of West Publishing and once as a retiree, resided at this address and was a contributor to George Bush for President Campaign in 1999 and the Linda Runbeck for Congress Campaign and the Jim Ramstad for Congress Campaign in 2000.

1456 Summit Avenue: Alb I. Shapira House; Built in 1912 (Sandeen, 1912-1913 according to Larson,) with an addition and repairs in 1942; Tudor Villa in style; Clarence H. Johnston, Sr., original architect, and H. J. Frandsen, builder. The structure is a two story, 3418 square foot, nine room, four bedroom, three bathroom, brick house, with a detached garage. The house was constructed at a cost of $14,500 (Sandeen; $17,000 according to Larson.) The house is a 2 1/2 story brick and stucco structure which has an intersecting gable and hip roof and one shed dormer. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. A. I. Shapira resided at this address. Dr. E. M. Hammes resided at this address in 1924. The 1924 city directory indicates that Dr. and Mrs. E. M. Hammes, Sr., resided at this address. Nathan C. Shapira (1895-1986), a Yeoman, was a World War I veteran who resided at this address in 1919. The 1930 city directory indicates that Ernest M. Hammes, a physician who officed at 350 St. Peter Street, and his wife, Hester Hammes, resided at this address. The 1939 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Ernest M. Hammes, Jr. (1916- ,) who was born in St. Paul, who attended the school from 1927 until 1934, who was a 1938 graduate of Yale University, and who attended the Harvard University Medical School, resided at this address. Alb I. Shapira was a jeweler. Ernest M. Hammes Sr. ( -1967) graduated from the College of Medicine and Surgery of the University of Minnesota in 1906, was a member of the Phi Beta Pi fraternity, interned at the City and County Hospital in St. Paul, did advanced study in neurology and psychiatry in Germany in 1909 and 1910, was a physician and surgeon, was appointed as an assistant in nervous and mental diseases at the Medical School at the University of Minnesota by Dr. Hamilton in 1913, was an instructor in nervous and mental diseases at the Medical School at the University of Minnesota in 1916, was the superintendent of the Nervous and Mental Department of the University Division of the City and County Hospital, resumed specialty practice in St. Paul after 1916, was a visiting neurologist at St. Joseph's Hospital, was a visiting neurologist at St. John's Hospital, was a visiting neurologist at the Mound's Park Sanitarium, authored the paper "Psychoses Associated with Sydenham's Chorea" that was read at the St. Louis, Missouri, Session of the American Medical Association in 1922, was active in medical organizations, was a member of the Minnesota Neurological Society, was the president of the Ramsey County Medical Association in 1925, was the president of the Minnesota State Medical Association in 1949, was a member of the St. Paul Athletic Club, and officed at the Lowry Building in 1916. Dr. Ernest M. Hammes was a member of the medical staff of the new Charles T. Miller Hospital in St. Paul in 1920 and became a member of the Minnesota Historical Society in 1922. In 1955, Dr. Ernest M. Hammes was the president of the Minnesota State Medical Association and was chairman of the Committee on Medical Testimony of the Minnesota State Medical Association. In 1959, Dr. Ernest M. Hammes, Sr., performed a mental competency examination under trial court direction on William George Birnbaum (1934- ,) who was convicted in federal court for kidnapping a woman he was acquainted with since his youth, Cecelia Ann Weisbecker (Mrs. Paul) Scott, and transported her over state lines, which conviction was upheld by the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals in William George Birnbaum v. United States of America, 356 F.2d 856 (1966.) Albert I. Shapira (1874-1957) was born outside of Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. Nathan C. Shapira was born in Minnesota, his mother's maiden name was Cook, and he died in Ramsey County. Ernest M. Hammes (1884-1967) was born in Minnesota, his mother's maiden name was Schmidt, and he died in Ramsey County. Hans J. Frandsen ( -1943) died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Harriet Arend and Michael W. Arend. Harriet Arend and Michael Arend were financial supporters of the St. Mary's University of Minnesota in 2002. Harriet Arend was a financial supporter of Guild Inc. in 2004, was a conservation volunteer for the Minnesota Historical Society in 2005, and was a program volunteer for the German Genealogy Society of Minnesota in 2006. Michael W. Arend was a 1955 Cretin High School graduate and was a financial supporter of Courage Center in 2001, of the James J. Hill Library in 2003, and of the Rivers Council of Minnesota in 2004. [See note on Johnston.]

1451 Summit Avenue: Philip C. Justus House; Built in 1929 and renovated (kitchen) in 2008; Period Revival/Tudor Villa in style; Philip C. Justus, original architect and builder; Paul Buum, A.I.A., Sala Architects, Inc., kitchen renovation architect. The house was built for $10,000. The house is a 2 1/2 story, 2562 square foot, ten room, five bedroom, three bathroom, one half-bathroom, brick structure which has an intersecting gable roof with two shed dormers. It utilizes an asymmetrical design, has a detached garage, and was last sold in 1997 for $385,000. The 1930 city directory indicates that Phillip C. Justus, a realtor who officed in the New York Building, and his wife, Caroline Justus, resided at this address. Philip C. Justus was born in St. Paul and was a St. Paul real estate agent. In 1897, Philip C. Justus also was a general hardware dealer and served on the St. Paul Board of Public Works. Philip C. Justus (1865-1942) died in Ramsey County. The previous owner of record of the property was the trustee for Deborah Buurma, located in Livingston, New Jersey, and the current owners are John Sagner and Cheryl Ekstrum. Cheryl M. Ekstrum, who resided at this address, was a contributor to the John Kerry for President campaign in 2004. Cheryl M. Ekstrum previously operated Ekstrum Appraisals, a real estate appraisal firm, at this address and now is associated with Appraisal Advantage. John Sagner, a self employed musician who resides at this address, contributed to the Barack Obama for President campaign in 2007-2008. Cheryl Ekstrum, a self employed real estate appraiser, contributed to the Barack Obama for President campaign in 2007-2008. In 1972-1973, Linda Florin, a Junior at Macalester College, resided at the nearby former 1448 Summit Avenue.

1446 Summit Avenue: Charles F. Diether House; Built in 1906 (1908 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Queen Anne Rectilinear in style; Louis Lockwood, architect. The structure is a two story, 2805 square foot, nine room, five bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage. The house was constructed at a cost of $12,000. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Charles F. Diether resided at this address in 1905 and owned a cemetery plot since 1876. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. F. Diether, their daughters, and Miss Caroline Diether all resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Althea Diether, a teacher at Central High School, Caroline Diether, a stenographer employed by the Minnesota State Highway Department, and Ruth Diether, a teacher at the Gordon School, all boarded at this address and that Charles F. Diether, proprietor of the Commercial Service Bureau, resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. F. Diether and their daughters resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Charles F. Diether, his wife, Sophie Diether, Althea Diether, a teacher at the Central High School, and Ruth Diether, a teacher at the Douglas School, all resided at this address. In 1940, Sophie C. Schulze Diether ( -1940,) the widow of Charles F. Diether, resided at this address. The 1964 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Angus McL. Mairs, a member of the Class of 1951, resided at this address. In 1879, Charles F. Diether, a traveling agent employed by P. H. Kelly & Company, resided on North Street near De Soto Street. Charles F. Diether and Sophia/Sophie C. Diether were the parents of Althea Diether, Ruth Diether and Carl S. Diether. Althea Diether was a 1907 graduate of the University of Minnesota, attended Stanford University and Columbia University, was a kindergarten teacher in St. Paul in 1911, taught for 45 years, was a retired St. Paul Central High School teacher, resided at 1443 Goodrich Avenue in 1961, was a member of the American Association of University Women, was a member of the Womens City Club, was a member of the House of Hope Presbyterian Church, and was buried at Oakland Cemetery. Ruth Diether resided at 1443 Goodrich Avenue in 1957. There is an Althea Diether Scholarship at the University of Minnesota. Caroline A. Diether ( -1930) and Sophie C. Diether ( -1940) died in Ramsey County. Althea Diether (1883-1961) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Schulze, and died in Ramsey County. Ruth Diether (1889-1957) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Schutze, and died in Ramsey County. Carl S. Diether (1878-1976) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Schulze, and died in Ramsey County. Charles F. Diether ( -1937) died in St. Louis County, Minnesota. The current owners of record of the property are Carolyn S. Nayematsu and Vincent E. Platt. Carolyn S. Nayematsu, a 1968 graduate of the University of Montana with a Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota, is executive director of the Multicultural Center for Academic Excellence at the University of Minnesota. Vincent E. Platt is an attorney, is a member of the Second District Bar Association of the Minnesota State Bar Association, and is an editor for West Group. Carolyn S. Nayematsu and Vincent E. Platt were financial supporters of the St. Paul Foundation and of the 4H organization. [See note on Lockwood.]

1445 Summit Avenue: Harry L. Brown House; Built in 1925; Georgian Rectilinear in style; Walter Stevens, architect. The structure is a two story, 2089 square foot, nine room, four bedroom, four bathroom, one half-bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage, which was last sold in 1994 for $212,000. Building the house cost $14,000. The 1930 city directory indicates that William Segal, a grocer with a store at 559 Robert Street, and his wife, Jennie Segal, resided at this address. Harry L. Brown ( -1946) died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Jacqueline A. Remington and John A. Remington. John Remington is a professor of Human Resources and Industrial Relations and Director of Labor Education Service at the Carlson School of Management at the University of Minnesota. [See note on Stevens.]

1440 Summit Avenue: Frances (Mrs. B. H.) Dickerman House; Built in 1914 (1910 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Tudor Villa in style; __?__ Sjostrand, architect. The structure is a two story, 3327 square foot, nine room, five bedroom, three bathroom, masonry and frame house, with a detached garage. The house was built for $11,000. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mrs. Frances Dickerman, J. O. Dickerman, and J. P. Hauer all resided at this address. J. O. Dickerman resided at this address in 1918. The records of the 1919-1920 Minnesota World War I Soldier's Bonus Board (#24980) indicate that John Peter Hauer (1893- ,) a 1918 draftee and a Sergeant in the Utilities Detachment of the Construction Division of the Quartermaster Corps, who was born in Lakeville, Minnesota, had brown eyes, black hair, and a dark complexion, was 5' 6 1/2" tall, was a bank clerk at induction, was issued one bronze Victory button, was a bank clerk employed by the First National Bank of St. Paul after the completion of service, and was married, resided with his wife, Frances H. Hauer,at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mrs. Frances Dickerman and J. P. Hauer both resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that John O. Dickerman, John P. Hauer, a teller at the First National Bank, and his wife, Frances Hauer, all resided at this address. The 1939 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that John O. Dickerman, who attended the school from 1911 until 1915, resided at this address. The current owners of record of the property are Helen Murphy and Richard T. Murphy.

1439 Summit Avenue: Ben L. Kostuck House; Built in 1925; Early Modern Rectilinear in style; __?__ Blumenthal, architect. The structure is a two story, 3706 square foot, 15 room, six bedroom, four bathroom, stucco house, with two detached garages, which was last sold in 1994 for $185,000. The house was constructed at a cost of $12,000. The 1930 city directory indicates that Benjamin L. Kostuch, a salesman employed by Owens Motor Sales, his wife, Helen Kostuch, Arthur J. Kelly, the residential manager employed by the Peabody Company, and his wife, Helen R. Kelly, all resided at this address. The current owner of record of the property is Jane L. Nevin.

1434 Summit Avenue: Henry Ferdinand Stock House; Built in 1910, with 1925 alteration; Tudor Revival/Tudor Villa in style; Charles William Buechner and Henry W. Orth, architect; John Olson, builder. The house was built for $12,000. The house is a 2 1/2 story, 3189 square foot, ten room, five bedroom, one bathroom, two half-bathroom, brick and stucco structure which has an intersecting gable roof. It has considerable leaded glass windows and a detached garage. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. H. F. Stock and their daughters resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. B. D. Reinfrank, Mr. and Mrs. H. F. Stock, and their daughters, all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Anna M. Stock, the widow of Henry F. Stock, and Burton D. Reinprank resided at this address. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Henry Ferdinand Stock once resided at this address. Henry F. Stock was president of Kuhles & Stock Company, a manufacturer of cigars and a leaf tobacco dealer. The current owners of record of the property are Burton D. Reinfrank, Jr., and Patricia J. Reinfrank. Burton D. Reinfrank was a World War I veteran who resided at 1850 Summit Avenue in 1919. Burton D. Reinfrank, Jr., is an art collector. [See the note for Burton D. Reinfrank for 1850 Summit Avenue.]

1431 Summit Avenue: Built in the 1930's (1926 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Twenties Villa in style. The structure is a two story, 2016 square foot, seven room, three bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided house, with a detached garage, which was last sold in 2004 for $682,000. The 1930 city directory indicates that Arnold S. Karon, a realtor, his wife, Ethel Karon, and Ira Karon, a lawyer who officed at the Commerce Building, all resided at this address. The current owner of record of the property is Eric Schultze. In 2002, Shavlik Technologies, of Roseville, Minnesota, a provider of vulnerability assessment and remediation tools for the Microsoft platform, hired Eric Schultze as executive director of research and development. Previously, Eric Schultze was a senior technologist for the Security Strategies Group of Microsoft Corporation, founded Foundstone, Inc., and was a senior manager in Ernst & Young's national Attack & Penetration group.

1428 Summit Avenue: L. F. Cronhardt House; Built in 1919; Early Modern Georgian Revival in style; Peter J. Linhoff, architect. The structure is a two story, 3399 square foot, 12 room, four bedroom, one bathroom, two half-bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. Construction of the house cost $12,000. The 1920 city directory indicates that Constance Cronhardt, a student, boarded at this address and that Louis F. Cronhardt, the president and treasurer of the St. Paul Drug Company, located at the corner of Wabasha Street and Seventh Street, resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. L. F. Cronhardt resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Louis F. Cronhardt resided at this address. The officers of the St. Paul Drug Company in 1920 were Louis F. Cronhardt, the president and treasurer, and J. W. Stone, vice president and secretary. Louis F. Cronhardt (1868-1958) was born outside of Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are James Rutzick and Sandra Rutzick. James Rutzick and Mark Rutzick, brothers, own All Inc., an appliance distributor located on the West Side and were two of 60 investors backing the Drake Bank, which opened in 2002, as St. Paul's first new chartered bank in 40 years. Sandra Rutzick and James Rutzick were financial supporters of the YMCA Twin Cities in 2003. [See note on Linhoff.]

1425 Summit Avenue: Dr. F. M. Owens House; Built in 1913; Georgian Revival in style; Peter J. Linhoff, architect. The structure is a two story, 3418 square foot, ten room, four bedroom, two bathroom, three half-bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. The house was constructed at a cost of $7,000. The 1918 and 1924 city directories indicate that Dr. and Mrs. F. M. Owens resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Frederick M. Owens, a dentist officing at 350 St. Peter Street, and his wife, Eloise Owens, resided at this address. The current owners of record of the property are the trustees for Elizabeth J. Kronschnabel and George J. Kronschnabel. In 2003, George Kronschnabel was a financial supporter of the Randy Kelly for St. Paul Mayor campaign and resided at this address. George Kronschnabel, a retired soldier, in 2003, protested the anti-Iraq War Peace movement that he saw sprouting up in his neighborhood by erecting a "God Bless Our Troops" sign and an American flag on the front lawn of this address. Betty Kronschnabel and George Kronschnabel were financial supporters of Guild Inc. in 2002 and 2003 and of the Tubman Family Alliance in 2001. George Kronschnabel, president of the Warm Rain Corporation, contributed to the John McCain for President campaign in 2007-2008. [See note on Linhoff.]

1420 Summit Avenue: Raymond W. Berglund House; Built in 1925; Colonial Revival/Early Modern Georgian Revival in style; Adolph Wald and Albin Wald, architects and builders. The house was built for $9,000. The house is a two story, 2168 square foot, eight room, four bedroom, one bathroom, wood frame clapboard (frame according to Ramsey County property tax records) structure which has a hipped roof with one eye lid dormer. It has paired Doric columns, a wrought iron balcony, a side porch, and a detached garage. The 1930 city directory indicates that Raymond R. Berglund, the manager of the S. Berglund Lumber Company, and his wife, Florence Berglund, resided at this address. Berglund was the president of the Berglund Lumber Company. Raymond R. W. Berglund ( -1948) died in Ramsey County. The property was last sold in 2005 with a sale price of $541,000. The previous owners of record of the property were Kenneth J. Berglund and Wesley E. Berglund and the current owners of record of the property are Anthony R. Sonnen and Carley R. Sonnen. Wesley E. Berglund was an experienced highway civil engineer and surveyor in Washington State.

1415 Summit Avenue: Charles B. Gedney House; Built in 1918 (1913 according to Ramsey County property tax records); Bungalow in style; Thomas D. Lane, architect and builder. Building the house cost $8,000. The house is a 1 1/2 story, 2182 square foot, ten room, two bedroom, three bathroom, one half-bathroom, brick rambler which has a hipped tile roof with one hipped dormer. The house sits very deep back on the lot. It has a detached garage and was last sold in 1994 for $299,000. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. B. Gedney resided at this address. Frank J. Kaske was a World War I veteran who resided at this address in 1919. The 1920 city directory indicates that Joseph Fellows, a chauffeur at this address, boarded at this address. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that William E. Coles, Jr., resided at this address in 1921. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Coles resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Elizabeth E. Scott, the widow of Louis N. Scott, resided at this address. Charles B. Gedney was the secretary of the M. A. Gedney Co., a pickle manufacturer. Louis N. Scott (1859-1929,) the son of Robert Scott, a hotel proprietor in Missouri, and Mary Ellen Coneff Scott, was born in Petersburg, Boone County, Kentucky, was educated in the common school and the business college of Evansville, Indiana, resided in Cincinnati, Ohio, Evansville, Indiana, and St. Louis, Missouri, until 1876, moved to Minnesota in 1876, settled in St. Paul in 1876, sent by his employer, the St. Louis & St. Paul Packet Company, a steamboat company owned by William F. Davidson, was employed as freight clerk and agent on the levee by the St. Louis & St. Paul Packet Company from 1876 until 1883, married Elizabeth Haines in 1886, was a manager of theatres and out-door display advertising, ran the Grand Opera House in St. Paul, owned by Commodore W. F. Davidson, until it was destroyed by fire in 1888, then was the manager of the Newmarket Theater in 1888, then was the manager of the Metropolitan Opera House in 1890, became a part owner of the Metropolitan Opera House Company as well as the Scott-Stafford Opera House Company, managed the Lyceum Theatre in Duluth, Minnesota, in 1894, was the manager of the Grand Opera House in Minneapolis until 1895, was placed in charge of the Metropolitan Opera House and the Lyceum Theatre in Minneapolis in 1895, was in the advertising business for 23 years, married Elizabeth Goodell in 1898, employed the actor Emmanuel Taylor Gordon (1893-1971) as his personal chauffeur in 1910, was a member of the Minneapolis Club, was a member of the Minnesota Club, and was the president of the Northern Display Advertising Company, was the president of the Minnesota State Bill Posters Association, was a member and an official of the Associated Bill Posters and Distributors of the U. S. and Canada, was a member of the Minnesota Club, was a member of the St. Paul Commercial Club, was a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, was a member of the Minneapolis Club, was a member of the New York Athletic Club, was a member of the Chicago Athletic Club, resided at 286 Marshall Street in 1902, successfully challenged the imposition by the St. Paul city council of a restricted residential district on a portion of Summit Avenue in In re Establishment of Restricted Residential District/City of St. Paul v. Scott, 186 NW 292 (1922,) resided at 286 Nelson Avenue in 1907, and officed at the Metropolitan Opera Houses of St. Paul and Minneapolis in 1907. Frank J. Kaske ( -1966) was born outside of Minnesota and died in Dakota County, Minnesota. The current owners of record of the property are J. Michael Dady and Kristi L. Skordahl. J. Michael Dady, an attorney with Dady & Garner PA, was a contributor to the John Kerry for President campaign in 2004 and to the Wesley Clark for President campaign in 2004. J. Michael Dady (1949- ) was born in Sisseton, South Dakota, graduated from St. John’s University in 1971 and from the University of Minnesota Law School in 1975, was an attorney with Lindquist & Vennum from 1975 to 1994, was a founding partner, Dady & Garner, 1994 to present, is admitted to the State and federal courts in Minnesota and South Dakota, the Eighth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, and the U.S. Supreme Court, and is a member of the American Bar Association, a member of the Minnesota State Bar Association, and the president of the Franchisee Lawyers Association. In 2003, J. Michael Dady, a contributor to the Randy Kelly for Mayor campaign, resided at this address. J. Dady contributed to the John Edwards for President campaign in 2007-2008. [See note on William F. Davidson for 400 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Mathias Anderson Gedney and the M. A. Gedney Pickling Company for 457 Ohio Street.]

