Thursday Night Hikes: Western Summit Avenue Hike Architecture Notes

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Thursday Night Hikes: Western Summit Avenue Hike Architecture Notes


Observations on Architectural Styles

Western Summit Avenue Hike

Assembled by

Lawrence A. Martin

Webpage Creation: October 20, 2003

General. Summit Avenue in St. Paul, Minnesota, is one of the best preserved upper-class Victorian promenade boulevards in America. It is a monumental boulevard of houses, churches, synagogues, and schools that stretches four-and-one-half miles from the Cathedral of St. Paul, just north and west of downtown, to the Mississippi River. Summit Avenue Historic District map

Additional Specific Structures. The following presents available information on the housing styles of specific structures located along the hike:

West End of Summit Avenue: World War I Monument; Built in 1922; Beaux Arts in style; Magnus Jemne, architect. The monument is made of granite. It was erected by the St. Paul Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution. It is dedicated to the memory of the residents of St. Paul and of Ramsey County who died in service during World War I. Magnus Jemne (1882-1964), a Norwegian, was a St. Paul architect architect who was born outside Minnesota, designed the 1931 St. Paul Women's City Club/Jemne Building at Kellogg Boulevard and St. Peter Street, and died in Ramsey County. Else/Elsa Laubach Jemne, a diary-writer of German extraction, was an artist who is credited with many murals and paintings. Elsa Laubach Jemne (1887-1974) was born in St. Paul, attended the St. Paul Art School and the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, received a Cresson Traveling Scholarship in 1914 and 1915 which enabled her to pursue her studies in France, England, and Italy, married Magnus Jemne in 1917, painted oils and watercolors of the Rocky Mountains during trips in the 1920's and 1930's, illustrated children's books in the 1930's and 1940's, taught painting at the Minneapolis School of Art from 1946-1950, painted murals for the Stearns County Courthouse, St. Cloud, Minnesota, in 1922, painted a 12-foot frescoed mural in the Minneapolis Armory and a mural in the Ladysmith, Wisconsin, post office, worked with the Treasury Department, and died in Ramsey County. Elsa Laubach Jemne first painted in the West in 1925 and 1926 and was commissioned by the Great Northern Railroad to paint portraits of Blackfoot Indians like Little Plume, Many Tail Feathers, Mrs. Curly Bear, and Lazy Boy. Elsa Jemne had one-person exhibitions in 1957 at the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, and, in 1961, at the Women's City Club of St. Paul. Magnus Jemne was a veteran of World War I from Ramsey County who resided at 71 West Winifred Street in St. Paul in 1919. Works by Elsa Jemne are held by the Frederick R. Weisman Art Museum, the Minnesota Museum of American Art, and the Montana Historical Society. The Women's City Club of St. Paul was founded in 1921, had 1,000 members in 1931, when the building was built, had its debt paid off in 1937, and was sold to the Minnesota Museum of Art in 1971. The St. Paul Art School is now the Minnesota Museum of American Art. Magnus Jemne (1887-1974) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Peters, and died in Ramsey County. Elsa Jemne (1882-1967) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Holten, and died in Ramsey County. [See note on the Great Northern RailRoad.]

2279 Summit Avenue: George L. Burg House; Built in 1964; Contemporary in style; Associated Architects & Engineers, architects. The structure is a one story, 3581 square foot, four bedroom, three bathroom, one half-bathroom, brick house, with a detached garage. The house was built for $40,000. The property was last sold in 2002 with a sale price of $800,000. The current owners of record of the property are Terrance M. Brueck and Kathryn E. Mitchell.

2265 Summit Avenue: George W. Robinson House; Built in 1922; Georgian Revival in style; Mather & Fleischbein, architects. The structure is a two story, 3743 square foot, seven bedroom, four bathroom, one half-bathroom, brick house, with a detached garage. The house was built for $28,000. The 1930 city directory indicates that George W. Robinson, the president of the Tri-State Telephone & Telegraph Company, and his wife, Lavicia Robinson, resided at this address. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that George W. Robinson resided at this address from 1923 to 1944. In 1934, George W. Robinson and Lavicia Brandt Robinson resided at this address. The Robinsons were members of the Minneapolis Club, the Minikahda Country Club, the St. Paul Athletic Club, the Somerset Club, the Town and Country Club, and the White Bear Yacht Club. George William Robinson and Lavicia "Louise" Robinson were the original owners of the property, residing there until 1944, and of the adjoining lot to preserve the view, according to Claudia Robinson Sladen of California, a granddaughter of George W. Robinson. George W. Robinson (1872-1922) died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is Dorothy P. Geis. [See note for Tri-State Telegraph & Telephone Company for 596 Portland Avenue.] [See note on the White Bear Yacht Club for 18 Kenwood Parkway.] [See note for the Minneapolis Street Railway Company.} [See note for the Soo Line RailRoad.}

2260 Summit Avenue: University of St. Thomas/St. Paul Seminary, St. Mary's Chapel; Built in 1901 (Sandeen; 1902-1903 according to Larson; 1904 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Romanesque Revival in style; Clarence H. Johnston, Sr., architect. The 14641 square foot church is a two story (one story according to Ramsey County property tax records) stone building with a gabled roof. It has stained glass windows. It follows a Latin cross plan, includes side chapels, and has very tall buttresses. The church was modeled after the Church of St. Paul Outside the Walls in Rome. The church was dedicated by Archbishop John Ireland. The church was one of the first churches designed by Clarence H. Johnston, Sr. It was built for $62,000 (Larson.) The church is part of the six building St. Paul Seminary complex. The 1895 city directory indicates that William McDonald was a student at the St. Paul Seminary. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that the St. Paul Seminary was located at this address from 1895 to 1967 and that the St. John Vianney Seminary was located at this address from 1968 to 1972. The 1910 city directory indicates that the Reverend Bernard Freney was a professor at the St. Paul Seminary and resided at the seminary. In 1984, the Grace Residence of the St. Paul Seminary also was located at this address. The owner of record of the property is the St. Paul Seminary. [See note on John Ireland for 225 Summit Avenue.]

2259 Summit Avenue: Dr. E. V. Goltz House; Built in 1922; Georgian Revival in style; F. O. Peterson, architect. The structure is a two story, 2872 square foot, ten room, six bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, brick house, with a detached garage. The house was built for $14,000. The 1930 city directory indicates that Edward V. Goltz, a physician who officed at 350 St. Peter Street, resided at this address. Dr. Edmund Victor Goltz (1880- ) was the son of Julius A. Goltz and Johanna Goltz, became a pharmacist in 1901, studied medicine at Northwestern University in Chicago, then returned to St. Paul and became a clinical assistant in pharyngology and nasology at the University of Minnesota Medical School, and served as the St. Paul Board of Health medical inspector. Mrs. E. V. Goltz was the president of the Minnesota Medical Association Auxiliary in 1945-1946. The current owners of record of the property are William R. Kennedy and others.

Summit Avenue; University of St. Thomas/School of Divinity; Constructed 1988/1989; Griswold, Rauma, Egge & Olson, architects. The complex includes a one story administration building and a five story student residence. The St. Paul Seminary was established at the west end of Summit Avenue in the early 1890's largely through the efforts of Archbishop John Ireland, an active promoter of the development of the area between Minneapolis and St. Paul, and by the railroad baron James J. Hill. The first buildings at the seminary were designed by Cass Gilbert in the early 1890's. The Saint Paul Seminary School of Divinity of the University of St. Thomas is a graduate theological school with degrees in divinity, pastoral studies, theology and religious education. The seminary program prepares candidates for ordination to the ministerial priesthood of the Roman Catholic Church. [See note on Cass Gilbert.]

2249 Summit Avenue: Charles Coddon House; Built in 1951 (1952 according to Ramsey County property tax records); Contemporary in style; Norman Johnson, architect. The structure is a one story, 4603 square foot, nine room, three bedroom, four bathroom, one half-bathroom, stucco bungalow, with an attached garage, which was last sold in 2004 for $1,100,000. The house was built for $28,000. Charles Coddon (1893-1978) died in Ramsey County. Jessie W. Coddon (1898-1992) was born outside of Minnesota and died in Hennepin County. There is a Charles and Jessie Coddon Charitable Fund at Mount Zion Temple which was established for the purpose of providing emergency assistance for people in need. The current owners of record of the property are Joan M. Haan and Philip C. Haan. In 2003, Jay Salmen was a financial supporter of the Randy Kelly for St. Paul Mayor campaign and resided at this address. Joan Haan was a contributor to the Democratic National Committee in 2004. [See note for Mount Zion Temple for 1300 Summit Avenue.]

2241 Summit Avenue: R. O. Bishop House; Built in 1955; Contemporary in style; Ellerbe & Co., architects. The structure is a one story, 3744 square foot, nine room, four bedroom, three bathroom, frame bungalow, with an attached garage. The house was built for $30,000. Rollin O. Bishop was the chairman of the board of the American National Bank of St. Paul. Rollin O. Bishop (1893-1976) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Underwood, and died in Ramsey County. The American National Bank & Trust Company was founded by the Bremer brothers, Otto Bremer (1867-1951) and Adolf Bremer (1869-1939,) and Charles Henry Francis Smith (1857-1937,) was established in 1903, and had capital of $0.2 million in 1906. Charles H. F. Smith was born in New York, came to St. Paul in 1883 and established a wholesale grocery business, became the first member of the New York Stock Exchange in the Northwest in 1890, married Mary Rosilla Shawe in 1891, was a co-receiver of the Chicago & Northwestern Railway, served on a number of civic boards, and was chairman of the funding committee to build the Cathedral of St. Paul. The Chicago & North Western Railway was a Class I railroad in the Midwest United States, was chartered in 1859, purchased the assets of the bankrupt Chicago, St. Paul & Fond du Lac RailRoad, merged with the Galena & Chicago Union RailRoad in 1863, and operated more than 5,000 miles of track in seven states at its peak. It owned a majority position in the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railway since 1882 and incorporated it in 1972. It acquired the 1,500-mile Minneapolis & St. Louis Railway in 1960 and the 1,500 mile Chicago Great Western Railway in 1968. The railroad was purchased by Union Pacific Railroad in 1995 and ceased to exist. The last sale of this property was in 2003 and the sale price was $750,000. The current owners of record of the property are Diane C. Johnson and Elizabeth K. Weinberg. [See note on Otto Bremer for 738 East Fourth Street.] [See note on the Chicago & Northwestern RailRoad.] [See note on the Chicago, St. Paul & Fond du Lac RailRoad.] [See note on the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha RailRoad.] [See note on the Minneapolis & St. Louis RailRoad.] [See note on the Chicago Great Western RailRoad.]

2233 Summit Avenue: E. J. Kingston House; Built in 1923; Early Modern Georgian Revival in style; Mather & Fleischbein, architects. The structure is a two story, 2519 square foot, ten room, four bedroom, two bathroom, two half-bathroom, stucco house, with an attached garage, which was last sold in 1996 for $450,000. The house was built for $12,000. The 1930 city directory indicates that Norman Nelson, an investment banker, and his wife, Blanche Nelson, resided at this address. Edward Joseph Kingston ( -1934) died in Hennepin County. Norman Nelson (1898-1967) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Rovig, and died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Stephen S. Hecht and Sharon E. Murphy. Sharon E. Murphy, a biochemist with Vot Minnesota, was a contributor to the John Kerry for President campaign in 2004.

2225 Summit Avenue: J. W. Gover House; Built in 1923 (1924 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Tudor Villa in style; Mather & Fleischbein, architects. The structure is a two story, 2488 square foot, eight room, three bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, stucco house, with an attached garage, which was last sold in 1996 for $300,000. The house was built for $11,000. The 1930 city directory indicates that James M. Whalen, the president of Commonwealth Electric Company, and his wife, Hilda E. Whalen, resided at this address. In 2006, Van Hove Construction appealed a variance to the St. Paul Board of Zoning Appeals of the rear setback requirement in order to enlarge an existing attached garage at this address. James M. Whalen ( -1948) died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Kenneth J. Guddal and Marla F. Murphy Guddal. Kenneth J. Guddal was a financial supporter of the St. Paul Humane Society for Companion Animals in 2005. Ken and Marla Guddal were financial supporters of the Groves Academy in 2001 and 2002, of the Boys & Girls Clubs of the Twin Cities in 2002, and of the Bridge for Youth in 2005.

2220 Summit Avenue: The property is tax-exempt property.

2215 Summit Avenue: Archibald Bush House; Built in 1927 (1926 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Tudor Villa in style; G. A. Anderson, architect. The structure is a two story, 3576 square foot, 11 room, six bedroom, four bathroom, two half-bathroom, stucco house, with an attached garage and a two car tuck-under garage. The house was built for $26,000. The 1930 city directory indicates that Arch G. Bush, vice president of Minnesota Mining & Manufacturing, Inc., his wife, Edythe Bush, and Sarah Bassler, the widow of Eugene Bassler, resided at this address. In 1934, A. G. Bush and Edythe Bassler Bush resided at this address and were members of St. Paul society. Gust Anderson was born in Sweden in 1861 and died in 1949. The Bush Grant Foundation was created by Archibald Granville Bush and his wife, Edyth Bassler Bush, in 1953. Archibald Bush worked for most of his life for the Minnesota Mining & Manufacturing Corporation, also serving as chairman of their executive committee. Edyth Bassler Bush ( -1972) was born in Chicago, Illinois, the daughter of Sarah Bassler and Eugene Bassler, became a successful ballet dancer, actress, musician, composer, and playwright, married A. G. Bush in 1919, and built, directed, and operated her own theater in St. Paul in 1941. Archibald Granville Bush (1887-1966) began his career with the Minnesota Mining & Manufacturing Company as a bookkeeper in 1909, became an officer, director, and principal stockholder of 3M by 1921, amassed a personal fortune in excess of $300 million, formed his own foundation, helped establish several local banking institutions, was associated with Hamline University as a donor and a member of its board of trustees, and served on the board of trustees of Rollins College in Orlando, Florida. After 1966, Edyth Bush decided to make the family's winter home in Winter Park, Florida, her permanent residence. Edyth Bassler Bush founded the the Edyth Bush Charitable Foundation in Winter Park, Florida, which began operations in 1973. In an effort to enhance the quality of life in the Minnesota, North Dakota and South Dakota, the Bush Foundation, incorporated in 1953 and based in St. Paul, has contributed more than $450 million for educational alternatives throughout these states aimed at promoting scientific, charitable, literary and educational efforts. The foundation’s income comes mainly from 3M stock given by Mr. and Mrs. Bush in the late 1970's. When Archibald G. Bush died, he left the bulk of his estate to The Bush Foundation and named Herschel S. Arrowood and Mary Jane Dickman as executors of his estate. A power struggle soon developed over control both of administration of the estate and of The Bush Foundation itself, which resulted in extensive litigation, in some of which the Minnesota Attorney General's office participated either as co-litigant or as amicus curiae. There were complaints filed against each other by Bush family members and factions of the foundation's board of directors, protestations against awards to the estate executors, attempts by Bush's widow, Edyth Bush, to overturn A. G. Bush's will and recover half of the estate, conflicts over jurisdiction of her estate following her death, and a claim of alleged improprieties in the sale of 3M stock by The Bush Foundation. The litigation continued until 1976. The investment portfolio of the Bush Foundation has diversified and grown over the years and now totals more than five times its original value. Most of the Bush Foundation's grant funding is distributed to educational institutions in these regions. In addition to supporting non-profit educational programs, the Bush foundation offers many fellowships to encourage individuals to pursue educational goals. The foundation also provides funding to Native American and predominantly black colleges located outside of the Midwest, in an effort to promote diversity and enhance the curriculum and facilities at these institutions. The A. G. Bush Library at the Industrial Relations Center at the University of Chicago was established in the 1950's, funded in part by the Bush Foundation. David A. Odahowski is the president and CEO of the Edyth Bush Charitable Foundation. Anita M. Pampusch is the current president of the Bush Foundation. Buildings at Hamline University named for the Bush family include the A. G. Bush Student Center, built in 1963, and the A. G. Bush Library, built in 1971. The former Edyth Bush Theatre, located on Cleveland Avenue, was given to Mrs. Edyth Bush as a birthday gift in 1940 from her husband, was presented to Hamline University in 1964, provided the Twin Cities with first-rate theatre productions for 25 years, was sold in 1975 to the Chimera Theatre Company, and was subsequently converted into an office building. The Bush family burial plot at Oakland Cemetery contains the graves of Archibald G. Bush (1887-1966) and Edyth D. Bush ( -1972.) Herschel S. Arrowood (1902-1988) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Wells, and died in Ramsey County. Mary Jane Dickman ( -2001) served in the U. S. military during World War II, owned a secretarial service, and was a member of the Zonta Club of St. Paul from 1963 to 2001 and served as the organization's president from 1972-1974. Zonta is an intergenerational service organization of managers and executives in business and the professions who volunteer their time, talents and energy to local and international service projects that are designed to advance the status of women and further a legacy of women's rights and progress. The St. Paul Zonta Club was established in 1926. The current owners of record of the property are Marianne D. Short and Raymond L. Skowyra, Jr. Marianne D. Short, an attorney with Dorsey & Whitney, was a contributor to the John Kerry for President campaign in 2004. Ray Skowyra, a consultant with Summit & Associates, was a contributor to the John Kerry for President campaign in 2004. [See note on the Minnesota Mining & Manufacturing Company/3M for 682 Fairmount Avenue.]

2195 Summit Avenue: Joseph F. Rosenthal House; Built in 1925 (1926 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Early Modern Rectilinear in style; H. F. Thamert, architect. The structure is a two story, 2092 square foot, eight room, three bedroom, one bathroom, one half-bathroom, masonry and frame house, with a detached garage, which was last sold in 2000 for $429,900. The house was built for $8,000. The 1930 city directory indicates that Joseph F. Rosenthal, a grocer with a store located at 217 Charles Street, and his wife, Anna Rosenthal resided at this address. Joseph F. Rosenthal ( -1931) died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Janne E. Ellerisaacs and Robert L. Ellerisaacs.

2187 Summit Avenue: Ethel Karon House; Built in 1923 (1924 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Early Modern Georgian Revival in style. The structure is a two story, 2443 square foot, nine room, four bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. The house was built for $9,000. The 1930 city directory indicates that Albert A. Fry, a manager employed by the Louden Machinery Company, his wife, Agnes Fry, a secretary employed by Holly Realty Company, and William L. Fry, an advertising man, all resided at this address. The 1939 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that William L. Fry, who attended the school from 1920 until 1922 and who attended the University of Minnesota, resided at this address. The Louden Machinery Company began with the 1867 patent received by William Louden for a device which helped farmers stack hay efficiently and the company subsequently developed and manufactured a variety of hay tools that allowed a farmer to easily and efficiently move and store hay. The Louden Machinery Company was principally located at Fairfield, Iowa. Before World War I, the Louden Machinery Company also developed a flexible barn door hanger in 1895, individual easy-to-clean metal cattle-watering drinking cups, and a monorail overhead traveling crane system and litter carrier for barns. The company established a free barn planning service to help farmers erect more efficient barns. During and after World War I, the company developed numerous material handling equipment innovations. Louden was chosen to construct the material handing devices for the manufacture of atomic bombs in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, during World War II. In the 1960's, Louden built 27 cranes and other devices to handle NASA's Apollo space booster rocket at Huntsville, Alabama, including two miles of track, and in 1961, the company supplied overhead cranes for a Boeing plant in Wichita, Kansas, which assembled B-52H airplanes. The Louden family sold the company in 1953. William Louden (1841-1931) was born in Belfast, Ireland, immigrated to America as a young boy with his family, almost died of inflammatory rheumatism in 1864, which caused him to be unable to help with the farm work and inspired him to think of innovative ways to apply technology to farm work. Albert A. Fry ( -1943) died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are James A. McFadden and others. [See the note for the St. Paul Academy.]

Summit Avenue; University of St. Thomas/Loras Hall. Constructed in 1894 as the North Residence for St. Paul Seminary students. It was designed by Cass Gilbert. It housed St. Thomas Academy students in the period 1943-1945. It housed St. John Vianney students in the 1970's. It was acquired by College of St. Thomas in 1982 to house undergraduate students. [See note on Cass Gilbert.]

2183 Summit Avenue: Perry-Tryle Co. House; Built in 1925; Perry-Tryle Co., architect. The structure is a two story, 1740 square foot, seven room, three bedroom, one bathroom, one half-bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage, which was last sold in 1992 for $166,000. The house was built for $9,000. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Florence A. Carter, the widow of George W. Carter, resided at this address. Florence A. Carter ( -1953) died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Peter H. Herzog and June M. Wheeler.

Summit Avenue; University of St. Thomas/O'Shaughnessy Science Hall. The Center is composed of two connected buildings, the O'Shaughnessy Science Hall which houses the Mathematics, Geology, Computer Science and Engineering departments and the Owens Science Hall which houses the Chemistry, Biology and Physics departments.

Summit Avenue; University of St. Thomas/Owens Science Hall/Frey Science and Engineering Center; Constructed 1995-1997; dedicated September 18, 1997; designed by Holabird & Root of Chicago, architects. The construction cost was $31.5 million. The gross square feet of the building is 200,000, while the net square feet of the building is 115,000. The Frey Science and Engineering Center, named after Mary Frey and Eugene Frey, a member of the University of St. Thomas class of 1952, is a $37 million facility that was funded by a federal grant and significant local contributions and houses 210,000 square feet of state-of-the art classroom, office, and laboratory space. The Center is composed of two connected buildings, the O'Shaughnessy Science Hall which houses the Mathematics, Geology, Computer Science and Engineering departments and the Owens Science Hall which houses the Chemistry, Biology and Physics departments. There are 35 classrooms and seminar rooms, 76 laboratories, 117 offices, the 150-seat 3M auditorium, one greenhouse, a snack bar, and assorted other spaces. The structure is covered with 55,000 square feet of Mankato Kasota stone. The facility houses the undergraduate biology, chemistry, geology, mathematics, physics, and quantitative methods and computer science departments. The building also accommodates the Graduate School of Technology for Manufacturing Systems Engineering and the Graduate School for Software Design and Development. The building also contains a mural by Roman Verostko, entitled "Epigenesis", and "Commissioned Stained Glass Window Designs," by Jantje Visscher. The mural project, located on the main floor of Owens Science Hall, employs technologies developed in the pioneer stages of the digital arts revolution. Eugene Frey was the chief executive officer at Waldorf Corp. and is chairman of Wabash Management Inc. Frey joined the Waldorf Corporation as a sales trainee in 1954, moved through the management ranks of the company, which makes folding cartons and recycled paperboard, became its president in 1985, after leading a leveraged buyout, became the sole owner of Waldorf in 1994, and sold the business to Atlanta-based Rock-Tenn Co. in 1997. Mary Frey, the wife of Eugene Frey, has been engaged in volunteer work for Catholic Charities. The Freys established the Frey Foundation in 1987. Dr. Ben Owens (1926- ) was from Hibbing, Minnesota, graduated from Hibbing High School in 1942 at age 16, attended the College of St. Thomas for four months, was admitted to the University of Minnesota Medical School, graduated in 1948, was a U. S. Navy flight surgeon at Moffett Naval Air Station in California, served on sea duty during the Korean War, returned to Hibbing, Minnesota, in 1952, began a practice with Drs. Bowen, Johnsrud, Eisenman, and Ahola, delivered 4358 babies during his career, served two extended turns on the volunteer medical ship, the U.S.S. Hope, off the coasts of Ecuador and Jamaica in the 1960’s, received the state Family Doctor of the Year Award in 1982, received the Dr. Harold K. Diehl Distinguished Alumni Award of the University of Minnesota Medical School in 1995, and received the Distinguished Service Award of the Minnesota Medical Association in 1997. The Owens Science Hall at St. Thomas University is dedicated to Dr. Ben Owens' deceased brother, Dr. Frank J. Owens, and his parents, Benjamin Owens and Mary Owens.

2174 Summit Avenue: S. Tierney House/University of St. Thomas; Built in 1921; Early Modern Rectilinear in style; F. X. Tewes, architect. The structure is a two story, 1930 square foot, eight room, three bedroom, two bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. The house cost $8,500 to construct. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. L. J. Tierney resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that this address was vacant. Stephen T. Tierney ( -1942) died in Ramsey County. Frank Tewes ( -1929) died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is the University of St. Thomas.

2170 Summit Avenue: H. S. Mills House/University of St. Thomas; Built in 1922; Two-story Colonial Revival/Georgian Revival variant in style; O. H. Round, architect. The structure is a two story, 2246 square foot, eight room, four bedroom, one bathroom, one half-bathroom, masonry, weatherboard, and frame house, with a detached garage. The house was built for $10,000. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. H. S. Mills resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Henry S. Mills, a bookkeeper employed by the Twin City Milk Producrs Association, and his wife, Jennie G. Mills, resided at this address. Henry Samuel Mills ( -1937) died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is the University of St. Thomas. [See note on Olin H. Round.]

2166 Summit Avenue: Ernest J. Murphy House/University of St. Thomas; Built in 1950; Cottage/Bungalow in style; William Golla, architect. The structure is a one story, 2220 square foot, eight room, two bedroom, one bathroom, one half-bathroom, frame bungalow, with a detached garage. The house was built for $17,000. The current owner of record of the property is the College of St. Thomas.

