Thursday Night Hikes: East Summit Avenue Hike 3 Architecture Notes

Thursday Night Hikes: Summit Avenue East Hike 3 Architecture Notes


Observations on Architectural Styles

Summit Avenue East Hike 2

Assembled by

Lawrence A. Martin

Webpage Creation: August 10, 2001

Specific Structures. The following presents available information on the housing styles of specific structures located along the hike:

500 Summit Avenue: Dr. Cornelius Williams House; Built in 1904 (1881 according to Ramsey County property tax records and 1909 according to the National Register of Historic Places;) Georgian Revival in style; Thomas Holyoke, architect. The structure is a two story, 4560 square foot, 12 room, seven bedroom, three bathroom, one half-bathroom, brick house, with a detached garage. The house was built for $8,000. The house is situated sideways on the lot because it was designed originally for a lot in downtown St. Paul, the site of the current Roy Wilkins Auditorium, and when Dr. Cornelius Williams decided to build on Summit Avenue instead, in what previously had been part of an apple orchard, he turned the house sideways rather than having the architect redesign it to better fit the lot. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. William A. Hardenbergh resided at this address in 1914. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. L. M. McCormack and their daughter all resided at this address. The 1920 federal census indicates that Charles L. Spencer (1856- ,) a clerk at the U. S. Distict Court and head of household, who was born in New York to parents born in New York, his wife, Margaret C. Spencer (1870- ,) who was born in Minnesota to a father born in New York and to a mother born in Pennsylvania, and their servant, Elizabeth Anderson (1891- ,) who was born in Sweden to parents born in Sweden and was employed as a private family servant, resided at 490 Summit Avenue. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. L. Spencer resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Charles L. Spencer, the president of the Amherst H. Wilder Charity, and his wife, Margaret Spencer, resided at this address. In 1934, Charles L. Spencer and Marjorie Clough Spencer resided at this address. The 1964 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Blake Shepard, a member of the Class of 1932, resided at this address. Cornelius Williams (1848-1918) was born in Kentucky, moved to Minnesota in 1864, graduated from the New York College of Physicians and Surgeons/Columbia University in 1874, was a physician, practiced medicine in New York City, worked in Knapps' Ophthalmic Institute, was a Democrat, was a member of the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Ramsey County (District 26) from 1893 until 1895, was an eye and ear disease specialist, was a member of the Minnesota Academy of Medicine, was a member of the Minnesota State Medical Association, was a member of the American Medical Association, was a member of the Chicago Ophthalmological and Otological Society, was the president of the Ramsey County Medical Society in 1901, was the president of the Minnesota State Medical Association in 1908, was the president of the Minnesota State Health Bureau in 1915, was the author of the article "The Medical and Surgical Treatment of the Suppurative Affections of the Middle Ear" in the Transactions of the Minnesota State Medical Association in 1904, and died of septicemia in St. Paul. William A. Hardenbergh ( -1920) was the son of P. R. L. Hardenbergh, who was the founder of Hardenbergh & Williams, a leather importer and manufacturer. Charles L. Spencer was a graduate of Yale University. Charles Langford Spencer was initiated as a member of Skull & Bones at Yale University in 1878, along with Treat Campbell, Charles Francis Carter, George Louis Curtis, George Benjamin Edwards, Roger Foster, Charles Newell Fowler, William Knowles James, Tudor Jenks, Clarence Kelsey, George Tapscott Knoll, George Edward Pollock, Edward Howard Seeley, Jr., Charles Martin Stone, William "Big Lub" Howard Taft, and Edward Baldwin Whitney. Charles L. Spencer was a member of the board of trustees of the Amherst H. Wilder Charities from 1910 to 1941. The Spencer family were members of the Minikahda Country Club, the Somerset Club, and the Women's City Club of St. Paul. Charles Langford Spencer (1855-1941,) the son of William Austin Spencer (1824-1897) and Marie Antoinette Langford Spencer (1829-1906,) was born in Utica, Oneida County, New York, married Margaret Clough (1869/1870-1949) in 1890, died at this address, and was buried at Oakland Cemetery. Margaret Clough was the daughter of Colonel William P. Clough (1845- ) and Dacia Green Clough (circa 1846-1892,) was born in Minnesota, died in St. Paul, and was buried in Oakland Cemetery. Charles