1414 Summit Avenue: C. J. Stevens House; Built in 1908; Tudor Rectilinear in style; C. M. Brettschneider, architect. The structure is a two story, 2948 square foot, 11 room, five bedroom, three bathroom, one half-bathroom, masonry and frame house, with a detached garage. The house was constructed at a cost of $4,500. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Frederick W. Eva (1860-1915,) the husband of Ada E. Eva, who was born in England to parents also born in England and who died of cerebral apoplexy, resided at this address in 1915. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mrs. F. W. Eva resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Haslam, Henry Fry, and Mrs. M. T. Fry all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Kenneth L. Holmes, a professor at Macalester College, and his wife, Martha Holmes, resided at this address. J. D. Sattler resided at this address in 1914. Frederick W. Eva (1860- ,) the son of James R. Eva (1829- ,) a decorator and painter, and Addison R. Eva (1838- ,) was born in Penzance, Cornwall, England, was employed as a decorator and painter in Penzance, Cornwall, England, in 1881, immigrated to the United States and moved to Minnesota in 1883, engaged in the grain business, was the chief Minnesota grain inspector after 1902, and resided in St. Paul. Kenneth L. Holmes was a professorial lecturer in history at the University of Minnesota in 1948 and 1949. Kenneth L. Holmes, B.A., M.A., was a professor of history, the secretary of the faculty, and the chairman of the advisory council at Macalester College in 1959. Martha Holmes and Kenneth Holmes were members of the House of Hope Presbyterian Church. Kenneth L. Holmes (1914-1995) was a professor at the Oregon College of Education at Monmouth, Oregon, and also was emeritus professor of history at Western Oregon State College. Kenneth L. Holmes was the editor of Covered Wagon Women: Diaries and Letters from the Western Trails in 11 volumes, was the author of Ewing Young, Master Trapper, published in Portland, Oregon, by Binfords & Mort in 1967, based on his doctoral dissertation at the University of Oregon in 1963, was the author, with Judith A. Farmer, of An Historical Atlas of Early Oregon, published in Portland, Oregon, by Historic Cartographic Publications in 1973, and was the author of the article "The Historiography of the Activities of Francis Drake Along the Pacific Coast of North America in 1579" in Albion, a scholarly journal concerned with British Studies published quarterly by Appalachian State University in 1969. There was a Kenneth L. Holmes Prize in American History at Macalester College in 1995. The previous owners of record of the property are Frances H. Gladish and Leon B. Gladish and the current owner of record of the property is Frances H. Gladish. Leon B. Gladish, a retiree, was a contributor to the Democratic National Committee in 2004. Leon B. Gladish ( -2005) was a Presbyterian minister. Mr. and Mrs. Leon B. Gladish were financial supporters of the Courage Center in 2003, the Friends of the St. Paul Public Library in 2003, and the Minneapolis Institute of Arts in 2004. Leon Gladish was a financial supporter of the Minnesota Historical Society in 2002. [See note for the fifth entry after the entry for 1605 Summit Avenue for information on Macalester College.]

1411 Summit Avenue: John A. Swenson House; Built in 1900 (1909 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Simplified Rectilinear in style; Louis Lockwood, architect. The structure is a two story, 3772 square foot, 13 room, five bedroom, three bathroom, one half-bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. The house was built for $4,300. The 1910 city directory indicates that John A. Swenson was a cashier at the Scandinavian American Bank and resided at this address. The 1916 University of Minnesota Alumni Directory indicates that Price Wickersham resided at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Price Wickersham resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. O. Jenks, W. D. Stewart, and his daughter all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that this address was vacant. The 1964 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that David C. Morgan, a member of the Class of 1957, Charles E. Morgan, a member of the Class of 1958, and John B. Morgan, Jr., a member of the Class of 1963, all resided at this address. John Alfred Swenson (1855- ,) the son of John and Sarah Shaleen Swenson, was born in Sweden, moved to Minnesota with his parents in 1856, attended public school in Chisago County, Minnesota, attended the Business College of St. Paul from 1871 until 1872, attended Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota, from 1872 until 1875, was the chief clerk and assistant land commissioner of the St. Paul & Duluth RailRoad from 1875 until 1888, was a banker, was the cashier of the Scandinavian-American Bank after 1888, was a member of the St. Paul Commercial Club, was a member of the Norden Club, and officed at the Scandinavian-American Bank Building in 1907. Price Wickersham (1877-1946) was born in Harrodsburgh, Kentucky, was a resident of Kansas City, Missouri, before 1897, was a clerk in the law office of Baker, Hook, & Atwood, came to Minnesota in 1897, was a cheerleader for the University of Minnesota football team in 1898, graduated from the University of Minnesota Law School with a bachelor's degree in 1900, graduated from the University of Minnesota Law School with a master's degree in 1901, was a member of the Delta Tau Delta, was a member of Phi Delta Phi, was the assistant student manager of track athletes at the University of Minnesota in 1895, was the student manager of the University of Minnesota football team from 1900 until 1901, was admitted to the practice of law in Minnesota in 1900, was a lawyer, married Ruth Atwood, the daughter of John Harrison Atwood and Nellie Wyman Atwood, was a law partner of Harry P. Churchill (1888-1934,) was the author of the article "Should the Office of County Coroner Be Abolished?" in the Minnesota Law Review in 1917, was a member of the University of Minnesota General Alumni Association, was a member of the Minnesota Club, was a member of the St. Paul Town & Country Club, returned to Kansas City, Missouri, before 1918, was a partner in the law firm of Atwood, Wickersham, Hill & Popham in Kansas City, Missouri, in 1918, officed at the Capitol Bank Building in 1916, and died in Kansas City, Missouri. John A. Swenson ( -1933) died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Lee A. Dunfee and Jacqueline A. Rogalski. [See note on Lockwood.] [See note on the St. Paul Commercial Club for 505 Summit Avenue.] [See note for the St. Paul & Duluth RailRoad.]

1410 Summit Avenue: William David Stewart House; Built in 1907 (1908 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Tudor Villa in style; Louis Lockwood, architect. The structure is a two story, 3679 square foot, nine room, five bedroom, two bathroom, two half-bathroom, brick house, with an attached masonry garage and a detached garage, which was last sold in 1996 for $412,000. The house was constructed at a cost of $9,000. The 1909 Central Presbyterian Church directory indicates that William D. Stewart and Nellie Stewart resided at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. W. D. Stewart and their daughter all resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Platt B. Walker, Jr., vice president of the St. Paul Builders Material Company, boarded at this address and that John O. Dickerman, a clerk employed by the St. Paul Association, resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that William D. Stewart, president of the St. Paul Builders Material Company, Thomas W. Walsh, a lawyer and partner in the law firm of Walsh, Jackson, Walsh & Yackel, and his wife, Mildred Walsh, all resided at this address. Platt Bayliss Walker, Jr., was a nephew of Thomas Barlow Walker (1840-1928), a lumber baron and the founder of Minneapolis' Walker Art Center. Platt B. Walker was the editor of the Lumberman in Minneapolis. Alexina C. Walker Gray, the wife of Clarence Caswell Gray, was the daughter of Platt B. Walker. Thomas Barlow Walker was the son of Platt Bayliss Walker and Antis K. Barlow Walker. William D. Stewart ( -1933) died in Ramsey County. Platt B. Walker ( -1934) died in Ramsey County. Platt B. Walker ( -1942) died in Hennepin County. The current owners of record of the property are Patricia M. Taylor and Richard D. Taylor. Patricia M. Taylor, a homemaker, was a contributor to the Howard Dean for President campaign in 2004. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. E. Podlasky resided at the former nearby 1407 Summit Avenue. [See note on Louis Lockwood.]

1405 Summit Avenue: G. C. Bohn House; Built around 1910; Tudor Villa in style. The structure is a two story, 6362 square foot, 13 room, seven bedroom, six bathrooms, one half-bathroom, brick house, with an attached 672 square foot, four room, one bathroom, brick bungalow-style garage/carriage house and a detached garage. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Gebhard C. Bohn resided at this address from 1907 to 1935. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. G. C. Bohn resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Gebhard C. Bohn, the president of the Bohn Refrigerator Company, resided at this address and that Harold Bohn and John Bohn, a helper, both boarded at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. G. C. Bohn and Harold Bohn all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Gebhard C. Bohn, the president of the Bohn Refrigerator Company, located at 1350 University Avenue, and his wife, Janet Bohn, resided at this address. In 1934, Gebbard C. Bohn, Janet Fischbein Bohn, and Haskell G. Bohn resided at this address and were notable members of St. Paul society. In 1932, kidnappers Verne Sankey ( -1934) and Gordon Alcorn, both of Melville, Saskatchewan, a former Canadian National RailRoad engineer and a former Canadian National RailRoad fireman respectively, stalked and then snatched Haskell Bohn (1912- ,) the son of refrigerator magnate Gerhard Bohn, blindfolding him at gunpoint, tossing a ransom note for $35,000 to the horrified chauffeur, and roaring away in a getaway car. Sankey and Alcorn kept Bohn for a week, his eyes taped shut, near Wayzata, Minnesota, then released him. Verne Sankey was declared Public Enemy No. 1 by the FBI in the United States in the 1930's. Verne Sankey also kidnapped Charles Boettcher II of Denver, Colorado. His picture was in every newspaper in Canada and the United States, especially when he was captured by authorities in 1934 while having a shave in a Chicago barber shop. Verne Sankey committed suicide in his cell at Leavenworth Prison in Kansas. Grace Ellen Cline Bohn (1912-2010) was the wife of Haskell Bohn. Gebhard C. Bohn (1908-1982) was born in Minnesota and died in Hennepin County. The property was last sold for $465,000 and that sale occurred in 1994. The current owner of record of the property is Gwynne L. Evans. [For more information on Gebhard Bohn, see 761 Summit Avenue.] [See note on the Canadian National RailRoad.]

1400 Summit Avenue: George Bookstover House; Built in 1913; Tudor Villa in style; Peter J. Linhoff, architect. The structure is a two story, 3504 square foot, 11 room, six bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage, which was last sold in 2002 for $576,000. The house was built for $8,000. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. George C. Bookstaver resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that George C. Bookstover, a manufacturers' agent located at the Gilfillan Block, resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Podlasky resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Albert E. Podlasky, a tanner with a store located at 129 Front Street, and his wife, Fannie Podlasky, resided at this address. George Cole Bookstaver (1871- ,) the son of George Cole Bookstaver and Mary Anne McKenna Bookstaver, was born in New York, New York, was educated in the New York City public schools, graduated from the St. Paul High School, was a clerk employed by the Powers Dry Goods Company from 1890 until 1891, was employed as a city salesman employed by the Powers Dry Goods Company from 1891 until 1897, was a traveling salesman employed by the Powers Dry Goods Company from 1897 until 1898, was the first lieutenant of Company B of the 15th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry during the Spanish-American War, was a city salesman employed by the Powers Dry Goods Company until 1900, was a manufacturer's agent for Percival D. Palmer & Company, a women's and children's clothing manufacturer, was a member of the St. Paul Commercial Club, was a member of the St. Paul Town & Country Club, was a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, was the organizer and the first captain of the Roosevelt Club, and served for ten years as the drill officer of Company D of the First Minnesota National Guard Regiment. George C. Bookstaver (1871-1962) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of McKenna, and died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is Scott Davido. Scott Davido is the General Counsel of NRG Energy, Inc., a wholesale power generation company, of Minneapolis, and also became the chief financial officer of Calpine Corporation, a San Jose, California-based energy company, in 2006, which had been operating under bankruptcy protection since December, 2005. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. S. J. Melady and S. J. Melady, Jr., all resided at the former nearby 1399 Summit Avenue. [See note on Linhoff.] [See note on Town & Country Club for 952 Wakefield Avenue.]

1397 Summit Avenue: S. J. Melady House; Built in 1922; Dutch Colonial in style; Wright and Hausler, architects. The structure is a two story, 2720 square foot, nine room, four bedroom, one bathroom, one half-bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage, which was last sold in 2002 for $485,000. The house was constructed at a cost of $15,000. The 1930 city directory indicates that Stephen J. Melady, the owner of Melady Cattle Company, and his wife, Isabelle Melady, resided at this address. Stephen J. Melady ( -1947) died in Ramsey County. Stephen J. Melady (1902-1991) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of O'Rourke, and died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Amy K. O'Connor and Robert W. Stolpestead. In 2003, Robert Stolpestad and Amy Stolpestad were contributors to the Randy Kelly for St. Paul Mayor campaign and resided at this address. Robert W. Stolpestad is President and Chief Financial Officer of Exeter Realty Company, a privately-held real estate development and management company. Robert W. Stolpestead was a financial contributor to the Amy Klobuchar for U. S. Senate campaign in 2006.

1396 Summit Avenue: F. Hildred House; Built in 1924 (1925 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Georgian Revival in style; William Murphy & Son, architect. The structure is a two story, 2706 square foot, seven room, three bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, brick house, with an attached garage. The house cost $15,500 to build. The 1930 city directory indicates that Fred T. Hildred, president of F. T. Hildred & Company, a dealer in power plant equipment, engines, boilers, pumps, machinery, and supplies, and his wife, Mary Hildred, the vice president of F. T. Hildred & Company, resided at this address. Leslie R. Love, a Gunnery Sergeant in the U.S. Marine Corps, the son of Mrs. Margaret S. Hildred, was a World War II casualty and resided at this address in the early 1940's. Frederick T. Hildred ( -1953) died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Leslie J. Erickson and Todd A. Erickson.

1395 Summit Avenue: Built in 1923. The structure is a two story, 2660 square foot, ten room, four bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage, which was last sold in 2002 for $429,900. The 1930 city directory indicates that Joseph M. Gaffney and his wife, Mary S. Gaffney, resided at this address. Joseph M. Gaffney ( -1932) died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are David V. Power and Dianna J. Shandy.

1393 Summit Avenue: J. M. Gaffney House; Built in 1923; Twenties Villa in style; William M. Lindau, architect. Building the house cost $15,000. Joseph M. Gaffney ( -1932) died in Ramsey County.

1390 Summit Avenue: J. C. Fitzgerald House; Built in 1922; Georgian Revival in style; George W. Blood, architect. The structure is a two story, 2098 square foot, seven room, three bedroom, one bathroom, one half-bathroom, stucco house, with an attached garage. The house was built for $10,000. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Fitzgerald resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that James C. Fitzgerald, the president of the Prouty Commission Company, and his wife, Genevieve Fitzgerald, resided at this address. James C. Fitzgerald (1875-1957) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Fitzgerald, and died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are James W. Kochevar and Laura K. Kochevar. James W. Kochevar has a Ph.D. in Experimental Psychology from the University of Minnesota and has board certification in professional ergonomics. Laura K. Kochevar, Ph.D., is an Educational Specialist at the Regional Injury Prevention Research Center and Center for Violence Prevention and Control, Division of Environmental and Occupational Health, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota.

1389 Summit Avenue: Yale Libman House; Built 1952; Contemporary in style; Norman Johnson, architect. The structure is a 5652 square foot, 12 room, six bedroom, five bathroom, three half-bathroom, brick rambler, with a two car tuck-under garage (detached garage according to Ramsey County property tax records.) The house was constructed at a cost of $12,000. Yale Libman (1920-1996) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Barenbaum, and died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is Karen Rae Hannah. Summit Adoption Home Studies, Inc. is also located at this address.

1382 Summit Avenue: Clarence H. Slocum House; Built in 1899; Colonial Revival/Queen Anne Rectilinear in style; Louis Lockwood, architect, and Harry Lange, builder. The house cost $3,625 to build. The house is a 2 1/2 story, 4414 square foot, 11 room, six bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, stucco structure which has an intersecting hip roof with a gable having flared eyes and with two gabled dormers. It has a detached garage and was last sold in 2003 for $1,200,000. Slocum was the secretary and manager of the former St. Paul Book & Stationery Company in 1900 and was its president in 1909. The 1910 city directory indicates that Clarence H. Slocum was the president and manager of the St. Paul Book & Stationery Company and resided at this address. The 1913 Hamline University Alumni Directory indicates that C. H. Slocum, an 1889 graduate and a bookseller and stationer, resided at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Slocum and their daughter all resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Slocum resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Clarence H. Slocum, the president-manager of the St. Paul Book & Stationery Company, and his wife, Cora Slocum, resided at this address. Clarence H. Slocum ( -1950) died in Ramsey County. Harry Frederick Lange ( -1929) died in Washington County, Minnesota. The current owners of record of the property are Maureen Chevalier and Mark K. Thomas. Maureen Chevalier and Mark Thomas were financial supporters of Park Nicollet Foundation in 2005 and of the Convent of the Visitation School in 2005-2006. Maureen Chevalier was in the class of 1976 of the International School of Geneva. [See note on Lockwood for 1118 Summit Avenue.] [See note for the St. Paul Book & Stationery for 629 North Street.]

1381 Summit Avenue: Mrs. B. Knuppe House; Built in 1899 (1907 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Simplified Rectilinear in style; Louis Lockwood, architect. The structure is a two story, 3222 square foot, 11 room, six bedroom, two bathroom, two half-bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage. The house was built for $3,000. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Louis W. Wolterstorff resided at this address in 1909. John Knuppe resided at this address in 1912, and L. W. Wolterstorff resided at this address from 1914 through 1924. The 1918 and 1924 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. L. W. Wolterstorff resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that William J. Smith, a master mechanic employed by the Twin City Rapid Transit Company, and his wife, Lora E. Smith, resided at this address. In 1887, John Knuppe was a contractor who was awarded a $378,000 contract for the construction of the Red River & Manitoba RailRoad and 33.5 miles of rail trackage, extending from Breckenridge, Minnesota, to a connection with the line of the St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad, 3.5 miles north of Barnesville, Minnesota, was completed and placed into operation in late 1877. John Knuppe was a brother-in-law of Johan Carp, a Utrecht, Netherland's financier with interests in the St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad, and was the land commissioner of the St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad. Belle Benedict Carp (Mrs. John) Knuppe was the daughter of Levi Crouch and Julia Woodworth Crouch, was the regent for the Nathan Hale Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution in 1901, and was a judge for the Women's Department of the Minnesota State Fair in 1910. The current owners of record of the property are Mary C. Cole and Michael G. Cole. [See note on Lockwood for 1118 Summit Avenue.] [See note on the Twin City Rapid Transit Company.] [See note on the Red River & Manitoba RailRoad.]