2156 Summit Avenue: A. A. Klemmer House/University of St. Thomas; Built in 1913; Two-story American Foursquare/Simplified in style; A. G. Erickson, architect. The structure is a two story, 1945 square foot, eight room, four bedroom, one bathroom, one half-bathroom, brick and stucco house, with a detached garage. The house was built for $5,000. The property is on the Register of National Historic Places as a part of the West Summit Avenue Historic District. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. A. A. Klammer and H. J. Lappin all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Julian D. Serrill, the Division manager of the Sun Life Assurance Company of Canada, officed at the Pioneer Building, and his wife, Dora B. Serrill, resided at this address. Lt. Julian "Julie" "Sterile" Serrill was the commander of Crew 8 of the patrol plane U.S. Navy PB4Y-2 "Privateer" of Patrol Bomber Squadron VPB-118 during World War II. "Privateer," the final version of the Consolidated B-24 long-range bomber with six power-assisted double-barreled 50-caliber machine gun turrets, armour-plating, bullet-resistant fuel tanks, radar, a double bomb bay, the high-performance Davis wing, and a prominent single vertical stabilizer, was eventually painted with the pinup art of Linda Darnell and named "Summer Storm" nose art just before a B-29 bomber lost power and crashed into her, destroying her with no fatalities. In 1958, Julian Serrill, the Executive Secretary of the Drake University Alumni Association since 1952, became Assistant Executive Secretary of the Iowa State Medical Society. In 1971, Julian B. Serrill was the Executive Director of the Iowa Chapter of the American Institute of Architects. Julian Serrill was the son of __?__ Serrill and Dora Moore Serrill. Julian D. Serrill (1887-1960) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Vogtman, and died in Hennepin County. The current owner of record of the property is the University of St. Thomas.

2154 Summit Avenue: Herbert A. Folsom House /University of St. Thomas; Built in 1912; Oversized Bungalow/Tudor Revival in style; Joseph Frisby, architect and builder. The structure is a two story, 2122 square foot, nine room, five bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, frame, stucco, and mock half-timbered house, with a detached garage. The house was built for $3,500. The 2 1/2 story woodframe, clapboard, and stucco half-timbered house has a multiple and intersecting gable roof. It has one chimney and a screened porch supported by battered piers. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Simeon P. Folsom resided at this address in 1908. In 1916, Allan K. Pruden was a member of the Minnesota Historical Society and resided at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Folsom and A. K. Pruden all resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Herbert A. Folsom, a tax agent employed by the Northern Pacific RailRoad, resided at this address and that Marie E. Blomquist, a clerk employed by the St. Paul Stamp Works, boarded at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. M. M. Goodsell resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Marshall M. Goodsill, a general passenger agent employed by the Northern Pacific RailRoad, and his wife, Margherita Goodsill, resided at this address. Herbert A. Folsom was a tax department agent for the Northern Pacific RailRoad and was the son of Simeon P. Folsom. The St. Paul Stamp Works was founded by Axel Edmund Mellgren, a young Finnish immigrant of Swedish heritage, in 1870, who possessed an artisan's engraving skills learned from his father, Carl Magnus Mellgren, one of Finland's most noted engravers. Axel Mellgren manufactured the first rubber stamps in St. Paul and was the first to advertise rubber stamps in St. Paul city directories in the 1870's. In 1878, Axel Mellgren entered into a brief partnership with Charles Cowham, a machinist. In the 1880's, with seven presses, vulcanizing equipment and a wide array of engraving tools, A. E. Mellgren Engraving produced stencils, seals, medals, rubber stamps, door numbers, letterpress books, dog license tags, tickets, programs, wedding invitations, greeting, holiday and visiting cards and calendars. In 1885, Axel Mellgren was forced to declare insolvency. Mellgren continued in business and in the 1890's, he used the new photoengraving processes for printing and managed the St. Paul Illustrating & Engraving Company and took on John Fritzen, Jr., his brother-in-law, as his partner. Allan Keene Pruden (1850- ,) the son of Sylvester Pruden and Mary A. Kittredge Pruden, was born in Dayton, Ohio, was educated in the Dayton, Ohio, public schools, graduated from Antioch College of Ohio, moved to St. Paul, married, in 1873, Emma Hare, initially resided at 604 Ashland Avenue, initially established a stoves and house furnishings business from 1874 until 1876, was a partner with Annette Hare during the mid-1870's, developed it into a large supply house, was the president and treasurer of the Pruden Stove Company, manufacturer's agents and jobbers, from 1881 until 1901, organized the St. Paul Roofing, Cornice, & Ornament Company in 1884, and served as its president and treasurer, invented and patented in 1910 the Pruden system of portable fire-proof buildings, incorporated and was president of the Metal Shelter Company, was president of the St. Paul Commercial Company from 1899 until 1900, was a member of a special committee of the American Forestry Association on Leech Lake, Minnesota, forestry problems in 1899, was a member of the executive committee of the St. Paul Retail Hardware Dealers and Sheet Metal Worker's Association in 1905, and was a Scotish Rite Mason. Allan K. Pruden and Emma Hare Pruden had three children, Leigh Pruden, Paul B. Pruden, and Jesse Pruden Neal. Mrs. A. K. Pruden was an artist who exhibited at the Minnesota State Fair and was awarded a gold medal for landscape painting. Simeon Pearl Folsom (1819- ,) the son of Jeremiah and Octavia Howe Folsom, citizens of United States temporarily sojourning in Canada, was born in Ascot, Lower Canada/Canada East, was educated in common schools of New Hampshire and Maine, graduated from the Maine Wesleyan Seminary in 1837, taught school, was employed by the Kennebec Driving Company from 1837 until 1838, studied law from 1837 until 1839, practiced law, became a civil engineer, took an active part in an international disturbance over the boundary line between Maine and New Brunswick, Canada, left Canada in 1839, came to Fort Atkinson, Iowa, in 1840, was clerk in a sutler's store from 1840 until 1842, was a U. S. Census official in 1842, was the sheriff and the county surveyor of Crawford County, Wisconsin, resumed study of law and was admitted to the practice of law at Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin, in 1844, served as a volunteer during the Mexican War in protecting Northwestern settlements against Indians, enlisted in the U. S. Army during the Mexican War, came to Minnesota in 1847, was a clerk of the Minnesota Territorial Legislature from 1852 until 1853, was the first city surveyor in St. Paul in 1854, was the county surveyor of Ramsey County, was a hotel keeper, was an Indian trader, was a real estate dealer, was a politician, was a member of an abstract firm, was a member of the St. Paul school board, served in as a member of Company H of the Seventh Minnesota Volunteer Infantry during the American Civil War, served in the Army of the Tennessee, becoming engineer at division headquarters, served in campaigns against the Indians in Minnesota, engaged in real estate in St. Paul, returned to Minnesota in 1865, was associated with the engineering departments of the St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad, was associated with the engineering departments of the Lake Superior & Wisconsin RailRoad, was involved in securing rights of way for other lines in Northwest from 1865 until 1878, was the attorney of the St. Paul Water Company from 1879 until 1882, was a member of the St. Paul Board of Water Commissioners until 1891, was connected with the general solicitor's office of the Great Northern RailRoad after 1890, was retained as counsel for the Great Northern RailRoad, officed at the NorthWest corner of Third Street and Broadway Street in 1907, and resided at 521 Whitall Street in 1907. Herbert Angier Folsom ( -1965) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Angier, and died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is the University of St. Thomas. [See note on the Northern Pacific RailRoad.] [See note on the St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad.] [See note on the Great Northern RailRoad.] [See note on the St. Paul Roofing & Cornice Works/St. Paul Roofing, Cornice & Ornament Company for 455 Goodhue Street.]

2150 Summit Avenue: McAnulty Company House/University of St. Thomas; Built in 1918; Bungalow in style; McAnulty Co., builder and architect. The structure is a one story, 1488 square foot, six room, two bedroom, one bathroom, stucco and fieldstone rambler, with a detached garage. The house was built for $5,000. The 1920 city directory indicates that Samuel M. Fink, a partner with Morris Fink in the real estate firm of Morris Fink & Son, located at the Exchange Bank Building, resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. S. M. Fink resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Samuel M. Fink, the secretary-treasurer of the Republic Finance Company, and his wife, Minnie Fink, resided at this address. The Morris Fink Family Liquor House was located at 302-306 East Seventh Street in St. Paul. Samuel M. Fink was the son of Morris Fink. Robert H. McAnulty ( -1959) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Berg, and died in Hennepin County. Samuel Fink ( -1945) died in Goodhue County, Minnesota. The current owner of record of the property is the College of St. Thomas.

2144 Summit Avenue: Helena C. Smith House/University of St. Thomas; Built in 1931; Tudor Revival/Spanish Colonial Revival in style. The structure is a two story, 1576 square foot, six room, three bedroom, one bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. Construction of the house cost $7,500. The house is a two story stucco structure with a gable roof. It has a chimney, a rounded arched entrance, a leaded glass door, and a rounded window in the gable end. Helena C. Smith was the president of the W. F. Smith Tire & Battery Company. Helena C. Smith ( -1954) died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is the College of St. Thomas.

2140 Summit Avenue: Mrs. O'Gorman House/University of St. Thomas; Built in 1938; Tudor Bungalow in style; Emil Nelson, architect. The structure is a one story, 969 square foot, five room, two bedroom, one bathroom, stucco and mock half-timbered bungalow, with a detached garage. The house was built for $5,000. The current owner of record of the property is the University of St. Thomas.

2134 Summit Avenue: Michael M. Tierney House/University of St. Thomas; Built in 1921; Craftsman Bungalow in style. The structure is a two story, 2487 square foot, ten room, five bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, stucco and fieldstone house, with a detached garage. The house was built for $4,000. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. M. M. Tierney resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Michael M. Tierney, a conductor, and his wife, Mary C. Tierney, resided at this address. Michael M. Tierney ( -1951) died in Ramsey County. The property was last sold in 1995 with a sale price of $202,000. The current owner of record of the property is the University of St. Thomas.

2130 Summit Avenue: Edna Glass House/University of St. Thomas President's House; Built in 1918; Two-story Colonial Revival/Twenties Villa in style; Edna Glass, architect. The structure is a two story, 1901 square foot, six room, three bedroom, one bathroom, one half-bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. The house was built for $5,500. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. P. E. Stevens resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that M. Quincy Haas, the vice president of the Matteson Company, and his wife, Maybell Haas, resided at this address. Morris Quincy Haas ( -1943) died in Ramsey County. The house is the residence of the Reverend Dennis Dease, president of the University of St. Thomas (1991-2004). The current owner of record of the property is the College of St. Thomas.

2120 Summit Avenue: Walter Butler House/University of St. Thomas Development Office; Built in 1924; Tudor Revival/Tudor Villa in style; Butler Brothers, builders and architects. The structure is a two story, 4192 square foot, 12 room, five bedroom, three bathroom, one half-bathroom, masonry, stucco, and frame house, with a detached garage. The house cost $15,000 to construct. The 1930 city directory indicates that Walter P. Butler, the secretary-treasurer of the Walter Butler Company, and his wife, Zena Butler, resided at this address. The 1939 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Walter Butler, Jr., who attended the school from 1904 until 1907, resided at this address. The 1950 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Walter Butler, Jr., who attended the school from 1905 until 1907, resided at this address. Walter P. Butler (1858- ,) the son of W. I. Butler and Amanda Elmore Butler, was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, was educated in the Milwaukee, Wisconsin, public schools and the New York public schools, attended Ripon College, Ripon, Wisconsin, from 1874 until 1875, attended the University of Michigan from 1876 until 1879, was a member of the Phi Delta Phi fraternity, received a law degree in 1879, taught school near Winona, Minnesota, was employed in the office of the chief engineer of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad, moved to Aberdeen, South Dakota, in 1881, and engaged in the lumber and mercantile businesses as a partner with H. E. Humphrey and Elias H. Alley, married Stella M. Butler in 1883, was an expert map-draftsman, was the city engineer for Aberdeen, South Dakota, for eight years, was employed in the office of the U. S. surveyor for South Dakota for two years, was employed as an actuary for a Minneapolis investment company from 1894 until 1898, engaged in the life insurance business, engaged in gold mining in Nome, Alaska, from 1900 until 1901, was engaged in the cast cement stone business after 1901, received a U. S. patent (#797,553) for artificial stone in 1905, and officed at the Bank of Commerce Building in Minneapolis in 1907. Walter Butler ( -1923) died in Ramsey County. The house is the Development Office for the University of St. Thomas. The current owner of record of the property is the College of St. Thomas. [See the note for the St. Paul Academy.] [See note on the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad.]

2115 Summit Avenue: University of St. Thomas/Aquinas Hall; Constructed in 1931; Gothic Revival in style; McGinnnis & Walsh of Boston, architects, and Foley Brothers, Inc., builders. It was remodeled in 1964. The building cost $300,000. In 1920, the United States Adjutant-General's Office U. S. Army Register, Volume VIII, indicates that William Cornelius Burns, a First Lieutenant in the Quartermaster's Section, listed his address as in care of St. Thomas College. Founded in 1885, the St. Thomas started as an all-male, Catholic seminary. John Ireland, Archbishop of Minneapolis and St. Paul, started the St. Thomas Aquinas seminary, which became a college in 1894. A gift from local railroad tycoon James J. Hill provided funds to establish the St. Paul Seminary apart from the college. Hill was not a Roman Catholic, but his wife was a Roman Catholic. In 1896, college officials made an artificial lake, Lake Mennith, using water from an underground stream. Located in the lower quadrant, the shallow lake dried up in 1922. The College of St. Thomas became a military-based school for undergraduates in 1906 and awarded its first academic degrees in 1910. Before that, the school gave out two-year diplomas in commercial and classical programs. In 1915, the college and St. Thomas Military Academy for high school students split into two institutions and, in 1965, the academy moved to Mendota Heights, Minnesota. The college later dropped its military distinction in 1922. The university has been operated by the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis for its entire history, except for the period 1928-1933, when the Holy Cross Fathers, who operate the University of Notre Dame, operated the college. St. Thomas started its education graduate program in 1950 and its business administration graduate program in 1974. Women started attending classes at St. Thomas for the first time in 1977 and now St. Thomas' undergraduate student body is 54 percent female and 46 percent male. In 1991, the College of St. Thomas became the University of St. Thomas. The following year, the university opened the Minneapolis campus. The University of St. Thomas is now a co-educational regional university offering more than 120 fields of study and has more than 10,000 students. The building is a 3 1/2 story stone structure with a slate tile, intersecting gable, steeply pitched roof. It also has low parapet walls, deeply recessed pointed arched windows, and buttresses. The building was dedicated by Archbishop Gregory Murray. It replaced the first administrative building for the college, which was designed by architect Edward P. Bassford. The University of St. Thomas consists of 24 buildings on its 40.47 acre campus, with the size of the buildings and the year the building was built as follows:

Building #1, which is a one story, 1,452 square foot building, that was built in 1940;

Building #2, which is a four story, 76,906 square foot building, that was built in 1945;

Building #3, which was built in 1900;

Building #4, which is a two story, 6,744 square foot building, that was built in 1914;

Building #5, which is a one story, 27,000 square foot building, that was built in 1917;

Building #6, which is a one story, 9,600 square foot building, that was built in 1903;

Building #7, which is a four story, 59,320 square foot building, that was built in 1912;

Building #8, which is a three story, 26,684 square foot building, that was built in 1900;

Building #9, which is a two story, 18,360 square foot building, that was built in 1914;

Building #10, which is a three story, 45,072 square foot building, that was built in 1931;

Building #11, which is a two story, 60,042 square foot building, that was built in 1939;

Building #12, which is a one story, 6,084 square foot building, that was built in 1940;

Building #13, which is a one story, 3,600 square foot building, that was built in 1947;

Building #14, which is a one story, 19,020 square foot building, that was built in 1948;

Building #15, which is a one story, 2,772 square foot building, that was built in 1957;

Building #16, which is a four story, 106,455 square foot building, that was built in 1958;

Building #17, which is a four story, 75,381 square foot building, that was built in 1958;

Building #18, which is a seven story, 291,205 square foot building, that was built in 1998;

Building #19, which is a one story, 616 square foot building, that was built in 1899;

Building #20, which is a one story, 3,024 square foot building, that was built in 1965;

Building #21, which is a five story, 52,896 square foot building, that was built in 1966;

Building #22, which is a two story, 49,248 square foot building, that was built in 1969;

Building #23, which is a two story, 17,100 square foot building, that was built in 1977; and

Building #24, which is a one story, 6,892 square foot building, that was built in 1982.

The current owner of record of the property is the University of St. Thomas. St. John Vianney College Seminary is located at 2115 Summit Avenue. In 2003, Meghan Maki was a financial supporter of the Randy Kelly for St. Paul Mayor campaign and was list as residing at this address.

2110 Summit Avenue: Harry Sinykin/Simpkin Duplex/University of St. Thomas; Built in 1923 (1924 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Two-story Colonial Revival/Early Modern Rectilinear in style. The structure is a two story, 3532 square foot, 16 room, six bedroom, two bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. Construction of the house cost $12,000. The 1930 city directory indicates that Clarence A. Cushman, Sr., the general manager of Swift & Company, his wife, Lila Cushman, Clarence A. Cushman, Jr., Alex Highland, chairman of the board of the Stockyards National Bank, and his wife, Nan L. Highland, all resided at this address. Clarence A. Cushman was the president of the Minnesota Section of the Society of Mayflower Descendants from 1940 until 1945. Harry Sinykin ( -1945) died in Ramsey County. Nancy Sinykin was a recent resident of the house. The current owner of record of the property is Marvin S. Sinykin. a href="http://www.angelfire.com/mn/thursdaynighthikes/westside3hike.html" [See the note for Swift & Company for 110 Robie Street West.]

Summit Avenue: University of St. Thomas, Albertus Magnus Hall/John R. Roach Center; Gothic Revival in style; Constructed as science classroom building in 1946-1948; Richard Reieche for Ellerbe Brothers, architect, and McGough Construction Co., builders. The building cost $1,342,000 to construct. Dedicated as Albertus Magnus Hall in 1948, named for St. Albert the Great, scientist, and St. Thomas Aquinas' teacher. The greenhouse addition was built in 1963 by Albert Laue, contractor. It was renovated in 1999-2000 by McGough Construction Co. for $9.8 million and was redicated as the John Roach Center for Liberal Arts in 2000. The building is a 3 1/2 story stone structure with a slate tile steeply pitched intersecting gable roof. It has buttresses between its bays. It also has a two story rectangular oriel window and other pointed arch windows. John Roach was the former Archbishop of the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis. The current owner of record of the property is the University of St. Thomas.

2100 Summit Avenue: University of St. Thomas, McNeely Hall/Mitchell Law School Building; Built in 1957 (1958 according to Ramsey County property tax records) as the William Mitchell College of Law and acquired by the College of St. Thomas in 1977, when the William Mitchell College of Law moved to 875 Summit Avenue. The building is a two story, 27300 square foot, classroom building. The current owner of record of the property is the University of St. Thomas. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Frank Nicolin, Jr., and A. G. Nicolin all resided at the former nearby 2106 Summit Avenue. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Frank Nicolin, Jr., resided at the nearby former 2106 Summit Avenue. The 1930 city directory indicates that John L. Sinykin, the manager of Cinderella Cosmetics, and his wife, Genevieve Sinykin, resided at the nearby former 2106 Summit Avenue. Frank Nicolin, Jr. (1863- ,) the son of Frank Nicolin and Anna S. Koesungsfeld Nicolin, was born in Gordon, Minnesota, was educated in parochial schools of Gordon, Minnesota, was educated at the Pio Nono College at St. Francis, Wiscomsin, was educated at the St Paul Business College, was engaged as a clerk for F. Nicolin & Company in Gordon, Minnesota, from 1879 until 1881, married Bertha Holzer in 1890, assumed charge of the office from 1881 until 1893, was a manufacturer's agent, was the deputy United States Internal Revenue collector at St. Paul from 1893 until 1901, was the St. Paul representative of Woolner & Company, distillers located at Peoria, Illinois, after 1901, was a member of the Knights of Pythias, resided at 305 North Chatsworth Street in 1907, and officed at the Endicott Building in 1907.

Summit Avenue: University of St. Thomas, Sitzmann Hall/Chiuminatto Hall. Acquired by the College of St. Thomas in 1943 as a faculty residence. It became known as the Fine Arts Building in 1946 and housed the Music Department offices and classrooms. It was remodeled in 1976 and renamed in honor of Anthony Chiuminatto, long-time chair of the Music Department. In 2002, it was again remodeled to house the Catholic Studies Department and was again renamed, this time in honor of Eugene Sitzmann (a 1947 graduate) and Faye Sitzmann. Anthony L. Chiuminatto (1904-1973) was born outside of Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. Anthony Lawrence Chiuminatto's 1959 dissertation for his Ph.D. degree in Music History and Literature from Northwestern University was The Liturgical Works of Baldassare Galuppi. Baldassare Galuppi (1706-1785)was born in Burano, Italy, and was introduced to music by his father, a barber, composed an opera, "La fede nell incostanza ossia Gli amici rivali" in 1722, worked for a time in Florence as harpsichordist in Teatro della Pergola, then returned to Venice in 1727, for the creation of the opera "Gli odii delusi dal sangue," composed "Dorinda" for the Theatro San Samuele, became the most famous composer of the Serenissime, was appointed Maestro di musica at the famous Ospedale dei Mendicanti, for which he composed several oratorios, was invited in London to compose opere serie for the King's Theatre in the Haymarket in 1741, was an opera buffa composer, working principally with the librettist Carlo Goldoni, in 1749, and also spent three years in Saint Petersburg, Russia, in the court of Catherine the Great.

2078 Summit Avenue: Former Christ Child School/University of St. Thomas, Christ Child Hall; Built in 1955; Contemporary in style; Ellerbe & Company, architects. The property is tax exempt property. The property is the site of a another St. Thomas University building. The cost to build the former two story, 32484 square foot, structure was $300,000. The 1916 University of Minnesota Alumni Directory indicates that Anne Doherty, a 1901 graduate of the University of Minnesota with a bachelor's degree in literature, resided at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Patrick Doherty and their daughters all resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Agnes E. Doherty, a teacher at the Central High School, Anne Doherty, a teacher at Humboldt High School, Catherine T. Doherty, a teacher at the Webster School, and Walter A. Doherty, a civil engineer, all boarded at this address and that Catherine Doherty, the widow of Patrick Doherty, resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mrs. Patrick Doherty, her daughters, and W. A. Doherty all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Catherine T. Doherty, the widow of Patrick Doherty, resided at this address. It was constructed as the Christ Child School for Exceptional Children. The Christ Child School for Exceptional Children was founded by Sister Anna Marie Meyers. Sister Anna Marie was injured in an automobile accident as an adult and was confined to a wheelchair for the remainder of her life, but was determined that her injuries would not prevent her from serving others. In 1939, she began to tutoring "brain-damaged" children from her room in the nurse's building of St. Joseph's Hospital. Word of her work spread and she quickly needed more room for her school. In 1948, the school moved into two rooms at the Christ Child Community Center on the near east side of St. Paul. Richard C. Lilly, a board member of the school, helped to obtain a house on Summit Avenue across from the College of St. Thomas in 1950 which could be converted to a "real" school. Initially known as the Merrick House school, it was soon officially named the Christ Child School for Exceptional Children. By 1954, enrollment had reached 70 children, which severely crowded the house. That same year, I. A. O'Shaughnessy donated two lots east of the home and by October 1955, the students were housed in a new building especially designed and constructed for their needs. With the advent of special education classes in public schools in the 1970's, enrollment declined at Christ Child. The school was closed in 1976, with the property reverting back to the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis, which in turn gave it to the College of St. Thomas. Richard C. Lilly (1884-1959) led a group of Twin Cities businessmen in 1929 to purchase Northwest Airways from the original Michigan investor group and was named president of Northwest Airlines. Richard C. Lilly also was president of the Merchant's National Bank of St. Paul and was involved, in 1920, in the St. Paul's Citizen's Alliance, an organization dedicated to maintain St. Paul as an open shop city by preventing the extension of unionism to the trades that were not then organized. The Citizen's Association of St. Paul was first formed in 1903 and re-emerged as the the St. Paul Civilian Auxiliary in 1917. The open shop forces inside the St. Paul Association, backed by Oliver Crosby of American Hoist & Derrick and other veterans of the 1903 organization, formed the Citizen's Alliance of Ramsey & Dakota Counties in 1920. Ex-Sheriff and real estate magnate E. A. "Crape Hanger" Davidson was elected to run the anti-union campaign by the organization's board of directors, which included Charles W. Ames of the Public Safety Commission, E. S. Warner, a founder of the Minnesota Employer's Association, M. W. Waldorf of the Waldorf Paper Products Company, W. O. Washburn of the American Hoist & Derrick Company, C. G. Roth of the St. Paul Hotel, J. G. Ordway of the Crane Company of Minnesota, Frederick R. Bigelow of the St. Paul Fire & Marine Insurance Company, Cyrus P. Brown of First National Bank of St. Paul, Richard C. Lilly of Merchant's National Bank of St. Paul, W. P. Kenny of Great Northern Railway, and Leslie Gedney of Gedney Pickles. By 1925, St. Paul gained a reputation as one of the leading "Open Shop" cities in the country. In l937, the Citizen's Alliance of Ramsey & Dakota Counties changed its name to the St. Paul Committee on Industrial Relations. Under W. H. MacMahon ( -1957,) the personnel director at American Hoist & Derrick, the St. Paul Committee on Industrial Relations packaged it "Open Shop" activities with the friendly rhetoric of industrial peace and harmony. In 1948, MacMahon brought the influence of St. Paul industry to bear on Governor Luther Youngdahl to send the National Guard into the streets of South St. Paul, Minnesota, to crush the supposed "anarchy" of the meat packer's union. In 1967, the organization renamed itself the Managements' Counselor on Industrial Relations, with a board of directors still representing the American Hoist & Derrick Company, the Union Brass & Metal Manufacturing Company, the St. Paul Dispatch-Pioneer Press, 3M, the First National Bank of St. Paul and the Northwest Bank. Richard C. Lilly ( -1928) died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is the College of St. Thomas. Nearby, at the former house at 2064 Summit Avenue, in 1891 and 1893, the residents were Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Davern and Miss M. A. Davern. The 1903 city directory indicates that James Cohn, employed in men's furnishings at 291 Sibley, resided at the nearby former 2064 Summit Avenue. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Mose Zimmerman and Mr. and Mrs. Reuben Blumberg all resided at the former nearby 2064 Summit Avenue. The 1920 city directory indicates that Mrs. Reuben Blumberg boarded at the former nearby 2064 Summit Avenue. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Moses Zimmerman resided at the former nearby 2064 Summit Avenue. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mose/Moses B. Zimmerman, the secretary-treasurer of Barrett & Zimmerman Inc., and his wife, Carrie Zimmerman, resided at the former nearby 2064 Summit Avenue. William A. Davern ( -1946) died in Ramsey County. [See note on the Northwest Airlines for 628 Portland Avenue.] [See note on Franklin Herbert Ellerbe.] [See note for the American Hoist and Derrick Company for 2010 Summit Avenue.]