Langford Spencer, the son of William Austin Spencer and Marie Antoinette Langford Spencer, had Colonial/Revolutionary War roots and was a member of the Minnesota Society of the Sons of the American Revolution as the grandson of George Langford and Chloe Sweeting Langford and of Joshua Austin Spencer and Electa Deane Spencer, the great-grandson of George Langford, a corporal in the Massachusetts Militia, the great-grandson of Nathaniel Sweeting, First Lieutenant in the Massachusetts Continental troops, the great great-grandson of Lewis Sweeting, a member of Rehoboth, Massachusetts, Committee of Safety and a private in Daggett's Regiment of Minutemen, the great-grandson of Eliphalet Spencer, Jr., a private in the Connecticut Militia, the great great-grandson of Eliphalet Spencer, a corporal in the Connecticut Militia, and the great-grandson of James Dean, Major and Indian Agent. Blanche Mae Clough (1878-1963) also was a child of William Pitt Clough and Dacia Green Clough. William Pitt Clough, closely connected to James J. Hill, was the chairman of the Northern Pacific RailRoad in 1913, a position that was created for him in appreciation by the Northern Pacific directors for the responsibility and executive work which Clough had been doing for the prior 12 years on the resignation of Howard Elliott as railroad president. William P. Clough was born in Cortland County, New York, and began railway work in 1880, as general counsel in the West for the Northern Pacific RailRoad until 1887, then entered the executive department of the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba RailRoad as assistant to the president, then became a director and second vice-president of the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba RailRoad, became a director of the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba RailRoad in 1890, when it was taken over by the Great Northern RailRoad, until 1901, then resigned to become a director of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy RailRoad, as well as a director and member of the executive committee of the Northern Pacific RailRoad, until 1912, and became the first vice-president of the Northern Pacific RailRoad. W. P. Clough delivered an address at the joint banquet given by the Minnesota Society of the Sons of the American Revolution and the Minnesota Society of the Sons of the Revolution at Saint Paul on Washington's birthday in 1896. Charles Langford Spencer ( -1941) died in Ramsey County. The previous owner of record of the property was Nancy T. Shepard and the current owners of record of the property are Kristen Rose and Stephen Rose. Nancy T. Shepard, a retiree, was a contributor to the Howard Dean for President campaign, to the Howard Dean for President campaign, and to the Democratic National Committee in 2004. [See note on Charles L. Spencer for 490 Summit Avenue.] [See note on the Northern Pacific RailRoad for 432 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Thomas Holyoke.] [See note for the Northern Pacific RailRoad.] [See note for the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba RailRoad.] [See note for the Great Northern RailRoad.] [See note for the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy RailRoad.]

505 Summit Avenue; Freedman-Krueger House/Everett W. Kroeger Residence/George W. Freeman House; Built between 1894 and 1896 (1910 according to the National Register of Historic Places;) Gothic Revival/Rectilinear Medieval/Tudor Revival in style; Cass Gilbert, architect. The facade of the house is of Minnesota limestone with Indiana limestone details. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that George W. Freeman ( -1916) resided at this address in 1891. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that George W. Freeman resided at this address from 1896 to 1912. The 1902 University of Minnesota Alumni Record indicates that Maude Gertrude Freeman, a 1901 graduate who received seminar honors in English, resided at this address. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that George W. Freeman (1846-1916,) the widower father of George J. Freeman, who was born in England to parents also born in England and who died of chronic institial nephritis, resided at 598 West Lincoln Avenue in 1916. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Sophie Kluckhohn (1850-1914,) the wife of Charles L. Kluckhohn, who was born in Germany to parents also born in Germany and who died of carcinoma of the stomach, resided at this address in 1914. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Egil Boeckmann resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Ambrose Tighe resided at this address. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Harriet Tighe resided at this address in 1929. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Harriet Tighe, the widow of Ambrose Tighe, resided at this address. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Everett M. Kroeger resided at this address from 1954. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. George Freeman (1845- ) was born in St. Ives, England, emigrated to the United States in 1853, settled with his family in St. Paul in 1855, and was the president of the Conrad Gotzian Shoe Company in Lowertown St. Paul since 1887. Gotzian & Company was owned by Conrad Gotzian (1835-1887,) who was born in Saxe-Weimar, Prussia, came to St. Paul in 1855, established himself first in the retail shoe and boot trade, then established a boot and shoe manufacturing company. He married Caroline Busse in 1859, was a member of the Minnesota Legislature in 1885, was a director of the German-American Bank, and died in St. Paul. The American Beauty Macaroni building at 352 Wacouta Street was originally built as the Gotzian Shoe Company in 1895. The house was built for $20,000. C. L. Kluckhorn resided at this address in 1914. Dr. Egil Boeckmann and Rachel Hill Boeckmann lived at this address from 1917 to 1922. World War I veteran Knute I. H. Johnson resided at this address in 1919. In 1934, Harriet Gotzian Tighe, the widow of Ambrose Tighe, resided at this address and was a member of the Women's City Club of St. Paul. In the 1960's, Everett W. Kroeger owned the house. Ambrose Tighe (1859-1928,) the son of James M. Tighe, was born in Brooklyn, New York, graduated from Adelphi Academy in Brooklyn, New York, in 1875, graduated with a bachelor's degree from Yale University in 1879, was a member of the Yale University Skull & Bones Club in 1878, was a member of the Phi Beta Kappa fraternity, briefly worked as a reporter for the New York Tribune, and then relocated to Frankfort, Kentucky, was admitted to the practice of law in Kentucky in 1880, moved to St. Paul in 1886, specialized in municipal and real estate law, graduated with a master's degree in Roman law from Yale University in 1887, was admitted to practice before the United States Supreme Court in 1892 by motion of U. S. Solicitor General William Henry Taft, married Harriet F. Gotzian in 1893, was attorney for the Mutual Life Insurance Company of New York since 1890, the Eastman Kodak Company since 1900, for Fairbanks, Morse & Company since 1926, and for a number of Minnesota counties and municipalities, including St. Paul, during the period 1920 to 1928, was the president of the Minnesota Water Works Company of Brainerd, Minnesota, organized the St. Paul & Suburban Railway Company, was a member of the St. Paul City Charter Commission from 1899 until 1900, founded the St. Paul College of Law with Hiram F. Stevens, Moses Clapp, Thomas D. O'Brien, and Clarence Halbert in 1900, purchased and was president of the Duluth, Red Wing & Southern RailRoad, organized in 1904, and was vice president and counsel of Luger Lumber Company of Phillips, Wisconsin, was a member of the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Ramsey County (District 36) from 1903 until 1905 and from 1907 until 1909, authored legal textbooks, was the vice president of the Security Trust Company of St. Paul, was a member of the Minnesota Club, was a member of the St. Paul Commercial Club, was a member of the St. Paul Town & Country Club, was a member of The Informal Club, was vice president of C. Gotzian & Company, shoe manufacturers, from 1906 to 1909, was president of the Minnesota State Bar Association in 1920, was the St. Paul City Attorney from 1920 to 1928, resided at 314 Dayton Avenue in 1907, and officed at the National German American Bank Building. Ambrose Tighe married Harriet Gotzian, the daughter of Conrad Gotzian, and were the parents of Katharine Gotzian Tighe, Laurence Gotzian Tighe, a member of the Yale University Skull & Bones in 1916, and Richard Lodge Tighe, a member of the Yale University Skull & Bones in 1923. In 1889, Ambrose Tighe was the receiver of the bankrupt Brainerd Water and Power Company, founded by Charles F. Kindred, which eventually became the Minnesota Water Works Company. Ambrose Tighe was the lead counsel for the Minnesota Commission for Public Safety in the 1920's. In 1920, the United States Adjutant-General's Office U. S. Army Register, Volume VIII, indicates that Laurence Gotzian Tighe (1894- ,) a Captain in the Field Artillery Section, resided at 314 Dayton Avenue. Laurence G. Tighe was a partner of Brown Brothers and of Brown Brothers Harriman & Company, and was an assistant treasurer of Yale University from 1938 to 1953, when he was succeeded by Charles Stafford Gage, a member of the Yale University Skull & Bones in 1925. Ambrose Tighe (1859- ,) a member of the Minnesota House representing Ramsey County from 1903 to 