1376 Summit Avenue: Rush B. Wheeler House; Built in 1909 (Ramsey County property tax records and Sandeen; 1909-1910 according to Larson;) Early Modern Rectilinear in style; Clarence H. Johnston, Sr., architect. The structure is a two story, 2496 square foot, eight room, five bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. The house was constructed at a cost of $5,500 (Sandeen; $6,000 according to Larson.) In 1916, Rush B. Wheeler was a member of the Minnesota Historical Society and resided at this address. The 1918 and 1924 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. R. B. Wheeler and their daughter resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Harriet S. Wheeler, the widow of Rush B. Wheeler, resided at this address. In 1934, Harriet Clark Wheeler, the widow of Rush Wheeler, and Cleora Clark Wheeler resided at this address. Rush B. Wheeler (1844- ,) the son of Orange H. Wheeler and Eve Tucker Wheeler, was born in South Butler, Wayne County, New York, graduated from the Cazenovia Seminary in New York in 1867, was a graduate of Yale University in 1871, moved to Minnesota in 1873, resided in Austin, Minnesota, from 1873 until 1888, read the law in 1876, was a member of the board of directors of the First National Bank of Austin, Minnesota, from 1880 until 1883, moved to St. Paul in 1883, practiced law, was engaged in real estate and loans, was a member of the St. Paul Chamber of Commerce from 1885 until 1900, was president of the Real Estate Exchange of St. Paul from 1894 until 1896, resided at 520 Summit Avenue in 1907, and officed at the Pioneer Press Building in 1907. Rush Wheeler married Harriet S. L. Clark in 1876. Harriet Clark Wheeler was a graduate of the University of Minnesota. Harriet Clark Wheeler and Cleora Clark Wheeler were members of the American Association of University Women and the Women's City Club of St. Paul. Cleora Clark Wheeler (1882-1980) was born in Austin, Minnesota, graduated with honors from St. Paul Central High School and from the University of Minnesota, received art training at the New York School of Fine and Applied Art/Parsons School of Art, opened a studio at this address, was a renowned artist, a designer, and an illuminator of books and other publications who received certificates of proficiency in advanced engineering drafting from the University of Minnesota, was a well-known bookplate and Christmas card designer, was also an architectural photographer and poet, was a wedding invitation designer, and was an expert in steel-die stamping with widespread recognition. Cleora Clark Wheeler received an Alumnae Achievement Award from the Kappa Kappa Gamma Fraternity in 1952, after she served as the Fraternity's Grand Registrar from 1904 to 1906 and as its representative to National Panhellenic Conference from 1905 to 1906, after she prepared a Song Leaflet and Manual of Information for distribution at the 1914 Estes Park Convention, after she attended the Fourth Inter-Sorority Conference in Chicago, where she was instrumental in bringing about the decision that the fraternities had the power of vote on recommendations only, not the power to legislate and hold their entire membership to rules passed by single representatives, after she served for seven years as the Fraternity's Custodian of the Badge, after she prepared the text and illustrations on insignia which appeared in the 1930 History of Kappa Kappa Gamma, and after she created an official bookplate of the Fraternity. Cleora Clark Wheeler was a member of the National Society Magna Charta Dames and Barons, whose membership is based upon the existence of a direct lineal descent from one or more of the twenty-five Sureties for the Magna Charta or from a Baron, Prelate, Knight, or other influential person present on the field of Runnemede, England, in June, 1215, was a judge for national achievement awards and was National Chairman of Heraldic Art of the National League of American Pen Women, and was state curator of the Nathan Hale chapter of the Minnesota Daughters of the American Revolution. Cleora Wheeler also was a substitute teacher in the St. Paul Public Schools. Cleora Wheeler had an exhibition of her bookplate work, entitled "Atmospheric studies," at the St. Paul Public Library in 1922, under the auspices of the Saint Paul Institute. Cleora Clark Wheeler was a niece of Charles A. Clark (1865-1929,) who was a Spanish-American War veteran and was a resident of the Far East. Clark airfield in Honolulu, Hawaii, was named for Clark's son, Harold Melville Clark (1890-1919,) who died in a airplane crash. Rush B. Wheeler ( -1930) and Harriet S. Wheeler ( -1937) both died in Ramsey County. Cleora Clark Wheeler (1882-1980) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Clark, and died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Raina Eberly and Brian Engdahl. Raina Eberly Ph. D. is employed by the Department of Veteran Affairs at the St. Paul Veterans Center. Brian E. Engdahl, Ph. D., is a counseling psychologist employed by the Department of Veterans Affairs at the Minneapolis VA Medical Center and is an Associate Professor at the Center on Aging in the graduate minor program in gerentology. Brian E. Engdahl, a U. S. D. V. A. psychologist, was a contributor to the Republican National Committee in 2004. Brian Engdahl and Raina Eberly have published articles on post traumatic stress. Raina Eberly and Brian Engdahl successively appealed to the St. Paul City Council a set back condition set by the St. Paul Heritage Preservation Commission in approving a building permit for construction of a tree house on their property in 2001. Raina Eberly and Brian Engdahl were financial supporters of the Friends School of Minnesota in 2003. [See note on Clarence H. Johnston.]

1374 Summit Avenue: Ruth B. Wheeler/Perry Smith House; Built in 1889; Victorian/Queen Anne in style; Adams, Dewey & Smith, architects. Building the house cost $5,000. The house is now a condominium. Unit 1 is a 1350 square foot, six room, one bedroom, one bathroom, frame condominium, with a detached garage, which last sold in 2004 for $250,000, and which is currently owned by Paul D. Hartleben. Unit 2 is a 2000 square foot, five room, two bedroom, two bathroom, frame condominium, with a detached garage, which is currently owned by Robin Sydor. The overall structure is a 2 1/2 story wood frame clapboard sided structure with a gabled roof. It is one of the oldest houses on this portion of Summit Avenue. The 1891 and 1893 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. C. T. Newcomb resided at this address. The 1903 Delta Upsilon Decennial Catalogue indicates that Harvey Dwight Barnett (1881- ,) the son of Edward De F. Barnett and Marietta Rogers Barnett, who was born in Orange City, Florida, who graduated from the St. Paul Central High School, and who attended the University of Minnesota, resided at this address. In 1907, Edward De Forest Barnett resided at this address. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Mrs. Marietta Barnett resided at this address in 1909. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. G. L. Stannard and Mrs. E. De F. Barnett all resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Marietta Barnett, the widow of De F. Barnett, resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mrs. Bertha McCord and Mrs. E. De F. Barnett both resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Marietta Barnett, the widow of Edward D. Barnett, resided at this address. Edward De Forest Barnett (1851- ,) the son of Joel Barnett (1825-) and Adelle Clarissa McKay Barnett (1825-1886,) was born in Arcade, Wyoming County, New York, was educated at the River Falls, Wisconsin, public schools, was educated at the River Falls, Wisconsin, Academy, became a bank clerk at Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin, in 1872, married Marietta Rogers, the daughter of Lawrence Rogers and Mary Rogers in Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin, in 1875, moved to St. Paul in 1892, was the cashier of the St. Paul Commercial Bank, in 1896, when the bank was reorganized, and was engaged in the investment security brokerage and timberlands business after 1901. E. De Forest Barnett was a partner of Frank J. Errett in Barnett & Errett. Edward De Forest Barnett and Marietta Rogers Barnett were the parents of Ella Mary Barnett (1879- ) and Harvey Dwight Barnett (1881- .) Harvey Dwight Barnett (1881- ) graduated from the University of Minnesota School of Dentistry in 1906, officed at 414 Wabasha Street in 1917, and resided at 1803 Ashland Avenue in 1917. Adams, Dewey & Smith was a St. Paul architectural firm. Charles Newcomb ( -1932) died in Ramsey County. Ruth Margaret Wheeler (1887-1996) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Heinlein, and died in Ramsey County. Perry Smith ( -1953) died in Ramsey County. Twig and Pebble, Limited, is currently located at Unit #2 at this address. Paul D. Hartleben M.D. is a a spine surgeon at Summit Orthopedics Ltd. Robin Sydor was a financial supporter of the St. Paul YWCA in 2005. In 2001, Robin Sydor, with Steven M. Reinecke, Allan D. Luce, and Mark J. Strehlke, patented a traction device adjustment mechanism and method, assigned to AMEI Technologies, Inc., and in 2003, patented an ambulatory support device, also assigned to AMEI Technologies, Inc. [See the note the Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA) for 198 Western Avenue North.] [See note for Frank J. Errett for 1364 Summit Avenue.]

1373 Summit Avenue: James B. Gribben/Thomas E. Yerxa House; Built in 1890 (1898 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Colonial Revival/Georgian Rectilinear in style; Malcolm McKay, architect and builder. The house cost $12,000 to build. The house is a 2 1/2 story, 4106 square foot, ten room, six bedroom, three bathroom, one half-bathroom, woodframe and clapboard sided structure which has a hipped bell cast roof, with one gabled and three hipped roof dormers. It has a symmetrical facade. "Bell cast" means a leveling out of a roof pitch over a wall head which achieves a bell-like shape. It is usually achieved by fixing short timbers called sprockets or cocking pieces to the feet of the rafters. It also has a detached garage. The house was one of the first Colonial Revival style houses built on Summit Avenue and the 1979-1982 St. Paul-Ramsey County architectural survey field worker indicates that it is an unusual presentation of the standard details of that style. The 1891 and 1893 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. T. E. Yerxa resided at this address. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that James P. Gribben and Jennie Dean Gribben (1855-1900,) who died of typhoid fever, husband and wife, resided at this address in 1900. The book of Minnesotans: a biographical dictionary of leading living men of Minnesota, edited by Albert Nelson Marquis, indicates that James Perry Gribben resided at this address in 1907. J. P. Gribben resided at this address in 1912. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Gribben resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Esther M. Defiel, a student, and Margaret L. Defiel, a student, both boarded at this address and that Michael E. Defiel, the treasurer of the Van Paper Supply Company, resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that James C. Otis, a lawyer in the law firm of Boyesen, Otis & Faricy, officing at the Endicott Building, and his wife, Winifred B. Otis, resided at this address. In 1934, James C. Otis, Winifred Brill Otis, James Otis, Elizabeth Otis, Gilbert Otis, and Alice Otis all resided at this address. James C. Otis was a graduate of Cornell University. Thomas Yerxa was a grocer with Yerxa Brothers & Company, Grocers, formerly in downtown St. Paul. The Otis family were members of the Minikahda Country Club, the St. Paul Athletic Club, and the Women's City Club of St. Paul in 1934. James C. Otis was an associate justice of the Minnesota Supreme Court from 1961 to 1982. In 1879, James P. Gribben, a dealer in lumber, lath, and shingles located at the corner of Ninth Street and Jackson Street, resided at 37 Western Avenue and William C. Gribben, a bookkeeper employed by Gribben Lumber Company, boarded at 37 Western Avenue. J. P. Gribben resided at 378 Summit Avenue in 1890. James Perry Gribben (1845- ,) the son of Samuel White Gribben and Elizabeth Mathews Morgan Gribben, the grandson of William Groom and Phoebe Campbell Morgan, was born in Mount Vernon, Ohio, was educated in the public schools of Mount Vernon, Ohio, graduated from the Mount Vernon, Ohio, High School, was employed by the federal government in Washington, D.C., until 1866, moved to St. Paul in 1867, was in the lumber business after 1867, was a partner of John Dwight Ludden in Gribben & Ludden in Pine City, Minnesota, and St. Paul during the late 1860's, married Jennie B. Dean ( -1890) in 1880, was an incorporator, with John J. Watson, Albert Scheffer, Kimble P. Cullen, and William Dawson, Jr., of the St. Paul, Fort Snelling & Minneapolis Railway Company in 1886, was the president of the Gribben Lumber Company, which was established in 1893, was a member of the board of directors of the St. Paul Chamber of Commerce in 1889, married Jean Piddington in 1904, was twice a member of the St. Paul Charter Commission, was a member of the Minnesota Division of the Sons of the American Revolution by virtue of descent from Robert Morgan, Ensign of the Maryland Flying Camp, resided at 378 Summit Avenue in 1890, and officed at 194 East Seventh Street in 1907. James Perry Gribben, the son of Samuel White Gribben and Elizabeth Mathews Morgan Gribben and the grandson of William Groom Morgan and Phoebe Campbell Morgan, was a member of the Minnesota Society of the Sons of the American Revolution by virtue of great grandfather Robert Morgan, an Ensign of the Maryland Flying Camp Battalion during the Revolutionary War. In 1882, James P. Gribben arranged to purchase the cemetery plot at Oakland Cemetery originally purchased by Walter J. S. Traill and his wife. James P. Gribben, a St. Paul lumber merchant, purchased property in Lake Elmo, Minnesota, in 1887, named it "Cloverdale Stock Farm" and developed a fine stable and training facility for trotting horses, including Dan Patch, the World's fastest pacer. In 1897, Mr. Gribben sold the Cloverdale property to Thomas Irvine and his son, Horace Hills Irvine, and eventually the Cloverdale Farm property was developed as residential real estate by the Robert Engstrom Companies. In 1902, James Perry Gribben was the president of the Gribben Lumber Company. James P. Gribben was a vice president of the Minnesota Society of the Sons of the American Revolution in 1908, was a director of the St. Paul Chamber of Commerce, and was a member of the Minnesota Historical Society in 1922. In 1908, the Gribben Lumber Company newly located in the Dayton's Bluff neighborhood and was included in the Picturesque Dayton's Bluff booklet published by the Dayton's Bluff Commercial Club. James Perry Gribben (1845- ) was born in Huron County, Ohio. Jennie Dean Gribben, the wife of James Perry Gribben, was born in Pennsylvania, the daughter of Captain William Dean and Aurelia Butler Dean, the granddaughter of John Dean and Elizabeth Dock Dean, and the great granddaughter of Philip Dock, a sergeant in the Fifth Pennsylvania Regiment during the American Revolution, and Elizabeth Killian Dock, and was a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution. Jean P. Gribben was the widow of James P. Gribben and resided at 709 Portland Avenue in 1930. Perry Dean Gribben (1881-1918) was born in St. Paul, attended the Hill School, attended Phillips Academy, graduated in 1903 from the Scheffield Scientific School at Yale University, became the secretary and treasurer of the Gribben Lumber Company in 1904, enlisted as a First Lieutenant in the Signal Corps in 1917, and died from injuries sustained in an automobile accident while on leave in St. Paul. In 1887, James P. Gribben purchased the Henry L. Moss property in Bayton Township, Minnesota, named it the "Cloverdale Stock Farm", used it as a stable and training facility for trotting horses, including Dan Patch, the World's fastest pacer, before selling the property in 1897 to Thomas Irvine and his son, Horace Irvine, both prominently involved in the lumber industry. James P. Gribben was the administrator de bonis non of the estate of Lydia M. Emerson in 1885. Edward A. Claypool (1851-1916) was the author of Ancestry of James Perry Gribben. James C. Otis ( -1949) died in Ramsey County. James Cornish Otis (1912-1993) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Brill, and died in Ramsey County. Winifred Brill Otis (1880-1970) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Grey, and died in Ramsey County. The Justice James C. Otis Scholarship Endowment at the William Mitchell College of Law was established in 1994. There is also a Justice James C. Otis Memorial Public Service Scholarship at the Hamline University School of Law. In 1898, Yerxa Brothers & Company, grocers, was located at the corner of Seventh Street and Cedar Street. The current owner of record of the property is U. S. Bank. [See note for the Minikahda Club for 702 Fairmount Avenue.] [See note for T. F. Yerxa for 2847 East Lake of the Isles Parkway.] [See note for Walter J. S. Traill for 534 Summit Avenue.]

1366 Summit Avenue: F. A. Upham House #1; Built in 1910; Gust Anderson, architect. The structure is a two story, 4862 square foot, 16 room, six bedroom, three bathroom, brick house, with a detached garage. The house was built for $6,500. Rev. John Wright resided at this address in 1914. In 1916, Frank A. Upham was a member of the Minnesota Historical Society and resided at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. F. A. Upham and Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Craven all resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Wilbur F. Day and Hjalmar C. Christensen, a musician, both resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Col. and Mrs. J. B. Woolnough and Miss Pearl Wilmont all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Jesse I. Mark, the manager of Markson's Jewelry Company, his wife, Baillie Mark, Morris Gordon, and his wife, Pauline Gordon, all resided at this address. James Barton "Goat" Woolnough (1879-1958) was born in Dubuque, Iowa, moved with his parents to Minnesota, first settled in Minneapolis, later moved to Lake Minnetonka, attended the University of Minnesota from 1899 until 1900, was a member of the Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity, was appointed to the U. S. Military Academy from Minnesota in 1900, graduated from the U. S. Military Academy at West Point, New York, in 1904, was assigned to the 21st Infantry Regiment and toured the Philippines, participated in several expeditions against Pulajanes, married Elsie Neukirk Kopper (1883-1965,) the daughter of Edward Kopper (1845-1920) and Ellen Neukirk Clark Kopper (1850-1921,) of St. Paul in 1907, was Professor of Military Science and Tactics at the University of Minnesota from 1912 until 1914, served on the Mexican Border in 1914, served with the 362nd Infantry, American Expeditionary Force, until 1919, participated in the Ypres-Lys, the St. Mihiel and the Meuse-Argonne operations with the 91st Division during World War I, received two promotions for gallantry in action, the Silver Star on two occasions, the French Croix de Guerre with Silver Star, and the Purple Heart, returned to Minnesota as a Regular Army instructor with the Minnesota National Guard until 1923, was a student at Fort Leavenworth in 1923, was assigned to the Militia Bureau in Washington from 1924 until 1928, attended the Army War College as a student in 1928, was assigned to the 14th Infantry in the Canal Zone from 1929 until 1931, was assigned to the Infantry School from 1931 until 1935, served in the Chief of Infantry's office from 1935 until 1939, suffered a coronary thrombosis in 1939 and retired from the U. S. Army, and died at DeWitt Hospital at Fort Belvoir, Virginia. James Barton Woolnough and Elsie Neukirk Kopper Woolnough had two children, James Karrick Woolnough (1910-1996) and Ellen Neukerk Woolnough (Mrs. Charles Merriam) Tooke (1908-1992.) Frank A. Upham ( -1920) died in Ramsey County. John Wright ( -1919) died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Owen L. Sorenson and Susan K. Sorenson, who reside at 872 Goodrich Avenue. Owen L. Sorenson is a lawyer with the law firm of Stringer & Rohleder, Ltd.

1365 Summit Avenue: William Filben House; Built in 1927 (1928 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Tudor Villa in style; William Larsen, architect. The structure is a two story, 3451 square foot, nine room, five bedroom, four bathroom, one half-bathroom, stucco house, with one one car attached garage and one two car attached garage, which was last sold in 1994 for $299,500. The house was constructed at a cost of $7,500. Walter R. Weaver was a World War I veteran who resided at this address in 1919. The 1930 city directory indicates that William M. Filben and his wife, Bernice Filben, resided at this address. William M. Filben ( -1940) died in Ramsey County. Walter Russell Weaver (1891-1975) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Sheets, and died in Marshall County, Minnesota. The current owners of record of the nonhomesteaded property are Paul D. Hartleben, who resides at 1374 Summit Avenue, and Mary A. McCarney.