2056 Summit Avenue: Nathan Coddon House; Built in 1924 (1925 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Spanish Colonial in style; Lindstrom-Anderson, architects. The structure is a two story, 3123 square foot, nine room, three bedroom, three bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. The house cost $15,000 to build. The 1930 city directory indicates that Nathan L. Coddon, vice president of L. D. Coddon & Brothers, Inc., and his wife, Harriet Coddon, resided at this address. The 1950 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Theodore L. Cook, Jr. (1930- ,) who attended the school from 1943 until 1948 and who attended Harvard University, resided at this address. Nathan Louis Coddon ( -1932) died in Ramsey County. Nate Coddon (1889-1971) married Harriet Shanedling (1897- ,) the daughter of Annie Shanedling (1878-1925) and Julius Shanedling (1871-1951,) and the couple had two children, David Coddon and Marjorie Coddon. Harriet S. Coddon (1897-1971) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Meyers, and died in Ramsey County. Julius Shanedling ( -1951) died in Hennepin County. The Jewish Historical Society of the Upper Midwest website indicates that Julius Shanedling emigrated from Lithuania and settled in Virginia, Minnesota, in 1892, was a founder of B’nai Abraham synagogue there, owned a men's clothing store in 1909, and raised five children with his wife, Annie Myers Shanedling (1878-1925.) Annie Shanedling was initially from Minneapolis and Julius Shanedling moved to Minneapolis several years after his wife's death. The current owners of record of the property are Dallas D. Laurents II and Luanne P. Laurents. [See the note for the St. Paul Academy.]

2055 Summit Avenue: J. Lisle Jesmer House; Built about 1926 (1927 according to Ramsey County property tax records); Georgian Revival in style. The structure is a two story, 3272 square foot, nine bedroom, four bathroom, two half-bathroom, brick house, with a detached garage. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that J. Lisle Jesmer resided at this address from 1928 to 1934. The 1930 city directory indicates that J. Lisle Jesmer, the president of Jesmer Brothers Inc., and his wife, Anna J. Jesmer, resided at this address. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that the St. Thomas College Music Department was located at this address from 1945. The Ramsey County property tax records indicate that the property is a vacant lot with a two story, 8758 square foot, building constructed in 1927. In 1920, J. Lisle Jesmer was a partner with J. F. Cowern in the law firm of Cowern & Jesmer, engaged in general civil law and officing at the Endicott Building. J. Lisle Jesmer (1891-1963) and J. Lisle (Joseph L.) Jesmer, Jr., (1919-1985) both were born in Minnesota and both died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is the College of St. Thomas.

2052 Summit Avenue: Bernard Druck House; Built in 1912; Bungalow in style; _?_ Rundquist, architect. The structure is a two story, eight room, 2582 square foot, five bedroom, one bathroom, one half-bathroom, masonry and frame house, with a detached garage, which was last sold in 1991 for $240,000. The house cost $4,500 to construct. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Druck resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Bernard Druck, a partner with William Druck in Druck Brothers, a neckwear, belts, garters, and suspenders manufacturer located at 221-223 East Fourth Street, resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Druck resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Bernard Druck, a partner with William Druck in Druck Brothers, a neckwear and suspenders manufacturer, his wife, Rae Druck, Elbert Druck, a salesman employed by Druck Brothers, Felicia Druck, a teacher, Geraldine Druck, a teacher, and Violet Druck, a teacher, all resided at this address. Rae Behrman Druck was the wife of Bernard Druck, was a graduate of Columbia College of Expression in Chicago, came to Minnesota in 1904, and organized World War I support efforts. Mr. and Mrs. Druck had eight children. Rae Berman Druck was born in Indiana and had five siblings, Samuel O. Berman, Abe Berman, Harry Berman, Fanny Berman Clyman, and Sarah Berman Cezch. Rae Druck and Bernard Druck donated a stained glass window "Aaron, Jacob, Moses and Job Wrestling with God," created by William Salzman, to the Mount Zion Hebrew Congregation, which was installed in Margolis Hall. The Columbia College of Chicago arose from a women's speech college, founded in 1890, as the Columbia School of Oratory, an early pioneer in speech art education, which became the Columbia College of Expression in 1893. In 1928, the college was incorporated into the Pestalozzi-Froebel Teachers College, and it became co-educational in 1936, and in 1944, the name was changed to Columbia College of Chicago. In 1974, Columbia won full accreditation as a four-year, undergraduate liberal arts school by the North Central Association of Schools and Colleges. Bernard Druck ( -1940) died in Ramsey County. Rae B. Druck (1880-1969) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Charek, and died in Hennepin County. The current owners of record of the property are Edwin F. Stromme and Rosemarie Stromme.

2048 Summit Avenue: Charles Coddon House; Built in 1919; Prairie Style/Classical Revival/Early Modern Georgian Revival in style; Henry Firmenger, architect, and Lundstrom & Anderson, builders. The structure is a two story, 2870 square foot, 11 room, four bedroom, two bathroom, two half-bathroom, brick house, with a detached garage. The cost to build the house was $12,500. The house is a two story brick structure with a hipped ceramic tile roof. It also has a flat roofed entrance porch. It also has first floor segmental arch windows. It has Prairie Style massing. The 1979-1982 architectural survey of Summit Avenue evaluator commented that it is an uninspired brick house. The 1920 city directory indicates that Charles Coddon, proprietor of L. D. Coddon & Company, resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Charles Coddon resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Frank Tanz, the president of Levine & Tanz, and his wife, Justine Tanz, resided at this address. Charles Coddon worked for L. D. Coddon & Company. Charles Coddon (1893-1978) died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is Todd R. Wadsworth.

2045 Summit Avenue: Jay J. Levine House; Built in 1936; Modified French Chateau/British American French Chateau in style; Car-Dell Co., architects. The structure is a two story, 3272 square foot, ten room, five bedroom, three bathroom, one half-bathroom, brick house, with an attached garage. The house cost $11,800 to construct. The house is a 2 1/2 story brick structure with a steeply pitched truncated hipped slate tile roof that resembles a Mansard roof and which has 10 dormers. It has a polygonal turret at the facade center. The first floor opening has a segmental arch. It has a symmetrical facade with ornate decorative brick patterning. The 1964 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Jacob R. Goldenberg, a member of the Class of 1964, resided at this address. Jay J. Levine was the secretary-treasurer of Levine & Tanz, Inc. The current owner of record of the property is Summit Avenue Property LLC, located in Wayzata, Minnesota. [See the note for the St. Paul Academy.]

2040 Summit Avenue: Built in 1980. The structure is a two story, 3402 square foot, nine room, three bedroom, four bathroom, one half-bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided house, with an attached garage. The current owners of record of the property are Judith M. Kleinman and Richard J. Kleinman, Jr.

2038 Summit Avenue: John D. Asselin House; Built in 1949 (1950 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Bungalow in style. The structure is a one story, 2821 square foot, nine room, four bedroom, two bathroom, brick house, with an attached garage. The house cost $22,000 to construct. The current owners of record of the property are Catherine A. Plessner and Frederick Plessner.

2037 Summit Avenue: Morris Fineberg House; Built in 1928 (1929 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Twenties Villa in style; Gustave Wiegner, architect. The structure is a two story, 3454 square foot, 11 room, five bedroom, three bathroom, two half-bathroom, brick house, with a detached garage, which was last sold in 1995 for $376,000. The house cost $15,000 to construct. The 1930 city directory indicates that J. Fred McCarthy resided at this address. Morris Fineberg (1889-1969) was born outside of Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Jane Ernst and Robert W. Ernst.

2032 Summit Avenue: J. P. Kennedy House; Built in 1936; Tudor Villa in style; J. A. Deutschlander, architect. The structure is a two story, 2150 square foot, ten room, four bedroom, three bathroom, one half-bathroom, brick house, with a detached garage, which was last sold in 2005 for $735,000. The cost to build the house was $10,000. The 1964 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that John K. Storr, a member of the Class of 1924, resided at this address. The previous owners of record of the property were Gregory S. Koalska and Paula J. Koalska and the current owners of record are Hseng Hung Hsu and Yuk Ling Cheng. Gregory S. Koalska participated in the 25th Annual "Get in Gear 10K Run/Walk" in Minneapolis in 2002. [See the note for the St. Paul Academy.]

2029 Summit Avenue: William Harris House; Built in 1925; Mediterranean Revival/Spanish Colonial in style; William T. Harris, architect. The structure is a two story, 6492 square foot, 17 room, seven bedroom, five bathroom, two half-bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. The house cost $30,000 to construct. The house is a two story wood frame and stucco structure with a hipped low pitched ceramic tile roof. The house has several levels and wings. It also has wrought iron balconies. The 1930 city directory indicates that William Harris, the proprietor of William Harris & Company, a wholesale woolens dealer, and his wife, Mildred Harris, resided at this address. The 1939 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that R. Nelson Harris (1915- ,) who was born in St. Paul, who attended the school from 1924 until 1930, who was a 1936 graduate of Yale University, and who was employed by Noma, Inc., a machineless permanent waving supplies manufacturer, resided at this address. R. Nelson Harris married Bette Deutsch in Fort Wayne, Indiana, in 1939. William Harris, the house owner, and William T. Harris, the architect of the house, were different people. The last sale of the property was in 2006 and the sale price was $1,900,000. The previous owner of record of the property was the trustee of June H. Barrows and the current owners of record are Roger D. Wilsey and Shari K. Taylor Wilsey. June H. Barrows, a retiree, was a contributor to the John Kerry for President campaign in 2004. [See the note for the St. Paul Academy.]

2022 Summit Avenue: John Leuthold/Dr. Ward L. Beebe House Built in 1912; English Arts and Crafts/Wrightian scheme and detailing/Prairie School in style; Purcell-Feick-Elmslie (William Gray Purcell, George Feick, Jr., and George G. Elmslie,) architects, Minneapolis, and F. N. Hegg, builder. The structure is a two story, 3074 square foot, ten room, four bedroom, four bathroom, one half-bathroom, stucco house, with an attached garage. The house cost $9,000 to construct. The house is a 2 1/2 story stucco structure with a steeply pitched intersecting gable roof. It has one chimney and an asymmetrical design. Its steeply pitched roof is atypical of the Prairie Style. It has wide eaves and varied windows. One of the unique features of the plan for the house is the tiny library-sitting-room with bay window and built in furniture on the second floor. The house was the only house in St. Paul designed by the Purcell-Feick-Elmslie architectural firm. Purcell later described the house as "a re-transcription of the Oscar Owre type" house, referring to the 1911-1912 Owre House at 2625 Newton Avenue South, Minneapolis. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Ward L. Beebe resided at this address from 1913. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Beebe resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Ward L. Beebe, the president of Beebe Laboratories, resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Beebe resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Ward L. Beebe, the president of Beebe Laboratories Inc., his wife, Bess L. Beebe, Leo F. Foley, the district sales manager of The Fisk Tire Company, and his wife, Ethel Foley, all resided at this address. Purcell also noted that the unusual corner windows on the house allowed views up and down Summit Avenue. The house was commissioned by Mr. and Mrs. J. Leuthold and was given to their daughter, Bess J. Leuthold, and her new husband, Ward Beebe. The Leuthold family were wealthy Germans in southern Minnesota and were great friends of Louis Heitman of Helena, Montana. John Leuthold ( -1951) died in Ramsey County. Ward L. Beebe (1881-1960) was a veterinary surgeon who stopped his veterinarian practice, went back to the University of Minnesota Medical School, graduated as a regular physician, became a bacteriologist, was the president of Beebe Labs in 1914, and died in Ramsey County. The Beebes lived in the house until 1929, when they moved to White Bear Lake. The house was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1977 for its architectural significance. The current owners of record of the property are David C. Anderson and Martha M. Anderson. [See note on William Gray Purcell.] [See note on George Feick, Jr.]

2020 Summit Avenue: C. A. Taney House; Built in 1913; Early Modern Rectilinear in style; A. L. Garlough, architect. The structure is a two story, 3310 square foot, ten room, six bedroom, three bathroom, two half-bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage, which was last sold in 1998 for $450,000. Construction cost for the house was $7,500. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Taney and their daughters all resided at this address. Dr. and Mrs. H. E. Binger resided at this address in 1924. The 1930 city directory indicates that Henry E. Binger, an oculist located at the Lowery Medical Arts Building, his wife, Vida Binger, and Mrs. May Gorman, a nurse, all resided at this address. In 1934, Dr. Henry E. Binger, Vida DeBar Binger, James Binger, Thomas Binger, Robert Binger, Jane Betty Binger, and Patricia Binger resided at this address and were members of St. Paul society. The 1939 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that C. Robert Binger (1918- ,) a member of the Class of 1936, a 1940 graduate of the University of Minnesota, and a student in the school of foresty at the University of Minnesota in 1940, and James H. Binger (1916- ,) a member of the Class of 1934, a 1938 graduate of Yale University, and a law student at the University of Minnesota, both resided at this address. Dr. Henry Ernest Binger (1885-1961) was born in Tulare, South Dakota, the son of Charles H. and Hattie Bell Binger, studied at Redfield College and at the Medical School of the University of Minnesota, and graduated with the class of 1910, interned at St. Luke's Hospital at St. Paul, then worked at the St. Peter, Minnesota, State Hospital for the Insane, served as health officer at Clark, South Dakota, in 1911, then began a private medical practice in South Dakota. Binger married Vida Elizabeth De Bar, a daughter of James De Bar, in 1911. Binger was a member of the St. Paul Foundation in the 1940's. James Binger (1916-2004) earned an economics degree from Yale University in 1938 and a law degree from the University of Minnesota, joined the Minneapolis law firm that later became Dorsey & Whitney, where a client was Honeywell Inc., became employed by Honeywell in 1943 and eventually held top executive positions at Honeywell from 1961 to 1978, was part owner of the Minnesota Vikings from 1988 to 1998, had invested in the Butler Square building, ran Tartan Farms, a Florida horse operation that William McKnight started, became a board member of the family foundation, owned theaters in both Minneapolis and New York, and was a life member of the Guthrie Theater board. James Binger married Virginia McKnight Binger in 1938 and the couple had three children, James "Mac" Binger, Cynthia Binger Boynton, and Judith Binger ( -1989.) Virginia McKnight (1916-2002) was born in St. Paul, the only daughter of William L. McKnight and Maude L. Gage McKnight, attended the Summit School in St. Paul, Class of 1934, and Briarcliff College in New York, lived in St. Paul, Minneapolis, Ardmore, Pennsylvania, and Wayzata, Minnesota, was president of The McKnight Foundation for 14 years, from 1974 through 1987, was on the elite "Forbes 400" list of the richest Americans for many years, and for several years, was the richest woman in Minnesota. Theater was another important interest in Virginia Binger's life and a Broadway theater in New York City, the Virginia at 245 West 52nd Street, is named after her, one of five theaters in the Jujamcyn Theaters empire which Virginia Binger and James Binger owned starting in the 1970's, after William McKnight gave her two theatres that he acquired in the 1950's. Noa Staryk, the current chairperson of the McKnight Foundation, is the granddaughter of James Binger. Clifford A. Taney ( -1941) died in Hennepin County. Clifford A. Taney (1899-1961) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Grubb, and died in Hennepin County. The current owner of record of the property is Susan K. Barker. Joel A. Barker, a futurist with Infinity Limited, Inc., was a contributor to the Democratic National Committee in 2004. [See note foe A. L. Garlough.] [See the note for the St. Paul Academy.]

2015 Summit Avenue: J. J. Corneveaux House #2; Built in 1921; Georgian Revival in style; Alden and Harris, architects. The structure is a two story, 3397 square foot, nine room, five bedroom, three bathroom, two half-bathroom, brick house, with two detached garages. The cost to build the house was $20,600. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Corneveau resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that John J. Corneveaux, agency director of the New York Life Insurance Company, and his wife, Myrtle Corneveaux, resided at this address. The 1939 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that George W. Corneveaux (1918- ,) who was born in St. Paul, who attended the school from 1929 until 1930, and who attended the University of Minnesota Law School in 1941, resided at this address. J. J. Corneveaux was an agent for the New York Life Insurance Company in 1911. Robert D. Goff grew up at this address, resided at 1649 Summit Avenue for almost 30 years, and currently resides at 558 Summit Avenue. John James Corneveaux ( -1949) died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are John A. Larsen and Karen R. Larsen. Karen Larsen, a housewife, was a contributor to the Democratic National Committee in 2004. [See the note for the St. Paul Academy.]

2010 Summit Avenue: Frederick Crosby and Edith Crosby House; Built in 1910 (Sandeen; 1912 according to Ramsey County property tax records; 1910-1911 according to Larson;) Tudor Revival/Tudor Villa in style; Clarence H. Johnston, Sr., architect. The house is a 2 1/2 story (two story according to Ramsey County property tax records,) 4421 square foot, ten room, four bedroom, two bathroom, three half-bathroom, stucco and half-timbered structure with an intersecting gable roof. It has one chimney, a porch and sunroom, and detailed half-timbering. The house has a detached garage. The cost to build the house was $20,000 (Sandeen and Larson.) The house was considered by the 1979-1982 St. Paul-Ramsey County architectural survey analyst to be the most sophisticated Tudor Revival style structure from the pre-World War I era along Summit Avenue. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Fred Crosby resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Frederic Crosby, assistant manager of the American Hoist & Derrick Company, and his wife resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Fred Crosly resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Abr. B. Levy, the secretary-treasurer of the St. Paul House Furnishing Company, Inc., and his wife, Hazel Levy, resided at this address. Oliver Crosby, Frederick Crosby's father, was the original owner of the house. The 1964 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Richard A. Moore, a member of the Class of 1964, resided at this address. Abraham Burt Levy (1888-1969) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Weiss, and died in Ramsey County. Frederick Crosby (1887- )was born in St. Paul, worked for his father's firm, the American Hoist & Derrick Company, and was a salesman for the company in 1910. In 1910, Frederick Crosby married Edith Schliek. Frederick Crosby was the third American Hoist & Derrick Company president, serving during the period 1934-1945. The American Hoist & Derrick Company, renamed Amhoist, traced its origins to the Franklin Manufacturing Company, a heavy equipment repair business that was established by Oliver T. Crosby and Frank Johnson in St. Paul, which engaged in the maintenance and repair of logging and iron ore mining equipment. In 1883, it became the American Manufacturing Company and began to manufacture hand and horse-powered hoisting equipment. In 1885, the company expanded its line to include a variety of construction equipment and equipment for quarrying. In 1882, the company changed its name to the American Hoist & Derrick Company and opened a second office and distribution facility in Chicago. In the 1950's and 1960's, the renamed Amhoist was engaged in the acquisition of other companies before moving to Willmington, North Carolina, in the early 1980's. Oliver Crosby ( -1922) died in Ramsey County. Edith S. Crosby (1887-1960) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Botzet, and died in Ramsey County. The house was last sold in 2004 with a sale price of $1,050,000. The previous owners of record of the property were Richard W. Noble and Tracy L. Hartwig Noble and the current owners of record are John T. Shaughnessy and Lisa Shaughnessy. [See note on Clarence H. Johnston.]

2007 Summit Avenue: B. L. Karon House; Built in 1924; Colonial Revival/Georgian Revival in style. The structure is a two story, 3382 square foot, 11 room, five bedroom, two bathroom, two half-bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. Construction cost for the house was $10,000. The 1930 city directory indicates that Bernard L. Karon, a real estate agent, and his wife, Fannie E. Karon, resided at this address. Bernard L. Karon ( -1940) died in Ramsey County. The house was last sold in 2004 for $830,000. The current owner of record of the property is Christopher A. Cudack and Gretchen E. Cudack.

2005 Summit Avenue: Alfred H. Auger and Delina Auger House; Built in 1924 (1922 accroding to Ramsey County property tax records); Prairie School/Early Modern Rectilinear in style. The structure is a two story, 2386 square foot, eight room, four bedroom, one bathroom, two half-bathroom, brick house, with a detached garage. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Alfred H. Auger resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Harvey E. Page and his wife, Hazel Page, resided at this address. The 1964 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Robert M. Knox, Jr., a member of the Class of 1943, resided at this address. Delina C. Auger ( -1935) died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Sarah K. Armstrong and William G. Armstrong. [See the note for the St. Paul Academy.]

2004 Summit Avenue: J. J. Corneveaux House #1; Built in 1910 (1912 according to Ramsey County proerty tax records;) Tudor Revival/Cottage/Tudor Villa in style; J. S. Sweitzer, architect and builder. The structure is a two story, 3465 square foot, ten room, six bedroom, three bathroom, two half-bathroom, masonry and frame house, with a detached garage. The house cost $7,500 to construct. The house is a three story wood frame, stucco, and brick structure with an intersecting gable roof. The house has two chimneys, an elliptical arched timber entrance, an overhang, intersecting window hoods, and timber detailing. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Corneveaux resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. L. Larsen resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Carl L. Larsen, a partner in Larsen, Wheeler, Wold, & Culver, oculists, physicians, and surgeons, and his wife, Elizabeth Larsen, resided at this address. J. J. Corneveaux was an agent for the New York Life Insurance Company in 1911. John James Corneveaux ( -1949) died in Ramsey County. John J. Corneveaux married Myrtie Luley, the daughter of Fredrick W. Luley (1838-1908) and Martha Ann Sessions Luley, the granddaughter of Holland Sessions (1815-1876) and Ann Eliza Sessions (1842- ), the great granddaughter of Leonard Sessions (1788-1891) and Azuba/Azubal/Ezubeth/Elizabeth "Zuba" Martin Sessions (1783-1860), and the great great granddaughter of William Martin and Olive Averell Martin. William Martin was a Revolutionary War soldier from Vermont. The current owners of record of the property are Sherelyn Ogden and Allan Thenen. Allan Thenen is a paper conservator with extensive experience in the treatment of varnished wall maps and volunteers for the Minnesota Historical Society. Sherelyn Ogden and Allan Thenen were married in 1996. Sherelyn Ogden was the director of book conservation at the Northeast Document Conservation Center, Andover, Massachusetts, for seventeen years, is the head of conservation in the book and paper conservator department of the Minnesota Historical Society, is the author of Caring for American Indian Objects, St. Paul, Minnesota Historical Society Press, 2004, and of The Storage of Art on Paper: A Basic Guide for Institutions, Urbana-Champaign, Illinois, University of Illinois Graduate School of Library and Information Science, 2001, and is the editor of the Northeast Document Conservation Center manual.

1995 Summit Avenue: Edward Kennan House; Built in 1917; Simplified Rectilinear in style; H. Edward Walker, architect. The structure is a two story, 2463 square foot, nine room, five bedroom, one bathroom, two half-bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. The cost to build the house was $8,000. The 1920 city directory indicates that Edward P. Keenan, involved in real estate, resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. E. P. Keenan resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Edward P. Kennan resided at this address. The current owners of record of the property are Eleanor C. Hill and Lyman L. Hill, Jr.

1994 Summit Avenue: August M. P. Cowley House; Built in 1913; English Manor House Revival/English Cottage/Twenties Villa in style; John Walter Stevens, architect; St. Paul Building Company, builder. The structure is a 1 3/4 story, 2531 square foot, eight room, four bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. The house cost $8,000 to construct. The house is a two story stucco structure with an intersecting gable ceramic tiled roof which has four shed dormers. The house also has one chimney and a gabled entrance with piers. The house is one of the last houses designed by J. W. Stevens on Summit Avenue. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Augustus M. P. Cowley resided at this address from 1914 to 1944. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. A. M. P. Crowley and their daughter all resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Augustus M. P. Cowley, the secretary of the Northwestern Blau Gas Company, resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. A. M. P. Cowley and their daughter all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Augustus M. P. Cowley, the secretary-treasurer of the Northwestern Blaugas Company, and his wife, Ida Cowley, resided at this address. In 1934, Mr. and Mrs. Augustus M. Cowley resided at this address and were noted members of St. Paul society. The 1991 St. Paul's on-the-Hill Episcopal Church directory indicates that Stephen Riendl resided at this address. The Northwestern Blau Gas Company was located at Hampden Avenue and Charles Street and its officers were Frank Y. Locke, president, and A. M. P. Cowley, secretary. Blaugas is the liquified remnants of the petroleum refining process, was discovered by Herman Blau of Augsburg, Germany, Augustus M. P. Cowley ( -1941) died in Ramsey County. The house last sold in 1992 for $280,000. The current owner of record of the property is Nancy Hernke. [See note on Stevens.]

1988 Summit Avenue: J. A. Childs House/Maryhill Convent and Renewal Center; Built in 1914; J. B. Wiles, architect. The structure is a two story, 2553 square foot, ten room, five bedroom, three bathroom, one half-bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. Construction cost for the house was $6,000. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that James A. Childs resided at this address from 1915 to 1942. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mrs. J. A. Childs resided at this address. In 1920, the United States Adjutant-General's Office U. S. Army Register, Volume VIII, indicates that James Alanson Childs, a captain in the Quartermaster's Section, resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that James A. Childs, an engineer, resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Childs resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that James A. Childs, chief engineer and secretary of the Metropolitan Drainage Commission,and his wife, Muriel T. Childs, resided at this address. James A. Childs ( -1935) died in Ramsey County. The property was last sold in 1997 with a sale price of $259,000. The current owner of record of the property is the Society of the Daughters of the Heart of Mary, Inc. The religious order of the Daughters of the Heart of Mary was established in 1791, during the French Revolution, by Peter Joseph de Cloriviere, S.J., also the founder of the religious order of the Priests of the Heart of Jesus, and Adelaide de Cice, a young French noblewoman. Five members of the two orders were guillotined in 1793-1794 while the Reign of Terror raged. The first sisters of the Daughters of the Heart of Mary arrived in America in 1851, at the invitation of Bishop Louis Amadeus Rappe (1801-1877,) of Cleveland, Ohio. Early in the 20th century, the sisters of the Daughters of the Heart of Mary had become actively involved in all levels of teaching, from kindergarten through university.