1904 and from 1907 to 1908, was the father of Richard L. Tighe (1902-1938,) a lawyer and a member of the Minnesota House representing Hennepin County from 1935 to 1938. The 1939 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Richard L. Tighe attended the school from 1913 until 1917, graduated from Yale University in 1923, attended the University of Minnesota Law School, served in the Legislature from 1935 until 1937, was a member of the Minneapolis Club, was married and had four children. Ambrose Tighe once resided at 314 Dayton Avenue. Ambrose Tighe was the author of The Development of the Roman Constitution, published in New York by the American Book Company in 1886. Charles Louis Kluckhohn (1855-1918) was born in Waukegan, Illinois, moved to St. Paul in 1873, was employed by Gordon & Ferguson in fur manufacturing, became a partner in and a vice president of Gordon & Ferguson in 1889, was a founding member of the original St. Paul Commercial Club, was a director of the St. Paul Institute, became a sustaining member of the Minnesota Historical Society in 1916, and died in Dellwood, Washington County, Minnesota. Sophie Zimmerman married Charles Louis Kluckhohn in 1877. Charles Louis Kluckhohn was a son of Sophie Henriette Freitag Kluckhohn (1834-1904) and Rev. Johann Friedrich Karl (Charles) Kluckhohn (1827-1901,) a Methodist minister. Charles L. Kluckhohn was the first president of the St. Paul Association of Commerce in 1910. Robert Kluckhohn was the author of Charles Louis Kluckhohn of St. Paul Minnesota and His Descendents, self-published in 1994. The Minnesota Shoe Company was associated with the Gotzian Shoe Company. The Knights of Labor, Local Assembly No. 2832, organized shoe workers at the Minnesota Shoe Company in the 1880's. Napoleon Savard worked for the Minnesota Shoe Company in the 1880's and was a member of the Knights of Labor and a founder of the St. Paul Trades and Labor Assembly. Charles James, a founder of the Boot and Shoe Workers Union in the Twin Cities and a prominent African-American labor leader, including three terms as the president of the St. Paul Trades and Labor Assembly, worked for the Minnesota Shoe Company as a skilled leather cutter in the 1890's. Because of the prominence of Charles James, the St. Paul Commercial Club, the city's main business organization, barred non-whites from membership and forbade members from bringing any person with any known African ancestry, regardless of appearance, to the club even as a guest. The St. Paul Commercial Club was organized in 1891, with John J. Corcoran as its first president and William Secombe as its first secretary. William Franklin Phelps (1822-1907,) the son of Halsey Phelps (1792- ) and Lucinda Hitchcock Phelps (1788- ,) was born in Auburn, New York, graduated from the Abany State Normal School in 1846, received a master's degree from Union College at Schenectady, New York, in 1851, married Caroline Chapman Livingston (1820- ) in Albany, Albany County, New York, in 1854, was the principal of the Trenton, New Jersey, State Normal School from 1855 until 1864, was the Winona, Minnesota, Normal School principal from 1864 until 1876, was the president of the National Education Association in 1876, edited the Chicago Educational Weekly, was the president of the Whitewater, Wisconsin, Normal School from 1876 until 1878, was president of the National Normal School Association in Worcester, Massachusetts, from 1876 until 1881, was vice president of the International Congress of Education in 1876, was the superintendent of Winona, Minnesota, city schools from 1878 until 1881, was secretary of the Winona Board of Trade from 1882 until 1888, was resident director of the Duluth, Minnesota, Normal school, was the Duluth, Minnesota, Board of Trade secretary after 1888, moved to St. Paul in 1886, was the president of the St. Paul Chamber of Commerce from 1886 until 1887, gave an address to the St. Paul Commercial Club on industrial supremacy in 1892, resided at 599 Summit Avenue in 1900, died of cardiac paralysis in St. Paul, and was buried in Winona, Minnesota. Caroline Chapman Livingston was the parent of two children from a prior marriage and William Franklin Phelps and Caroline Chapman Livingston Phelps were the parents of Alice Livingston Phelps (1856- .) In 1894, Michael John Dowling was the representative of the St. Paul Commercial Club to the first national Good Roads convention at Asbury Park, New Jersey. In 1895, D. R. McGinnis was the secretary of the St. Paul Commercial Club. In 1902, the St. Paul Chamber of Commerce merged into the St. Paul Commercial Club, which incorporated in 1891. The first officers of the St. Paul Commercial Club were John J. Corcoran, president, J. F. Broderick and L. L. May, vice presidents, William Secombe, secretary, and