1364 Summit Avenue: F. J. Errett House; Built in 1899 (1902 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Queen Anne Rectilinear in style; Louis Lockwood, architect. The structure is a two story, 3101 square foot, ten room, five bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage, which was last sold in 2003 for $633,000. The house cost $6,000 to construct. The book of Minnesotans: a biographical dictionary of leading living men of Minnesota, edited by Albert Nelson Marquis, indicates that Frank J. Errett resided at this address in 1907. The 1910-1911 Directory of the University of Minnesota indicates that Joseph M. Little, a student, resided at this address. Dr. J. B. Little resided at this address from 1912 to 1924. The 1918 city directory indicates that the residents at this address were Dr. and Mrs. J. B. Little, G. A. Timmerman, Dr. J. M. Little, and Mrs. L. J. Gates. World War I veterans Gates A. Timmerman, Charles H. Little, and Harvey B. Little all resided at this address in 1919. The 1924 city directory indicates that Dr. and Mrs. J. B. Little and G. A. Timmerman all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that James H. Mulally, the general attorney employed by the Great Northern RailRoad, and his wife, Helen Mulally, resided at this address. The 1915 city directory indicates that James H. Mulally was a lawyer with the law firm of Lawler & Mulally, located at the New York Life Building, and resided at 941 Goodrich. Frank J. Errett (1862- ,) the son of Thomas L. Errett and Ruth Wing Errett, was born at Waterville, Minnesota, was raised on a farm near Moorhead, Minnesota, was educated in country schools of Clay County, Minnesota, graduated from the Moorhead, Minnesota, high school, attended Hamline University from 1882 until 1883, studied the law in the offices of Briggs & Elders from 1883 until 1885 in Moorhead, Minnesota,took full charge of the insurance department of Briggs & Elders in 1885, operated the insurance and real estate firm of F. J. Errett & Company with John P. Jacobson from 1887 until 1893, married Flora J. Trumbull in 1890, traveled in the Dakotas and Minnesota as a special agent for the Fire Association Insurance Company of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, from 1893 until 1902, was a partner, with L. F. Hubbard and E. De F. Barnett, in the Western Land & Mortgage Company, which sold lands and handled mortgages in Minnesota and the Dakotas, from 1902 until 1905, was a partner of De Forest Barnett in Barnett & Errett in 1905, traveled as State fire insurance agent for the Queen City Fire Insurance Company of Sioux Falls, Iowa, in 1905, was a member of the board of directors of the Minnesota Mutual Fire Insurance Company after 1905, was the secretary of the Minnesota Mutual Fire Insurance Company in 1907, was a Republican, was a Congregationalist, engaged in outdoor athletic sports, officed at the Lumber Exchange Building in Minneapolis in 1907, and resided at 587 Marshall Avenue in St. Paul in 1907. J. H. Mulally was a member of the Minnesota Historical Society in 1946. J. H. Mulally represented the railroad in Lewis v. Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railway, 127 NW 180 (1910,) in Julia Symons v. Great Northern Railway Company, _?_ Minn. _?_ (1940,) in Engberg v. Great Northern Railway Co., 207 Minn. 194 (1940,) in New York Trust Co. v. Northern Pacific Railway Co., _?_ Minn. _?_ (1944,) in Waylander-Peterson Co. v. Great Northern Railway Co., 201 F2d 408 (1953,) in Swift & Company v. Walter R. Casura and the Chicago Great Western Railway Company, 234 F.2d 441 (1956,) and in J.L. Shiely Company v. Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific Railroad Company, _?_ Minn. _?_ (1958.) In 1917, J. H. Mulally was an instructor in business law in the General Extension Division of the University of Minnesota. Flora J. Errett ( -1936) died in Hennepin County. John Batten Little ( -1950) died in Ramsey County. Harvey Little (1915-1986) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Kellar, and died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Laura C. Dunham and John F. McVea. Laura Dunham, an Assistant Professor at the University of St. Thomas, was a contributor to the Democratic National Committee in 2004. [See note on Louis Lockwood.] [See note on the Great Northern RailRoad.] [See note on the Northern Pacific RailRoad.] [See note on the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha RailRoad.] [See note on the Chicago Great Western RailRoad.]

1358 Summit Avenue: E. Barenson House; Built in 1918; Simplified Rectilinear in style; Johnson-Schwartz, architects. The structure is a two story, 2488 square foot, 12 room, five bedroom, two bathroom, two half-bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. The house cost $5,000 to build. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. George Lidren resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Charles W. Briggs, a lawyer and a partner in the law firm of Clapp, Richardson, Elmquist, Briggs & McCartney, and his wife, Lois Briggs, resided at this address. George Lidren resided at this address in 1924. Mrs. Rose Barenson ( -1921) and George Lidren ( -1931) both died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is Mary Louise Gladhill.

1353 Summit Avenue: William Segal House; Built in 1954; Contemporary in style; Bream & Sons, architects. The structure is a 2409 square foot, eight room, three bedroom, three bathroom, masonry and frame rambler, with a detached garage. The house was built for $16,000. William Segal ( -1932) and William Segal ( -1969) both died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is James J. Kennelly. Jim Kennelly and Margie Kennelly are the parents of Samantha Kennelly, a French immersion school student in Independent School District No. 625, St. Paul.

1352 Summit Avenue: Joseph M. Dickson House; Built in 1899; Colonial Revival/Queen Anne Rectilinear in style; O. Hahn, architect and builder. The structure is a 2 1/2 story (two story according to Ramsey County property tax records), 3866 square foot, 11 room, five bedroom, four bathroom, brick house, with a detached garage. Construction of the house cost $10,000. The house has a hipped roof with an intersecting gable and with two bellcast hipped dormers. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Joseph M. Dickson resided at this address in 1900. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Dickson resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Ella M. Dickson, proprietor of a grocery store located at 180 Concord Street, and Joseph M. Dickson both resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Dickson resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Elizabeth M. Dickson, the widow of Joseph M. Dickson, resided at this address. Dickson was the proprietor of Pioneer Tea & Coffee Co. The current owner of record of the property is Brent C. Nelson.

1345-1347 Summit Avenue: Walter Butler and Pierce Butler House; Built in 1900 (1895 according to Larson;) NeoJacobean/British American Dutch Renaissance in style; Clarence H. Johnston, Sr., architect, and the Butler-Ryan Co., builder. The house cost $25,000 to build (Sandeen and Larson.) The structure at 1345 Summit Avenue is a two story, 6222 square foot, 12 room, five bedroom, four bathroom, brick house, which was last sold in 1992 for $207,500, and which is currently owned by Thomas R. Bergin, Jr., and Jessica K. Dodge. The house at 1347 Summit Avenue is a 2 1/2 story (two story according to Ramsey County property tax records,) 6093 square foot, 11 room, four bedroom, three bathroom, one half-bathroom, brick double house which has a hipped roof with an intersecting gable and with one polygonal and two shed dormers that also has a detached garage and is currently owned by Aviel Goodman and Diane Goodman. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Walter Butler resided at 1345 Summit Avenue and that Pierce Butler resided at 1347 Summit Avenue from 1897 to 1959. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Walter Butler and their daughter resided at 1345 Summit Avenue and that Mr. and Mrs. Pierce Butler, their daughter, and Pierce Butler, Jr., all resided at 1345 Summit Avenue. The 1920 city directory indicates that Francis D. Butler, a student, John E. Butler, a superintendent employed by the Butler Brothers, Kevin Butler, a student, Leo P. Butler, a mine superintendent, Robert Butler, and Walter P. Butler, a superintendent, all boarded at 1345 Summit Avenue and that Pierce Butler, a partner with William D. Mitchell, Michael J. Doherty, Wilfred E. Rumble, and Charles Bunn in the law firm of Butler, Mitchell & Doherty, located at the Merchant Bank Building, and Walter Butler, the president of Butler Brothers, both resided at 1345 Summit Avenue and that William J. Butler, a student at the Nichols School, Antoinette Cronin, and John Cronin, a student, all boarded at 1347 Summit Avenue. In 1920, the United States Adjutant-General's Office U. S. Army Register, Volume VIII, indicates that Robert Butler (1894- ,) a Second Lieutenant in the Infantry Section, resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Walter Butler and W. P. Butler all resided at 1345 Summit Avenue and that Hon. and Mrs. Pierce Butler resided at 1347 Summit Avenue. The 1930 city directory indicates that Walter P. Butler, the secretary-treasurer of the Walter Butler Company, and his wife, Zena Butler, resided at 1345 Summit Avenue and that Robert Butler, vice president-manager of the Walter Butler Company, and his wife, Margaret Porter Butler, resided at 1347 Summit Avenue. The 1939 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Robert Butler, who attended the school from 1913 until 1914, who served in the Purchase, Storage and Traffic Division, General Staff, of the Philippine Scouts, and who officed at the Guardian Building, resided at this address. The 1950 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that the Honorable Robert Butler, who attended the school from 1913 until 1914, who attended Dartmouth College, who graduated from the University of Minnesota in Mining Engineering in 1922, who was a Captain in the Philippine Constabulary during World War I, who was a member of the Union Club, the Minnesota Club, and the Havana, Cuba, Country Club, who was the U. S. Delegate to the South Sea Conference, who was Ambassador to Australia, who was Ambassador to Cuba, who was a judge at Mati Davao, Philippine Islands, who was president of the Builder's Trust Company, who was president of the Walter Butler Company, who was president of the Walter Butler Ship Builders' Trust Company, resided at 1347 Summit Avenue, at White Bear Lake, Minnesota, and in Havana, Cuba. The 1950 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory also indicates that Walter Butler III, who attended the school from 1935 until 1938, who attended the Virginia Military Institute, who attended the University of Minnesota, who was a First Lieutenant in an Armored Division of the U. S. Army during World War III, who received a Purple Heart, and who married Shirley Riedel in Canberra, Australia, in 1947, resided at 1347 Summit Avenue. In 1972-1973, Kenneth Damlo, a student at Macalester College, resided at 1347 Summit Avenue. The 1991 St. Paul’s on-the-Hill Episcopal Church directory indicates that Joan Gregg resided at this address. Walter Butler founded Butler Brothers Co., a builder. Pierce Butler (1866-1939) the sixth of the eight children of Patrick Butler (1823-1900) and Mary A. Gaffrey Butler (1830-1915,) was born in Waterford, Minnesota, and was educated in the public schools of Sciota, Dakota County, Minnesota, and of Waterford, Dakota County, Minnesota. His parents, who were Roman Catholics, settled on a farm in the Northwest after emigrating from Ireland during the potato famine of the 1840's. With money earned at a nearby dairy, Pierce Butler attended Carleton College in his home town of Northfield, Minnesota, and graduated in 1887 with a bachelor of arts degree and a bachelor of science degree. Pierce Butler left Northfield, Minnesota, to read the law with the St. Paul firm Pinch & Twohy and was admitted to the bar in 1888 at the age of 22. Pierce Butler moved to St. Paul and began his legal career practicing law with Stan Donnelly, the son of Ignatius Donnelly, who was a member of Congress from Minnesota and future vice-presidential candidate of the People's Party. In 1893, Butler was elected county attorney of Ramsey County and held that office until 1897. He also was a partner in the law firm of How & Butler from 1897 until 1899, was the president of the Ramsey County Bar Association, and was a member of the board of directors of the St. Paul Library Board. While he was the county attorney, he formed the law firm of How, Butler & Mitchell and later became senior partner of Butler, Mitchell & Doherty. Pierce Butler was a Democrat and officed at the Fire and Marine Building in 1907. U. S. Attorney General George Wickersham chose Butler to represent the federal government in a number of antitrust cases around 1910. His skillful prosecution won him the attorney general's praise as the "foremost lawyer in his part of the country" and brought him to President Harding's attention. When Justice Day's resignation in 1922 left a vacancy on the Court, Butler was Chief Justice Taft's top choice for the seat. During an arbitration in Canada in 1921, Taft had been favorably impressed with Butler and recommended him to Harding. There were other reasons for Taft's strong preference, however. He wanted to obtain a conservative majority on the Court. Butler's conservative judicial past made Taft confident that if appointed he would align himself with Justices Van Devanter, McReynolds, and Sutherland. Taft, a Protestant, had replaced Chief Justice White, a Catholic, and another Catholic also was needed on the bench. Pierce Butler was nominated a U. S. Supreme Court associate justice by President Warren G. Harding and confirmed by the Senate in 1922, by a 61-8 vote. Although Taft succeeded in convincing President Harding of Butler's merits, Senate liberals were not so easily persuaded. Their primary objection concerned Butler's defense of the Northern Pacific, Great Northern, and Chicago, Burlington, & Quincy railroads during his legal practice. Also criticized were Butler's actions as a regent of the University of Minnesota from 1907 to 1924. Faculty members whose economic or political views differed from Butler's had been dismissed from or refused tenure at the University of Minnesota. Cass Gilbert prepared plans for the design of the University of Minnesota-Minneapolis campus, but his hopes seemed to have run aground on the bitter animosity with University of Minnesota regent Pierce Butler in addition to expense and other bottom-line concerns. Butler's enmity was as much personal as financial, stemming from a 1906 dispute between Gilbert and Walter Butler's contracting firm, which failed to complete work on a Boston bank building that Gilbert had designed, and about which Gilbert recommended that Butler's company be assessed a $6,000 penalty. Ironically, Butler served in the Gilbert-designed U. S. Supreme Court building. Butler died in Washington, D.C. He was a staunch advocate of the Court's laissez faire decisions during his tenure. Both Butler brothers were raised in Northfield, Minnesota. Patrick Butler (1823-1900) was born in Wicklow, Ireland, emigrated to the United States in 1846, settled in Dakota County, Minnesota in 1855, owned a farm near Northfield, Rice County, Minnesota until 1888, when he moved to St. Paul, and died in St. Paul. The 1920 city directory indicates that John E. Butler, the superintendent for the Butler Brothers Company, resided at 1345 Summit Avenue and that Robert Butler and Walter P. Butler, a superintendent, both boarded at 1345 Summit Avenue. The 1920 city directory also indicates that Pierce Butler, a partner in the Butler, Mitchell & Doherty law firm, resided at 1347 Summit Avenue and that Kevin Butler, a student, Leo P. Butler, a mine superintendent, and Walter J. Butler, a student at the Nicholas School, all boarded at 1347 Summit Avenue. World War I veterans John E. Butler (1888- ,) a corporal, Walter P. Butler (1892- ,) a sergeant, and Robert J. Butler (1897- ,) a second lieutenant, resided at 1345 Summit Avenue in 1919. Leo P. Butler, Pierce Butler, Jr., and William J. Butler were World War I veterans who all resided at 1347 Summit Avenue in 1919. The house was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1982 because of its connection with a famous person and its influence in the areas of industry, engineering, law, and architecture. The Walter Butler Company was a contractor that helped build the Huntsville, Alabama, Redstone Arsenal, a military chemical manufacturing installation, during World War II and the Farragut Naval Training Station in Sandstone, Idaho, in 1942. Pierce Butler (1866-1939) is buried in Cavalry Cemetery in St. Paul. Walter Butler ( -1923) and John Edward Butler ( -1927) both died in Ramsey County. Walter P. Butler ( -1939) died in Hennepin County. Walter J. Butler (1918-1981) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Murphy, and died in Hennepin County. Jessica Dodge is a program manager for the Minneapolis Regional Chamber of Commerce. Aviel Goodman is a photographer and had an exhibit of photographs during January, 2007, at Augsburg College Art Galleries. In Fall, 1995, an exhibit of photomontages by Diane Grace Goodman and poetry by Aviel Goodman entitled "Holocaust and Burning Bush" was presented at the Jewish Community Center of St. Paul. Aviel Goodman MD, is a Psychoanalyst and Psychiatrist in private practice in St. Paul, is also the Director of the Minnesota Institute of Psychiatry, located at this address, is the Editor and Columnist for PSA Today, the newsletter of the Minnesota Psychoanalytic Institute and Society, and is the Chair of the Faculty Committee of the Minnesota Psychoanalytic Institute. < a href="http://www.angelfire.com/mn/thursdaynighthikes/wsummit.html"> [See note on Walter P. Butler for 2120 Summit Avenue.] [See the note for Ignatius Loyola Donnelly for 847 Portland Avenue.] [See note on Stanislaus J. Donnelly for 873 Fairmount Avenue.] [See note on Johnston.] [See note on the Northern Pacific RailRoad.] [See note on the Great Northern RailRoad.] [See note on the Chicago, Burlington, & Quincy RailRoad.]