1987 Summit Avenue: S. R. Reuler House; Built in 1916; Tudor Villa in style; Carl Nelson, architect. The structure is a two story, 3591 square foot, 11 room, five bedroom, three bathroom, two half-bathroom, masonry and frame house, with a detached garage. The house cost $12,000 to construct. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. S. R. Reuler resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mrs. K. E. Lilley resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Augustus W. Clapp, a lawyer and a partner with Harold J. Richardson, Charles E. Elmquist, Charles W. Briggs, Grant S. McCartney, and Wayne C. Gilbert in the law firm of Clapp, Richardson, Elmquist, Briggs & McCartney, located at the Merchants National Bank Building, and his wife, Rosina Clapp, resided at this address. In 1934, August W. Clapp and Rosina Kraft Clapp resided at this address and were noted members of St. Paul society. Samuel R. Reuler ( -1946) died in Hennepin County. Rosina M. Clapp ( -1954) died in Ramsey County. The property last sold in 1994 for $485,000. The current owners of record of the property are Catherine C. Scallen and Timothy J. Scallen. Timothy J. Scallen graduated from the University of Notre Dame with an accounting degree, received a law degree from the University of Minnesota Law School, and is a partner in the Corporate Finance and Transactions Practice of Oppenheimer Wolff & Donnelly LLP.

1982 Summit Avenue: B. F. Robertson House; Built in 1910; Early Modern Rectilinear in style; Hartford & Jacobson, architects. The structure is a two story, 2487 square foot, nine room, four bedroom, two bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. The cost to build the house was $4,000. The 1918 and 1924 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. B. F. Robertson resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Benjamin F. Robertson, a department manager employed by the Farwell, Ozmun, Kirk & Company, and his wife, Mina Robertson, resided at this address. In 1934, Benjamin F. Robertson, Mina Herms Robertson, E. L. Robertson, and Mitzi Robertson all resided at this address. Benjamin F. Robertson (1877-1957) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Case, and died in Ramsey County. Mina Sophia Robertson (1875-1963) was born in Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. Edward Lowell Robertson (1915-1996) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Hermes, and died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is James V. Toscano and Sharon L. Toscano. James V. Toscano is the president of the Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation, an independent, not-for-profit, community-based research and education organization engaged in research, education, and innovation in health and health care, serves on the board of directors of the Summit Avenue Residential Preservation Association, serves on the board of directors of the Friends of the Saint Paul Public Library, is secretary of the Board of the World Press Institute, is chair of the Board of Rainbow Research, and is a lecturer in nonprofit management at the graduate school of Hamline University. James Toscano, the president of the Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation, contributed to the Hillary Clinton for President campaign in 2007-2008.

1979 Summit Avenue: Moses C. Shapira House #2; Built in 1924; Mediteranean Revival/Early Modern Georgian Revival in style; Clarence H. Johnston, Jr., architect; Lindstrom & Anderson, builders. The structure is a two story, 4895 square foot, ten room, six bedroom, three bathroom, one half-bathroom, stucco house, with an attached garrage. Construction of the house cost $24,000. The house is a 2 1/2 story wood frame and stucco structure with an intersecting gable green tile steeply pitched roof. The house also has one chimney, a projecting central bay, and a small balcony above the main door. The 1930 city directory indicates that Moses C. Shapira, partner with Albert I. Shapira and Nathan C. Shapira, of the Shapira Realty Company, his wife, Gertrude Shapira, and Mayer Shapira, all resided at this address. Moses C. Shapira also was a jeweler and a partner with his brother Albert Shapira in the firm Albert Shapira & Brother, Diamonds and Jewelry. Moses Shapira (1846-1951) was born in Lithuania, came to St. Paul in 1880, moved to Minneapolis in 1929, and died at the age of 105. The house subsequently has been converted to a duplex. Moses C. Shapira ( -1934) died in Ramsey County. Albert I. Shapira (1874-1957) was born outside of Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is Thomas J. Vonrueden. Thomas J. Von Rueden, M.D. is a graduate of the University of Minnesota Medical School, is a diplomate of the American Board of Thoracic Surgery, and is a CardioThoracic surgeon with Cardiovascular Surgeons of Saint Paul. [See note on Johnston.]

1978 Summit Avenue: George T. Withy House; Built in 1913; Tudor Villa in style; Peter J. Linhoff, architect. The structure is a two story, 3035 square foot, 11 room, five bedroom, two bathroom, three half-bathroom, brick house, with a detached garage. Construction cost for the house was $7,000. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Mrs. Maggie B. Shaw resided at this address in 1909. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. G. T. Withy and Mrs. W. R. Shaw all resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. G. T. Withy and Mrs. Margaret Shaw all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Mabel S. Withy, the widow of George T. Withy, resided at this address. The 1939 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that John T. Withy (1918- ,) who attended the school from 1929 until 1936 and attended the University of Minnesota, resided at this address. George T. Withy was a member of the Railroad Printing Company of St. Paul and married Mabel Shaw. George Thomas Withy ( -1926) died in Ramsey County. Mabel Shaw Withy (1877-1969) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Bell, and died in Ramsey County. George Shaw Withy (1914-1983) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Shaw, and died in Hennepin County. John T. Withy (1918-1983) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Shaw, and died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Annette Whaley and John P. Whaley. John P. Whaley, a venture capitalist with Northwest Equity Partners, was a contributor to the George W. Bush for President campaign in 2004. [See note on Linhoff.] [See the note for the St. Paul Academy.]

1969 Summit Avenue: Edward G. Riedel and Hulda Riedel House; Built in 1925 (1926 according to Ramsey County property tax records); Tudor Revival/Tudor Villa in style; H. M. Elmer, architect. The structure is a 2 1/2 story (two story according to Ramsey County property tax records,) 3497 square foot, nine room, five bedroom, three bathroom, one half-bathroom, masonry and frame house, with an attached garage. The house cost $16,000 to construct. The house is an English bond brick structure with an intersecting gable slate-roofed steeply pitched roof which has one hipped dormer and one shed dormer. The house has a complex roofline. It also has wood family crests on its timber brackets and carved floral motifs in its bargeboards. The 1930 city directory indicates that Edward G. Riedel, the president of Sanitary Farm Daries Inc., and his wife, Hulda Riedel, resided at this address. The 1939 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Harley E. Riedel (1916- ,) who was born in St. Paul, who attended the school from 1929 until 1935, and who attended Carlton College and the University of Minnesota, and Roy L. Reidel (1921- ,) who was born in St. Paul and who attended the school from 1932 until 1936, both resided at this address. Edward G. Riedel was the vice president of the Sanitary Farm Dairies and was promoted to president of the firm in 1926. Hulda Riedel ( -1927) died in Ramsey County. The last sale of this property was in 2003 and the sale price was $951,000. The current owner of record of the property is Thomas J. Von Rueden, who also owns 1979 Summit Avenue. [See the note for the St. Paul Academy.]

1964 Summit Avenue: Charles Miller House; Built in 1955; Contemporary Georgian Revival in style; Roy A. Spandle, architect. The structure is a two story, 1924 square foot, eight room, four bedroom, one bathroom, one half-bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided house, with a detached garage. The cost to build the house was $18,000. The current owner of record of the property is Craig Randall Miller.

1960 Summit Avenue: Valentine O'Malley House; Built in the 1950's according to Sandeen (1956 according to Ramsey County property tax records); Bungalow in style. The structure is a one story, 1666 square foot, seven room, three bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, frame rambler, with a detached garage. The previous owner of record of the property was the trustee of Valentine O'Malley and the current owner of record is Susan O. Kosel. Valentine O'Malley was appointed by Mayor Randy Kelly to the Saint Paul Parks and Recreation Commission in 2003. Dr. Valentine O'Malley was a medical consultant with the Minnesota Department of Health in 1993 and was the medical advisor to the Public Employees Retirement Association in 1999. Valentine O'Malley, M.D., was a member of the Environmental Health and Occupational Medicine Subcommittee of the Minnesota Medical Association in 2003.

1959 Summit Avenue: George K. Gann House; Built in 1924; Tudor Villa in style; Mather & Fleischbein, architects. The structure is a two story, 2741 square foot, eight room, four bedroom, three bathroom, one half-bathroom, stucco house, with an attached garage. The cost to build the house was $10,000. The 1930 city directory indicates that George K. Gann resided at this address prior to moving to Chicago in that same year and that Myrtle Chasensky was a maid at this address. The property was last sold for $725,000 and that sale occurred in 2003. The current owner of record of the property is Peggy A. Rupp. John Rupp and Peggy Rupp opened the W. A. Frost restaurant at 374 Selby Avenue in 1975.

1954 Summit Avenue: William J. Saint Onge House; Built in the 1950's (1955 according to Ramsey County property tax records); Contemporary in style. The structure is a 2095 square foot, eight room, three bedroom, two bathroom, split entry frame house, with a detached garage. The previous owners of record of the property were Margaret K. Diblasio and Raymond J. Diblasio and the current owner of record is Margaret K. Diblasio. Margaret Klempay Diblasio was the head of the art education program at the University of Minnesota in 1985 and also was a faculty member of the 1985 Getty Institute for Educators on the Visual Arts. Raymond J. Diblasio (1936-1998) was a historic preservationist who played a key role in getting the western section of Summit Avenue in St. Paul listed on the National Register of Historic Places, moved from his native state of Ohio to Minnesota in 1978, was a former teacher of philosophy, was an ordained priest, established the first alternative draft counseling center at Youngstown State University, and founded Human Options Inc. Drs. Margaret Diblasio and Raymond Diblasio developed the smART curriculum.

1953 Summit Avenue: Louis A. Weidenborner House; Built in 1919 (1920 according to Ramsey County property tax records); Early Modern Georgian Revival in style; Morin Westmark, architect. It cost $10,500 to build the house. The house is a two story brick and stucco, 2587 square foot, eight room, three bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom structure with an intersecting gable jerkinhead roof and a detached garage. The house has an asymmetrical design. It also has brick window quoins, overhanging eaves, and an arched hood over the doors. The 1979-1982 Summit Avenue architectural survey analyst indicates that the house is noted for its eclectic details. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Louis A. Weidenborner resided at this address from 1920 to 1931. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. L. A. Weidenborner resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Louis A. Weidenborner and his wife, Helen H. Weidenborner, resided at this address. Louis A. Weidenborner was the president/treasurer of the American Home Furnishing Company. The property last sold in 1996 for $287,500. The current owners of record of the property are Cristiana Giordano and David A. Kristal. David A. Kristal, the C.E.O. of Embers Restaurants, was a contributor to the George W. Bush for President campaign in 2004. David A. Kristal is the oldest son of Henry Kristal. David Kristal leads three Twin Cities-based companies, Embers America, Joey's Seafood & Grill, and Augeo. Prior to founding Augeo, David Kristal attended the University of Minnesota's Carlson School of Management and Stanford University's School of Law, was an executive at a leading outsourcing services company, and practiced law for a boutique litigation firm in Minneapolis. Henry Kristal was a co-founder, with Carl Birnberg, of Midwest restaurant chain "Embers Restaurants," which opened on Lake Street in Minneapolis in 1956, who was inducted into the Minnesota Restaurant Association Hospitality Hall of Fame in 2005. The Kristal family moved to St. Paul from Joliet, Illinois, in 1937.

1950 Summit Avenue: J. F. George House; Built in 1911; Bungalow in style; Ellerbe-Round, architects. The structure is a one story, 1704 square foot, seven room, three bedroom, two bathroom, frame bungalow, with a detached garage. The cost to build the house was $3,200. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that John Franklin George resided at this address in 1914. The 1918 and 1924 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. J. F. George resided at this address. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that John F. George (1859-1925,) the husband of Nellie R. George, who was born in Indiana to parents who were born in the United States and who died of arteriosclerosis and nephritis, resided at this address in 1925. The 1930 city directory indicates that Edwin O. Swanson, a physician with an office at 971 East Seventh Street, and his wife, Mae Swanson, resided at this address. John Franklin George (1859- ,) the son of Richard George and Sarah Ann Haines George, was born in Noblesville, Indiana, received bachelor's and master's degrees from DePauw University, was a member of the Sigma Chi fraternity, was admitted to the practice of law in Indiana in 1882, was admitted to the practice of law in Minnesota in 1883, moved to Minnesota in 1884, married Nellie R. Graham in Chicago, Illinois, in 1887, was a lawyer, officed at the New York Life Building in 1900, resided at 257 Summit Place in 1900 and 1907, and officed at the Globe Building in 1907. John Franklin George ( -1925) and Nellie R. George ( -1927) both died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Larry D. Starns and Mary Beth Carlson Starns. Larry D. Starns is a lawyer, is assistant general counsel for the Minnesota State Colleges and Universities System (MnSCU,) and is president of the board of the Soo Line Credit Union.

1944 Summit Avenue: Dr. John C. Nelson House; Built in 1912; Craftsman/Tudor Revival/Tudor Villa in style; Arthur C. Clausen, architect. The structure is a two story, 3277 square foot, ten room, five bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, masonry and frame house, with a detached garage. The construction cost for the house was $9,000. The house is a 2 1/2 story Flemish bond red brick half-timbered structure with a bellcast intersecting gable roof which has two bellcast gable dormers. The house also has one chimney. Its entry faces west rather than towards the street. It also has an oriel window and a porch with three segmented arched windows. Dr. John C. Nelson was a medical doctor and was also vice consul to Denmark. The 1916 University of Minnesota Alumni Directory indicates that Louis Allan Nelson resided at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Nelson, Dr. L. A. Nelson, Dr. Edgar Nelson, and Mrs. Anna Nelson all resided at this address. World War I veteran Louis A. Nelson resided at this address in 1919. In 1920, the United States Adjutant-General's Office U. S. Army Register, Volume VIII, indicates that Louis Allan Nelson (1875- ,) a Major in the Medical Section, resided at this address. C. A. Cushman resided at this address in 1924. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Cushman resided at this address. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that John S. Priedeman (1849-1926,) the husband of Mary K. Priedeman, who was born in Wisconsin to parents born in Germany and who died of coronary sclerosis and angina pectoris, resided at this address in 1926. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Mary K. Priedman, the widow of John S. Priedeman, G. Walter Priedeman, and his wife, Cecil Priedeman, all resided at this address. John C. Nelson (1847- ,) the son of Narcus Nelson and Helen Emilie Nelson, was born in Copenhagen, Denmark, was educated in Copenhagen, Denmark, married Hanrine E. Nelson in 1871, graduated from the College of Physicians and Surgeons in Keokuk, Iowa, in 1879, was a physician and surgeon, was the coroner of Ramsey county for two terms, was a Republican, was the vice president of the Ramsey County Medical Society, was a member of the staff of the City & County Hospital, was appointed the Danish vice-counsul in 1896, and officed at the Union Block in 1907. Louis Allan Nelson (1875- ) was born in Lanesboro, Minnesota, was educated at the St. Paul High and Common Schools, graduated from the University of Minnesota Medical School in 1896, interned at St. Joseph's Hospital from 1896 until 1897, studied Opthalmology and Otology in the medical office of Dr. John F. Fulton for 18 months, did post graduate work in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and New York, New York, was associated with Dr. J. F. Fulton from 1899 until 1903, was asociated with Dr. J. W. Chamberlin after 1903, was employed as the oculist for the State Hospital for Crippled Children, was a clinical professor of Ophthalmology and Otology at Hamline University, was an oculist and aurist at the City and County Hospital and the St. Joseph's Hospital, was an oculist for the Northern Pacific Railway, was a member of the American Medical Association, was a member of the Minnesota State Medical Society, was a member of the Ramsey County Medical Society, was a member of the Minnesota Academy of Medicine, was a clinical instructor in Ophthalmology and Otology at the University of Minnesota in 1896 and in 1913, was a member of the Alpha Kappa Kappa fraternity, resided at 989 Hague Avenue in 1909, and officed at the Lowry Building in 1916. John C. Nelson ( -1924,) John S. Priedeman ( -1926,) Mary K. Priedeman ( -1935,) and Clarence Alphonso Cushman ( -1945) all died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is Eileen M. Cullen. The 1920 city directory indicates that Clarence A. Cushman, a general superintendent employed by the Swift & Company, resided at the former nearby __?__. [See the note for Swift & Company for 110 Robie Street West.] [See note on Jehiel W. Chamberlin for 572 Lincoln Avenue.]

1943 Summit Avenue: Louis L. Dow/Louis F. Dow House; Built in 1913 (Sandeen and Larson;) Tudor Villa in style; Clarence H. Johnston, Sr., architect. The structure is a two story, 4396 square foot, 11 room, five bedroom, four bathroom, two half-bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage, which last sold in 1998 for $640,000. The house cost $10,000 to construct (Sandeen and Larson.) The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. L. F. Dow resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Louis F. Dow, the president and treasurer of the Louis F. Dow Company, lithographers, printers, stationers, and office furniture dealers located at 381 Jackson Street, resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. L. F. Dow resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Louis F. Dow resided at this address. The 1964 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Mark Paper, a member of the Class of 1950, resided at this address. Louis F. Dow (1877- ,) the son of John B. Dow and Elizabeth L. McCullough Dow, was born in St. Paul, was educated in the St. Paul public schools, was educated at Cretin High School in St. Paul, was employed initially as an errand boy by the St. Paul branch of the American Type Foundry Company in 1890, continued in the employ of the St. Paul branch of the American Type Foundry Company until 1898, served as a corporal in the 13th Minnesota Regiment during the Spanish American War in the Philippines, started a laundry in the Philippines, used the profit upon selling the laundry to print "Eighth Army" souvenir copies of Philippine Island scenes, was a stationer and printer, returned to St. Paul in 1899, purchased a half interest in a printing firm that became Harmon & Dow, was the president of Harmon & Dow upon its incorporation in 1902, bought out his partner in 1904, married Minnette/Minette/Minnitte P. Kolb in 1903/1904, incorporated Harmon & Dow as L. F. Dow & Company, a printing, engraving, lithographing, office supply and bank stationery firm, in 1904, was a Republican, was a member of the St. Paul Board of Water Commissioners, was a member of St. Luke's Roman Catholic Church, was a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, was a member of the St. Paul Automobile Club, was a member of the St. Paul Commercial Club, was a member of the Knights of Pythias, was a member of the Knights of Columbus, was a member of the Knights of the Maccabees of the World, was a member of the Army of the Philippines, engaged in the hobby of automobiling, resided at 957 Selby Street in 1907, officed at 336-340 Minnesota Street in 1907, and was involved, in 1915, with the Capitol City Athletic Club/Boxing Club of St. Paul, a boxing promotion business. The boxing club was sold by Dow to James Connolly in 1916. The Louis F. Dow Company was formed in 1899 and was an advertising specialty company. Dow utilized pin-ups in his advertising art, employing artists such as Billy De Vorss, Gillette A. Elvgren, Ruth Deckard, Joyce Ballantyne, and Edward D'Ancona. Dow also employed Arnold Friberg for calendar art using American Western themes. A native of St. Joseph, Missouri, Billy De Vorss worked out of New York's Greenwich Village from the mid-1930's until his return to the Midwest in the early 1950's. His earliest calendar girls appeared under the Louis F. Dow imprint. Gillette A. Elvgren (1914-1980) created art deco-ish pin-ups for publisher Louis F. Dow from the late 1930's into the 1940's, but it was his long run with the calendar company, Brown & Bigelow, that sealed his fame. Chicago-area artist Ruth Deckard worked for Louis F. Dow in the late 1940's and into the 1950's. A prolific contributor of calendar-girl art to numerous companies, from Chicago, Edward D'Ancona's earliest works appear to have been for Louis F. Dow. The Louis F. Dow Co., stationers and bank designers, also had an architectural department, employing St. Paul architect Carl Herbert Buetow (1893-1987) in his formative years. In 1921, Louis F. Dow had two printing plants, one in St. Paul, 2242 University Avenue West, that was a nonunion shop, and one in Minneapolis, a union shop. Louis F. Dow and Minnitte P. Kolb Dow were the parents of two children, James L. Dow and Henry J. Dow. Bon D. Grussing was vice president and manager of the Louis F. Dow Company in 1948. Louis Dow ( -1927) died in Ramsey County. The Knights of the Maccabees of the World is the result of a merger of the Knights of the Maccabees, a fraternal organization formed by Nathan Boynton in 1878 in London, Ontario, Canada, and the Maccabees of the World. The Knights of the Maccabees had a membership of 209,831 in 1896. The organization's name was later shortened to the Maccabees in 1914. The organization was most active in the State of Michigan. The organization provided low-cost insurance to members and also provided society cemeteries. In 1941, the Maccabees operated the Michigan Union Life Association, transforming the organization into a modern, legal-reserve insurance company. In 1962, the company became the Maccabees Mutual Life Insurance Company and, in the 1990's, the organization was demutualized, was sold to the Royal Insurance Group, and operated as the Royal Maccabees Life Insurance Company. In 1999, Royal Maccabees was sold by its parent company, Royal & SunAlliance Financial Services, to Swiss Re, which merged it into its subsidiary, Reassure America Life Insurance Company. After a long period as a mutual reserve life insurance company, the Knights of the Maccabees again became a fraternal organization and has no connection with Michigan Union Life Association, the Maccabees Mutual Life Insurance Company, or any other insurance company. The Knights of Columbus, founded as a mutual benefit society by Venerable Father Michael J. McGivney in New Haven, Connecticut, in 1882 and named in honor of Christopher Columbus, is the world's largest Catholic fraternal service organization. Membership of the Knights of Columbus is limited to "practical Catholic" men who are at least age 18. In 1954, lobbying by the Knights of Columbus helped convince the U.S. Congress to add the phrase "under God" to the Pledge of Allegiance. The Knights of Columbus has a professional insurance operation and provides permanent and term life insurance, annuities, and long term care insurance. Louis F. Dow (1877-1971) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of McCullough, and died in Ramsey County. Carl H. Buetow (1893-1987) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Ramlow, and died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are William Hills Gamble and Anne Rachel Labovitz. Anne R. Labovitz was a financial supporter of Minnesota Public Radio in 2005. Anne Labovitz, a portrait painter, was born and raised on the shores of Lake Superior, in Duluth, Minnesota, had an adobe home in the mountains of northern New Mexico after 1982, then lived in Zurich, Switzerland, and moved to Hannover, Germany, in 2005 with her husband, Bill Gamble, and their three children. [See note on Johnston.] [See note on Gillette "Gil" Elvgren for 369 Laurel Avenue.] [See note on Carl Herbert Buetow.] [See note on the St. Paul Commercial Club for 505 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Knights of Pythias for 2225 East Lake of the Isles Parkway.] [See note on St. Luke's Catholic Church/St. Thomas More Catholic Church for 1079 Summit Avenue.]

1941 Summit Avenue: J. L. Hoffman House; Built in 1925 (1926 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Twenties Villa in style. The structure is a two story, 3536 square foot, 12 room, five bedroom, five bathroom, one half-bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. The cost to build the house was $18,000. During World War I, representing the Dean Family of St. Paul, Mr. and Mrs. Archibald MacLaren, Mr. and Mrs. William B. Dean, Mr. and Mrs. William J. Dean, Mr. and Mrs. Sidney B. Dean, Mr. and Mrs. John N. Jackson, and Mr. and Mrs. Frank W. Lightner of St. Paul, and Mr. and Mrs. S. H. De Forest of Babylon, New York, donated a car to the American Field Service in France as a memorial to John Nicols Haupt. The 1930 city directory indicates that William P. MacMicking, the secretary-treasurer of the St. Paul Baseball Club, his wife, Florence MacMicking, Evelyn MacMicking, a clerk, Marjorie MacMicking, and James S. Thompson all resided at this address. In 1934, Archibald Dean MacLaren and Helen Gage MacLaren resided at this address. The MacLarens were members of the Minikahda Country Club, the University Club, and the Women's City Club of St. Paul in 1934. The 1906 Jubilee Manual of the House of Hope Presbyterian Church indicates that Dr. Archibald MacLaren, a member of the church since 1871, Mary K. (Mrs. A.) MacLaren, a member of the church since 1879, and Margaret MacLaren, a member of the church since 1906, all resided at 412 Holly Avenue. Archibald MacLaren (1858-1924,) was the son of Gen. Robert Neil MacLaren, a pioneer settler in Minnesota, a member of the Minnesota State Senate from 1859 until 1861, a cavalry officer in the American Civil War, and an Indian fighter, and Anna McVean MacLaren, was born in Red Wing, Minnesota, was educated in St. Paul High School, graduated from Princeton College in 1880, graduated from the College of Physicians and Surgeons/Columbia University in 1883, completed his internship at the Woman's Hospital of New York in 1885, was a surgeon, practiced medicine associated with Dr. Edward C. Spencer and then with Dr. C. A. Wheaton from 1885 until 1895, married Katherine Dean in 1890, was associated with Dr. H. P. Ritchie after 1897, was a professor of clinical surgery at the University of Minnesota Medical School in 1906, was the author of "The Treatment of Gastric and Duodenal Ulcers and Benign Obstructions of the Pylorus" in Annals of Surgery in 1906, was a captain in the United States Army Medical Reserve Corps, served as the chair of the draft board in Minnesota, was a member of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States, was a member of the American Surgical Society, was a member of the Ramsey County Medical Society, was a member of the American Medical Association, was a member of the Minnesota Academy of Medicine, was a member of the American Surgical Association, was a member of the American Society of Clinical Surgery, was a member of the Societe Internationale de Chirurgie, was a member of the University Club, was a member of the Minnesota Club, was a member of the St. Paul Town & Country Club, was a member of the Somerset Club, was a member of the White Bear Yacht Club, was a member of the Ivy Club of Princeton University, was a Presbyterian, was a Republican, resided at 412 Holly Avenue in 1907, officed at the Lowry Arcade in 1907, died in St. Paul, and is buried at Oakland Cemetery. Helen Gage MacLaren was a graduate of Vassar College. Katherine Dean MacLaren (1868- ,) the daughter of William B. Dean and Mary K. Nicols Dean, was born in St. Paul, was educated at Miss Anable's School in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, married Archibald MacLaren in 1889, was a trustee of the Associated Charities, was the president of King's Daughters' Aid, was the superintendent of the Primary Department of the House of Hope Presbyterian Church Sunday School, was a member of the Young Women's Chrisian Association, was a member of the Women's Welfare League, was a member of the St. Paul Civic League, was a member of the Century Club, and was a member of the St. Paul City Club. Archibald MacLaren and Katherine Dean MacLaren were the parents of Margaret MacLaren, Kathrine/Katherine Dean MacLaren, and Archibald Dean MacLaren. John L. Hoffman (1890-1978) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Brown, and died in Ramsey County. William B. Dean ( -1922,) Archibald MacLaren ( -1924,) Frank Waterman Lightner ( -1928,) William J. Dean ( -1941,) and James Thompson ( -1954) all died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is the U. S. Bank Trust National Association Trust. [See note for the Minikahda Club for 702 Fairmount Avenue.]