O. T. Roberts, treasurer. In 1903, the St. Paul Commercial Club not only barred non-whites from membership, but forbid members from bringing any black person to the club even as a guest and people with any known African ancestry, regardless of appearance, were subject to official or unofficial discrimination. In 1907, the St. Paul Commercial Club had a membership of more than 1,000 businessmen. In 1907, John D. Rockefeller declined an invitation from the St. Paul Commercial Club to attend a banquet to be held in his honor. From 1892 until 1910, the St. Paul Commercial Club had rooms in the Germania Bank Building at Fourth Street and Minnesota Street and moved to larger quarters in the Commerce Building at Fourth Street and Wabasha Street in 1912. Everett Kroeger was a portrait photographer who was active in the 1940's, 1950's, and 1970's. Everett Kroeger became a member of the Camera Craftsmen of America in 1953. Caroline Gotzian ( -1913,) Sophie Kluckhohn ( -1914,) Michael J. Dowling ( -1921,) Charles Edward James ( -1923,) Ambrose Tighe ( -1928,) Harriet G. Tighe ( -1936,) and Knute Iver Hilding Johnson ( -1951) all died in Ramsey County. George W. Freeman (1845- ) was born at St. Ives, England, emigrated to America with his parents in 1853, resided for two years in Cleveland, Ohio, moved to St. Paul in 1855, filled the position of clerk in a boot and shoe store until 1860, became a traveling salesman for Conrad Gotzian, manufacturer of boots and shoes, in 1866, advanced to partnership in the house in 1872, was president and general manager of C. Gotzian & Company after 1887, was the president of the St. Paul Board of Fire Commissioners, was a Scottish Rite Mason, was a Shriner, officed at 242-280 East Fifth Street in 1907, and resided at 506 Summit Avenue in 1907. George R. Freeman (1893-1965) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Reynolds, and died in Ramsey County. George J. Freeman (1904-1984) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Lamb, and died in Ramsey County. Everett M. Kroeger (1921-1990) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Stoltz, and died in Ramsey County. Rachel Hill Boeckmann (1881-1967) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Meehagen, and died in Ramsey County. Charles F. James (1882-1956) was born outside of Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. Richard L. Tighe ( -1938) died in Hennepin County. Charles Louis Kluckhohn ( -1918) died in Washington County, Minnesota. Egil Boeckmann (1887-1955) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Gill, and died in Washington County, Minnesota. John Joseph Corcoran (1877-1959) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Tracey, and died in Stevens County, Minnesota. The current owner of the property is architect Peter O'Brien. [See the note for the St. Paul Academy.] [See note on Gilbert.] [See note on the St. Paul Commercial Club for 505 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Egil Boeckmann for 366 Summit Avenue] [See note on Richards Gordon and the Gordon-Ferguson Company for 378 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Town & Country Club for 952 Wakefield Avenue.] [See note on the Duluth, Red Wing & Northern RailRoad.] [See note for the St. Paul Street RailRoad.] [See note on the Minneapolis & St. Paul Suburban Railroad Company for 165 Western Avenue North.] [See note on Conrad Gotzian for 297 Bates Avenue.]

504-506 Summit Avenue: Charles S. Bunker House; Built in 1882 (1891 according to the National Register of Historic Places and 1900 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Georgian Revival/Colonial Revival in style; George Wirth, architect. The structure is a two story, 3530 square foot, ten room, four bedroom, three bathroom, one half-bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. The book of Minnesotans: a biographical dictionary of leading living men of Minnesota, edited by Albert Nelson Marquis, indicates that George W. Freeman resided at this address in 1907. This house originally built at 361 Summit Avenue, was moved to this site in 1912, and was remodeled by its owner at the time, C. W. Talbert. Milton C. Lightner purchased the house in 1923 and the Lightners lived in the house until the early 1970's. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Clarence W. Halbert resided at 506 Summit Avenue from 1912 to 1914 and that Milton C. Lightner resided at 506 Summit Avenue from 1919 to 1967. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Milton Lightner resided at 506 Summit Avenue. The 1930 city directory indicates that Milton C. Lightner, a lawyer and a partner with William H. Lightner and Mark H. Gehan in the law firm of Lightner & Gehan, and his wife, Evelyn F. Lightner, resided at this address. In 1934, Milton C. Lightner, Evelyn French Lightner, Evelyn Lightner, and William H. Lightner, Jr., all resided at this address. The 1939 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Milton C. Lightner (1886- ,) who was born in St. Paul, who attended the school from 1900 until 1905, who was a 1909 graduate in Yale University, who was a 1912 graduate of the Harvard University Law School, who was an attorney with the law firm of Lightner & Gehan at the Endicott Building, who was an Ensign in the U. S. Naval Reserve Force during World War I,who engaged in the hobbies of golf, curling, politics, and government, who was a member of the Minnesota House of Representatives from 1921 until 1930, who was a member of the Minnesota Senate from 1931 until 1940, and who was a member of the University Club, the Minnesota Club, the Somerset Country Club, the St. Paul Curling Club, the American Legion, the 40 and 8 Society, the Ramsey County Bar Association, the Minnesota Bar Association, the American Bar Association, and the Informal Club, and William H. Lightner (1919- ,) who attended the school from 1930 until 1937 and who attended Yale University, both resided at 506 Summit Avenue. The 1964 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Milton C. Lightner, a member of the Class of 1905, and William H. Lightner, a member of the Class of 1937, both resided at 506 Summit Avenue. Charles S. Bunker was a clerk for P. H. Kelly Mercantile Company. Patrick H. (P. H.) Kelly (1831-1900) was born in County Mayo, Ireland, came to Montreal, Canada, in 1847, moved to Mooers, New York, in 1848, where he was a clerk and a merchant, moved to Minnesota in 1857 with his brother, Anthony Kelly, operated a grocery business with his borther in St. Anthony, Minnesota, for six years, moved to St. Paul in 1863 and owned a wholesale grocery business, the P. H. Kelly Mercantile Company, and was elected a life member of the Minnesota Historical Society in 1877. P. H. Kelly was a member of the board of directors of the First National Bank of St. Paul in 1879. Clarence Wells Halbert (1874- ,) the son of Edwin G. Halbert and Nancy Melvina Tyler Halbert, was born in Binghamton, New York, moved to St. Paul with his parents, was educated in the St. Paul High School in 1891, graduated from Yale College in 1895, graduated from the Yale College Law School in 1897, was engaged in the advertising business outside of Minnesota, admitted to the practice of law in Minnesota in 1898, returned to St. Paul and joined the law firm of Davis, Kellogg & Severance, practiced law alone after 1900, formed the law firm Halbert & Halbert with Hugh T. Halbert, was a founder of the St. Paul College of Law, was a member of the board of trustees and the secretary of the St. Paul College of Law, was an instructor at the St. Paul College of Law, was a member of the Roosevelt Republican Club, was a member of the St. Paul Town & Country Club, resided at 19 Floral Avenue in 1907, and officed at the Dispatch Building in 1907. Hugh Tyler Halbert (1873- ,) the son of Edwin G. Halbert and Nancy Melvina Tyler Halbert, was born at Binghamton, New York, graduated from the St. Paul High School in 1891, graduated with a bachelors degree from Yale College in 1895, graduated with a law degree from the Yale University Law School in 1897, was admitted to the practice of law in Minnesota in 1898, was a lawyer, was a member of the law office of Munn & Thygreson from 1898 until 1902, was a partner with his brother, Clarence W. Halbert, in the law firm of Halbert & Halbert in 1902, was a member of the Ramsey County Bar Association, was a member of the Minnesota State Bar Association, was a member of the American Bar Association, was a Republican, was a member of the President Roosevelt Republican Club from 1904 until 1906, was a booster of the University of Minnesota football team in 1910, was the leader of the Roosevelt insurgent group at the 1910 Minnesota Republican Party Convention, was the president of the Roosevelt Club of St. Paul in 1911, was the chairman of the legislative committee of the Progressive Republican League of Minnesota in 1911, was a Roosevelt delegate to the Credentials Committee of the 15th Republican Party National Convention in Chicago, Illinois, in 1912 and led a walkout from the committee, was the nominee for Fourth District U. S. Congressman of the Minnesota Progressive Party in 1912, receiving 21.92 percent of the vote, was the nominee for Minnesota governor of the Minnesota Progressive Party in 1914, receiving 1.04 percent of the vote, was the Chairman of the Minnesota State Progressive Committee before 1916, was a member of the board of directors of the Citizens' League, was the secretary of the Citizens' League, was a Presbyterian, was a member of the St. Paul Town and Country Club, was a member of