1344 Summit Avenue: Charles E. Otis House/Uptown House; Built in 1898; Addition in 1912; Colonial Revival/Queen Anne Rectilinear in style; C. P. Wildung, builder. The house is a 2 1/2 story, 5539 square foot, 15 room, nine bedroom, four bathroom, two half-bathroom, brick structure which has a hipped gable roof with two bellcast hip dormers. It also has Tuscan columns and a detached garage. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Charles E. Otis and Elizabeth Ransom Otis (1848-1899,) who died of a carcinoma, husband and wife, resided at this address in 1899. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Charles Denison Andrews (1848-1905,) the uncle of Mary D. Andrews, who was born in the United States to parents also born in the United States and who died of diabetes, resided at this address in 1905. The 1906 Jubilee Manual of the House of Hope Presbyterian Church indicates that Charles E. Otis, a member of the church since 1874, and Maribel R. Otis, a member of the church since 1888, both resided at this address. In 1916, Otto Bremer was a member of the Minnesota Historical Society and resided at this address. The 1916 University of Minnesota Alumni Directory indicates that Paul G. Bremer resided at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that Otto Bremer, Mrs. Marie Bremer, and her daughter all resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Mrs. Marie Bremer, the widow of Edward Bremer, boarded at this address and that Otto Bremer, the secretary-treasurer of the Jacob Schmidt Company, both resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mrs. Marie Bremer and Otto Bremer both resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Otto Bremer, chairman of the board of the American National Bank, resided at this address. In 1934, Otto Bremer and Miss Frieda Bremer both resided at this address and were notable members of St. Paul society. Charles E. Otis was a judge in the Second Judicial District (Ramsey County.) Charles Eugene Otis (1846-1917,) the son of Isaac Otis (1798-1850) and Caroline Abigail Curtis Otis (1808-1883,) was born in Prairiesville, Barry County, Michigan, attended Barry County, Michigan, public schools, attended Richland Seminary, was educated at the high school of Kalamazoo, Michigan, from 1863 until 1864, was an 1869 graduate of the University of Michigan, was superintendent of schools in La Porte, Indiana, from 1869 until 1871, came to Minnesota in 1871, read the law in his brother's office, George Lorenzo Otis (1829-1883,) was admitted to the practice of law in 1873, was a lawyer, practiced law with two of his brothers in the law firm of George L. Otis & Charles E. Otis, practiced law in the law firm of Charles E. Otis & Arthur Gray Otis from 1883 until 1889, was a Democrat before 1896, broke with the candidacy of William Jennings Bryan and was a Republican after 1895, was a St. Paul library board member, was a member of the St. Paul city council, was a member of the St. Paul school board, was instrumental in transferring the Ramsey County Poor Farm property to the State Agricultural Society (Minnesota State Fair,) was appointed a judge by Republican Governor William R. Merriam to fill a vacancy for Judge Levi M. Vilas in 1889, and became a special master in chancery for the Eighth Circuit federal court in 1903, handled Shepard v. Northern Pacific Railway, the "Minnesota Rate Case," was an unsuccessful candidate for justice of Minnesota state supreme court in 1904, was the senior member of the firm of Charles E. Otis & James Cornish Otis, was the granduncle of Amelia Mary Earhart (1897-1937,) resided at 48 Summit Avenue in 1880, resided at 43 South Ramblin Avenue in 1910, and officed at the Globe Building in 1907. Charles E. Otis married Elizabeth Noyes Ransom (1847-1899,) the daughter of Alexis Ransom and the niece of Michigan Governor Epaphroditus Ransom (1798-1859,) in 1874 and the couple had two children, James Cornish Otis (1879- ,) a lawyer, and Maribel R. Otis (1875- .) George Lamartine/Lorenzo Otis (1829-1882,) the son of Isaac Otis (1798-1853) and Caroline Abigail Curtiss Otis (1808-1883) and the brother of Charles E. Otis, Alfred G. Otis (1827-1912,) a Kansas judge, Ephraim Allen Otis, a Chicago lawyer, and Isaac N. Otis, a Boulder, Colorado, Presbyterian minister, was born in Homer, Courtland County, New York, was admitted to the practice of law in Michigan, moved to St. Paul in 1855, was an Episcopalian, was a Mason, was a Grand Commander of Minnesota in 1870 and 1871, started the predecessor law firm to the current Moore, Costello & Hart, was a Democrat, was a member of the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Ramsey County (District 2) from 1857 until 1959, married Mary Virginia Mix Morrison in 1858, was a member of the Minnesota Senate representing Ramsey County (District 21) in 1866, was the mayor of St. Paul in 1867, was an unsuccessful Democratic candidate for Minnesota Governor in 1869, losing to Horace Austin, was a member of the board of managers of the State Reform School, died of a pulmonary disease in St. Paul, and is buried in Oakland Cemetery. One of George L. Otis' daughters, Caroline "Carrie" Otis, married Lieutenant George D. Wallace of the Seventh U. S. Cavalry, a native of Yorkville, South Carolina. In 1863, George L. Otis built a house at 226 Summit Avenue, which was replaced by the Amherst Wilder residence, which in turn was replaced by the Archdiocese Chancery and Residence. Hermann Kretz designed two apartment buildings along Summit Avenue for Charles Otis. Paul G. Bremer was a 1909 graduate of the University of Minnesota Law School, graduated with a masters of law degree from Yale University in 1910, was admitted to the practice of law in Minnesota, was a lawyer, was a member of the board of directors of the City Bank of St. Paul in 1916, was a member of American Bar Association, was a member of the Minnesota State Bar Association, was a member of the Ramsey County Bar Association, was a member of St. Paul Commercial Club, was a member of the University Club, was a member of the St. Paul Athletic Club, was a member of the Yale Alumni Association, was a member of the Minnesota Alumni Association, was a member of the St. Paul Association of Commerce, was a member of the Minnesota Historical Society in 1922, officed at 738 East Fourth Street in 1912, officed at the Germania Life Building in 1916, officed at the Guardian Life Building in 1920, and officed at the Bremer Arcade Building in Minneapolis in 1942. The Uptown Thursday Alateen organization, the Uptown Thursday Night Al-Anon organization, the Uptown Monday Night Al-Anon organization, and the Saturday Beginners AFG organization meet at this address. Charles Eugene Otis ( -1917) died in Ramsey County. James C. Otis ( -1949) died in Ramsey County. Maribel R. Otis (1875-1960) was born in Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. Marie Bremer ( -1928) and Marie Bremer ( -1929) both died in Ramsey County. Otto Bremer ( -1951) and Otto William Bremer ( -1943) both died in Ramsey County. Carl P. Wildung ( -1913) died in Ramsey County. Frieda Bremer (1871-1958) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Malder, and died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is the Uptown Foundation Inc., a tax exempt organization. [See note on John L. Merriam and William Rush Merriam for 4 Crocus Hill.] < a href ="http://www.angelfire.com/mn/thursdaynighthikes/stparctecs.html"> [See note on Hermann Kretz.] [See note on Lieutenant George Wallace for 226 Summit Avenue.]

1335 Summit Avenue: Vernon O'Connor/Walter Butler House; Built in 1920; Georgian Revival in style; Linhoff-Ziegler, architects, and Butler Brothers Co., builders. The house was constructed at a cost of $20,000. The house is a 2 1/2 story, 4404 square foot, 11 room, six bedroom, three bedroom, one half-bathroom, brick structure which has a gabled roof with three segmental arched dormers. It also has a detached garage. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. V. W. O'Connor resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Vernon W. O'Connor, the vice president of the Builder's Trust Company and Walter Butler & Company, and his wife, Effie B. O'Connor, resided at this address. The original owner was Walter Butler, but he never lived in the house. Vernon O'Connor, the first resident, was the treasurer of Mid Continental Transfer & Storage. Walter Butler ( -1923) died in Ramsey County. The previous owners of record of the property were Andrejs Vape and Ingrid Vape and the current owner of record is Andrejs Vape. Andrejs Vape and Ingrid Vape are experienced real estate investors. There was a special assessment by the City of St. Paul against the property for November and December 2003 for a special clean-up to the property, which was disputed in March, 2004, by Andrejs Vape. In Andrejs Vape v. County of Hennepin, Nos. 30550 and 30549, 2004 1843008 (Minn. Tax Court 08/09/04,) the Minnesota Tax Court dismissed an appeal on grounds that the property taxpayer failed to comply with sufficient business and financial information required under Minnesota Statutes, Section 278.05 (6), also known as the "60-day rule," rejecting the taxpayer's argument that the financial information was unavailable due to his wife's illness and subsequent death because the court found the financial information was in the taxpayer's possession and was available.

1325 Summit Avenue: Former Veterans of Foreign Wars Club House/Former William C. Edwards House; Built in the 1950's (1954 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Contemporary in style. The structure is a 4584 square foot, ten room, three bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, stucco rambler, with an attached garage, which was last sold in 2003 for $459,900. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that William C. Edwards resided at this address from 1891 to 1917. The 1891 and 1893 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Edwards resided at this address. The 1903 Delta Upsilon Decennial Catalogue indicates that Benjamin Kilbourne Edwards (1880- ,) the son of William C. Edwards and Finetta E. Johnson Edwards, was born in Topeka, Kansas, graduated from the St. Paul Central High School, attended the University of Minnesota, was a merchant, officed at the Manhattan Building, and resided at this address. The book of Minnesotans: a biographical dictionary of leading living men of Minnesota, edited by Albert Nelson Marquis, indicates that Benjamin K. Edwards and William Rufus Edwards both resided at this address in 1907. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Phinetta Elizabeth Edwards (1853-1909,) the wife of William Chalmers Edwards, who was born in the United States to parents who were also born in the United States and who died of arteriosclerosis, resided at this address in 1909. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that William Chalmers Edwards (1847-1910,) the widower father of William Rufus Edwards, who was born in the United States to parents also born in the United States and who died of cerebral hemorrhage, resided at this address in 1910. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Edwards resided at this address. Harold Y. Ayers and Goar T. Young (1899- ), a Private, were World War I veterans who resided at this address in 1919. The records of the 1919-1920 Minnesota World War I Soldier's Bonus Board (#2876) indicate that Goar Thomas Young (1899- ,) a 1917 enlistee and a Sergeant in the 24th Construction Company, A. S. A., who was born in Deer Creek, Minnesota, had gray eyes, brown hair, and a fair complexion, was 5' 10 1/2" tall, was a cost accountant/clerk at induction, was a clerical worker employed by George H. Young at the Pioneer Building after the completion of service, and was unmarried, resided with his father, George H. Young, at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Goar T. Young, a bookkeeper for the St. Paul Book & Stationery Company, boarded at this address. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that the Veterans of Foreign Wars, Howard Nagel Club, was located at this address in 1924 and that the Cross of Malta Club was located at this address in 1925. William Chalmers Edwards (1846-1910,) the son of Rufus Edwards (1802-1888,) a judge, and Harriet Orpha Hart Edwards, was born in Virgil, Cortland County, New York, was educated at the Cortland Academy of New York, left school in 1862, was employed as a clerk in Fish & Walrad, a dry goods store, from 1864 until 1865, managed a lumber yard in Tolona, Illinois, in 1865, started a lumber business in Chicago, Illinois, in 1866, ran a sawmill in Grand River, Michigan, in 1867 and 1868, started a lumber yard in New Windsor, Illinois, in 1868, sold the lumber yard in 1868, started a lumber yard in Solomon City, Kansas, in 1870, married Phinetta/Nettie Elizabeth Johnson ( -1909) in New Haven, Connecticut, in 1874, was engaged in the lumber trade in Kansas and other states from 1879 until 1907, organized Edwards County, Kansas, and owned Kinsley, Kansas, the county seat of Edwards County, Kansas, was a builder of Reno County, Kansas, and Hutchinson, Kansas, aided in eradicating the cinch bug infestation in Kansas, manufactured bricks at Kinsley, Kansas, was an original backer of the Kansas Farmer, was a prohibitionist, moved to St. Paul in 1883, was president of the Edwards Lumber Company, organized the Three States Lumber Company, organized the Consolidated Lumber Company, was president of the Bradford Lumber Company, and was president of the Kansas Lumber Company, had a controlling interest in the Lindas Lumber Company, had large investments in the Edwards & Westmacott Lumber Company, had large investments in the Edwards & Fair Lumber Company, donated Edwards Hall to Macalester College in 1904, was a member of the St. Paul Commercial Club, was a Mason, was a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, resided at this address in 1907, and officed at the Manhattan Building in 1907. William Chalmers Edwards and Phinetta E. Johnson Edwards were the parents of three sons, Benjamin K. Edwards (1880- ,) Albert Edwards (1877- ,) and W. R. Edwards (1875- .) Benjamin Kilbourne "Sonny" Edwards (1880-1943,) the son of William C. and Nettie E. Edwards, was born at Topeka, Kansas, graduated from the St. Paul Central High School in 1898, attended a business college, attended the University of Minnesota until he left due to ill health, was unmarried in 1907, was a lumberman, entered his father's business in 1901, operated in lumber and coffee lands in 1907, married Katherine Mathews ( -1911) in Minneapolis in 1907, married Florence Vivian Dunn at Wheaton, Minnesota, in 1912, was the owner of the Salvadora Coffee Company, was the owner of the Edwards & Ogden Pole & Piling Company, was a member of the board of directors and was the vice president of the Kansas Lumber Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Edwards & Westmacott Lumber Company, was the secretary of the Minnesota & Nicaragua Coffee Company, and was the secretary of the Edwards Lumber Company, resided at 1535 Asbury Avenue, Evanston, Cook County, Illinois, in 1917, was the president of the Edwards & Bradford Lumber Company in Chicago, Illinois, was associated with the B. K. & W. R. Edwards Lumber Company in 1917, married Marian Florence Fillius (1892-1930,) the daughter of John Fillius, an Oakland, Colorado, mining expert, and Love Fillius, married Helen K. __?__, was a Mason, was a member of the St. Paul Commercial Club, was a member of the St. Paul Town & Country Club, was a member of the St. Paul Association of Commerce, was a member of the Delta Upsilon Club, collected 2,100 baseball cards dating from 1887 to 1914 which were ultimately donated to the National Archives and are now housed at the H. J. Lutcher Stark Center, officed at the Manhattan Building in 1907, resided at 702 Fairmont Avenue in 1917, officed at the Capital Bank Building in 1917, moved to California, resided in Beverly Hills, California, died in Beverly Hills, Los Angeles, California, and was buried in St. Paul. Benjamin Kilbourne Edwards and Katherine Mathews Edwards were the parents of one child, Katherine Elizabeth Edwards (1909- .) After his death, Edwards' daughter gave the albums to noted poet and Lincoln biographer Carl Sandburg, who donated them to the Library of Congress' Prints and Photographs Division in 1954. Benjamin Kilbourne Edwards and Florence Vivian Dunn Edwards were the parents of one child, Benjamin Chalmers Edwards (1913- .) Benjamin K. Edwards, Jr. (1927-1948,) was born in Evanston, Illinois, lodged with his widower father at the Union League Club, Chicago, in 1930, died in Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada, as a tourist in a one-car (1947 Studebaker convertible coupe) collision with a Canadian Pacific diesel locomotive. Donovan Y. Erickson of Evanston, Illinois, was the guardian of Benjamin K. Edwards, Jr., in 1948. William Rufus Edwards (1875- ,) the son of William Chalmers Edwards and Phinetta E. Johnson Edwards, was born in Hutchinson, Kansas, was educated in the St. Paul public schools, graduated from Macalester College in 1893, was initially employed by his father in the lumber business after 1893, founded the Edwards & Westmacott Lumber Company in 1896, was the president and member of the board of directors of Edwards & Westmacott Lumber Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Kansas Lumber Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Bradford Lumber Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Lindas Lumber Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Consolidated Lumber Company, married Frances Lorraine Barnard, the niece of U. S. Senator Moses Clapp, in 1912, was a member of the St. Paul Commercial Club, was a member of the St. Paul Automobile Club, was a Mason, was a Shriner, was a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, resided at this address in 1907, officed at the Manhattan Building in 1907, lost a breach of promise to marry lawsuit, Cox v. Edwards, 120 Minn. 512 (1913) and 148 NW 500 (1914,) to Ada M. Cox, a stenographer, in 1914, and was tried in 1916 in federal court for violating the Mann (regulation of interstate travel for purposes of prostitution or "immoral purposes") Act based on his taking Ada M. Cox on a pleasure trip to Chicago. William C. Edwards ( -1910) died in Ramsey County. Harold Y. Ayers (1893-1958) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Young, and died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is the Authentic Development LLC, which is located 740 Grand Avenue. In 2004, Authentic Development LLC sought from the St. Paul Board of Zoning Appeals a four foot front setback variance in order to build a covered porch addition to the front of the house at this address. [See note for the St. Paul Book & Stationery for 629 North Street.] [See note on the St. Paul Commercial Club for 505 Summit Avenue.]

1317-1319 Summit Avenue: Charles Dibble and Julia B. Dibble House; Built in 1895 (according to Sandeen and Larson; 1898 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Colonial Revival/Queen Anne Rectilinear in style; Clarence H. Johnston, Sr., architect, and G. W. Thayer, builder. The house cost $8,000 to build (Sandeen and Larson). The house is a 2 1/2 story, 4445 square foot, 16 room, five bedroom, three bathroom, two half-bathroom, wood frame and clapboard sided (frame according to Ramsey County property tax records) duplex which has an intersecting hipped gable roof, with one eyelid dormer. It also has a detached garage. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Walter Gordon Dibble (1883-1905,) the unmarried son of Charles A. Dibble, who was born in St. Paul to parents born in the United States and who died of pulmonary tuberculosis, resided at this address in 1905. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Charles A. Dibble resided at this address in 1906. The 1910 city directory indicates that Marie L. Obenauer, secretary for the Courant Publishing & Printing Company, boarded at this address. The 1918 and 1924 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Wood resided at 1317 Summit Avenue. The 1930 city directory indicates that 1319 Summit Avenue was vacant and that Fred C. Schaefer and his wife, Dagna Schaefer, resided at 1317 Summit Avenue. In 1934, Charles Bechoeffer and Caroline Goldman Bechoeffer resided at 1319 Summit Avenue and were notable members of St. Paul society. Charles Bechhoeffer (1864-1932,) the son of of Abraham Leopold Bechhoefer (1832-1898) and Rebecca Goldschmidt Bechhoefer (1827-1895,) was born in Woodbury, Bedford County, Pennsylvania, was educated in the Altoona, Pennsylvania, public school system, graduated from the University of Michigan Law School in 1885, moved to Minnesota in 1885, read the law in the offices of John B. Sanborn and W. H. Sanborn, was admitted to the practice of law in Minnesota in 1887, practiced real estate, probate, and commercial law in St. Paul, was a member of the Jewish Temple of St. Paul, was a member of the Ramsey County Bar Association, was a United States Commissioner for the District of Minnesota from 1899 until 1905, and resided at 847 Ashland Avenue in 1907. Charles Bechhoefer married Helen Goldman (1869-1912) in Hollidaysburg, Pennsylvania, in 1892 and the couple had two children, Bernhard G. Bechhoefer (1904-1998) and Jeanette Bechhoefer (1900-1921.) Charles Bechhoefer was an elective member of the executive council of the Minnesota Historical Society in 1915. Charles Bechhoeffer and the law firm of Cant & Brigham unsuccessfully represented an individual fee owner of real estate against a purchaser of the same real estate in a county auditor tax sale with an erroneous sale notice in Frank Robert, Jr. v. Western Land Association, 43 Minn. 3 (1890.) Charles Bechhoefer, with Abraham Slimmer, Jr., was an executor of the will of Abraham Slimmer, Sr., and was a party in litigation over the will in In Re Estate of Abraham Slimmer, Deceased. Adolph Lipman v. Charles Bechhoefer and another, 141 Minn. 131 (1918.) In 1918, Charles Bechhoefer was a member of the 41 member Committee on Local Arrangements of the 11th Annual Meeting of the Mississippi Valley Historical Association. Charles Bechhoeffer was a Ramsey County District Court judge in 1925. Abraham Leopold Bechhoefer was born in Schwabach, Bavaria, Germany, recieved a liberal education, was a school teacher, emigrated to America in 1848, moved to New York City, married Rebecca Goldschmidt/Goldsmith in 1856, began a mercantile business at Woodbury, Bedford County, Pennsylvania, moved to Altoona in 1880, was a member of the Hebrew Reformed congregation, was a member of the Woodbury Lodge of Odd Fellows, was a member of the Roaring Spring Lodge of Free Masons, was a member of the Beacon Light Club, and retired in 1889. Abraham Leopold Bechhoefer and Rebecca Goldsmith Bechhoefer had eight children, Joseph Bechhoefer, Fannie (Mrs. J. B. "Woodbury Joe") Bechhoefer, Charles Bechhoefer, Lena Bechhoefer, Bertha Bechhoefer, Jacob Emanuel Bechhoefer, Lea Bechhoefer, and Pauline Bechhoefer. Bernhard G. Bechhoefer, a former Foreign Service officer, a former U. S. disarmament negotiator, and a Washington, D. C. lawyer, was the author of Atoms for Peace: The New International Atomic Emergy Agency, published in 1957, Postwar Negotiations for Arms Control, published in 1961, and On the Periphery, a privately printed biography of a lawyer published in 1987, and was the co-author, with David Walter Wainhouse, of Arms Control Agreements; Designs for Verification and Organization, published in 1968, and was the co-author, with Bennett Boskey, of Nuclear Proliferation: Prospects for Control, published in 1970. Bernhard G. Bechhoefer (1904-1998) married Estelle Scharfeld (1908-2001,) a 1929 graduate of Wellesley College, and the couple had three children, William Bechhoefer, Charles Bechhoefer, and Arthur Bechhoefer. Estelle Bechhoefer took a photograph of Heinrich Himmler and Adolf Hitler that is now property of the U. S. Holocaust Memorial Museum. In 1999, Estelle Bechhoefer was a financial supporter of the Bill Bradley for President campaign. Jeanette Bechhoefer was born in St. Paul, was taught piano by her mother, enrolled in the Julliard School of Music, gave a concert in Carnegie Hall, a Steinway concert B grand piano manufactured in Hamburg, Germany, and died of pernicious anemia. Jeanette Bechhoefer's Steinway concert B grand piano is now used regularly by the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. Jacob Emanuel Bechhoefer married Lavinia Dorothy Schleisner ( -1946) and the couple had a child, Miriam Rebecca Bechhoefer (Mrs. David Clemens) Sachs (1908- .) Charles Bechhoefer was the author of a bachelor's honors degree thesis "Political Broadcasting in the United States; Its Implications for the Democratic Process" from Harvard University in 1955. Charles Bechhoefer was chairman of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Panel in 1996 and was an administrative judge of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission in 2000. Charles Dibble was a tax clerk for the Great Northern RailRoad. Julia Dibble was his wife and her name solely appeared on the building permit. Walter Gordon Dibble was the son of Charles A. Dibble. G. W. Thayer ( -1925) died in Hennepin County. Charles Bechhoefer served for ten years as a judge in the Fourth Judicial District of Minnesota. In 1920, Charles Bechhoefer was a commercial, real estate, and estate lawyer in solo private practice who officed at the Guardian Life Building and represented the Merchants National Bank, A. Guthrie & Company, Guiterman Brothers, and Mannheimer Brothers. Charles Bechhoefer ( -1932) and Caroline Goldman Bechoeffer ( -1940) died in Ramsey County. Walter G. Dibble (1883-1905) was born in Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. The property was last sold in 1992 and the purchase price was $267,000. The previous owner of record of the property is Justin E. O'Brien and the current owner of record of the property is Theresa King. Dr. Justin O'Brien is associated with the Institute of the Himalayan Tradition. Justin O'Brien has a Ph.D., Philosophy, from Nijmegen University, Netherlands, and has an M.A., Religious Studies, from Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, is the founder of Justin O'Brien Associates, Consultants in Lifestyle Management, and organizes wellness conferences nationally, has expertise in stress management, leadership, and counseling, is a core faculty member of the Institute of the Himalayan Tradition, and is a professor at the University of Minnesota in the Master of Liberal Studies program of the College of Continuing Education. [See note on Abraham Slimmer for 966 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Clarence H. Johnston.] [See note on the Great Northern RailRoad.]