1936 Summit Avenue: Victor Ingemann House; Built in 1912 (1913 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Period Revival/Tudor Revival/Craftsman/Tudor Villa in style; Ingemann & Co., architect and builder. The structure is a two story, 3004 square foot, 12 room, five bedroom, three bathroom, one half-bathroom, brick house, with a detached garage, which last sold in 1991 for $237,500. The house cost $6,000 to construct. The house is a 2 1/2 story brick and half-timbered structure with an intersecting and multiple gabled ceramic tile roof. The brickwork is in a herringbone pattern. It has an open porch and two ornate chimneys. It also has a symmetrical facade. The porch bargeboards were carved in Denmark by a relative of Ingemann's. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Jerry William Jorgenson, the father of an infant son, who was born in the United States, resided at this address in 1914. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Victor Ingemann resided at this address. William Ingeman (1897- ), a Cadet, and Charles N. Ingemann (1893- ), a Sergeant, were World War I veterans who resided at this address in 1919. The records of the 1919-1920 Minnesota World War I Soldier's Bonus Board indicate that Charles M. Ingemann (1893- ,) a 1912 enlistee and a Sergeant, who was born in St. Paul, had blue eyes, light hair, and a fair complexion, was five foot, ten inches tall, was an engineer upon induction, served on the Mexican border in 1916-1917, was discharged due to a disability, and was employed as a hoisting engineer by the Ingemann Company, 1930 St. Anthony Avenue, resided with his wife, Iene Ingemann, at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mrs. Dorothy Ingemann, William Ingemann, and James Laurence all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Henry A. Brandtjen, the secretary-treasurer of Brandtjen & Kjuge, and his wife, Gladys Brandtjen, resided at this address. John Scanlon owned the house in 1982. Victor Ingemann (1877-1922) founded the Ingemann Brothers contracting company with his brother George Ingemann in 1884. When Lars P. Jorgenson joined the firm, it became Ingemann & Company. The firm designed hundreds of houses and business buildings in the Twin Cities. Charles M. Ingemann was a son of Victor Ingemann and Dora Ingemann. William Ingemann was born in St. Paul and was educated at the University of Minnesota (1915-1922) and the American Academy in Rome. He served in World War I as an ambulance driver and as an engineer for the American Red Cross. During World War II, William Ingemann served as a major in the Army Air Corps and, after the war, in 1945, was in partnership with Milton Bergstedt until 1958. Ingemann retired in 1961, moved to Mexico in 1965, and died there. Elmer L. Anderson (1910-2005) was born in Illinois, grew up in Michigan, had his parents divorce, had polio at age 9, lost his mother at age 15, lost his father at age 16, was initially employed as a factory worker and a door-to-door salesman, graduated from the Business School at the University of Minnesota, married Eleanor Johnson, was employed by the glue company, H. B. Fuller, in 1934, became the president of H. B. Fuller in 1941, was elected to the Minnesota State Senate as a liberal Republican, sponsored the 1957 ground-breaking Fair Employment Practices Act, which banned discrimination based on race, was Governor of Minnesota from 1961 to 1963, lost reelection in 1962 to Karl Rolvaag by 91 votes after a four month recount, returned to H. B. Fuller and remained as Fuller's CEO until 1976, created ECM, a company that published newspapers in small cities and suburbs, served on numerous foundations and boards, including chairman of the University of Minnesota's Board of Regents, donated to the University of Minnesota library his lifetime collection of more than 12,000 books, and became known as "Minnesota's leading citizen." There is an Elmer L. Anderson Chair in Corporate Responsibility at the Carlson School of Management at the University of Minnesota. Charles N. Ingemann (1893-1972) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Laurison, and died in Stearns County, Minnesota. Henry A. Brandtjen (1890-1962) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Ott, and died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Jacqueline S. Nakasone and John G. Nakasone. John Nakasone operates Painting by Nakasone, Inc., and was a contributor to the Republican National Committee in 2002.

1935 Summit Avenue: Fannie Olkon House; Built in 1922; Prairie Style/Early Modern Rectilinear in style; W. D. Blumenthal, Inc., architect and builder. The structure is a two story, 3183 square foot, 14 room, six bedroom, three bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. The house cost $10,000 to construct. The house is a two story brick and wood frame structure with an intersecting hipped roof. The house has one chimney, a three bay facade, a two story sleeping and sun porch, an oriel window in the center of the second story, and an unusual large rounded arch hood. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Fannie Olkon, Diana Olkon, an instructor, Ivan A. Olkon, a salesman, and Lt. Col. Wildurr Willing, district engineer for the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers, all resided at this address. Fannie Olkon was the vice president and secretary of W. D. Blumenthal, Inc., a construction company. The current owners of record of the property are Joseph J. Westermeyer and Rachel M. Westermeyer. Joseph J. Westermeyer, M.D., M.P.H., Ph.D., is a professor in the department of psychiatry at the University of Minnesota and chief of psychiatry at the Minneapolis VA Hospital.

1926 Summit Avenue: Carolyn Dohs House; Built in 1925; Early Modern Rectilinear in style; C. A. Lee Co., architects. The structure is a two story, 3760 square foot, 14 room, six bedroom, two bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. The house was built for $8,000. Caroline Harriet Dohs (1871-1962) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Crombie, and died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Jacqueline S. Nakasone and John G. Nakasone, who reside at 1936 Summit Avenue.

1923 Summit Avenue: E. A. Jackson House; Built in 1926; Tudor Villa in style; Liebenberg & Kaplan, architects. The structure is a two story, 3953 square foot, 15 room, eight bedroom, four bathroom, one half-bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. The cost to build the house was $20,000. The 1930 city directory indicates that Henry B. Christian, his wife, Mary E. Christian, and Mrs. Annie F. Paper, the widow of Louis Paper, all resided at this address. In 1934, Ernest A. Jackson, Clara Arth Jackson, Dorothy Jackson, and Ernest A. Jackson, Jr., all resided at this address and were members of the St. Paul Town & Country Country Club, the St. Paul Athletic Club, the Minikahda Club, and the Women's Club of St. Paul. Henry Bonnell Christian (1904-1977) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Bonnell, and died in Ramsey County. Annie F. Paper ( -1944) and Ernest A. Jackson ( -1947) died in Ramsey County. The Minikahda Country Club, in Minneapolis, was founded in 1898 and hosted the U. S. Open Golf Tournament in 1915. Ernest A. Jackson ( -1947) died in Ramsey County. Ernest A. Jackson ( -1940) died in St. Louis County, Minnesota. Ernest A. Jackson (1912-1977) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Arth, and died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Michael J. Conter and Carol J. Janson. Anne White, a self-employed photographer who indicated this address in 2004, was a contributor to the Howard Dean for President campaign in 2004. [See note for the Minikahda Club for 702 Fairmount Avenue.] [See note on Town & Country Club for 952 Wakefield Avenue.]

1920 Summit Avenue: Dr. M. N. Moss House; Built in 1931; Spanish Colonial in style; Sal Goldie, architect. The structure is a two story, 4073 square foot, 16 room, eight bedroom, four bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage, which last sold in 1991 for $225,000. The house cost $12,000 to construct. The 1930 city directory indicates that Charles N. Dohs, a lawyer and a partner in the law firm of Edgerton, Dohs, and Edgerton, located at the Anchor Insurance Company, his wife, Caroline H. Dohs, Henry Hansen, a purchasing agent employed by the Northern Pacific RailRoad, and his wife, Jane Hansen, all resided at this address. In 1934, John A. Maher, Florence Murray Maher, Mary J. Maher, and John A. Maher, Jr., resided at this address. The Maher family were members of the Minikahda Country Club in 1934. Charles Dohs ( -1938) died in Ramsey County. John A. Maher (1887-1959) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Smith, and died in Ramsey County. Florence M. Maher (1886-1977) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of McDonald, and died in Ramsey County. The property was last sold in 1991 with a sale price of $225,000. The previous owner of record of the property was William G. Graves and the current owners of record are Beverley G. Noel and Michael J. Noel. [See note on the Northern Pacific RailRoad.]

1917 Summit Avenue: Feldstein and Miller House/Alexander Place Condo; Built in 1925; Twenties Villa in style; Feldstein & Miller, architects; Ralph Rapson, renovation architect. The original house was built for $20,000. Unit #1 is a 2300 square foot, nine room, four bedroom, two bathroom, stucco condominium, which was last sold in 1997 for $275,000, and which is currently owned by Caroline J. Frenette and Donald H. Frenette. Unit #2 is a 2300 square foot, nine room, five bedroom, four bathroom, stucco condominium, which was last sold in 1999 for $345,000, and which is currently owned by Thomas H. Keller. The 1930 city directory indicates that Fernand B. Baer, his wife, Cora Baer, Nathaniel S. Bangs, a partner in the live stock firm of Bangs & Terry, and his wife, Ruth Bangs, all resided at this address. The 1939 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Nathaniel S. Bangs, a member of the Class of 1911, resided at this address. The 1950 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Nathaniel S. Bangs, who attended the school from 1910 until 1911, resided at this address. The 1978 Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, Saint Paul First Ward, directory indicates that Gloria Marie Gutierrez resided at this address. Fernand B. Baer (1892-1957) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Flarsheim, and died in Ramsey County. Nathaniel Swift Bangs (1890-1956) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Swift, and died in Ramsey County. [See the note for the St. Paul Academy.]

1916 Summit Avenue: William Dunn/Dr. Tilendaier House; Built in 1926; Early Modern Rectilinear in style; O. H. Rundquist, architect. The structure is a two story, 3072 square foot, 12 room, six bedroom, three bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. Construction of the building cost $13,000. The 1930 city directory indicates that William W. Dunn, a sales manager employed by the Hamms Brewing Company, his wife, Evaline Dunn, and Mrs. Ursula S. Wheaton all resided at this address. William Dunn, William Hamm's business manager, was the intermediary between the Barker-Karpis Gang, the kidnappers of William Hamm, president of Hamm's Brewery, in 1933, and the Hamm family, and lived at this home. Apparently unbeknownst to William Hamm, William Dunn had also served as the conduit for underworld payoff money to corrupt St. Paul police officers. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Charles Augustus Wheaton (1863-1916,) who was born in New York to parents born in the United States and who died of interstitial nephritis, was the husband of Ursula Wheaton and resided at 442 Summit Avenue in 1916. Charles Augustus Wheaton, Jr. (1853-1916,) the son of Charles Augustus Wheaton, Sr. (1809–1882,) was born in Syracuse, New York, moved to Northfield, Minnesota, in 1861, graduated from the medical department of Harvard University, practiced medicine in St. Paul after 1877, was professor of surgery at the University of Minnesota Medical School from 1888 until 1902, was the first vice president of the Mississippi Valley Medical Society in 1896, was an emeritus professor at the University of Minnesota after 1902, and resided at 291 South Exchange Street in 1914. William Wallace Dunn (1882-1967) was born outside of Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. Mrs. Ursula Stewart Wheaton ( -1943) died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of both units on the property are June M. Gust and Robert P. Gust. Robert P. Gust is a lawyer who was the subject of a disciplinary action of a nine month suspension of his law license by the Minnesota Supreme Court in 1996, based on falsely claiming, for a six year period, for property tax purposes, homestead status for rental property that he owned, rented to others, and did not occupy as his homestead, and failing to timely file federal and state individual income tax returns for the years 1988, 1989, 1990, and 1992.

1912 Summit Avenue: Warren Seeley/Seely House; Built in 1911; Early Modern Rectilinear in style; C. A. Pear, architect. The structure is a two story, 2198 square foot, eight room, four bedroom, one bathroom, one half-bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage, which last sold in 2004 for $725,000. The construction cost for the house was $6,000. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Lewis resided at this address. World War I veteran William W. Lewis resided at this address in 1919. The 1924 city directory indicates that Dr. and Mrs. W. W. Lewis resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that William W. Lewis, a partner in the oculist and aurist practice of Lewis & Leavenworth, located at the Lowry Medical Arts Building, and his wife, Barbara Lewis, resided at this address. William W. Lewis (1903-1970) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Stutt, and died in Hennepin County. The current owners of record of the property are Steven J. Keough and Jean M. Lageson. Jean Lageson M. D. is a doctor who practices pathology and internal medicine in St. Paul. Steven Keogh and Jean Lageson were financial supporters of Cretin-Derham Hall in 2005-2006.

1911 Summit Avenue: Built in 1928. The structure is a two story, 2410 square foot, nine room, four bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. The 1930 city directory indicates that Joseph Braufman and his wife, Sofia Braufman, resided at this address. Joseph Braufman ( -1947) died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Ruth Brombach and William A. Brombach. William A. Brombach, M. D., was a 1979 graduate of St. Thomas Academy, graduated from St. Louis University Medical School in 1987, did his residency at the Hennepin County Medical Center, specializes in internal medicine, and is the Medical Director for the HealthEast Midway Clinic. Ruth Haag Brombach is a graduate of the College of St. Catherine and the executive director of the CSC Alumnae Association.

1906 Summit Avenue: A. N. Thome House; Built in 1926; Spanish Colonial Revival in style; A. S. Thome, architect. The structure is a two story, 2699 square foot, 12 room, six bedroom, three bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. The house was built for $12,500. The 1930 city directory indicates that Bert B. Beveridge, a traveling salesman, his wife, Arka T. Beveridge, Edward F. Sands, Jr., vice president of Robinson Cary & Sands Company, and his wife, Winifred Sands, all resided at this address. Edward F. Sands (1861- ) was born in Berlin, Wisconsin, was educated in Wisconsin public schools, moved to Minnesota, was initally employed by the C. N. Nelson Company in Stillwater, Minnesota, from 1876 until 1880, was involved in railroad supplies, was employed by Robinson & Cary, later the Robinson & Cary Company, manufacturers of and dealers in engines, boilers, machinery, and railway supplies, after 1880, married Katherine Dindorf in 1889, eventually was the vice president and general manager of the the Robinson & Cary Company, was a member of the Minnesota Club, was a member of the St. Paul Commercial Club, was a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, was a member of the Northern Railway Club, was a member of the NorthWest Railway Club, resided at 829 Laurel Avenue in 1907, and officed at the corner of Fourth Street and Wacouta Street in 1907. Adolf Nicholas Thome (1892-1978) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Mose, and died in Ramsey County. Edward F. Sands ( -1934) died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is Leanne K. Greenheck. Anne C. Russell, a financial planner who indicated this address in 2004, was a contributor to the John Kerry for President campaign in 2004. Leanne Greenheck is a nurse who is employed by Aspen Medical and donated to America Coming Together in 2004. Leanne Greenheck was a financial supporter of Visitation Convent in 2005-2006. Merrell Peters, self employed, a resident at this address, contributed to the Barack Obama for President campaign in 2007-2008. [See note on the St. Paul Commercial Club for 505 Summit Avenue.] [See note on the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks for 334 Cherokee Avenue.]

1905 Summit Avenue: William J. Huch House; Built in 1928; Spanish Colonial/Spanish Colonial Revival in style; L. G. Scherer Company of Los Angeles, California, architect, and Albin Wall, builder. The structure is a two story, 2749 square foot, ten room, five bedroom, three bathroom, one half-bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. The cost to build the house was $15,000. The house is a two story stucco structure with an intersecting gable red ceramic tile roof. There is one chimney which has chimney pots. The house is "L" shaped and includes a low stucco covered wall. It also has curvilinear buttressing piers and a wrought iron balcony. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that William J. Huch resided at this address from 1928 to 1954. The 1930 city directory indicates that William J. Huch and his wife, Irene Huch, resided at this address. William J. Hoch was the treasurer of the Capitol City Lumber Company. Albin F. Wall ( -1949) died in Hennepin County. The current owners of record of the property are Sharon Davis Luikart and V. Francis Luikart II. Dr. Sharon Luikart received her M.D. from Duke University, did her Internal Medicine residency at Duke University, did her subspecialty training in Hematology/Oncology at Yale University, is the chief of hematology/oncology at the Veterans Administration Medical Center in Minneapolis and is a professor of medicine at the University of Minnesota.

1902 Summit Avenue: P. J. McGuire House; Built in 1928; Twenties Villa in style; Ben Lindahl, architect. The structure is a two story, 3675 square foot, 12 room, five bedroom, two bathroom, two half-bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. The house cost $15,000 to build. The 1930 city directory indicates that Bernard Marx, his wife, Belle Marx, Merritt J. Osborn, the president-treasurer of Economics Laboratory Inc., and his wife, Susan Osborn, all resided at this address. In 1934, Merrit J. Osborn, Susan Bartley Osborn, Stephen Osborn, Edward Osborn, and Lillian Osborn all resided at this address. Stephen Osborn and Edward Osborn were graduates of Dartmouth College. Lillian Osborn was a graduate of Wellesley College. The 1964 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Howard E. Kelly, Jr., a member of the Class of 1951, resided at this address. The Osborn family were members of the Minikahda Country Club, the St. Paul Athletic Club, and the Women's City Club of St. Paul. Merritt Osborn (1879- ) was the founder of Ecolab. In 1923, Henry Ford drove Merritt J. Osborn, an auto dealer, out of that business, causing him to develop a new product, Absorbit, which cleaned carpets on the spot and eliminated the need for hotels to shut down while their carpets were being cleaned, and a new company, Economics Laboratory, reflecting its mission to save customers time, labor and money with "economic" solutions developed through "laboratory" research. By 1924, Economics Laboratory employed Ida Koran, the company secretary, two young saleswomen, and a production manager. The company obtained a product in 1924, Soilax, from a chemistry student, for use in restaurant mechanical dishwashers. After graduating from Dartmouth College, Steve Osborn joined Economics Laboratory in 1927, eventually specializing in advertising and promotion. In 1928, the company invented and patented the first "wash boiler" dispenser, which injected Soilax into dishwashing machines. Economics Laboratory almost went under in 1933, when customers began defaulting in product payments, but after a company-wide salary reduction, the company netted a profit of $98.19 in 1934. In 1935, E. B. Osborn, M. J. Osborn's son, became company sales manager. In 1949, the company had 130 St. Paul employees, 200 salespeople, and 100 manufacturing employees. In 1957, Economics Laboratory had its first public stock offering. Bernard Marx ( -1940) died in Ramsey County. Patrick James McGuire (1878-1979) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Keating, and died in Ramsey County. Merritt J. Osborn (1879-1960) was born outside of Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. Susan Bartley Osborn (1880-1956) was born outside of Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. Stephen A. Osborn (1905-1996) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Bartley, and died in Ramsey County. Ida C. Koran (1893-1967) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Mies, and died in Ramsey County. The property was last sold for $850,000 and that sale occurred in 2004. The current owners of record of the property are Karen J. Wahmanholm and Paul G. Wahmanholm. Paul Wahmanholm was a teacher at the Daytons Bluff school and now is an administrative intern and a literacy coach at the Daytons Bluff school.

1897 Summit Avenue: Dr. Thomas C. Fulton House; Built in 1910 (1912 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Tudor Villa in style; H. J. Frandson, architect. The structure is a story, 3699 square foot, nine room, five bedroom, three bathroom, one half-bathroom, masonry and frame house, with two detached garages. The house cost $9,000 to build. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Thomas C. Fulton resided at this address from 1912 to 1915. The 1915 Hamline University Alumni Quarterly indicates that Charles A. McCann, a member of the Class of 1894 and a real estate dealer, resided at this address. C. A. McCann resided at this address in 1918. The 1918 and 1924 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. C. A. McCann resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that A. Amos McCree, a partner with Fred H. Mork and Guy Chase in the contracting firm, McCree & Company, and his wife, Alice B. McCree, resided at this address. In 1934, A. A. McCree and Alice Mills McCree resided at this address and were members of the University Club. Alice Mills McCree was a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution. Thomas C. Fulton, Jr., was the son of Thomas C. Fulton, Sr. (1830-1894,) and Margaret Magee Fulton (1834-1905,) was the brother of James Cooper Fulton (1874-1929,) and was a doctor. Scholarships at the University of Minnesota-Morris were established by Dorothybelle Kaufman and Edward Kaufman of Appleton, Minnesota, in memory of their parents, A. A. McCree and Alice Mills McCree and Andrew Kaufman and Kate McCoy Kaufman. The A. Amos McCree scholarship is given to a student majoring in mathematics or computer science, the Alice Mills McCree scholarship to a student majoring in theatre arts, the Andrew Kaufman scholarship to a student majoring in the natural sciences and the Kate McCoy Kaufman scholarship to a student majoring in elementary education. Thomas C. Fulton, Sr., was in the furniture business. Thomas C. Fulton, Sr., was born in Fallston, Beaver County, Pennsylvania, worked in a machine shop and bell foundry, worked on steam boats, was a steamboat chief engineer, married Margaret Magee in 1869, was in the furniture business in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, moved to St. Paul and resided at the Merchant's Hotel, them moved to White Bear Lake, Minnesota. Thomas C. Fulton, Sr., and Margaret Magee Fulton had five children, Thomas C. Fulton, Jr., Jane M. Fulton, James C. Fulton, Andrew F. Fulton, and Plenney A. Fulton. Thomas C. Fulton, Jr. (1871- ,) was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, moved to Minnesota with his family in 1872, graduated from the Shattuck School, Faribault, Minnesota, attended the University of Michigan from 1889 until 1890, graduated from Cornell University with a bachelor's degree in 1895 and from the Law School in 1898, graduated from the University of Minnesota Medical School, resided in White Bear Lake, Minnesota, was a member of the Phi Delta Theta fraternity, was president of the White Bear Lake, Minnesota, village council, was a lawyer and a doctor, was a Republican, and was a member of the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Ramsey County (District 37) from 1899 until 1900 and from 1903 until 1906. Thomas C. Fulton, Sr., donated the bell for the bell tower of the St. John in the Wilderness Church in White Bear Lake, Minnesota. Thomas Cooper Fulton ( -1950) died in Ramsey County. Margaret M. Fulton (1886-1975) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Wilson, and died in Hennepin County. Andrew Amos McCree (1883-1957) was born outside Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Swan, and died in Hennepin County. Alice B. McCree (1885-1974) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Bunting, and died in Ramsey County. James C. Fulton ( -1929) died in Ramsey County. Dorothy G. Kaufman ( -1975) had a mother with a maiden name of Wyland and died in Ramsey County. Andrew Kaufman (1867-1960) was born outside of Minnesota and died in Big Stone County, Minnesota. The current owners of record of the property are Judith M. Lutter and Lowell D. Lutter. Dr. Lowell D. Lutter is an assistant clinical professor at Gillette Children's Hospital in St. Paul and is a foot and ankle surgeon and specialist.

1896 Summit Avenue: A. Johnson House; Built in 1925; Tudor Revival/Twenties Villa in style; Nelson Benson, architect. The structure is a two story, 4130 square foot, 14 room, six bedroom, four bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. The house was built for $13,500. The property is on the Register of National Historic Places as a part of the West Summit Avenue Historic District. World War I veteran William B. Parker resided at this address in 1919. The 1930 city directory indicates that Samuel N. Field, his wife, Senta Field, and Samuel G. Heller, vice president of the Louis Silverstein Company, and his wife, Dot Heller, all resided at this address. William Parker ( -1920) died in Ramsey County. The property was last sold in 1992 with a sale price of $210,000. The previous owners of record of the property were Hoa P. Young and Stephen B. Young and the current owner of record of the property is Valorie L. Klemz. Stephen B. Young is the Global Executive Director of the Caux Round Table, an international network of senior business leaders dedicated to corporate social responsibility and better outcomes from globalization for poor nations and their peoples. Young is also President of the Minnesota Public Policy Forum and a member of the Board of Ready 4K, a non-profit advocacy group seeking better results for young children. Young has been Assistant Dean of Harvard Law School, Dean and Professor of Law at Hamline Law School, and an adjunct professor at the University of Minnesota and at Minnesota State University-Mankato. Young was the founding board chair of the Center of the American Experiment and chaired the boards of United Arts and the Minnesota Museum of Art. He was a member of the Council on Foreign Relations in New York City, is a member of the American Law Institute, and is the editor of the Hmong Forum magazine. Hoa P. Young is the Small Business Liaison for the City of St. Paul, was a member of the Children's Services Committee of the City of St. Paul, and is a member of the Asian Pacific Cultural Center Capital Campaign Committee, a nonprofit organization that is proposing to build a $5.5 million, two-story, 45,000 square foot facility, as a component of a mixed-use development called "Unity Square Project," at the southeast corner of University Avenue and Dale Avenue in St. Paul.