the Minnesota Boat, was the president of the St. Paul City Tennis Association, was the president of the state tennis association, was unmarried in 1907, officed at the Dispatch Building in 1907, and officed at the Exchange Bank Building in 1920. Milton C. Lightner (1886-1967) was born in St. Paul, was an Episcopalian, was a lawyer, was an alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from Minnesota in 1940, was a member of Minnesota State Senate from the 40th District for the 1943 Legislative Session, and was a member of the Minnesota Constitutional Commission in 1947-1948, with Senator William E. Dahlquist, Senator A. R. Johanson, Senator Henry A. Larson, Senator Gerald T. Mullin, Senator Elmer Peterson, Senator Gordon Rosenmeier, vice chair, and Senator Harry L. Wahlstrand, Representative Thomas N. Christie, Representative E. B. Herseth, Representative Stanley W. Holmquist, Representative Frank B. Johnson, Representative O. L. Johnson, Representative Harold R. Lundeen, Representative Howard W. Rundquist, and Representative Robert J. Sheran, and public members Leroy E. Matson, Earl L. Berg, secretary, George W. Lawson, Mabeth Hurd Paige, Helen Horr, and Lloyd M. Short, chair. The Commission was created by the Legislature in Laws 1947, Chapter 614, to study the state constitution and to recommend revisions that would improve its conciseness and coherence, and increase its relevance to current and future social, economic, and political developments. The final report of the Commission, consisting of numerous constitutional revisions, was submitted in 1948 and the Commission unanimously recommended to the Legislature in 1949 a bill for a constitutional convention as an effective method of constitutional revision, but the bill was never enacted. The Lightner family were members of the Yale Club, the Harvard Club, and the Women's City Club of St. Paul in 1934. George W. Lawson was a member of the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota from 1933 until 1959 and served as secretary of the Minnesota State Federation of Labor for 40 years. Milton C. Lightner married Evelyn Finch in St. Paul in 1915 and the couple had two children, Evelyn H. Lightner (1916- ) and William H. Lightner (1919- .) William Hurley Lightner (1856- ,) the son of Milton Clarkson Lightner (1820-1880,) an Episcopal priest, and Martha Hurley Baldy Lightner, the grandson of Peter Baldy and Sarah Hurley Baldy and of Nathaniel Ferree Lightner and Maria Ellmaker Lightner, and the great grandson of Peter Ellmaker and Susanna Carpenter Ellmaker, was a member of the Minnesota Society of the Sons of the American Revolution by virtue of great grandfather Paul Baldy, a Private in the Pennsylvania Militia, and by virtue of great great grandfathers Jacob Baldy, a Captain in the Berks County, Pennsylvania Militia, Leonard Ellmaker, a Private in the Pennsylvania State Troops, and Jacob Carpenter, a Captain in the Pennsylvania State Troops, during the Revolutionary War. Clarence W. Halbert, Hugh T. Halbert, and J. W. Roe of New York were the editors in 1894 of the Yale University Banner, an annual statistical abstract for the university. Hugh T. Halbert and Clarence W. Halbert were partners in the law firm of Halbert & Halbert, located at the Dispatch Building in 1912 and 1914 and at the Exchange Bank Building in 1920. Clarence W. Halbert resided with Hugh T. Halbert (1873- ) at 19 Floral Avenue in 1907. Halbert & Halbert unsuccessfully represented Hugh T. Halbert, a bankruptcy trustee, in an action before the Minnesota Supreme Court to set aside a conveyance of real estate from the bankrupt husband to his wife through a third party in Halbert v. Pranke, 97 N.W. 976 (1904.) Halbert & Halbert successfully represented the plaintiff, a stationery business, and the intervener, Taylor Lee, in a utility rate case before the Minnesota Supreme Court in St. Paul Book & Stationery Company v. St. Paul Gaslight Company, 130 Minn. 71 (1918.) Elmer Peterson was a resident of Hibbing, St. Louis County, Minnesota, was a member of Minnesota state house of representatives from 1941 until 1946, and was a member of Minnesota state senate from 1947 until 1959. E. B. Herseth (1904-1989) was born in Teien Township, Kittson County, Minnesota, graduated from the Concordia College Academy in 1921, graduated from Concordia College, Moorhead, Minnesota, in 1927, attended graduate school at the University of North Dakota in 1934, was the Kennedy, Minnesota, High School principal, was Superintendent of Schools in Kennedy, Minnesota, was a member of the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Kittson County, Minnesota, from 1939 until 1950, and was the grandfather of Clare Carlson, a former member of the North Dakota Legislature. Stanley Willard Holmquist (1909-2003) was born in