1307 Summit Avenue: Built in 1994. The structure is a two story, 2595 square foot, eight room, three bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. The property was last sold in 2004 with a sale price of $1,175,000. The current owner of record of the property is Kim W. Jenkins.

1300 Summit Avenue: Mount Zion Temple; Built in 1951 and altered in 1967; International/ Contemporary in style; Eric Mendelsohn, original architect, and Bentz/Thompson/Rietow, renovation master architect. The two story, 47942 square foot, building, is located on 2.75 acres and was built at a cost of $500,000. Misha Zinkow is the rabbi. This was the first Hebrew congregation in St. Paul. It was founded in 1856 by middle class German imigrants. It was disbanded in 1860 and was reformulated in 1868. The initial synagogue was built in 1870 at Tenth Street and Minnesota Street and the second synagogue was built in 1903 at Avon and Holly. It became a reformed congregation in 1903. In the fall of 1996, the architectural firm of Bentz/Thompson/Rietow was selected to master plan the renovation, remodeling, and revitalization of the facility. Over the years, various remodeling projects and two new addition projects were completed. However, none of these projects resolved handicap accessibility issues or the congregation's need for an additional social hall space to supplement the main social hall. The facility was also sorely in need in 1996 of a renewal of finishes and new mechanical and electrical systems. The current owner of record of the property is the Mount Zion Hebrew Congregation. [See note on Eric Mendelsohn.]

1297 Summit Avenue: Built in 1922; Contemporary Georgian Revival in style. The structure is a two story, 2109 square foot, nine room, three bedroom, three bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage, which was last sold in 2001 for $425,000. The house was moved to the site in 1960. The current owners of record of the property are Byron Kremenak and Nancy Walden. Nancy Walden, a homemaker and self-employed writer, was a contributor to the John Kerry for President campaign and to the Democratic National Committee in 2004. Byron Kremenak and Nancy Walden were financial supporters of Casa de Esperanza in 2003. Byron Kremenak is an anesthesiologist at Fairview Ridges Hospital with the Metropolitan Anesthesia Network. Byron Kremenak made political contributions to the Luther For Congress Volunteer Committee in 1999, 2000, 2001, and 2002, Wellstone For Senate in 2002, the American Society Of Anesthesiologists Incorporated Political Action Committee in 2001, 2002, and 2003, Daly For Congress in 2004, Mark Dayton For Minnesota in 2004, the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee in 2004, the Feingold Senate Committee in 2004, McCollum For Congress in 2003, and Klobuchar For Minnesota in 2006.

1289-1291 Summit Avenue: Built in 1928; Contemporary Georgian Revival in style. The structure is a two story, 2340 square foot, eight room, four bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage. The house was moved to the site in 1960. The current owner of record of the property is Mary L. Larson.

1285 Summit Avenue: Edwin Rydeen House; Built in 1924 (1925 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Georgian Revival in style; Edwin Rydeen, architect. The structure is a two story, 2866 square foot, 11 room, five bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, brick house, with an attached masonry garage and a detached garage. Construction of the house cost $12,000. The 1930 city directory indicates that Edwin Rydeen, a contractor and secretary-treasurer of Rydeen-Den Boer, Inc., a general contractor, and his wife, Josephine M. Rydeen, Lloyd B. Rydeen, a bookkeeper with Siems-Helmers Inc., and Lorraine J. Rydeen, a teacher, all resided at this address. Edwin Rydeen ( -1950) died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Gary R. Tonn and Sharon A. Tonn. Gary Tonn is the purchasing manager for AmSan, a janitorial sanitary maintenance supply distributor located in St. Paul. The 1930 city directory indicates that Charles W. Moore, a contractor, resided at the former nearby 1255 Summit Avenue. Gary Tonn and Sharon Tonn were financial supporters of the Minnesota Oncology Hematology Foundation in 2004.

1220 Summit Avenue: John McCardy House; Built in 1909; Simplified Rectilinear in style; A. L. Garlough, architect. The structure is a two story, 2333 square foot, 12 room, seven bedroom, three bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided house, with a detached garage. The house cost $3,000 to build. John McCardy was St. Paul City Comptroller and the Commander of the Minnesota Department of the Grand Army of the Republic. The 1910 city directory indicates that Mary E. Conway, the widow of James C. Conway, resided at this address and that James E. Conway, a bookkeeper, William J. Conway, a court crier, and Laura B. Conway, a clerk with the Northwestern Telephone Exchange, both boarded at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. John McCarthy and Mr. and Mrs. F. D. McCarthy all resided at this address. Frederic D. McCarthy (1890- ), a Captain, was a World War I veteran who resided at this address in 1919. In 1920, the United States Adjutant-General's Office U. S. Army Register, Volume VIII, indicates that Frederic Donough McCarthy (1890- ,) was a captain who resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that John McCarthy, a clerk at the Railway Mail Service, resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Edward Y. Arnold, the manager of the Twin City Building Material Exchange, and his wife, Bess Arnold, resided at this address. J. J. McCardy represented the Fourth Ward on and was the secretary of the 1879 St. Paul Board of Education. John McCarthy ( -1946) and John McCarthy ( -1950) both died in Ramsey County. James E. Conway ( -1972) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Thompson, and died in Ramsey County. William J. Conway ( -1923) died in Ramsey County. Frederic D. McCarthy ( -1945) died in Ramsey County. Laura B. Conway ( -1940) died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is Arthur Franklin Bergstrom. Arthur Bergstrom was a financial supporter of the Minnesota Historical Society in 2006. [See note on Northwestern Telephone Exchange Company/Northwestern Bell Telephone Company for 562 Lincoln Avenue.] [See note on Railway Mail Service for 360 Maria Avenue.]

1218 Summit Avenue: Built in the 1950's (1957 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Bungalow in style. The structure is a split-level, 1723 square foot, seven room, four bedroom, two bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage. The current owner of record of the property is Margaret J. Hermes.

1213 Summit Avenue: Margaret Rann House; Built in 1922; Early Modern Rectilinear in style; Jens Pedersen, architect. The structure is a two story, 2876 square foot, 14 room, six bedroom, three bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage, which was last sold in 1998 for $210,000. The house was built for $12,000. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. N. L. Coddon and Mr. and Mrs. P. E. Lilleborg all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Eugene J. Gates, his wife, Frances W. Gates, James Erickson, a mechanic employed by Harold J. Slawik Inc., his wife, Elizabeth Erickson, Conrad Olson, and Arthur Redpath all resided at this address. The 1964 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Donald H. Bruce, a member of the Class of 1961, resided at this address. The current owners of record of the property are Karen D. Gray and Nora D. Hall. Nora Hall, Ph.D., is the managing partner and Karen Gray is the senior partner of GrayHall LLP. Nora D. Hall has 22 years of experience in research, management, education, program evaluation, organization and leadership development and was the founder of a leadership program that was housed at the University of Minnesota for 11 years. In 1997, Nora Hall was a Research Fellow at the Humphrey Institute for Public Affairs. Karen Gray has 20 years experience in consulting, planning, evaluation and research for new business development in entrepreneurial and established firms and has been employed as a rehabilitation/employment counselor, evaluator, and business owner.

1212 Summit Avenue: Warren Arend House; Built in 1956; Contemporary in style; Warren Arend, architect. The structure is a 1536 square foot, seven room, four bedroom, two bathroom, split-level frame house, with a detached garage, which was last sold in 1999 for $239,000. The house was constructed at a cost of $15,000. The previous owners of record of the property are Helen J. Harris and Max D. Harris and the current owner of record is Helen J. Harris, who resides in Carrollton, Texas.

1211 Summit Avenue: Frances W. Gates House; Built in 1922 (1923 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Early Modern Rectilinear in style; F. W. Gates, architect. The structure is a two story, 2930 square foot, 12 room, six bedroom, two bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. Construction of the house cost $10,000. The 1930 city directory indicates that Frank L. Osburg resided at this address. Frances W. Gates (1890-1977) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Strehlein, and died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is the EMK Holding Company, LLC, located at 500 Grand Avenue.

1209 Summit Avenue: Homer H. Hoyt House; Built in 1911 (1910 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Bungalow in style; Homer H. Hoyt, architect. The structure is a two story, 1924 square foot, seven room, four bedroom, two bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. The house cost $3,500 to build. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Paul Hartmann resided at this address in 1904. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Bronn resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Silverstein resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Walter C. Jones, vice president of the Twin City Motor Bus Company, and his wife, Buelah H. Jones, resided at this address. Homer Hoyt was one of the early well respected real estate theorists, was a real estate theorist, an urban economist at the University of Chicago, and a sociologist who had strong interests in geography in 1939, and published One Hundred Years of Land Values in Chicago: The Relationship of the Growth of Chicago to the Rise of Its Land Values, 1830-1933 published in Chicago by the University of Chicago Press in 1933 and Structure and Growth of Residential Neighborhoods in American Cities published in Washington, D.C., by the Federal Housing Administration in 1939. Hoyt donated funds to establish the Homer Hoyt Center at Florida State University, which is now known as the Homer Hoyt Program in Land Economics and Finance. Homer H. Hoyt ( -1944) died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is Mae L. Hanegraaf. [See note for Twin City Motor Bus Company for 266 Banfil Street.]

1206 Summit Avenue: Orrin E. Keller House; Built in 1926 (1927 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Mission/Classical Revival/Early Modified Georgian Revival in style; B. J. Raak, architect and builder. The house was built for $8,000. The house is a two story, 2336 square foot, ten room, four bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, stucco structure which has a hipped roof. It also has a detached garage. The 1930 city directory indicates that Orrin E. Keller, a salesman employed by Keis-Gaffney & Company, his wife, Natalie Keller, and Matthew Keller all resided at this address. Orrin Keller was a cattle buyer. Orrin E. Keller (1895-1983) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of La Rue, and died in Dakota County, Minnesota. Bruno J. Raak (1888-1961) was born outside of Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are David G. Aamodt and Yasmine Aamodt. David G. Aamodt is a 1969 graduate of St. Thomas Academy and a financial supporter of the high school in 2005.

1205 Summit Avenue: William F. Keefe House; Built in 1922, with 1952 addition to the rear of the house; Prairie Style/Early Modern Rectilinear in style; W. F. Keefe, architect and builder. The structure is a two story, 3238 square foot, 14 room, seven bedroom, three bathroom, stucco house, which was last sold in 1993 for $225,500. Construction of the house cost $15,000. The house was originally a duplex. The house is a two story stucco structure which has an intersecting low pitched hipped roof. It also has unusual square paned windows. The house is similar to the duplex at 863-865 West Linwood Avenue in St. Paul. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Keefe resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Harrison C. Browne and Henry P. Blanks, a major and an instructor in the Minnesota National Guard, and his wife, Margaret Blanks, all resided at this address. The current owner of record of the property is Francisco V. Deocampo. John S. Christensen, who resided at this address, was a contributor to the John Kerry for President campaign in 2004. The book of Minnesotans: a biographical dictionary of leading living men of Minnesota, edited by Albert Nelson Marquis, indicates that Michael Foley resided at the nearby former 1203 Summit Avenue in 1907. Michael Foley (1849-1920) was a native of Lanark County, Ontario, Canada, was educated in public schools in Canada, immigrated to the United States in 1882, came to Minnesota in 1882, began in contracting in 1882, with headquarters in St. Paul, was a railroad contractor, married Helena Agatha White (1859-1895) at Prescott, Canada, in 1886, was the treasurer of Foley Brothers, railroad contractors, was the treasurer of Foley Brothers & Kelly, wholesale grocers, was a member of Foley Brothers, Larson & Company in 1908, railroad contractors, was a member of the board of directors of the Foley Bean Lumber Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Foley, Lock & Larson, wholesale grocers in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, was a Catholic, was a member of the Minnesota Club, was a member of the St. Paul Town & Country Club, resided at 1003 Portland Avenue in 1900, and officed at the Gilflllan Block in 1907. [See note on Foley Brothers.] [See note on Town & Country Club for 952 Wakefield Avenue.]

1201 Summit Avenue: Built in 1990. The structure is a 1980 square foot, eight room, three bedroom, two bathroom, split-level frame house, with an attached garage. The current owner of record of the property is Mary H. Gavin.

1200 Summit Avenue: Morris Rossman and Mary Rossman House; Built in 1921; Prairie Style/Mission Revival/Early Modern Rectilinear in style; L. Fridman, architect. The house cost $10,000 to build. The house is a two story, 3226 square foot, 13 room, five bedroom, three bathroom, stucco structure which has an intersecting hip roof and a detached garage. The structure's Spanish red tile roof contrasts with the Mission style of house. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Max Morgan, Mr. and Mrs. Morris Rossman, their daughter, and Miss Mary Rossman all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Morris Rossman, his wife, Rose Rossman, Maxwell E. Morgan, the manager of Rossman-Clemons Inc., and his wife, Nettie Morgan, all resided at this address. Morris Rossman owned Rossman, Inc., a retail clothing business. Mary Rossman was a cashier for Rossman, Inc., Nathaniel Rossman was a salesman for Rossman, Inc., and Ida B. Rossman was a cashier for Rossman, Inc. Morris Rossman ( -1945) died in Ramsey County. Nat T. Rossman (1904-1982) died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Geraldine F. McManus and John E. McManus.

1195 Summit Avenue: Built in the 1950's (1957 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Contemporary in style. The structure is a one story, 1637 square foot, seven room, two bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, brick rambler, with a detached garage, which was last sold in 1995 for $169,000. The current owners of record of the property are Carol L. Halloran and T. Jerome Halloran. Jerome Halloran is an attorney.

1190 Summit Avenue: Conrad O. Searle House; Built 1909 (1915 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Conrad O. Searle, architect. The structure is a two story, 3752 square foot, 11 room, five bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, stucco/masonry and frame house, with a detached garage. The house was built for $6,000. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Conrad O. Searle resided at this address in 1904. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Warren B. Strong resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Moses Lieberman resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Moses I. Lieberman, the manager of the Cut Rate Grocery, located at 676 South Smith Avenue, his wife, Hildegarde Lieberman, and Florence Lieberman, a clerk employed by Kronicks, all resided at this address. Conrad O. Searle ( -1947) died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Janet L. Hohn and William C. Hohn. Janet and William Hohn were financial supporters, in memory of Ann Schneider, of the Ridgeview Medical Center Foundation in 2003.

1189 Summit Avenue: Built in 1885 (1890 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Victorian/Vernacular stick in style, altered significantly. The house is a two story, 2531 square foot, eight room, four bedroom, two bathroom, wood frame and shingle structure with an intersecting gable roof. It is the oldest house on this block of Summit Avenue. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mrs. Frank Keogh, her daughter, D. S. Keogh, and F. C. Keogh all resided at this address. World War I veteran Douglas S. Keogh resided at this address in 1919. The records of the 1919-1920 Minnesota World War I Soldier's Bonus Board (#14061) indicate that Douglas Stephen Keogh (1888- ,) a 1918 draftee and a Private in Company 3 of E. O. T. S., who was born in St. Paul, had blue eyes, brown hair, and a dark complexion, was 5' 7" tall, was a concrete construction worker at induction, was a sales representative employed by the Universal Portland Cement Company after the completion of service, and was unmarried, resided with his mother, Mary M. Keogh, at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mrs. Margaret Keogh and T. G. Keogh both resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Margaret M. Keogh, the widow of Frank Keogh, resided at this address. In 1879, Frank Keogh, who resided at 5 Hopkins street, was a partner with Bruno Beaupre (1823- ) and John H. Allen in the wholesale grocery firm of Beaupre, Allen & Keogh, located at 143-147 East Third Street. Beaupre, Allen & Keogh dissolved in 1881 and was succeeded by Beaupre, Keogh & Company, a partnership of Bruno Beaupre, Frank Keogh, and John F. Broderick. In 1886, Frank Keogh was a partner in the wholesale grocery business of Beaupre, Keogh & Company. The last sale of this property was in 2004 and the sale price was $550,000. The current owners of record of the property are Glenn Karwoski and Madelaine S. Karwoski. Glenn Karwoski (1955- ) is the founder of, senior vice president at, and managing director at Minneapolis-based Karwoski & Courage, a communications company, and is the author of CPR (Creating Positive Reputation) for Business. In 2004, Glenn Karwoski put this residence up for rent by a Macalester College faculty member or administrator for between six and ten months. Madelaine Karwoski was the secretary of the Ordway Circle of Stars, a fund raising organization supporting St. Paul's Ordway Theatre, in 2005.

1186 Summit Avenue: ; Built in 1916; Dutch Colonial in style; McAnulty Co., architect and builder. The structure is a two story, 2999 square foot, 11 room, four bedroom, three bathroom, one half-bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided house, with a detached garage, which was last sold in 2002 for $481,000. The house cost $3,800 to build. The 1918 and 1924 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Van Slyck resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that George F. Van Slyck, vice president of Finch, Van Slyck & McConnville, and his wife, Emmalynn Van Slyck, resided at this address. Robert H. McAnulty ( -1959) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Berg, and died in Hennepin County. The current owners of record of the property are Julianna M. Hersman and Steven J. Hersman. [See note on Finch, Van Slyck & McConnville for 969 West Osceola Avenue.]