1894 Summit Avenue: Warner Ogden House; Built in 1924 (1925 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Mildly Tudor Revival/Tudor Villa in style; G. A. Anderson, architect and builder. The structure is a two story, 3232 square foot, 11 room, six bedroom, two bathroom, two half-bathroom, stucco house, with two detached garages. Construction cost for the house was $12,500. The 1978-1982 Ramsey County/St. Paul Architectural Survey fieldworker indicates that the house is a 2 1/2 story stucco and half-timbered (second floor) structure with a steeply pitched hipped roof which has one hipped dormer. It has one chimney. It also has an enclosed entrance porch with a steep bellcast hipped roof and a rounded arched door. The roof line of the structure is unusual. The 1930 city directory indicates that Warner Ogden, a physician with an office at 350 St. Peter Street, and his wife, Margaret Ogden, resided at this address. Warner Ogden was a physician who graduated from Carleton College in 1916. The Ogden-Wilkinson Scholarship Fund at Carleton College was established in 1980 by J. Humphrey Wilkinson, of the Class of 1916, and by gifts from Dr. Warner Ogden and his son, Dr. Harry S. Ogden, of the Class of 1945, in honor of J. Humphrey Wilkinson and his classmate and friend, Dr. Warner Ogden. The current owners of record of the property are Jeffery P. Cairns and Katherine A. Cairns. Katherine A. Cairns, MPH, MBA, previously was Commissioner of Public Health for the City of St. Paul, previously was the Director of the Medica State Public Programs at the Allina Health System and now is a health care consultant and the president of Summit Health Group, specializing in strategic planning for public organizations and agencies serving low income clients and clients with special health care needs. In 2003, Jeffry Cairns, a contributor to the Randy Kelly for Mayor campaign, resided at this address.

1890 Summit Avenue: W. J. Gilberson/A. L. Gilbertson House; Built in 1926; Colonial Revival/Georgian Revival in style; N. G. Persson, architect. The structure is a two story, 1980 square foot, seven room, four bedroom, one bathroom, one half-bathroom, stucco house, with a detached one car garage. The house cost $9,000 to build. The 1930 city directory indicates that William J. Gilberson resided at this address. The current owners of record of the property are the trustees of William I. Fine and Toby Silverman, located in Minneapolis. There is the William I. Fine Theoretical Physics Institute at the University of Minnesota, a major international center for research in theoretical physics. William I. Fine, a real estate developer, was the founder and managing general partner of Fine Associates of Minneapolis, was the original co-developer of Northgate Shopping Center in Decatur, Illinois, in 1998, and had a life-long interest in theoretical physics.

1889 Summit Avenue: A. L. Goffstein House; Built in 1926; Twenties Villa in style; Jay Axelrod, architect. The structure is a two story, 2636 square foot, eight room, three bedroom, one bathroom, one half-bathroom, stucco house, with two detached garages. Construction of the house cost $18,225. The 1930 city directory indicates that Abr. L. Goffstein, proprietor of the Goffstein Realty Company, and his wife, Sarah Goffstein, resided at this address. A. L. Goffstein ( -1953) died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Jeanette A. Frederickson and Steven R. Frederickson.

1884 Summit Avenue: A. S. Fine House; Built in 1931; Spanish Colonial/Spanish Colonial Revival in style; Jacob Fine, architect. The structure is a two story, 2594 square foot, ten room, four bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. The house cost $16,500 to construct. Adolph S. Fine (1893-1988) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Kraviecz, and died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are the trustees of William I. Fine and Toby Silverman, located in Minneapolis, who also own 1890 Summit Avenue.

1883 Summit Avenue: J. R. Fry House; Built in 1910; Tudor Revival/Craftsman/Bungalow/Tudor Villa in style; H. J. Frandsen, architect and builder. The structure is a two/2 1/2 story, 3909 square foot, 11 room, four bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, masonry and frame house, with a detached garage. The cost to build the house was $10,000. The house is a brick structure, half timbered on the second floor, with an intersecting gable roof, one chimney, heavy ornamentation, and a matching garage. The 1981-1982 architectural survey worker for Summit Avenue remarked that the house is lavishly adorned. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that J. Rudolph Fry resided at this address from 1911 to 1942. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Fry resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Fry and Mr. and Mrs. T. R. Fry resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that John R. Fry, the secretary-treasurer of Owens Motor Sales, Inc., and his wife, Alice S. Fry, resided at this address. The 1939 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that William Welz Fry (1915- ,) who was born in St. Paul, who attended the school from 1929 until 1934, who attended the University of Munich in 1937, who attended the University of Berlin in 1938, who was a 1938 graduate of Dartmouth College, who was employed at the Joseph A. Rogers Agency at the Lowry Building, and who pursued the hobbies of skiing, tennis, and photography, resided at this address. J. R. Fry was the secretary-treasurer of the Welz-Mangler Company. Frederick R. Welz (1833- ) was born in Berlin, Germany, was educated in public schools of Germany, was the proprietor of a woolen goods factory in Finsterwalde, Germany, from 1857 until 1873, married Marie Theresa Golpfert in 1857, came to the United States in 1874, was in the restaurant business in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1874, was the proprietor of the Park House in Indianapolis, Indiana, moved to St. Paul in 1882, sued James K. Goodhue in 1884 and enforced the judgment at a sheriff's sale against real estate owned by Goodhue, ran the Clarendon Hotel from 1882 until selling it in 1886, purchased the Merchants Hotel in 1887 with his son-in-law and partner, Dr. Christian Fry, and operated it until 1892, opened Welz & Mangler, a wholesale wine house, was the president of the Welz-Mangier Company, purchased the Ryan Hotel with Fry in 1893 and operated it from 1893 until 1904, and resided at 1035 Summit Avenue in 1906. Frederick R. Welz and Marie Theresa Golpfert Welz were the parents of one daughter. Frederick Welz ( -1933) died in Hennepin County. The current owners of record of the property are Mary E. Bolkcom and L. Marshall Smith. Mary E. Bolkcom (1952- ) is a lawyer in and founding member of the law firm of Hanson, Marek, Bolkcom & Greene, Ltd. and was a member of the Fourth District Bar Association (Minneapolis) of the Minnesota State Bar Association in 2004. L. Marshall Smith and Mary Bolkcom were financial supporters of Cretin-Derham Hall High School in 2004-2005. L. Marshall Smith is a lawyer and successfully argued, on appointment by the court, before the United States Supreme Court the case of Kenneth Eugene Bousley v. United States, 523 U.S. 614 (1998), on behalf of Kenneth Bousley, relating to the nature of a voluntary guilty plea in a drug trafficking and firearm use case when misinformed by the District Court as to the nature of the charged crime. [See the note for the St. Paul Academy.]

1874 Summit Avenue: G. A. Aston/Ashton House; Built in 1928; Tudor Revival/Tudor Villa in style; F. O. Peterson, architect. The structure is a two story, 5381 square foot, 12 room, six bedroom, four bathroom, one half-bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage, which was last sold in 2000 for $753,000. The house cost $18,000 to build. The house is a three story brick structure with half timbering and with a slate intersecting gabled roof. It also has two chimneys. It has an overhanging gable end above the entry to the house and a porte cochere. The 1930 city directory indicates that Guy A. Ashton, the president of the G. A. Ashton Company, and his wife, Edrina M. Ashton, resided at this address. In 1934, Mr. and Mrs. G. A. Ashton resided at this address and were noted members of St. Paul society. Guy A. Ashton ( 1949) died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Elisabeth S. Woodward and Todd G. Woodward.

1873 Summit Avenue: Lytton James Shields House; Built in 1912 (Sandeen; 1913 according to Larson;) Early Modern Rectilinear in style; Clarence H. Johnston, Sr., architect. The structure is a two story, 2842 square foot, nine room, four bedroom, three bathroom, one half-bathroom, stucco house, with a one car attached garage and a detached garage. The house cost $8,000 to construct (Sandeen; $10,000 according to Larson.) Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Lytton J. Shields resided at this address from 1913 to 1931. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. L. J. Shields resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. L. J. Lewis resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Lytton J. Shields, president of the National Battery Company, and his wife, Helen Shields, resided at this address. Lytton Shields (1883-1936) died in Ramsey County and was survived by his wife, Helen Burchard Shields ( -1950,) and one child, Cynthia Shields. Helen Burchard Shields was the sister of Henry Burchard, an executive at Gould National Batteries and a resident of West Saint Paul, Minnesota, who left an unrestricted gift of approximately $5.5 million to The Saint Paul Foundation. Henry McNiel Burchard was a World War I veteran who resided at the Angus Hotel in 1920. The 1939 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Lytton J. Shields ( -1938) attended the school from 1904 until 1905, married Helen Burchard, and the couple had one daughter, Cynthia Shields. Helen Shields was survived by her daughter. Cynthia Shields had four children, William Young, John Young, Robert Young, and Judith Young. Cynthia Shields ( -1993) was survived by her son, William Young, and by her daughter, Judith Young. William Young ( -1993) died shortly after his mother and was survived by his five children, Lori Bunker, John Young, James Young, Melissa Young, and Will Young and those grandchildren were involved in litigation over Lytton Shield's will and its application to them, in which the Minnesota Court of Appeals found that "grandchildren" does not include great-grandchildren and distinguished the case of In re Kittson's Estate, 177 Minn. 469, 225 N.W. 439 (1929), where the court decided the issue of whether or not the terms "nephews" and "nieces" in a will included grandnephews and grandnieces. Lytton J. Shields (1887-1936,) a student at Yale University and a member of the Psi Upsilon fraternity, purchased, before World War I, the Electric Manufacturing Company of St. Paul, established by Bertram B. Down, Neil R. McLeod and Edgar A. Reed in 1906, initially guided the company into the automotive battery distributorship business, and then into the manufacturing end of the battery business by pursuing an affordable way to make lead grids and connectors for batteries. After two years of research, the company went into battery production and was renamed the National Lead Battery Company. A combination of a small customer base, a fire which destroyed the battery factory, and a recession after World War I left National Lead Battery Company with great financial problems. The company rebounded when Shields acquired Montgomery Ward as its first national battery customer and then developed a way to produce replacement car batteries at one-quarter to one-eighth of the prior cost, and received national contracts with Goodrich, Goodyear, and Phillips, making it one of the largest producers of replacement batteries. It was renamed National Battery in the 1920's. In 1930, Shields' interest was drawn to a fiberglass method of insulating battery plates for which Gould Storage Battery Corporation held the patent. Shields saw an application for this process in the production of automotive batteries. Gould Electronics dated to the late 1800's, when Charles J. Gould started a small foundry to forge couplers for railroad cars and added other products to its line, including batteries for railcars. The growing market for storage batteries prompted Gould to expand his product line and change the business name to Gould Storage Battery Corporation. Gould produced storage batteries for use by trains, electric utilities, subways, elevators, and farms. Gould also became a principal supplier of submarine batteries to the United States Navy. In addition, Gould developed a battery for the rapidly growing automotive industry. By 1930, the company had become an established name in the battery industry and was one of the largest manufacturers of industrial batteries in the country. The ambitious Shields acquired Gould Storage Battery Corporation for $225,000. The fiberglass separator batteries were perfected for automobiles, and, in 1936, Shields introduced a significant advancement in the industry. The Kathanode Glass-Klad battery was guaranteed to last "as long as you own your car." At his death, Shields left behind a national company with branches in 16 cities and seven plants across the country. Shields' successor, Albert H. Daggett, expanded the business into the industrial battery market as a major supplier of batteries for submarines and aircraft and the company changed its name to Gould-National Batteries, Inc. Gould-National Battery struggled during the 1950's and 1960's, as costs grew faster than margins in replacement batteries. In 1958, Gould-National acquired from White Machine Works a group of companies that manufactured parts for internal combustion engines. Gould-National acquired another engine parts manufacturer, Wilkening Manufacturing Company, a manufacturer of piston rings and equipment rings for aircraft engines, in 1960. It also acquired Cyclone Filter Corporation, a manufacturer of air and fuel filters. Under William T. Ylvisaker as chief executive officer, Gould-National began to diversify and to move the company away from its reliance on the battery market, merging with Cleveland-based Clevite Corporation, a manufacturer of precision automotive parts, batteries, and electronic systems and components. From 1969 to 1976, Gould acquired 20 companies, including the makers of electronic controls, computer output devices, battery-related equipment, medical instrumentation, heating equipment parts, specialized electric motors, and electronic test and measurement equipment as well as a smelter and refiner of lead. Gould-National Batteries pioneered work in sealed-cell nickel cadmium batteries, helping to create a market for rechargeable appliances. Gould-National was purchased by the Nippon Mining Company in 1988. In 1928, Lytton J. Shields and Stanley E. Hubbard purchased KFOY, initially was known as the National Battery Broadcasting Company, changed its call name to KSTP, began to broadcast at 10,000 watts, and became NBC's first radio affiliate. Lytton J. Shields resided at 911 Lincoln Avenue in 1917 and also built a home at Dellwood, Minnesota, on the north side of White Bear Lake. Lytton J. Shields received a U. S. patent (#1,382,129) for a storage battery connector in 1918. Helen Grace Shields ( -1946) died in Ramsey County. Architect Edwin Hugh Lundie (1886-1972) is listed as designing a St. Paul residence for Lytton Shields. The current owners of record of the property are Ann Swanson and John B. Swanson. [See note on Johnston.] [See note on the National Battery Broadcasting Company for 194 Summit Avenue.]

1866 Summit Avenue: E. J. Daly House; Built in 1912; Bungalow in style; E. J. Donahue, architect. The structure is a one story, 2245 square foot, seven room, four bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, brick house, with a detached garage. It cost $5,000 to build the house. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Daly resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Eugene J. Daly resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Daly resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Eugene J. Daly and his wife, Elizabeth Daly, resided at this address. E. J. Daly constructed the Old Classroom Building at the University of St. Thomas in 1903, which was razed in 1965. Eugene J. Daly ( -1935) and Edward J. Daly ( -1937) both died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Kenneth M. Nimmer and Elaine M. Yorkgitis. Kenneth Nimmer, REM, CEP, associated with IMPACT Planning, which provides environmental consulting and community planning services. Elaine M. Yorkgitis is employed by the Automotive Division of 3M. Elaine M. Yorkgitis is a 1985 graduate of Virginia Tech University and married Kenneth Nimmer in 1996.

1865 Summit Avenue: Jens Pedersen House; Built in 1922; Early Modern Rectilinear in style; Jens Pedersen, architect. The structure is a two story, 2803 square foot, 12 room, four bedroom, three bathroom, one half-bathroom, stucco house, with an attached garage and a detached garage, which last sold in 1998 for $525,000. The cost to build the house was $9,000. The 1930 city directory indicates that Jens Pedersen, a civil engineer who officed at the Globe Building, and his wife, Sophie Pedersen, resided at this address. Jens Pedersen ( -1941) died in Ramsey County. Jens Peder Pedersen (1897-1962) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Pedersen, and died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Brian J. Sweeney and Janice L. Sweeney.

1858 Summit Avenue: Ben Weed House; Built in 1912; Georgian Revival in style; Peter J. Linhoff, architect. The structure is a two story, 3105 square foot, ten room, four bedroom, three bathroom, brick house, with a detached garage. The house cost $5,500 to construct. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Lampert resided at this address. World War I veteran Horace H. Lampert resided at this address in 1919. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Lampert, their daughters, and H. H. Lampert all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Jacob Lampert, the chairman of the board of Jake Lampert Yards, Inc., and his wife, Margaret Lampert, resided at this address. Horace H. Lampert ( -1938) was the son of Jacob Lampert, the founder of Lampert Yards, and became the president of the company in 1928. Horace Lampert successfully guided the company through the Great Depression and through the pre-war years and by 1937, Lampert Yards had a total of 53 yards. Horace Lampert died by drowning. Benjamin Kellogg Weed (1889-1974) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Kellogg, and died in Waseca County, Minnesota. Jacob Lampert ( -1947) and Jacob Lampert ( -1948) both died in Ramsey County. Horace H. Lampert ( -1938) died in Washington County, Minnesota. The current owners of record of the property are Laura M. Kolar and Stephen J. Kolar. In 2003, Stephen Kolar was a contributor to the Randy Kelly for St. Paul Mayor campaign and resided at this address. Stephen J. Kolar M.D. is an internal medicine doctor with HealthPartners. Stephen Kolar, with Daniel D. Foley, is associated with East Metro Disease Initiative, a nonprofit educational institution. Stephen Kolar was a 1967 graduate of Cretin-Derham Hall and was a financial supporter of Cretin-Derham Hall High School in 2005-2006. Laura Kolar was a financial supporter of Guild Incorporated in 2003. [See note on Linhoff.]

1855 Summit Avenue: Ben M. Hirschman House; Built in 1916 (1917 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Classical Revival/Mission/Classical Rectilinear in style; Ralph Mather, architect. The structure is a two story, 6070 square foot, 16 room, seven bedroom, four bathroom, two half-bathroom, brick house, with a detached garage. The house cost $15,000 to construct. The 1981-1982 architectural survey worker for Summit Avenue remarked that the house is a 2 1/2 story brick structure with a hipped red tile roof. It has one chimney and an open porch with square and round Ionic columns. It also has a leaded glass door and terra cotta ridge flashing. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. B. M. Hirschman resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Ben Hirschman and Adolph Hirschman all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that William L. McKnight, the president of Minnesota Mining & Manufacturing Company, and his wife, Maude McKnight, resided at this address. In 1981, Judy Boss resided at this address. Ben M. Hirschman (1877- ) was the son of Adolph Hirschman and Rosie Cohn Hirschman and was a partner with his father in Hirschman & Co., which was a wholesale wines and liquor dealer. McKnight married Maude Marion Rothschild in 1900 and the couple had three children, Joseph Rothschild Hirschman, Philip Stanley Hirschman, and Adrian Byron Hirschman. Ben M. Hirschman also was the president of J. Rothschild Co. in 1917-1918. William McKnight bought the house in 1925. William L. McKnight (1887-1978) was the third child born to Joseph McKnight and Cordelia McKnight, and was born in White, South Dakota. McKnight was an early Minnesota Mining & Manufacturing (3M) executive and spent 59 years with the company. He was a 20 year old business student when he was hired by 3M in 1907 as assistant book keeper, after the company had turned him down for a laborer's job in 1906. After becoming 3M's sales manager in 1911, he was the General Manager of 3M in 1914, became president in 1929, and then became the chairman of the 3M Board in 1949. McKnight married in 1915 and the couple had one daughter, Virginia McKnight Binger (1916-2002.) Minnesota Mining & Manufacturing was formed by a lawyer, a doctor, two railroad executives, and a meat market owner in 1902 in Two Harbors, Minnesota, expecting to get rich. When their supposed corundum mine turned out to be a soft abraisive rock, the company began to fail. The founders then shifted gears, entering the abrasives business directly by making their own sandpaper. In 1921, 3M released "Wetordry" sandpaper, its first breakthrough product, and in the 1930's, 3M introduced Scotch® Tape. McKnight donated this house to Hamline University in his will and Hamline University sold the house in 1980. William McKnight founded the McKnight Foundation in 1953. Virginia McKnight Binger was president of the foundation from 1974 to 1988. Rip Rapson is the current president of the McKnight Foundation. The McKnight Foundation is Minnesota's largest foundation, with approximately $2 billion in assets. Adolph Hirschman ( -1935) died in Ramsey County. Maude R. Rothschild ( -1935) died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is Frederic G. Schmidt. [See the note for 2020 Summit Avenue for additional information on Virginia McKnight Binger.]

1850 Summit Avenue: Bertha (Mrs. J. L.) Hinners House; Built in 1907; Simplified Rectilinear in style; F. L. Breitkreutz, architect. The structure is a two story, 2990 square foot, ten room, five bedroom, one bathroom, one half-bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage, which was last sold in 2000 for $376,000. It cost $4,500 to build the house. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mrs. J. L. Hinners and her daughters resided at this address. World War I veteran Burton D. Reinfrank resided at this address in 1919. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mrs. Bertha Hinners resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Bertha Hinners, the widow of John L. Hinners, Clara L. Hinners, a stenographer employed by Morgan, Carter, Chase & Headley, and Gertrude Hinners, a teacher at the Hancock School, all resided at this address. Bertha Reinfrank was the second wife of John Leonard Hinners (1846-1906,) the son of Peter Hinners (1824- ,) a skilled church builder, and Luise Justine Juliane Muller Hinners (1824-1908.) John L. Hinners was born in Wheeling, West Virginia, initially married Wilhelmina Frederica Witt (1850- ,) the couple had four children, Charles John Hinners, Arthur William Hinners (1873-1955,) Emily Gertrude Hinners, and Clara Louise Hinners, and died in Pekin, Illinois. John L. Hinners, after serving in the Civil War and apprenticing with the reed organ division of Mason & Hamlin of Boston, moved to Chicago, then moved to Pekin, Illinois, founded the Hinners Organ Company, first called the Perfection Organ Works, in 1879, initially in partnership with J. J. Fink and subsequently in partnership with Ubbo J. Albertsen, spent the first ten years in business building reed organs, and produced nearly 3,000 pipe organs and 20,000 reed organs in its 55 years of existence. The Hinners Organ Company had no salesmen, but simply provided catalogues listing standard instruments and kept prices low enough that small, rural church congregations could afford an organ. A numbering system in manufacturing and packing the organ made installation easy and required only one company representative. Arthur Hinners presided over the company after his father's death. The Hinners Organ Company business peaked in 1912, with 97 workers and three organs shipped per week, but declined after 1930, with the Great Depression and after a financial fraud by the company's treasurer and the company ceased business in 1936. In 1959, Burton Reinfrank was the Sales Manager of McCulloch International Inc. and introduced go-karts to Europe. Reinfrank brought the first two go-karts, both powered by a McCulloch engine, to the 1959 Salon Nautique (Paris Boat Show), held on the left bank of the Seine near the Eiffel Tower, at the same time as the Paris Salon d'Automobile (Paris Motor Show,) held at the Grand Palais and covered by the automobile press worldwide. The two go-karts were displayed on the McCulloch stand at the show and they created a large amount of interest when the two top French automobile journals sent photographers and did full page stories on the karts with color photos. Bertha R. "Reinfrank" Hinners ( -1947) died in Ramsey County. Burton D. Reinfrank (1894-1983) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Kropf, and died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are James H. Lee and Jean Miller Lee.

1846 Summit Avenue: V. J. Hawkins House; Built in 1914; Simplified Rectilinear in style; Nicholas Steinmetz, architect. The structure is a two story, 2627 square foot, ten room, five bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. The cost to build the house was $4,600. The 1918 city directory indicates that Dr. and Mrs. V. J. Hawkins resided at this address. World War I veteran Arthur D. Hawkins resided at this address in 1919. The 1924 city directory indicates that Dr. and Mrs. V. J. Hawkins resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Vincent J. Hawkins, Sr., a physician who officed at 428 South Wabasha Street, his wife, Cora E. Hawkins, and Vincent J. Hawkins, Jr., a dentist who officed at 350 St. Peter Street, all resided at this address. Vincent John Hawkins ( -1940) died in Ramsey County. Arthur D. Hawkins (1882-1964) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Fisher, and died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Susan A. Kressin and James A. Radtke. James Radtke was made assistant vice president of United Bankers' Bank of Bloomington, Minnesota, in 2005. James A. Radtke and Susan Kressin were financial supporters of the National Parks Conservation Association in 2005.

1845 Summit Avenue: Ruth Cukier House; Built between 1969 and 1970 (1969 according to Ramsey County property tax records); Contemporary in style; Sam Cukier, architect. The structure is a 2113 square foot, seven room, two bedroom, three bathroom, split level stucco house, with a basement garage. The house cost $20,000 to build. Samson Cukier (1908-1996) was born outside of Minnesota and died in Hennepin County, Minnesota. The last sale of the unit occurred in 1995 at a sale price of $175,000. The current owners of record of the property are Kirk D. Velett and Laurie C. Velett. Laurie C. Velett was a contributor to the John Kerry for President campaign in 2004. Mr. and Mrs. Kirk D. Velett were financial supporters of Second Harvest Heartland in 2004 and of the American Red Cross in 2004.

1844 Summit Avenue: A. D. Cumming House; Built in 1922; Early Modern Rectilinear in style. The structure is a two story, 4576 square foot, 16 room, eight bedroom, three bathroom, two half-bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. The house cost $10,000 to construct. The 1930 city directory indicates that Joseph F. Moyer, the president-treasurer of the E. A. Brown Company, his wife, Gertrude Moyer, and Gale W. Perry, a special agent employed by the St. Paul Fire & Marine Insurance Company, all resided at this address and that Charlotte Lade was a maid at this address. The current owners of record of the property are Janet A. Baumanis and Uldis Baumanis. [See note on the St. Paul Fire & Marine Insurance Company for 297 Bates Avenue.]