1180 Summit Avenue: George F. van Slyke and Emmalynn van Slyke House; Built 1909 (1911 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Tudor Revival/Tudor Villa in style; Peter J. Linhoff, architect, and Finstad & Anderson, builder. Building the house cost $5,500. The house is a two story, 4433 square foot, ten room, four bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, wood frame and stucco structure which has an intersecting gable steeply pitched roof with two gable dormers and one shed dormer. The house also has a detached garage. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that George F. Van Slyck resided at this address from 1910 to 1914. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. John H. Allen resided at this address. The records of the 1919-1920 Minnesota World War I Soldier's Bonus Board (#19066) indicate that John H. Allen (- ,) a 1918 draftee and a Sergeant in the Quartermaster Corps, who was born in 1887, had blue eyes, dark brown hair, and a ruddy complexion, was 5' 6 3/4" tall, was a manufacturing worker at induction, was issued one bronze Victory button, was a self-employed candy maker with the Allen-Qualley Company after the completion of service, and was married, resided with his wife, Muriel Wright Allen, at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Jno. H. Allen, president of the Allen Quality Company, resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Allen resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that this address was vacant. George van Slyke (1874- ) was born in Montclair, New Jersey, was the son of William H. van Slyke and Lucy A. Ricker van Slyke, graduated from Yale University in 1894 and the Columbia University Law School in 1896, came to St. Paul in 1906, first married Edith A. Glenny van Slyke in 1895, subsequently married Emmalyn Young van Slyke in 1909, and helped found Finch, Van Slyke, & McConville, which was the largest dry goods wholesaler in the Midwest in the early 20th Century. George van Slyke and Edith Glenny van Slyke had one son, De Forest van Slyke. In 1919, John H. Allen was the president and Arthur L. Qualley was the vice-president of the Allen-Qualley Company, a chocolate company. The current owners of record of the property are David R. Hols and Marjorie Hols. Marjorie C. Hols, a retiree, was a contributor to the John Kerry for President campaign in 2004. David R. Hols is an attorney. Mr. and Mrs. David R. Hols were financial supporters of Second Harvest Heartland in 2003. [See note on Linhoff.]

1179 Summit Avenue: John McDevett House; Built in 1915 (1916 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Simplified Rectilinear in style; F. Sjostrand, architect. The structure is a two story, 3712 square foot, 14 room, eight bedroom, four bathroom, one half-bathroom, masonry and frame house, with two detached garages. The house was constructed at a cost of $7,500. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Jno McDevitt resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. F. A. Ubel resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Frank A. Ubel, president of Frank A. Ubel Inc, opticians and jewelers, and his wife, Mary Ubel, resided at this address. John McDevitt ( -1937) died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are John R. Gaertner and Patricia Gaertner. Dr. John Gaertner graduated from the University of Minnesota Medical School, practices family medicine, and has been a doctor for 46 years. Dr. and Mrs. John R. Gaertner were financial supporters St. Thomas Academy in 2005, of the Convent of the Visitation School in 2005-2006, of Cretin-Derham Hall in 2005-2006, and of St. Mary's University of Minnesota in 2005-2006.

1171 Summit Avenue: Otto N. Raths House; Built in 1925; Early Modern Rectilinear in style; F. J. Eder, architect. The structure is a two story, 2264 square foot, ten room, three bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage, which was last sold in 1992 for $235,500. The house was built for $7,500. The 1930 city directory indicates that Otto N. Raths, the consul for the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg, and his wife, Ellen Raths, resided at this address. Otto N. Raths ( -1947) died in Hennepin County. Frank J. Eder (1902-1991) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Weishaupl, and died in Ramsey County. Frank Joseph Eder (1890-1977) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Nikowitz, and died in Ramsey County. Otto N. Raths ( -1947) was a sergeant in Company B, First Battalion, of the 13th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry which served in the Spanish American War. Raths died in St. Paul according to the program and regimental roster for the 51st Anniversary reunion of the 13th Minnesota Regimental Association held in 1949 at the Automobile Country Club House in Bloomington, Minnesota. On May 16, 1898, the 13th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry departed Camp Ramsey, St. Paul, Minnesota and set out for San Francisco, California. On June 26, 1898, the regiment steamed for Manila. The troops stopped at Pearl Harbor on July 5, 1898, and remained there until July 8, 1898, when their trip to the Philippines resumed. On July 31, 1898, the regiment reached Manila Harbor. They remained on board the ship until August 7, 1898, when a landing was made at Paranque. The regiment set their tents in a peanut field at Camp Dewey, near Manila. On August 19, 1899, the 13th left Manila on board the Sheridan, arriving at San Francisco on September 8, 1899. The regiment was mustered out of U. S. service on October 3, 1899, and, on October 5, 1899, the men left for Minnesota. The current owners of record of the property are Andrew D. Dubner and Susan C. Noe. Andrew D. Dubner is an employee of 3M, a senior specialist with 3M Security Systems Division. With Alan L. Hudd, of Hertfordshire, Great Britain, Philip G. Bentley, of Cambridge, Great Britain, Thomas J. Junck, of Neuss, Germany, Mario Otte, of Dusseldorf, Germany, Andrew D. Dubner was granted U.S. patent (#10,960,725) for a method and apparatus for monitoring usage of liquids of high value. Susan C. Noe is a 1987 graduate in chemical engineering of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

1165 Summit Avenue: Fred M. Fogg House; Built in 1927; Colonial Revival/Georgian Revival in style; Lundstrom & Anderson, architects and builders. The house cost $18,000 to build. The house is a three story (two story according to Ramsey County property tax records,) 3587 square foot, 12 room, five bedroom, four bathroom, one half-bathroom, brick structure which has a steeply pitched intersecting gable roof. It also has stained glass windows and a detached garage. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Frederic M. Fogg resided at this address from 1928 to 1936. The 1930 city directory indicates that Frederick M. Fogg, a realtor, and his wife, Hazel L. Fogg, resided at this address. The 1964 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that James W. McManus, a member of the Class of 1962, resided at this address. Fred Fogg was a salesman and realtor. Frederic A. Fogg ( -1930) died in Ramsey County. The Fogg burial plot at Oakland Cemetery includes the graves of Patricia L. Fogg (1933-1945,) Frederic A. Fogg (1850-1930,) his wife, Louise Miller Fogg (1853-1918,) Frederic M. Fogg (1883-1935,) and his wife, Hazel L. Fogg (1889-1967.) The current owners of record of the property are Brian P. Short and Kathleen D. Short, who reside in Minneapolis. Brian P. Short, a graduate of the University of Notre Dame and the Notre Dame University Law School, is the Chief Executive Officer of the Leamington Company, a holding company with interests in transportation, community banking, agricultural production and real estate that operates Admiral Merchants Motor Freight, Inc., St. Paul Flight Center, Inc., First Farmers & Merchants Banks, Municipal Parking, Inc. and Benson Parking Services, Inc., and is a director of C. H. Robinson Worldwide. < a href="http://www.angelfire.com/mn/thursdaynighthikes/summiteast1.html"> [See note for Frederick A. Fogg for 285 Summit Avenue.]

1164 Summit Avenue: Albert P. Wallich House/Dr. W. C. Carroll House; Built in 1914; Craftsman/Prairie Style/Colonial Revival/Medieval Rectilinear in style; Alden & Harris, architect, and A. G. Erickson, builder. The house was constructed at a cost of $17,000. The house is a two story, 3991 square foot, 12 room, six bedroom, two bathroom, two half-bathroom, brick structure which has a hipped roof and a symmetrical facade. The house also has many stained glass windows and a detached garage. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Albert P. Wallich resided at this address from 1914 to 1921. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Mary Ella Wallich (1858-1916,) the wife of Albert P. Wallich, who was born in Illinois to parents who were born in the United States and who died of organic heart disease, resided at this address in 1916. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Albert P. Wallich resided at this address in 1917. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. A. P. Wallich resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Lena Colt, the widow of Robert Colt, roomed at this address. W. C. Carroll resided at this address in 1924. The 1924 city directory indicates that Dr. and Mrs. W. C. Carroll and Miss N. M. Carroll all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that William C. Carroll, a surgeon associated with the St. Paul Clinic, and his wife, Lauretta Carroll, resided at this address. Albert P. Wallich ( -1925) died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is Alford S. Karayusuf. Alford S. Karayusuf M.D. is a phsychiatrist with the Associated Clinic of Psychology in the Twin Cities. Alford Karayusuf, a self-employed physician, was a contributor to the Howard Dean for President campaign in 2004.

1157 Summit Avenue: Dr. D. C. Walde House; Built in 1924; Tudor Villa in style; Peter J. Linhoff, architect. The structure is a two story, 2891 square foot, 12 room, six bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, masonry and frame house, with a detached garage. The house was built for $14,220. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Dr. Karl C. Wold built the house in 1924, that Dr. Wold resided at this address from 1925 to 1926, and that the house was badly damaged by an explosion in 1926. The 1930 city directory indicates that Alf E. Hakanson, associated with Perry A. Swenson & Hakanson, and his wife, Viola Hakanson, resided at this address. The current owners of record of the property are Joseph M. Finley and Mary M. Finley. In 2003, Joseph Finley was a contributor to the Randy Kelly for Mayor campaign and resided at this address. Joseph M. Finley is the president of Leonard, Street & Deinard, is a member of the American College of Real Estate Lawyers, and is an adjunct professor at William Mitchell College of Law. [See note on Linhoff.] [See note on Karl Christian Wold for 685 West Linwood Avenue.]

1156 Summit Avenue: George R. Holmes House; Built in 1907 (1906 according to Ramsey County property tax records); Baroque Revival/Classical Rectilinear in style; Charles A. Bassford, architect, and Henry Kohlman, builder. The house cost $12,000 to build. The house is a two story, 4055 square foot, 11 room, six bedroom, three, one half-bathroom, brick structure which has an intersecting gable hipped roof. It also has leaded glass windows with stone sills and lintels and a detached garage. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that George R. Holmes resided at this address from 1908 to 1922. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. G. R. Holmes and their daughter resided at this address. George Holmes was a jeweler. World War I veteran George L. Fogel resided at this address in 1919. The 1920 city directory indicates that Harry H. Fogle, a jeweler employed by George R. Holmes & Son, Inc., boarded at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. G. W. La Brand and Mrs. M. H. Fogle all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Jacob Lampert, a lumberman, and his wife, Marie Lampert, resided at this address. George R. Holmes ( -1922) died in Ramsey County. Henry Kohlman ( -1952) died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is Deborah R. Olson. Deborah Olson, the president of Nelson Laboratories, was a contributor to the Democratic National Committee in 2004. Deborah Olson is the president of the American Veterinary Distributors Association. Deborah Olson, the CEO of Nelson Laboratories, contributed to the Hillary Clinton for President campaign in 2007-2008. [See note on Charles Asher Bassford.]

1153 Summit Avenue: D. J. Hertz House; Built in 1925; Twenties Villa in style; Gus Lindgren, architect. The structure is a two story, 1887 square foot, eight room, four bedroom, two bathroom, masonry and frame house, with a detached garage. Building the house cost $10,000. The 1930 city directory indicates that David I. Hertz, associated with Capitol Suspender Company, and his wife, Della Hertz, resided at this address. David I. Hertz ( -1945) died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Lisa Ann Prouty Gehrig and Mark N. Gehrig. Since 1977, Mark Gehrig is an Accredited Senior Appraiser with Jabs, Gehrig & Co., specializing in business valuation and in the appraisal and valuation of fractional ownership interests, both majority and minority, of closely held corporations and partnerships and performing financial analysis and valuation of warrants, options, preferred stock and fixed income securities of privately owned firms, in addition to the appraisal of intellectual property and intangible assets.

1149 Summit Avenue: O. G. Hasper House; Built in 1904 (1905 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Simplified Rectilinear in style; Buechner & Orth, architect. The structure is a two story, 3326 square foot, 13 room, eight bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage. The house was constructed for $6,000. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Nancy A. Gilbert (1831-1909,) the widowed of Mrs. Fred G. Prest, who was born in New York to parents born in the United States and who died of arteriosclerosis, resided at this address in 1909. The 1918 city directory indicates that V. R. O'Brien resided at this address. Vincent R. O'Brien was a World War I veteran who resided at this address in 1919. The records of the 1919-1920 Minnesota World War I Soldier's Bonus Board (#14174) indicate that Vincent R. O'Brien (1888- ,) a 1918 draftee and a Private in the F. A. R. T., who was born in St. Paul, had gray eyes, light hair, and a fair complexion, was 5' 9" tall, was a supply clerk at induction, was a plumbing and heating supply clerk employed by the Cochran-Sargent Company after the completion of service, and was married, resided with his wife, Margaret L. O'Brien, at this address. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Arthur Jay Gillette (1864-1921,) the husband of Kathrine Gillette, who was born in Minnesota to parents born in the United States and who died of apoplexy, resided at this address in 1921. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Elmquist resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Charles E. Elmquist, a lawyer and a partner in the law firm of Clapp, Richardson, Elmquist, Briggs & McCartney, and his wife, Charlotte G. Elmquist, resided at this address. In 1934, Charles E. Elmquist and Charlotte Gemmel Elmquist resided at this address and were members of the Minikahda Contry Club. Margaret Gillette, the daughter of Arthur Gillette and Ellen Moore Gillette (1865-1905,) was the wife of Vincent O'Brien. Arthur Gillette subsequently married Katherine Kennedy, a nurse at the Gillette Crippled Childrens Hospital, in 1907 and the couple had a summer residence in Dellwood, Minnesota, on White Bear Lake. Arthur Jay Gillette, the son of Albert Gillette and Ellen Gillette, grew up on a farm in South St. Paul, Minnesota, initially attended Hamline University, then attended the Minnesota Hospital College and the St. Paul Medical College, was a 1903 graduate of the University of Minnesota Medical School, was a member of the Nu Sigma Nu fraternity, moved to New York, and studied orthopaedic surgery under Dr. Lewis Albert Sayer and Dr. Newton Shaffer, was an orthopedic surgeon, returned to Minnesota in 1888, was Minnesota's first full-time orthopaedist, was an instructor at the University of Minnesota Medical School in 1890, was aprofessor of orthopedic surgery at the University of Minnesota Medical School in 1916, was the surgeon in charge of the Minnesota State Hospital for the Crippled and Deformed in 1916, was an orthopedic surgeon at St. Luke's Hospital, was an orthopedic surgeon at St. Joseph's Hospital, was an orthopedic surgeon at Bethesda Hospital, was an orthopedic surgeon at St. Paul's Hospital, was an orthopedic surgeon at St. John's Hospital, was the president of the American Orthopedic Association, was the president of the Ramsey County Medical Society, was the president of the Minnesota Academy of Medicine, was the president of the Minnesota Medical Association in 1918, was a member of the University Club, was a member of the Minnesota Club, was a member of the St. Paul Commercial Club, was a Mason, resided in the Seven Corners neighborhood of St. Paul during the Winter in 1916, and resided at Dellwood, White Bear Lake, Minnesota, during the Summer in 1916. Charles Emil Elmquist (1873-1948) was a graduate of the University of Minnesota, was the chairman of the Federal Electric Railways Commission in 1920, was a delegate to Republican National Convention from Minnesota from Ramsey County in 1932, and died in Ramsey County. Charlotte Gemmel Elmquist ( -1944) died in Ramsey County. During and immediately after World War I, inflation robbed the nickel of most of its value, even as wages doubled. Companies begged legislatures for permission to raise their fares, usually in vain. By 1919, street railways in New York, Providence, Buffalo, New Orleans, Denver, St. Louis, Birmingham, Montgomery, Pittsburgh, and several smaller cities were in receivership. In May, 1919, the Secretary of Commerce and the Secretary of Labor joined in a letter to President Wilson, advising him that 50 or more urban street railway systems representing a considerable percentage of the electric railway mileage was in the hands of receivers, affecting some of the largest cities of the country, and that other systems were on the verge of insolvency and the industry as a whole was virtually bankrupt. They urged the appointment of a commission to study and report upon the problem. President Wilson, on June 1, 1919, named a commission which held extensive public hearings. The Federal Electric Railways Commission reported that while electric railways were still necessary and viable private enterprises, it would take a profound restructuring of regulation, labor relations, and capitalization to return them to profitability. In 1935, Congress passed the Public Utility Holding Company Act, which the Securities and Exchange Commission interpreted as requiring electric power companies to divest themselves of their transit operations. In many cases electric railways were surviving only because they were part of the power business, which had grown out of the railway decades earlier and had come to surpass it. The divestment order was a death sentence to electric railways across the country. Between 1909 and 1940, 489 transit companies operating 30,302 miles of electric railways went bankrupt. To put those numbers in perspective, by 1937 there were only 478 transit companies left in the United States, operating 23,770 miles of track. Average fares were still only 6.9 cents in 1945. However, post-World War II inflation finally caused transit fares to start rising rapidly. By 1954, the average fare was almost 20 cents and the industry was still barely able to cover operating expenses from the fareboxes. In 1968, the first year the industry reported a net operating loss, average fares had risen to almost 23 cents. In 1988, average fares were 62 cents, but the revenue generated by passengers only covered 36% of operating expenses. The remainder of the funds needed to operate came mainly from federal, state, and local government sources. The current owners of record of the property are Roderick A. Barke and Linda F. Carson. Roderick A. Barke, M.D., is a doctor at the Minneapolis Veterans Affairs Medical Center and is a faculty member of the Department of Surgery of the University of Minnesota Medical School. Linda F. Carson, M.D., is a Gynecological Oncology doctor and is a faculty member of the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Women's Health of the University of Minnesota Medical School. [See note on Charles William Buechner.] [See note on Henry W. Orth.] [See note on the Cochran-Sargent Company for 79 Western Avenue North.] [See note for the Minikahda Club for 702 Fairmount Avenue.]

1142 Summit Avenue: Charles A. Roach House; Built in 1912; Colonial/Georgian Revival in style; Peter J. Linhoff, architect. The house was built for $8,500. The house is a three story (two story according to Ramsey County property tax records,) 5032 square foot, 15 room, nine bedroom, five bathroom, brick house which has a medium pitched roof. The house has a symmetrical design and has a detached garage. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Charles A. Roach resided at this address in 1913 and that Ada L. Mayall resided at this address from 1914 to 1933. The 1918 city directory indicates that Miss A. L. Mayall and Miss Ada Mayall both resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Miss Ida Mayall resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Ada Mayall resided at this address. Charles Roach was an adjuster for the Remington Typewriter Company. Miss Ada Mayall resided at this address in 1916. Virginia Burris Roach was the wife of Charles A. Roach. Ada L. Mayall ( -1934) died in Ramsey County. Peter J. Linhoff designed 17 houses along Summit Avenue. The current owners of record of the property are David Klevan and Susan Klevan. David H. Klevan, MD, FACP, is Chief of Professional Services for HealthPartners Como Clinic, Internal Medicine. Susan Klevan, unemployed, contributed to the Hillary Clinton for President campaign in 2007-2008. [See note on Linhoff.]

1141 Summit Avenue: William Ivins House; Built in 1919 (Sandeen and Larson; 1920 according to Ramsey County property tax records) and altered in 1934 and 1937; Tudor Revival/Tudor Villa in style; Clarence H. Johnston, Sr., architect, and O. H. Rundquist, builder. The house cost $12,000 to build (Sandeen; $21,000 according to Larson). The house is a two story, 4382 square foot, 11 room, six bedroom, four bathroom, two half-bathroom, stucco structure which has an intersecting gable and a slate hip roof. It also has a detached garage and a second one story, bungalow style, 622 square foot, four room, two bedroom, one bathroom, brick residence on the same lot. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. W. N. S. Ivins resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Chester A. Dosdell, the secretary of the St. Paul Fire & Marine Insurance Company, and his wife, Marie C. Dosdell, resided at this address. William Ivins worked for the Great Northern RailRoad. In 1934, Chester A. Dosdall, Marie Culligan Dosdall, Thomas Dosdall, and Chester A. Dosdall, Jr., all resided at this address. The 1950 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Chester A. Dosdall, Jr. (1927- ,) who attended the school from 1938 until 1945, who attended the University of Rochester, who married Marijane Cavelli in 1950, who served as a Corporal in the U. S. Army after World War II, and was employed by the St. Paul Mercury Indemnity Company, and that Thomas Dosdall (1930- ,) who attended the school from 1941 until 1948 and who attended Princeton University, both resided at this address. The Dosdall family were members of the Minikahda Country Club, the St. Paul Athletic Club, and the Women's Club of St. Paul in 1934. Chester A. Dosdall ( -1949) and Marie C. Dosdall (1891-1980) both died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Deborah S. Rupp and William M. Rupp. William M. Rupp, M.D., is a surgeon and is the Medical Director of the Bariatric Center of United Hospital and is affiliated with St. Paul Surgeon's Ltd. [See note on Clarence H. Johnston.] < a href="http://www.angelfire.com/mn/thursdaynighthikes/minnrrs.html"> [See note on the Great Northern RailRoad.] [See note on the St. Paul Fire & Marine Insurance Company for 297 Bates Avenue.] [See note for the Minikahda Club for 702 Fairmount Avenue.]

1135 Summit Avenue: Thomas D. McLaughlin House; Built in 1905 (1909 according to Ramsey County property tax records); Colonial Revival/Prairie Style/Eclectic Rectilinear in style; Louis Lockwood, architect, and H. D. Frankson, builder. The house was constructed for $17,000. The house is a two story, 4448 square foot, 12 room, five bedroom, three bathroom, two half-bathroom, brick structure which has intersecting gable hipped roof. The house also has an attached masonry garage and a 760 square foot, one story, two room, one bedroom, one bathroom, wood frame carriage house located towards the back of the lot. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Thomas D. McLaughlin resided at this address from 1906 to 1910. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mrs. James McClure resided at this address. The 1920 federal census indicates that Andrew B. Clarke (1843- ,) a banker employed by a bank and the head of household, who was born in English Canada to a father who was born in Vermont and a mother who was born in New York, his wife, Victoria A. Clark (1885- ,) who was born in Iowa to parents who were born in Sweden, his sister-in-law, Eda E. Clarke (1887- ,) who was born in Iowa to parents who were born in Sweden, and a servant, Elvira S. Johnston (1900- ,) a who was born in Minnesota to parents who were born in Sweden, all resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. James Neiger and Mrs. Eva Husch all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that James Neiger, the president of Husch Brothers, Inc., and his wife, Jennie Neiger, resided at this address. The 1950 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Robert P. Frenzel (1926- ,) who attended the school from 1942 until 1944, who graduated from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1949, and who served in the military during World War II, that Thomas M. Frenzel (1931- ,) who attended the school from 1945 until 1949 and who attended Dartmouth College, and that William E. Frenzel (1926- ,) who attended the school from 1942 until 1946 and who attended Dartmouth College, all resided at this address. McLaughlin was associated with McLaughlin Brothers, who were importers of stallions. The current owners of record of the property are Anil Poulose and Clare Poulose. Anil Poulose, M.D., is a physician with Allina Health System-Abbott NorthWestern Hospital in Minneapolis. Anil Poulose, M.D., was an author in 2005, along with ten other authors, of a paper in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology entitled "Patent Foramen Ovale: Current Pathology, Pathophysiology, and Clinical Status." [See note on Lockwood.]

1134 Summit Avenue: Built about 1912 (1913 according to Ramsey County property tax records); Tudor Revival/Early Modern Rectilinear in style. The house is a 2 1/2 story, 3269 square foot, five bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, brick structure which has a jerkinhead roof (a clipped gable roof that is truncated at the apex) with eyelid dormers. It also has an attached masonry garage and a detached garage. Louis Salet and Leon Salet both resided at this address in 1916 and again in 1924. W. A. Tilden resided at this address in 1918. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Leon Salet and Louis Salet all resided at this address. Harry N. Salet, (1894- ), a First Lieutenant, was a World War I veteran who resided at this address in 1919. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Louis Salet resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Leon Salet and his wife, Anna Salet, resided at this address. Leon Salet, a Russian Jew, emigrated to Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, was a peddler in Grand Forks, Minnesota, resided in St. Paul in 1891, moved to Mankato, Minnesota, in 1892 with his wife, Annie __?__ Salet, and their children, Louis Salet ( -1963) and Harry Salet, opened a department store in Mankato, Minnesota, managed by Louis Salet, returned to St. Paul in 1917, purchased this house on Summit Avenue, was a member of the Temple of Aaron, and was a member of the board of trustees of Jewish Home for the Aged. Leon Salet and Louis Salet eventually opened department stores in New Ulm, Minnesota, South St. Paul, Minnesota, Winona, Minnesota, Owatonna, Minnesota, and Rochester, Minnesota. William A. Tilden ( - 1931) and Leon Salet ( -1954) both died in Ramsey County. The property was last sold in 1996 for $359,000. The current owners of record of the property are Ronald E. Schutte and Wendy L. Schutte. Ronald Schutte was a 1971 graduate of Northland College and is a Manager employed by 3M. [See note on the Minnesota Mining & Manufacturing Company/3M for 682 Fairmount Avenue.]

1127 Summit Avenue: Smith and J. W. Taylor House; Built in 1891; Early Modern Rectilinear in style; John Haulen, architect. The 1893 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Taylor, their daughter, Carl Taylor, and Colonel John W. Taylor all resided at this address. The 1910 city directory indicates that John W. Taylor was the president of the Taylor Realty Company, located at the Globe Building, and resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Caroline L. Carlson, a stenographer employed by the Great Northern RailRoad, boarded at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Taylor resided at this address. In 1889, John W. Taylor was instrumental in the founding of the White Bear Yacht Club and, in 1897, in the founding of the Inland Lakes Yachting Association. [See note on the Great Northern RailRoad.] [See note on the White Bear Yacht Club for 767 Goodrich Avenue.]

1126 Summit Avenue: Laurence C. Jefferson House; Built in 1905 (1903 according to Ramsey County property tax records); Tudor Revival/Tudor Villa in style; St. Paul Building Co., architect and builder. The house was built for $15,000. The house is a 2 1/2 story, 3299 square foot, four bedroom, three bathroom, one half-bathroom, brick structure which has a steep slate roof. It also has a detached garage. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Lawrence C. Jefferson resided at this address from 1905 to 1938. The 1906 Jubilee Manual of the House of Hope Presbyterian Church indicates that Lawrence C. Jefferson, a member of the church since 1888, resided at this address. In 1911, Nellie Coburn (Mrs. Lawrence Church) Jefferson was a Minnesota vice regent of the Daughters of the American Revolution and resided at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence C. Jefferson and Mrs. A. C. Coburn all resided at this address. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Anna C. Coburn (1849-1920,) the widowed mother of Mrs. L. C. Jefferson, who was born in Massachusetts to parents born in the United States and who died of apoplexy, resided at this address in 1920. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. L. C. Jefferson and their daughters resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Lawrence C. Jefferson, who officed at the Pioneer Building, and his wife, Nellie C. Jefferson, resided at this address. In 1934, Lawrence C. Jefferson, Nellie Coburn Jefferson, and Louise D. Jefferson all resided at this address. The Jeffersons were members of the Schubert Club in 1934. Lawrence C. Jefferson was a graduate of Princeton University. The property was last sold for $225,000 and that sale occurred in 1993. The current owners of record of the property are Juliann F. S. P. Geis and Robert P. Thavis. Robert P. Thavis (1955- ) was born Mankato, Minnesota, graduated from St. John's University, Mankato State University (B.A., 1977) and Yale University Law School (J.D., 1980), was admitted to to the practice of law in 1980 in Minnesota, in 2001 in Wisconsin, and in 2003 in North Dakota, and is a Shareholder practicing in insurance coverage litigation and business torts litigation for Leonard, Street & Deinard, Professional Association.

1118 Summit Avenue: Dr. Knox Bacon House; Built in 1902; Colonial Revival/Queen Anne Rectilinear in style; Louis Lockwood, architect, and J. J. Booth, builder. The house cost $5,000 to build. The house is a 2 1/2 story, 3363 square foot, six bedroom, three bathroom, wood frame structure which has a symmetrical facade. It also has a detached garage. The house predates the surrounding structures. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Knox Bacon resided at this address from 1903. The book of Minnesotans: a biographical dictionary of leading living men of Minnesota, edited by Albert Nelson Marquis, indicates that Knox Bacon resided at this address in 1907. The 1910 city directory indicates that Knox Backus was a physician at the Lowry Arcade Building and resided at this address. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Minerva Emerson Bacon (1871-1914,) the wife of Dr. Knox Bacon, who was born in Minnesota to parents who were born in the United States and who died of Addison's disease, resided at this address in 1914. The 1918 city directory indicates that Dr. and Mrs. Knox Bacon and Miss Zillah Knox all resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Knox Bacon, a physician who officed at the Lowry Building, resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. R. W. Clark resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Roy W. Clark, a general traffic manager, and his wife, Margaret C. Clark, resided at this address. In 1934, Roy W. Clark, Margaret Haines Clark, George E. Clark, Edward S. Clark, and Margaret C. Clark all resided at this address and were notable members of St. Paul society. The 1989 Arlington Hills Lutheran Church directory indicates that Dr. Robert Nelson, DeeAnne Nelson, Dana Nelson, Connie Nelson, Rebecca Nelson, and Andrea Nelson all resided at this address. Knox Bacon (1864- ,) the son of Dr. Cyrus Bacon, Jr. (1837-1868,) a U. S. Army physician during the American Civil War who treated the wounded from the Battle of Gettysburg, and Arabella Knox Bacon (1838-1899,) the grandson of Cyrus Bacon and Melinda Guersey Bacon and of Abraham Philip Knox and Elizabeth Cholwell Knox, was born in Niles, Berrien County, Michigan, attended the Niles, Michigan, High School, graduated from the University of Minnesota Medical School in 1894, was in the private practice of medicine in St. Paul after 1894, officed at the Lowry Building in 1907, was the general surgeon for the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha RailRoad from 1897 until 1901, married Minerva Emmerson in St. Paul in 1897, was the visiting physician for the St. Paul Home for the Friendless and for the Protestant Orphan Asylum, was a member of the surgical staff of St. Luke's Hospital, was a member of the Ramsey County Medical Society, was a member of the executive committee of the Minnesota Medical Society, was the author of the paper "Case of Symptomatic Epilepsy, Circumcision, and Complete Recovery" in the St. Paul Medical Journal in 1901, was a member of the Nu Sigma Nu fraternity, was a member of the board of directors of the St. Paul Commercial Club, and officed at the Lowry Building in 1907. In 1891, Zillah Knox was a clerk employed by the Minnesota State Board of Corrections and Charities. In 1892, Zillah Knox was a stenographer employed by the Minnesota State Board of Corrections and Charities with an annual salary of $480. In 1894, Knox Bacon and Zillah Knox were two of 117 delegates representing the State of Minnesota at the St. Paul Prison Conference sponsored by the National Prison Association of the United States. In 1896, Zillah Knox remained a stenographer employed by the Minnesota State Board of Corrections and Charities. Roy W. Clark was an assistant to the president of the Northern Pacific RailRoad in 1909. Howard Elliott was the president of the Northern Pacific RailRoad in 1909. Howard Elliott (1860-1928) was born in New York, New York, graduated from the Lawrence Scientific School, Harvard University, with a degree in Civil Engineer in 1881, was a level roadman in the engineer corps of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy RailRoad, was a clerk in the president's office of the St. Louis, Keokuk & Northwestern RailRoad, was an auditor and assistant treasurer for the Chicago, Burlington & Kansas City RailRoad and St. Louis, Keokuk & Northwestern RailRoad from 1882 to 1887, was a general freight and passenger agent for the Chicago, Burlington & Kansas City RailRoad and St. Louis, Keokuk & Northwestern RailRoad from 1887 to 1891, was the general freight agent for the Chicago, Burlington & Kansas City RailRoad, the St. Louis, Keokuk & Northwestern RailRoad, the Hannibal & St. Joseph RailRoad, and the Kansas City, St. Joseph & Council Bluffs RailRoad from 1891 to 1896, was the general manager for the Chicago, Burlington & Kansas City RailRoad, the St. Louis, Keokuk & Northwestern RailRoad, the Hannibal & St. Joseph RailRoad, and the Kansas City, St. Joseph & Council Bluffs RailRoad from 1896 to 1902, was the second vice-president of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy RailRoad in 1902, was the president of the Northern Pacific RailRoad, the Washington & Columbia River RailRoad and the Minnesota & International RailRoad from 1903 to 1913, resided in St. Paul, was the president and chairman of the board of directors of the New York, New Haven & Hartford RailRoad from 1913 to 1917, was chairman of the committee on Intercorporate Relations of the New York, New Haven & Hartford RailRoad from 1917, was a member of the Railroads' War Board in 1917, was president of the Northern Pacific Railway from 1917 to 1920, and was chairman of the board of the Northern Pacific Railway from 1920. Howard Elliott gave an address entitled "The Land of Fortune" to the National Irrigation Congress in Spokane, Washington, in 1909, gave an address entitled "Montana" in 1910, gave an address entitled "Co-Operation between the Railway Owner, the Railway Employee and the Railway User" in 1910, gave an address entitled "The College Man in Business" in 1910, gave an address entitled "Address" in 1910, gave an address entitled "The Relation of the Railway to Community and State-Wide Advertising" in 1910, gave an address entitled "The Individual, the Corporation and the Government" to the National Association of Manufacturers Convention in New York in 1911, gave an address entitled "A Mile of Railroad and the Country Store" in 1911, delivered a talk entitled "Minnesota, The Railways and Advertising" to the Minnesota Federation of Commercial Clubs in 1911, gave an address entitled "Efficient Railway Management" to the $100 and Acre Club of Valley City, North Dakota, in 1911, delivered a talk entitled "The Work of the Farmer and of the Railroad in Minnesota" in 1912, delivered a talk entitled "Public Opinion, Its Effect on Business" to the Publicity Club of Minneapolis in 1912, delivered a talk entitled "Relation between the Farmer and the Railroad" in 1912, delivered a talk entitled "The Conservation of Railway Service" at the second Minnesota Conservation and Agricultural Development Congress in Minneapolis in 1912, delivered a talk entitled "The City of Superior, the Northern Pacific Railway and their Future Growth" in 1913, and gave an address entitled "New London situation and labor problems" to the Chamber of Commerce of New London, Connecticut in 1916. Howard Elliott authored The Truth About RailRoads, published in Boston, Massachusetts, by the Houghton Mifflin Company in 1913. Roy W. Clark ( -1948) and Margaret C. Clark ( -1938) both died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Deeanne W. Nelson and Robert P. Nelson. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that John A. Ostlund resided at the former nearby 1115 Summit Avenue in 1922. [See note for the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha RailRoad.] [See note for the Minnesota & International RailRoad.] [See note for the Northern Pacific RailRoad.] [See note for the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy RailRoad.]

1111 Summit Avenue: St. George's Greek Orthodox Church/Former Alex A. McDonell Residence; Built in 1967; Byzantine Revival in style; Voight-Fourre, architect. The building cost $150,000 to build. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Samuel C. Stickney resided at this address from 1902. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. A. A. McDonnell resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Amanda Arvidson, a nurse, roomed at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. A. A. McDonnell resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Alex A. McDonell resided at this address. The 1939 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that A. Angus McDonell (1917- ,) who attended the school from 1928 until 1930 and who attended Harvard University, resided at this address. Rev. Fr. Richard Demetrius Andrews is the presbyter of the church, George Kanavati is the parish council president, Barbara Bauman is the choir director, and Anna Christoforides is the Greek school director. St. George the Great Martyr was an officer in the Roman army who, because he was a Christian, was killed for refusing to enforce the Emperor's edict against the Church. St. George is frequently depicted as being engaged in battle with a dragon. By 1910, St. Paul had about 100 Greek immigrants. By 1923, 78 Greek-owned businesses had been opened in St. Paul. Until 1939, the St. Paul Greek community attended St. Mary's Greek Orthodox Church on East Lake Street in Minneapolis. In 1936, the Greek community raised $4,000 to acquire its own church. In 1939, the property at 1111 Summit Avenue, known as the McDonald Mansion, was purchased and remodeled to serve the St. George Greek Orthodox Community as their first Church. The first service to be held in the new church was on Palm Sunday in 1940. In 1967, a fire of unknown origin destroyed the interior of the church, compelling the construction of a new church. The building of the church was completed in 1968. In 1975, the mortgage loan on the church was paid off. In 2000, renovation of the church was completed, with the addition of new priest and secretary offices, an elevator, entrances, and improvements to two restrooms. World War I veteran John Lynch resided at this address in 1919. The current owner of record of the property is the St. George Greek Orthodox Church. [See note on Samuel Crosby Stickney for 653 Goodrich Avenue.]

1106 Summit Avenue: Minnie F. Lennon House; Built in 1911 (1922 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Tudor Villa in style; Peter J. Linhoff, architect, and Minnesota Investment Company, builder. The house was built for $12,500. The house is a 2 1/2 story, 2122 square foot, four bedroom, two bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided structure, with a tuck-under two car garage, which was last sold in 1992 for $225,000. The porch is unusual for a Tudor style house and probably was altered. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. George E. Lennon and Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Lennon all resided at this address. J. Warren Lennon (1895- ), a Boatswain's Mate, was a World War I veteran who resided at this address in 1919. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. G. E. Lennon resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that George E. Lennon resided at this address. Minnie Lennon was a seamstress. She reportedly was the widow of John Lennon, but also is reported to be the wife of George Lennon. Her son, John Warren Lennon, was the assistant secretary of the St. Paul Baseball Club. Edward B. Smith was the owner and George Lennon, a downtown clothing business owner, Seventh Street and Wabasha Avenue, and amateur baseball club sponsor, was the president of the St. Paul Saints Baseball Club in 1902. George Lennon was the principal owner of the St. Paul Saints Baseball Club from 1905 until 1915. John W. Norton, the St. Paul Saints president, purchased the St. Paul Baseball and Amusement Company and the Saints in 1915. George E. Lennon was a partner of William M. Gibbons in the clothing business in 1901. In 1915, George E. Lennon and Herman Benz were partners in developing a new 2,500 seat moving picture theatre at the corner of Seventh Street and Wabasha Avenue. The current owners of record of the property are John A. Siekmeier and Rebecca L. Siekmeier. John A. Siekmeier is a Senior Research Engineer for the Minnesota Department of Transportation and was a presenter as part of the National Cooperative Highway Research Program Project Panel on Intelligent Soil Compaction Systems in 2007. John Siekmeier was a member of the Summit Hill Association Board in 2004 and 2005. [See note on Linhoff.]

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Information from the University of Minnesota, Northwest Architectural Archives, was used in this webpage.

This webpage was last modified on July 28, 2011.