1838 Summit Avenue: A. H. Holler/Heller House; Built in 1921; Tudor Revival/Twenties Villa in style; C. K. Carpenter, architect. The structure is a two story, 2856 square foot, 11 room, four bedroom, three bathroom, one half-bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage, which was last sold in 2000 for $515,000. It cost $15,000 to build the house. The property is on the Register of National Historic Places as a part of the West Summit Avenue Historic District. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Heller resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Leonard H. Heller and his wife, Ruth Heller, resided at this address. The 1950 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that James H. Heller (1928- ,) who attended the school from 1938 until 1945, who graduated from Harvard University in 1949, who attended Yale University Law School, and who pursued the hobby of listening to music, and Leonard H. Heller, Jr., who attended the school from 1936 until 1943, who attended Central Missouri State Teachers College, Yale University, the University of Oslo, Norway, and the University of Minnesota, who served as an Ensign in the U. S. Naval Reserve during World War II, and who pursued the hobbies of hunting, fishing, international study and relations, manual shop work, and sports, resided at this address. Aaron H. Heller ( -1926) died in Ramsey County. Arthur H. Heller (1895-1993) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Mueller, and died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Kathy R. Gromer and J. Roberto Sobalvarro. K. R. Gromer, self-employed, was a contributor to the Democratic National Committee in 2004. Roberto Sobalvarro is the head coach of the Twin City Fencing Club, has been coaching and fencing for thirty years, is a member of the U.S. national coaching staff and a former national head coach, and has coached numerous senior and junior U.S. teams. Kathy Gromer, M.D., graduated from Kansas University Medical School in 1985, completed her Internal Medicine residency and her Pulmonary/Critical Care Medicine fellowship at the University of Michigan, is the Medical Director of the Respiratory Care Program at Saint Paul Technical College, has been in private practice since 1991, is Board Certified in Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine and Sleep Disorders, and is associated with the Minnesota Lung Center. [See the note for the St. Paul Academy.]

1837 Summit Avenue: Morris H. Wax House; Built in 1949; Contemporary in style. The structure is a one story, 2101 square foot, six room, one bedroom, two bathroom, masonry and frame house, with a detached garage. The cost to build the house was $20,000. The current owner of record of the property is Jane Kristoff Samargia. Jane Samargia is a graduate of the University of the Philippines and, since 1983, has been the executive director of HIRED, a workforce development organization that was founded in 1968, originally with the purpose of helping ex-offenders to find employment and avoid returning to criminal behaviors, and expanded in 1976 to assist disadvantaged and other job seekers to become qualified for and obtain employment.

1834 Summit Avenue: John W. Nabersberg House; Built in 1906; Mildly Colonial Revival/Simplified Rectilinear in style, altered by a subsequent enclosure of the porch; F. L. Breitkrentz, architect and builder. The structure is a 2 1/2 story (two story according to Ramsey County property tax records,) 1866 square foot, ten room, four bedroom, two bathroom, wood clapboard (aluminum/vinyl-sided according to Ramsey County property tax records) house, with a detached garage, which was last sold in 1997 for $225,000. Construction of the house cost $3,500. The house has a hipped roof, which has a hipped dormer, a limestone foundation, and a chimney. It also has an enclosed front porch. The structure has box-like massing. The 1918 city directory indicates that Dr. and Mrs. J. W. Nabersberg resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Thomas resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Frank B. Blair resided at this address. John W. Nabersberg was a physician. John William Nabersberg ( -1920) died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is Shawn F. Chambers. Shawn Chambers is a program administrator employed by the Minnesota Department of Transportation. Shawn Chambers was a 2006 Futsal Tournament volunteer for the St. Paul Blackhawks Youth Soccer Club. The St. Paul Blackhawks was founded in 1952 and is the oldest soccer club in Minnesota, offering soccer programs for youth, juniors, men, women and seniors twelve months a year.

1831 Summit Avenue: William W. Kennedy House; Built in 1928; Spanish Colonial in style; Robert C. Martin, architect. The structure is a two story, 2334 square foot, ten room, four bedroom, two bathroom, two half-bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage, which was last sold in 1998 for $315,000. The 1930 city directory indicates that William W. Kennedy, a mayonnaise manufacturer, and his wife, Nellie F. Kennedy, resided at this address. In 1934, William W. Kennedy, Nellie Foley Kennedy, William W. Kennedy, Jr., John Kennedy, Richard Kennedy, and Roger F. Kennedy resided at this address. William W. Kennedy was a graduate of the University of Minnesota. The current owners of record of the property are Megan E. Tucci and Thomas J. Tucci. Thomas J. Tucci (1961- ) is an attorney, has bachelors and law degrees from the University of Minnesota, is a certified public accountant, and is a member of the law firm Fabyanske Westra Hart & Thomson P.A. Tom Tucci and Megan Tucci were financial supporters of Hill-Murray High School during 2004-2005.

1826 Summit Avenue: Hermann G. Graaf House; Built in 1912 (1913 according to Ramsey County property tax records); Tudor Villa/Modified Bungalow in style; Samuel A. Nicholson, architect and builder. The structure is a 2 1/2 story (two story according to Ramsey County property tax records,) 3497 square foot, ten room, five bedroom, two bathroom, two half-bathroom, brick bungalow, with a detached garage. The house cost $10,000 to construct. The house has a gabled roof which has a shed dormer with a warped roof. The porch has brick ogee arches. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. H. G. Graaf resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Charles W. Fogarty, a physician officing at the Lowry Building, resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Dr. and Mrs. C. W. Fogarty resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Charles W. Fogarty, a surgeon at the St. Paul Clinic, and his wife, Emma Fogarty, resided at this address. The 1987 St. Agnes Catholic Church directory indicates that James Shrake resided at this address. Hermann G. Graaf was a partner in Graaf & Cummings, Graaf & Goetzmann, a retail clothier. Charles W. Fogarty (1915-1969) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Berrisford, and died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are James H. Shrake and Jeanne M. Shrake. James H. Shrake was a 1953 graduate of St. Mary's University of Minnesota and was a financial supporter of the institution in 2004.

1825 Summit Avenue: Louisa Lindeke House; Built in 1911; Simplified Rectilinear in style; Martin Fenstad, architect. The structure is a two story, 2476 square foot, nine room, four bedroom, one bathroom, two half-bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage. The cost to build the house was $5,000. Louisa Lindeke was the wife of St. Paul dry goods wholesaler Albert H. Lindeke. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. O. A. Lindeke resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Oscar A. Lindeke and his wife, Jenn Lindeke, resided at this address. Louisa Lindeke ( -1940) died in Ramsey County. The property was last sold for $727,000 and that sale occurred in 2004. The current owners of record of the property are James R. O'Brien and Rosalie W. O'Brien. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Lindke resided at the former nearby 1824 Summit Avenue.

1818 Summit Avenue: Bernard P. Rosenstein House; Built in 1916 and altered later with porch addition; Ornate Prairie Style/Early Modern Rectilinear in style; Wyvill & Stewart, architects. The structure is a two story, 2160 square foot, eight room, four bedroom, one bathroom, one half-bathroom, brick and stone (brick according to Ramsey County proerty tax records) house, with a detached garage, which was last sold in 1996 for $179,700. It cost $5,000 to build the house. The structure has a hipped roof with green ceramic roofing tile. It has one chimney and a garage with two hipped dormers. The unusual entry porch was added. The 1918 and 1924 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. Frank King resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Frank King, the proprietor of the King Pig Company, located at the Exchange Building, and his wife, Mary King, resided at this address. Bernard P. Rosenstein was president and treasurer of the Realty Service Company and lived at 145 South Lexington Avenue in 1917. The current owner of record of the property is William F. Long.

1815 Summit Avenue: J. B. Forrest House #3; Built in 1938; Contemporary in style; A. G. Erickson, architect. The structure is a two story, 2390 square foot, eight room,three bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage, which was last sold in 1997 for $184,500. The house cost $9,000 to construct. James B. Forrest ( -1940) died in Hennepin County. The current owners of record of the property are Christine A. Garner and W. Michael Garner. W. Michael Garner is an attorney, is a partner in the law firm of Dady & Garner, P.A., and has practiced franchise and distribution law for over twenty years. W. Michael Garner received an honorable mention in fiction from the Loft Literary Center in 2006 in its Mentor Series Competition.

1812 Summit Avenue: C. E. Bergman House; Built in 1914; Tudor Rectilinear in style; Olai Haugen, architect. The 1920 city directory indicates that Clarence E. Bergman, the secretary for D. Bergman & Company, resided at this address and that Conrad Bergman, a helper employed by the Chicago & Great Western RailRoad, boarded at this address. The structure is a two story, 2569 square foot, ten room, four bedroom, one bathroom, brick house, with a detached one car garage. The house was built for $5,500. The 1918 and 1924 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Bergman resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Clarence E. Bergman, a broker, and his wife, Elsie Bergman, resided at this address. Clarence E. Bergman ( -1933) died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Kathryn L. Oftelie and Winton A. Oftelie. Winton Oftelie was a 1960 graduate of Lincoln High School in Thief River Falls, Minnesota, and is a member of Trackside Racing, a radio controlled car club. Kathryn Oftelie was a financial supporter of the Minnesota Literacy Council in 2005. [See note on the Chicago Great Western RailRoad.]

1811 Summit Avenue: J. B. Forrest House #2; Built in 1938; Late bland Colonial Revival/Georgian Revival in style; A. G. Erickson, architect and builder. The structure is a two story, 2651 square foot, nine room, four bedroom, three bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. It cost $11,000 to build the house. The house has a gabled roof and a symmetrical facade. It has one chimney, a colossal pedimented portico, and a classical doorway. The stucco exterior is believed to have been added after original construction of the house. The 1964 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Peter H. Levy, a member of the Class of 1960, resided at this address. James B. Forrest lived on Iglehart Avenue and was an office employee in downtown St. Paul. James B. Forrest ( -1940) died in Hennepin County. The current owner of record of the property is Vera S. Tanasichuk. Vera Tanasichuk was a contributor to the Republican Senatorial Committee in 1984, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1991, 1992, 1993, and 2005, and to the Republican Congressional Campaign in 1986, 1987, 1988, 1990, 1991, 1992, and 1993.

1801 Summit Avenue: J. B. Forrest House #1; Built in 1938; Georgian Revival in style; A. G. Erickson, architect. The structure is a two story, 2044 square foot, eight room, four bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage. The cost to build the house was $10,000. James B. Forrest ( -1940) died in Hennepin County. The current owners of record of the property are Edwin Fogelman and Milda K. H. Fogelman. Edwin Fogelman, Ph.D. (Princeton University), is a professor of political science at the University of Minnesota, teaching courses in the history of political thought, political ideologies, American political thought, and democratic theory, is the chair of the University of Minnesota’s Council on Public Engagement, is the principal investigator for a Ford Foundation grant on Citizenship and Public Ethical Practices, chaired the University of Minnesota Senate Judicial Committee for four years, and was the chair in 2000 of the Task Force on Civic Engagement of the University of Minnesota, which was intended to foster a culture of public service at the University true to its land-grant mission. Edwin Fogelman is the editor of Hiroshima: The Decision to Use the A-Bomb, published by Scribner Research Anthologies in New York in 1964, and was a co-author with Alan Ebenstein and William Ebenstein of Today's ISMS; Socialism, Capitalism, Fascism, Communism, and Libertarianism, published by Prentice Hall in New York in 1999 (11th edition).

1800 Summit Avenue: Wilkie E. Collins House; Built in 1910; Simplified Rectilinear in style; W. E. Collins, architect. The structure is a two story, 2108 square foot, seven room, three bedroom, two bathroom, frame house, with two detached garages. The construction cost for the house was $3,450. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Wilkie E. Collins resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Wilkie E. Collins, a solicitor and freight agent employed by the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha RailRoad, resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Collins resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Wilkie E. Collins, a freight agent employed by the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha RailRoad, and his wife, Blanche Collins, resided at this address. Wilkie E. Collins (1879-1973) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Dillon, and died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Corrine T. Reidl and Gary J. Reidl. Gary Reidl/Riedl is a retired teacher who formerly taught at Wayzata Senior High, Plymouth, Minnesota, is an active scholar in research on the author Jack London, and is the editor, with Thomas R. Tietze, of Jack London's Tales of Cannibals and Headhunters: Nine South Seas Stories by America's Master of Adventure, University of New Mexico Press, 2006. [See note on the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha RailRoad.]

1799 Summit Avenue: M. Donnelly House; Built in 1957; Contemporary in style; Antler Corporation, builders and architects. The structure is a 1912 square foot, eight room, four bedroom, two bathroom, split-entry stucco house, with a detached garage, which last sold in 1993 for $168,000. The house cost $16,000 to construct. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mrs. L. J. Selig, her daughters, Mrs. Ruth Selig, and her daughters, all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Edward F. Flynn, an assistant general counsel employed by the Great Northern RailRoad, and his wife, Susan E. Flynn, resided at this address. The previous owner of record of the property is the trustee for Carla J. Peterson, located in Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin, and the current owners of record of the property are Mary F. Nantell and Timothy J. Nantell. [See note on the Great Northern RailRoad.]

1798 Summit Avenue: T. A. Matthews/Ida and Alice Mathews House; Built in 1910; Mildly Colonial Revival/Craftsman/Simplified Rectilinear in style; C. A. Fowble, architect and builder. The structure is a 2 1/2 story (two story according to Ramsey County property tax records,) 2519 square foot, ten room, six bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, wood frame, clapboard and shingle house, with a detached garage. The house was built for $4,500. The house has an intersecting bellcast gabled roof, a chimney, a limestone foundation, and a deep open wrap-around porch. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Thomas A. Matthews resided at this address in 1908. The 1918 and 1924 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. T. A. Matthews, Jr., and T. A. Matthews all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Thomas A. Matthews resided at this address. Charles A. Fowble ( -1937) died in Washington County, Minnesota. The current owners of record of the property are Audrey S. Bailey and Dan L. Bailey.

1795 Summit Avenue: Mary Donnelly and Francis Donnelly House; Built in 1951; Contemporary in style; L. W. Santa, architect. The structure is a two story, 3184 square foot, 11 room, four bedroom, two bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage, which last sold in 1991 for $186,000. The house cost $22,000 to construct. Francis Donnelly ( -1946) died in Hennepin County. Mary Yvonne Donnelly (1906-1960) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Mailloux, and died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is the Youth and Family Center Inc., located in Minneapolis.

1789 Summit Avenue: Mrs. Mary E. Monkhouse House; Built in 1917 (Sandeen and Larson;) Period Revival/Colonial/Craftsman/Georgian Revival Variant in style; Clarence H. Johnston, Sr., architect. The house cost $12,000 to build (Sandeen; $14,000 according to Larson.) The house is a 2 1/2 story, 3543 square foot, 12 room, five bedroom, three bathroom, one half-bathroom, stucco structure with a symmetrical facade which has a gabled roof with one eyelid dormer and one shed dormer. It also has an enclosed porch in the rear of the house and one chimney. The house has a detached garage. The house has been altered over time. Mrs. Mary E. Monkhouse was the widow of Harry Monkhouse ( -1917.) In 1879, Harry Monkhouse, a foreman employed by the St. Paul, Minneaopolis & Manitoba Railway Shops, boarded at the corner of Williams Street and De Bow Street. Mary E. Monkhouse ( -1926) died in Ramsey County. The house last sold in 1997 for $350,000. The current owners of record of the property are Maureen Coonan and Christopher J. Nachtsheim. Maureen Ann Coonan (1951- ,) a descendant of Martin Francis Coonan (1819-1886) and Catherine O'Connell Coonan (1825-1897,) married Christopher John Nachtsheim (1951- ) and the couple have two children, Abigael Catherine Nachtsheim (1987- ) and Andrew Benjamin Nachtsheim (1991- .) Christopher J. Nachtsheim was a member of the Statistics Group at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory in 1980, was employed in the Management Information Systems Department of General Mills in 1982, was a professor in the Department of Management Sciences of the University of Minnesota in 1987, was Associate Dean of Faculty at the Carlson School of Management at the University of Minnesota in 1999, and was a professor of Operations and Management Science in the Statistics Department in the Graduate School at the University of Minnesota in 2003. Christopher J. Nachtsheim, a professor at the University of Minnesota, was a contributor to the John Kerry for President campaign in 2004. [See note on Johnston.]

1788 Summit Avenue: Peter Maendler House; Built in 1913 (1914 according to Ramsey County property tax records); Simplified Rectilinear in style; H. M. Elmer, architect. The structure is a two story, 3137 square foot, ten room, six bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, stucco house, with an attached garage and a detached garage, which last sold in 1992 for $229,000. The construction cost for the house was $8,500. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Peter Maendler and their daughters resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. A. L. Runyon, Mr. and Mrs. Peter Maendler, and the Misses Maendler all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Peter Maendler, the president of the Maendler Brush Manufacturing Company, and his wife, Emma C. Maendler, resided at this address. Peter Maendler ( -1936) died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Marylin C. Ampe Schestak and Robert J. Schestak. Robert J. Schestak, D.D.S., is a dentist with an office at 241 Cleveland Avenue South. Robert Schestak and Mari Lyn Ampe Schestak own property in the vicinity of a proposed Minnesota Pipe Line Company 295 mile long, 24-inch diameter, pipeline in Morrison County and, in 2006, suggested four different routes to avoid crossing their property.

1779 Summit Avenue: Rose (Mrs. Thomas M.) Furniss House; Built in 1925; Elizabethan Revival/Tudor Villa in style; Peterson-Lang, architects and builders. The structure is a two story, 2736 square foot, 11 room, four bedroom, one bathroom, two half-bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. The cost to build the house was $12,000. The house has a slate roofed intersecting gable jerkinhead roof which has three hipped roof dormers. It also has a half-timbered exterior. It is asymmetrical, has an arched garden gate entrance, and has a screened porch. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Rose B. Furniss, the widow of Thomas W. Furniss, resided at this address. Rose Furniss was the widow of Thomas M. Furniss, who was a Duluth millionaire, mine owner, and theatrical magnate. Mr. and Mrs. Furniss moved to St. Paul in 1922 and they initially lived at 1844 Summit Avenue. Thomas M. Furniss died in 1924. He disinherited two of his four children in his will. Rose B. Furniss (1868-1968) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Walsch, and died in Hennepin County. Thomas W. Furniss ( -1924) died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is Sandra A. Neren. Sandra Neren is an attorney with the law firm of Messerli & Kramer and is or has been a lobbyist for the Minnesota District Judges Association, the Minnesota County Attorneys Association, the Minnesota Sheriff's Association, the Minnesota Newspaper Association, the Civil Justice Coalition, and the Alliance of Auto Manufacturers. In 1994, Sandra Neren made a campaign donation to the Bill Luther for Congress Volunteer Committee.

1774 Summit Avenue: Sam Friedman House; Built in 1922; Tudor Villa in style; C. F. Rule Construction, builder and architect. The structure is a two story, 3262 square foot, 11 room, four bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, stucco house, with an attached garage. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Friedman resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Samuel Friedman, associated with Dorays Smart Shop, resided at this address. Biofacilitator, Inc., and Denrick, Inc. are currently located at this address. Sam Friedman (1896-1980) was born outside of Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. The house cost $15,000 to construct. The current owners of record of the property are Catherina J. Messina and Richard A. Messina. Mr. & Mrs. Richard A. Messina were financial supporters of St. Thomas Academy in 2005.

1773 Summit Avenue: Herbert A. Sullwold/J. L. Sullwold House; Built in 1910; Tudor Villa in style; F. J. Jenny, architect. The structure is a two story, 2364 square foot, ten room, four bedroom, two bathroom, masonry and frame house, with a detached garage. The house was built for $7,000. The 1917 Catalogue of the Beta Theta Pi Fraternity, published by James T. Brown of New York, indicated that Herbert Arthur Sullwold, a member of the class of 1907 at the University of Minnesota and also the recipient of an S. B. degree in architecture from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1907, was an architect and resided at this address. The 1918 and 1924 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Sullwold resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Jacob G. Kretsch, the president of E. M. Lohmann Company, and his wife, Agnes Kretsch, resided at this address. Herbert A. Sullwold was the architect for Derham Hall and Our Lady of Victory Chapel, a 1923 Romanesque Revival structure at the University of St. Catherine, placed on the National Register of Historic Buildings in 1985. Herbert A. Sullwold resided at 807 Holly Avenue in 1905. Herbert Sullwold was one of the founders, with Frank Abrahamson, Beaver Wade Day, Magnus Jemne, Hiram Livingstone, Fred Slifer, and Frank Smalley, of the Gargoyle Club of St. Paul, a social and cultural club for architects and draftsmen incorporated in 1913, which owned the 1890 Cass Gilbert-designed 1890 German Presbyterian Church between 1917 and 1921. H. A. Sullwold also worked for Reed & Stem for a period of time. John L. Sullwold (1860- ,) the son of Herman Sullwold and Maria Gronewold Sullwold, was born in Oneota, Minnesota, was initially engaged in the grocery business for one year, was engaged in the hardware business for one year, married Clementine Rank in St. Paul in 1882, was a plumbers' supplies merchant, was employed by H. P. Rugg & Company, plumbers' supplies, for two years, was employed by Wilson & Rogers, plumbers' supplies, for 12 years, was one of the incorporators of the Western Supply Company in 1899, was the president and manager of the Western Supply Company, was a member of the National Committee of the Central Supply Association, was unsuccessfully involved in litigation with the City of St. Paul over the condemnation of land for an alley, culminating in the Minnesota Supreme Court decision John L. Sullwold et al. v. City of St. Paul, 138 Minn. 271 (1917,) was a member of the St. Paul Commercial Club, was a Scottish Rite Mason, was a Shriner, was a member of the Junior Pioneers, was a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, was a member of the Order of United Commercial Travelers of America, resided at 807 Holly Avenue in 1907, and officed at the corner of Sibley Street and Fifth Street in 1907. In 1883, John L. Sullwold, a clerk employed by Wilson & Rogers, boarded at the NorthWest corner of Hall Street and Harriet Street. Herbert Arthur Sullwod, an architect, was a member of the Beta Pi Chapter of the Beta Theta Pi fraternity, graduated from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1907, and resided at this address in 1917. Harold Herman Sullwold, associated with the Western Supply Company, was a member of the Beta Pi Chapter of the Beta Theta Pi fraternity, graduated from the University of Minnesota in 1913, and resided at the Park Square in 1917. The previous owners of record of the property are Deborah L. Gelbach and Philip K. Gelbach and the current owners of record of the property are C. Thomas Enestvedt and Mary H. Enestvedt. In 2003, Deborah Gelbach was a contributor to the Randy Kelly for Mayor campaign and resided at this address. Philip Gelbach, of Gelbach & Associates, a marketing and sales consulting firm, located at 1239 Willow Lane, Roseville, Minnesota, is a member of the Midway Chamber of Commerce. C. Thomas Enestvedt and Mary H. Enestvedt previously resided at 1645 Summit Avenue. C. Thomas Enestvedt was a financial supporter of Cretin-Derham Hall High School in 2005-2006 and of St. John's University in 2004. Alison Enestvedt was one of the eight leadership volunteer planners of the annual "Sponsor a Family" project, a joint holiday effort of Catholic Charities and Lutheran Social Services. Alison Enestvedt was the recording secretary of the Guild of Catholic Women, Inc., from 2004 to 2006.

1770 Summit Avenue: George S. MacLeod House; Built in 1915; Early Modern Rectilinear in style; Ralph Mather, architect. The structure is a two story, 3238 square foot, nine bedroom, three bathroom, two half-bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. Construction of the building cost $10,000. The 1918 and 1924 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. G. S. McLeod resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that George S. McLeod, the president of the Emporium Mercantile Company, Inc., and his wife, Edith McLeod, resided at this address. In 1934, George S. McLeod and Edith Crevier McLeod resided at this address and were members of the Minikahda Country Club. Angus McLeod (1859-1924,) the third son of George McLeod and Jane Stuart McLeod, organized the Angus McLeod Co., with a brother, George S. McLeod, after starting as a carpenter, and, in 1902, owned the Emporium Department Store, which had a floor space of nearly eight acres and was valued at $4 million in 1924. George S. McLeod (1868-1933) was the fifth son of George McLeod and Jane Stuart McLeod. George S. McLeod ( -1933) died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is Anne F. Geisser. Anne Geisser was the chairperson of an ad hoc planning commission committee of the City of St. Paul in 1997 which recommended an extension of a temporary moratorium on new metal shredders in the city. Anne Geisser was an alumna of the Education Policy Fellowship Program of the College of Education and Human Development of the University of Minnesota. There is a Geisser Lecture at the University of Minnesota to honor the late Seymour Geisser, who was the director of the School of Statistics at the University from 1971 to 2001. Seymour Geisser (1929-2004,) the husband of Anne Geisser, was a statistician noted for emphasizing the role of prediction in statistical inference and was a frequent critic of the way prosecutors and law enforcement agencies use DNA evidence. Seymour Geisser was the son of Polish immigrant garment workers, was born in the Bronx, New York, was raised in the Bensonhurst section of Brooklyn, New York, graduated from City College of New York in 1950, earned his master's and Ph.D. at the University of North Carolina, held various positions at the National Institutes of Health, founded the Statistics Department at the State University of New York, Buffalo, and then founded the School of Statistics at the University of Minnesota. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. R. B. Whitacre and E. M. Whitacre all resided at the former nearby 1767 Summit Avenue.

1761 Summit Avenue: R. B. Whitacre House; Built in 1916 (1917 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Tudor Rectilinear in style; S. M. Bartlett, architect. The structure is a two story, 4852 square foot, 11 room, four bedroom, two bathroom, masonry and frame house, with an attached garage. The construction cost for the house was $15,000. World War I veteran Eugene M. Whitacre resided at this address in 1919. The records of the 1919-1920 Minnesota World War I Soldier's Bonus Board (#5073) indicate that Eugene M. Whitacre (1889- ,) a 1917 draftee and a Sergeant First Class in the Ordnance section, who was born in St. Paul, had blue eyes, dark brown hair, and a medium fair complexion, was 5' 8" tall, was a mechanic at induction, served in the American Expeditionary Force in France, was a merchant employed by R. B. Whitacre & Company after the completion of service, and was unmarried, resided with his father, R. B. Whitacre, at this address. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Robert Bond Whitacre resided at this address in 1923. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. E. M. Whitacre and R. B. Whitacre all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Robert B. Whitacre, the president-treasurer of R. B. Whitacre & Company, Eugene M. Whitacre, vice president-secretary of R. B. Whitacre & Company, and his wife, Dorothy Whitacre, all resided at this address. Robert Bond Whitacre ( -1954) died in Ramsey County. Eugene M. Whitacre (1889-1977) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Mann, and died in Ramsey County. Eugene Mann Whitacre (1923-1992) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Humphrey, and died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Louis E. Lapierre and Georgia L. Miller.

1760 Summit Avenue: Philip Weiss/Mrs. Mae Weiss Fox House; Built in 1922; Early Modern Rectilinear in style; J. W. Lindstrom, architect. The structure is a two story, 2576 square foot, ten room, four bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. The house was built for $7,450. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Fox and Mr. and Mrs. Philip Weiss all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Michael T. Nagle, the president of the Pitcher Snow Plow Company, and his wife, Mary M. Nagle, resided at this address. The 1964 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Douglas C. Green, a member of the Class of 1964, resided at this address. Philip Weiss ( -1925) died in Swift County, Minnesota. The last sale of this property was in 2004 and the sale price was $634,000. The current owners of record of the property are the trustees of Debra Asplund and Paul Padratzik. Debra Asplund competed in the 2004 Hennepin-Lake Classic 10K Women's Race and the 2004 Race for the Cure 5K Race. Paul Padratzik is associated with the Japs-Olson Co. and is a member of the Mid-America Direct Marketing Association. [See the note for the St. Paul Academy.]

1753 Summit Avenue: Reuben Blumberg House; Built in 1926; Period Revival/Tudor Villa in style; H. M. Elmer, architect. The structure is a two story, 4018 square foot, 11 room, three bedroom, two bathroom, two half-bathroom, wood and brick, half-timbered (brick according to Ramsey County property tax records,) house, with an attached garage, which last sold in 2004 for $1,040,000. The cost to build the house was $20,000. The house has a slate roof, intersecting gable and jerkinhead, which has one gabled dormer and one hipped dormer. The house is "L" shaped. It has a bay window on the main facade, which is obscured by awnings. The front porch was added subsequent to the original construction of the house. The 1930 city directory indicates that Reuben Blumberg, a realtor, and his wife, Carrie Blumberg, resided at this address. Reuben Blumberg was a real estate agent. The 1920 city directory indicates that Mrs. Reuben Blumberg boarded at 2064 Summit Avenue, a former residence that was razed as part of a past expansion of the University of St. Thomas. Rueben Blumberg (1876-1970) was born outside of Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is Stephanie N. Melstrom. J. Kevin Costley, an attorney with Lindquist & Vennum, was a contributor to the Wesley Clark for President campaign and to the Democratic National Committee in 2004.

1750 Summit Avenue: L. D. Coddon House; Built in 1924 (1925 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Twenties Villa in style; Lindstrom-Anderson, architects. The structure is a two story, 3784 square foot, 12 room, four bedroom, four bathroom, two half-bathroom, brick house, with a detached garage. The house cost $16,000 to build. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Ida Coddon, the widow of Louis D. Coddon, resided at this address. The 1939 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that George H. Park (1917- ,) who was born in Caro, Michigan, who attended the school from 1931 until 1937, and who attended the University of Minnesota, resided at this address. Louis D. Coddon ( -1929) died in Ramsey County. The last sale of this property was in 2004 and the sale price was $1,025,000. The current owner of record of the property is Daniel T. Wu. [See the note for the St. Paul Academy.]

1747 Summit Avenue: J. G. Robertson House; Built in 1912; Tudor Villa in style. The structure is a two story, 3267 square foot, 12 room, five bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, masonry and frame house, with a detached garage. The house cost $6,500 to build. The house was moved to this site in 1926 from 1668 Summit Avenue. The 1930 city directory indicates that Samuel J. Jacobs, proprietor of the Jacobs Furniture Company, and his wife, Etta Jacobs, resided at this address. James Gordon Robertson ( -1926) died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Darlene J. Metzger and Stephen F. Metzger. In 2003, Steven Metzen was a financial supporter of the Randy Kelly for St. Paul Mayor campaign and resided at this address. Mr. and Mrs. Stephen F. Metzger were financial supporters of St. Thomas Academy in 2005, the Minnesota Medical Foundation in 2003, and the Diabetes Institute for Immunology and Transplantation at the University of Minnesota in 2002. Stephen Metzger was a 1954 graduate of Cretin-Derham Hall High School and Darlene and Stephen Metzger were financial supporters of the high school in 2005.

1740 Summit Avenue: Dr. J. C. Nelson House; Built in 1909 (1910 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Tudor Villa in style; Mark Fitzpatrick, architect. The structure is a two story, 3253 square foot, nine room, five bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, masonry and frame house, with a detached garage. The house was built for $4,200. Howard Everett resided at this address in 1914 and in 1918. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Howard Everett and Mrs. E. A. Hayden all resided at this address. J. W. Gaver resided at this address in 1924. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Gaver and Mr. and Mrs. H. B. Warren all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Frederick Ritzinger, a solicitor with the Wight Insurance Agency, and his wife, Jessie Ritzinger, resided at this address. In 1934, Frederick K. Ritzinger, Sr., Jessie Greene Ritzinger, Charles Ritzinger, L. Ritzinger, Frederick K. Ritzinger, Jr., Dorothy L. Ritzinger, and John Ritzinger resided at this address. Frederick K. Ritzinger, Sr., was a graduate of the University of Minnesota. World War I veteran Frederick Ritzinger (1885-1965), a First Lieutenant, resided at 45 South St. Albans Street in 1919. Frederick Ritzinger was a native of Indianapolis, Indiana, was an assistant postmaster in St. Paul for 20 years, retired to Sedona, Arizona, in 1953, with his wife, Ethel Ritzinger, and died in Cottonwood, Arizona, after a short illness. Charles L. Ritzinger resided in San Rafael, California in 1965. Mrs. Dorothy L. Ritzinger Stickney resided in San Anselmo, California, in 1965. John B. Ritzinger resided in St. Paul in 1965. Dr. Frederick Ritzinger, Jr., resided in San Antonio, Texas, in 1965. Jessie Greene Ritzinger was the daughter of Charles Lyman Greene and the granddaughter of William Warren Greene. Frederick Ramsay Ritzinger, Jr., (1913- 1985), a Colonel in the U. S. Air Force, married Norma Mae Lennarson Ritzinger (1924-1985). Frederick R. Ritzinger, Jr., and Ellis G. Aboud authored "Pressure Suits - Their Evolution and Development," in Air University Review, Volume XVI (Jan.-Feb. 1965). Dr. William Warren Greene (1831- ) was born in North Waterford, Maine, married Elizabeth Carelton ( -1860) of Waterford, Maine in 1855 and married Elizabeth Lawrence ( -1876) of Pownal, Maine in 1861, was a respected surgeon, and was among the founders of Maine General Hospital in Portland, Maine. Charles Lyman Greene (1862- ) studied medicine at the University of Michigan, was a doctor in Minnesota in 1898, was a Colonel in the U. S. Army in 1917, authored The Medical Examination For Life Insurance And Its Associated Clinical Methods: With Chapters On The Insurance Of Substandard Lives And Accident Insurance (1906) and Medical Diagnosis For The Student And Practitioner (1917), had two daughters, Dorothy Lawrence Greene, who married Alfred J. Schweppe and lived in Seattle, Washington, and Jessie Greene, who married Dr. Frederick Ramsay Ritzinger and lived in St. Paul. Jessie G. Ritzinger (1887-1970) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Rice, and died in Ramsey County. The property was last sold in 2003 with a sale price of $815,000. The current owners of record of the property are Dawn M. Igo and Patrick T. Igo. Patrick Igo was a member of the St. Paul Heritage Preservation Commission in 2003, residing at 412 Duke Street. Patrick Igo is a realtor with Coldwell Banker Burnet in partnership with Craig Schleisman. Patrick Igo was the treasurer of the St. Paul Republican City Committee in 2002. [See note on Fitzpatrick.]

1737 Summit Avenue: Moses Shapira/S. L. Shapiro House; Built in 1913; Simplified Rectilinear in style; Eugene Schmidt, architect. The structure is a two story, 2588 square foot, ten room, five bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, masonry and frame house, with a detached garage. Construction cost for the house was $7,200. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Moses Shapira resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Mose Shapira resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that this address was vacant. Moses C. Shapira ( -1934) died in Ramsey County. Samuel L. Shapiro (1874-1957) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Warshofsky, and died in Hennepin County. Sheila A. Rangitsch resided at this address in 2005. The current owners of record of the property are Robert E. Cattanach and Terry Cattanach. Robert E. Cattanach graduated with a B. S. in engineering from the United States Naval Academy in 1972, graduated with a law degree from the University of Wisconsin Law School in 1975, is an attorney, and is a partner in the law firm of Dorsey & Whitney LLP. The 1930 city directory indicates that William Aags, a service engineer, resided at the nearby former 1726 Summit Avenue.

1732 Summit Avenue: R. H. Gerig House; Built in 1909 (1910 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Craftsman Bungalow/Simplified Rectilinear in style; Peter J. Linhoff, architect. The house cost $5,000 to build. The house is a 2 1/2 story, 2850 square foot, ten room, five bedroom, three bathroom, wood, clapboard, and shingle (frame according to Ramsey County property tax records) structure with a gabled roof which has a gabled dormer and with a detached garage, which was last sold in 1998 for $379,900. It has a brick chimney, an open "L" shaped porch with columns, and lead glass windows. Robert H. Seng resided at this address in 1912. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that William Seng (1832-1915,) the widower brother of Robert H. Seng, who was born in Germany to parents also born in Germany and who died of a cerebral hemorrhage, resided at this address in 1915. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Seng resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Frank E. Driscoll, proprietor of the Hook-Em-Cow Hotel Cafe, Confectionery, and Soft Drinks located in South St. Paul, Minnesota, resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. F. E. Driscoll resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Michael E. Fleming, a vice president, and his wife, Octavia Fleming, resided at this address. In 1934, Michael E. Fleming, Octavia Forgette Fleming, Richard Fleming, Ward Fleming, and James Fleming all resided at this address. The Flemings were members of the Minikahda Country Club. Robert H. Seng (1860- ,) the son of William Seng, was born in St. Paul, was educated in the public schools and a business college in St. Paul, was initially employed as a barber, was employed in the retail boot and shoe business for a number of years after leaving school, subsequently became a dealer in boots and shoes, was associated with the St. Paul Lake Ice Company from 1881 until 1885, married Catherine Hardy in 1887, was a Republican, was the Ramsey County assessor from 1885 until 1890, was appointed the general agent and a distributor for Minnesota for the Anheuser-Busch Brewing Company of St. Louis in 1898, successfully challenged a competitor for the Ramsey County assessor office by overturning as unconstitutional an 1899 Minnesota law in State ex rel. Wallace B. Douglass and another v. Gregory V. Pitts, 76 Minn. 531 (1899,) was a vice president, treasurer, and marshal of the Ramsey County Junior Pioneers Association in 1896, was a manager of a brewery company after 1899, and was named by Governor Samuel Van Sant as a colonel on his staff in 1901, was a brewer's agent, was a member of the Druids, was a member of the St. Paul Commercial Club, was a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, resided at 222 North Smith Avenue in 1907, and officed on Chestnut Street in 1907. Captain Richard E. Fleming (1917-1942) was a Navy/Marine Corps pilot (Flight Officer of Marine Scout Bombing Squadron 241) during World War II who was posthumously presented the congressional medal of honor for his actions during the battle of Midway on June 5, 1942, in sinking the Japanese cruiser Mikuma. Richard E. Fleming graduated from St. Thomas Military Academy in 1935 and graduated from the University of Minnesota in 1939. The medal was received by Mrs. Michael E. Fleming, the mother of Richard Fleming, who resided at the Commodore Hotel in 1942. A 300 feet long, 1,300 ton, World War II destroyer escort vessel was named for Richard Fleming, as was Fleming Field at the South St. Paul Municipal Airport in South St. Paul, Minnesota. Octavia Forgette was the daughter of Francois Xavier Forgette and Elizabeth Leblanc Forgette. Michael Edward Fleming and Octavia Forgette Fleming had three children. The Mikuma was the second of the four-vessel Mogami-class of heavy cruisers in the Imperial Japanese Navy, was named after the Mikuma river in Oita prefecture, Japan, was launched in 1934, was rebuilt in 1939, was badly damaged on June 5, 1942, and was sunk on June 6, 1942. Robert N. Seng ( -1922) died in Ramsey County. Michael E. Fleming ( -1941) died in Ramsey County. Octavia M. Fleming (1881-1956) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Leblanc, and died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Jodi L. Ladwig and Steven D. Ladwig. Steven D. Ladwig was a 1980 graduate of Minnesota State University-Mankato, was a financial supporter of the university in 2004-2005, and was a financial supporter of the University of Minnesota Foundation in 2005. Steven D. Ladwig was employed for nearly 20 years by International Business Machines Corp. before 1998, was the President of Imation Data Storage and Information Management in 1998, additionally became Senior Vice President of Imation Corp. in 2000, became the President, Chief Executive Officer and a director of Retek Inc. in 2001 and resigned from Retek Inc. in 2003, and was General Manager, Global Retail Industry, IBM Corporation, in 2006. [See note for the Minikahda Club for 702 Fairmount Avenue.] [See note on Linhoff.] [See note on the St. Paul Commercial Club for 505 Summit Avenue.]

1731 Summit Avenue: George G. Whitney House; Built in 1912; Twenties Villa in style; Allen W. Jackson, architect. The structure is a two story, 2640 square foot, 11 room, six bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided house, with a detached garage. Construction of the house cost $4,500. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. G. G. Whiting resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. B. P. Rand resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Emily S. Whitacre resided at this address and that Lillian Drake, the widow of Harry E. Drake, was a housekeeper at this address. The current owners of record of the property are Charles J. Michel, Jr., and Mary A. Michel.

1726 Summit Avenue: P. W. Connell/Mrs. Francis J. Connell House; Built in 1906 (1908 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Queen Anne Rectilinear in style; Louis Lockwood, architect. The structure is a two story, 3130 square foot, 13 room, seven bedroom, two bathroom, two half-bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage. The house was built for $5,000. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. John Wharry and their daughter resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mrs. B. A. Wharry resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Bessie A. Wharry, the widow of John Wharry, and Doris Churchill, a music teacher, resided at this address. John Wharry (1857- ,) the son of John Wharry and Eliza Day Wharry, was born in Greensville, Ohio, was educated in the common schools of Greensville, Ohio, was engaged in undertaking business in Greensville, Ohio, until 1873, was employed by Stees Brothers, undertakers, in St. Paul in 1880, was a merchant, was a bookkeeper employed by the Northwestern Lime Company in 1882, married Bessie A Griffin in 1882, was the secretary of the Northwestern Lime Company after 1882, was the president and treasurer of the Northwestern Lime Company after 1895, was a member of the board of directors of the Burlington Mining Company in Lead City, Missouri, was a member of the board of directors of the Twin City Oil & Gas Company, was a member of the board of directors of the St. Paul Commercial Club from 1905 until 1907, was a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, resided at 1080 Burns Avenue in 1907, and officed at 68 Lower Levee in 1907. Patrick Connell ( -1925) died in Hennepin County. Francis Connell ( -1905) was born in the United States and died in Ramsey County. The property was last sold in 2005 and the sale price was $718,000. The previous owners of record of the property are Mary Lou Byrne and Philip B. Byrne and the current owners of record of the property are Mary M. Lynch and William F. Lynch, Jr. Mary Lou Byrne is an office assistant in the Department of Anthropology at Macalester College. Philip B. Byrne (1938- ) was born in St. Paul, received a bachelor's degree from St Mary's College, Winona, Minnesota, in 1960, received a law degree from the Notre Dame Law School, was Secretary/Treasurer of the Minnesota State Bar Association from 1993 to 1995, was an attorney with the St. Paul City Attorney's office from 1973 to 2000, and represented the State of Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development in the Minnesota Court of Appeals case Moore vs. Second Harvest St. Paul Food Bank and the Commissioner of Employment and Economic Development in 2004. Mr. and Mrs. Philip B. Byrne were financial supporters of Second Harvest Heartland in 2004 and 2005. [See note on Lockwood.]

1725 Summit Avenue: Louis F. Shaw House; Built in 1915 (1916 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Early Modern Georgian Revival in style; Ernest Hartford and Charles Hausler, architects. The structure is a two story, 2946 square foot, ten room, five bedroom, one bathroom, two half-bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. The house cost $7,500 to construct. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Elizabeth L. Shaw (1916-1918,) the daughter of Louis F. Shaw, who was born in Minnesota to parents born in the United States and who died of influenza, resided at this address in 1918. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. L. F. Shaw resided at this address. Carl A. Linkey was a World War I veteran who resided at this address in 1919. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. L. F. Shaw resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Louis F. Shaw, vice president of the W. R. Shaw Lumber Company, and his wife, Elizabeth L. Shaw, resided at this address. Louis F. Shaw ( -1953) died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is Jacqueline J. Reeves. [See note on Hausler.]

1722 Summit Avenue: Professor Preston T. Jackson House/Macalester College Student Housing; Built in 1886 (1887 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Victorian/Vernacular Stick in style; Brack & Brothers, architects and builders. The structure is a 2 1/2 story (two story according to Ramsey County property tax records), 2946 square foot, ten room, five bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, wood frame house, with a detached garage. Construction of the house cost $3,400. The house has an intersecting hipped and gabled roof that includes one gabled dormer. The house also has two chimneys. It has a shed roofed porch. The dormer has a rounded arch. The porch has been altered. The house is one of the oldest houses on the avenue west of Lexington Avenue. Preston Jackson ( -1937) was involved in real estate. He was an organizer of the Macalester Presbyterian Church and was a member of the Minnesota Historical Society. Reverend R. R. Otis resided at this address according to the 1910 federal census and according to the 1912 city directory. The Reverend R. R. Otis was the pastor of the House of Hope Presbyterian Chapel, established in 1895, as a mission of the House of Hope Presbyterian Church. According to the 1910 federal census, the Macalester Presbyterian Church was located on Summit Avenue at the southwest corner with Cambridge Street, had a membership of 135, and retained the Reverend F. D. McRae as its pastor. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. P. T. Jackson and their daughter resided at this address. P. T. Jordan resided at this address in 1914 and in 1924. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Ellen J. Jackson (1848-1920,) the wife of Preston T. Jackson, who was born in Ohio to parents who were born in the United States and who died of cerebral softening, resided at this address in 1920. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. P. T. Jackson resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Preston T. Jackson, a realtor with an office located at 326 Jackson Street, Myron V. Jackson, a salesman employed by Preston T. Jackson, and his wife, Clara W. Jackson, all resided at this address. Myron B. Jackson, Clara Wolf Jackson, Betty J. Jackson, and Robert P. Jackson resided at this address in 1934. Myron B. Jackson graduated from the University of Minnesota. Preston T. Jackson ( -1937) and Robert Roy Otis ( -1943) died in Ramsey County. Myron B. Jackson (1882-1966) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Gilbert, and died in Ramsey County. Clara W. Jackson (1886-1974) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Baumgartner, and died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is Marshall B. Jackson. In 1996, the appeal of the marriage dissolution caseAdrianne VanderBorght Jackson v. Marshall B. Jackson was heard by the Minnesota Court of Appeals, in which Marshall B. Jackson unsuccessfully challenged an increased child support obligation. Marshall B. Jackson is associated with MBJ Development, a real estate company.

1719 Summit Avenue: Wilfred Johnson House; Built in 1925; Tudor Villa in style; H. M. Elmer, architect. The structure is a two story, 4041 square foot, ten room, four bedroom, two bathroom, two half-bathroom, masonry and frame house, with a detached garage. The house cost $19,000 to construct. The 1930 city directory indicates that Wilfred T. Johnson, the secretary-treasurer of the C. I. Johnson Manufacturing Company, a printers supply house located at 145 South Wabasha Street, and his wife, Minnie Johnson, resided at this address. Wilfred T. Johnson ( -1946) died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Patricia A. Paulus and Stephen H. Paulus. Stephen H. Paulus (1949- ) was born in New Jersey and was raised in Minnesota, is a composer, co-founded the Minnesota Composers Forum in 1973, was a 1982 John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation fellow, was a resident composer at the Tanglewood Festival, the Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival, the Aspen Music Festival, the Oregon Bach Festival, the Aldeburgh (U.K.) Festival, and the Edinburgh, Scotland, Festival, has written over 200 works, including more than 30 works for orchestra, eight operas, dozens of choral works, and works for solo voice and chamber ensembles, is co-founder and a current Board Vice President of the American Composers Forum, and serves on the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP) Board of Directors as the Concert Music Representative. Paulus attended Macalester College and the University of Minnesota, receiving his Ph. D. in Music Composition in 1978. Patty Paulus is an artist, and the couple has two sons, Gregory Paulus and Andrew Paulus.

1713 Summit Avenue: F. B. Strunz House; Built in 1908; Tudor Villa in style; John R. Schmit, architect. The structure is a two story, 2783 square foot, nine room, five bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, masonry and frame house, with a detached garage, which was last sold in 1998 for $315,000. The cost to build the house was $9,000. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Frederick George Prest resided at this address in 1909. The 1910-1911 Directory of the University of Minnesota indicates that Marion Prest, a student, resided at this address. The city directory indicates that F. G. Prest resided at this address in 1914. The 1916 University of Minnesota Alumni Directory indicates that Marion Prest, a 1913 graduate of the University of Minnesota, resided at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. F. G. Prest and their daughter all resided at this address. George G. Prest was a World War I veteran who resided at this address in 1919. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. F. G. Prest resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Hattie G. Prest, the widow of Frederick Prest, resided at this address. In 1916, Marion Prest was selected for a second prize for lupines by the Minnesota Horticulturist Society. In 1916, Miss Marion Prest of St. Paul won a second prize for a lupine at the Minnesota State Fair. Frederick G. Prest ( -1928) died in Ramsey County. George G. Prest (1900-1975) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Gilbert, and died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Judith A. Gergen and Robert W. Gergen. Robert W. Gergen is a member of the General John W. Vessey Jr. Chapter of the Association of the United States Army. Robert W. Gergen was a member of the Cretin High School class of 1975.

1705 Summit Avenue: Louis A. Weidenborner House; Built in 1910 (1913 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Mildly Colonial Revival/Slightly Prairie Style/Simplified Rectilinear in style; H. M. Seby, architect and builder. The structure is a 2 1/2 story (two story according to Ramsey County property tax records), 3949 square foot, three bay, 13 room, six bedroom, three bathroom, brick house, with a detached garage. The house cost $14,000 to build. The house has a hipped roof, three hipped dormers, two chimneys, and an open porch. The house has box-like massing. It also has a small woodframe oriel window on the main facade. The main facade dormer has columns. There is bevelled glass at the house entrance and leaded glass in the window run. A 1981-1982 architectural survey of Summit Avenue characterizes the house as being a disjointed mix of styles. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. L. A. Weidenborner resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that I. A. O'Shaughnessy resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Ignatius O'Shaughnessy and his wife, Lillian O'Shaughnessy, resided at this address. Louis Weidenborner was the president and treasurer of the American Home Furnishings Company. From 1920 to 1942, Ignatius A. O'Shaughnessy and Lillian O'Shaughnessy owned the house. Ignatius Aloysius O'Shaughnessy (1885-1973,) the son of John O'Shaughnessy and Mary Miland O'Shaughnessy, was born in Stillwater, Minnesota, was educated in the public schools at Stillwater, Minnesota, entered St. John's University in Collegeville, Minnesota, in 1901, but stayed only one semester, then entered the College of St. Thomas in January 1902, where he was a star football player and member of the Philomathic Debating Society, completed his studies at the College in 1907, then joined his brother John O'Shaughnessy in the insurance business, became secretary of the American Athletic Association in St Paul in 1907, was an educator, was the secretary of St. Thomas College, was a member of the Order of Hibernians, was a member of the Knights of Columbus and resided at St. Thomas College in 1907. I. A. O'Shaughnessy was not particularly successful in the insurance venture and soon turned his attention to the oil business as a wildcatter. In 1910, he struck oil with his first well, located just outside of Blackwell, Oklahoma. Success in the oil business prompted him to organize and become president of the Globe Oil & Refining Company in 1917. By 1927, he had established the Lorio Oil and Gas Company and, by 1934, was known as the head of the largest oil refineries owned by an individual in the world. O'Shaughnessy was well known for contributing his wealth to worthy organizations. For the College of St. Thomas campus, he contributed financing toward the construction of O'Shaughnessy Hall in 1943, the Stadium in 1946, Albertus Magnus Hall in 1947, the O'Shaughnessy Library in 1959, and the O'Shaughnessy Educational Center in 1968. All told, he gave nearly $5 million to the College of St. Thomas. O'Shaughnessy was also a major contributor to the University of Notre Dame in South Bend, Indiana, and the College of St. Catherine in St. Paul. O'Shaughnessy married Lillian Smith in 1908 and the couple had five children, Laurence O'Shaughnessy, John O'Shaughnessy, Donald O'Shaughnessy, Eileen O'Shaughnessy, and Marion O'Shaughnessy. I. A. O'Shaughnessy died in Miami, Florida. There is an annual Laurence O'Shaughnessy Award for Poetry which is presented by the University of St. Thomas Centre for Irish Studies. In 1934, I. A. O'Shaughnessy, Lillian Smith O'Shaughnessy, John O'Shaughnessy, Eileen O'Shaughnessy, Marion O'Shaughnessy, Larry O'Shaughnessy, and Donald O'Shaughnessy resided at this address. The O'Shaughnessy family were members of the Town & Country Country Club, the Minikahda Country Club, and St. Paul Athletic Club in 1934. The current owners of record of the property are Josef Ruzicka and Libuse Ruzicka. Josef Ruzicka was a contributor to the George W. Bush for President campaign in 2004. In 2002, Josef Ruzicka filed an unspecified claim with the City of St. Paul. Mr. and Mrs. Josef Ruzicka were financial supporters of St. Thomas Academy in 2003.

Architectural Style Notes

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Information from the University of Minnesota, Northwest Architectural Archives, was used in this webpage.

This webpage was last modified on June 4, 2012.