Hallock, Kittson County, Minnesota, graduated from the Minnehaha Academy High School in 1932, attended the Augustana Lutheran Synod Minnesota College, graduated from the University of Minnesota in 1936, received a masters degree in educational administration from the University of Minnesota in 1940, was a retail lumber dealer and superintendent and principal of the Grove City, Minnesota, Schools, and represented the Minnesota counties of Meeker, Renville, and Wright in the Minnesota Legislature from 1947 until 1972. Stanley W. Holmquist authored the self-published bokk, Memorable Reflections: Education is the Life of Democracy in 2001. Stanley W. Holmquist married Edith Maria Johnson in 1938 and the couple had three children, Willard Holmquist, Charles "Charlie" Holmquist, and Mary Holmquist. Frank B. Johnson (1894-1949) was born in Brainerd, Crow Wing County, Minnesota, the grandson of Parsons K. Johnson, a Minnesota legislator, graduated from the Brainerd, Minnesota, Public Schools, attended the University of Minnesota, served in France and Germany in the U. S. Army during World War I, was a druggist, was an alderman and was the mayor of Brainerd, Minnesota, and represented Crow Wing County, Minnesota, in the Minnesota House of Representatives from 1947 until 1949. O. L. Johnson (1889-1977) was born in Estherville, Iowa, moved to Minnesota in 1901, was a funeral director and a manager of a telephone company, served on the Minnesota Board of Education for 30 years, and was a member of the Minnesota House of Representatives from 1943 until 1949 and from 1955 until 1959. The Roosevelt Republican Club was a pre-World War I organization that was opposed to bossism and machine politics, promoted direct popular participation in partisan nominations, and sought a separation of municipal affairs from national partisan politics. Milton C. Lightner (1886-1967) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Drake, and died in Ramsey County. William H. Lightner (1919-1991) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Finch, and died in Ramsey County. Evelyn Finch Lightner (1891-1998) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Hersey, and died in Ramsey County. Mark H. Gehan (1892-1967) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Hogan, and died in Ramsey County. Patrick H. Kelly ( -1938) died in Ramsey County. Earl L. Berg (1906-1963) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Klingenberg, and died in Ramsey County. William E. Dahlquist (1896-1977) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Thossen, and died in Pennington County, Minnesota. Alvin Roswell Johanson (1899-1964) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Johnson, and died in Traverse County, Minnesota. Gerald T. Mullin (1900-1982) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Grogan, and died in Hennepin County. Thomas N. Christie ( -1959) was born outside of Minnesota and died in Hennepin County. Leroy Edison Matson (1896-1960) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Erickson, and died in Hennepin County. Harold R. Lundeen (1900-1981) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Lindou, and died in Hennepin County. George W. Lawson (1876-1959) was born outside of Minnesota and died in Hennepin County. Mabeth Hurd Paige ( -1961) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Campbell, and died in Hennepin County. Helen Horr (1876-1978) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Lynch, and died in Hennepin County. Gordon Rosenmeier (1907-1989) was born in Royalton, Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Bakken, and died in St. Cloud, Minnesota. Harry L. Wahlstrand (1890-1962) was born in Minnesota and died in Stearns County, Minnesota. Howard Wordsworth Rundquist (1901-1985) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Larson, and died in Kandiyohi County, Minnesota. Lloyd Milton Short (1897-1981) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Palmquist, and died in Freeborn County, Minnesota. The current owners of record of the property are Catherine Shannon Ballman and Gary E. Ballman. Gary E. Ballman has a doctorate from the University of Minnesota, is a senior vice president of marketing and product development with Decare Dental, is a member of the board of directors of Compatible Technology International, served on the Board of Examiners of the Malcolm Baldridge National Quality Award Program, and was a financial supporter of former Minnesota Senator Mark Dayton, of U. S. Senate candidate Michael V. Ciresi in 2007, and of U. S. Senate candidate Al Franken in 2008. Catherine Shannon Ballman was a member of the board of directors of the former Theatre de la Jeune Lune. In 1999, Catherine Ballman took over the reins of Buon Gusto, the bimonthly regional food publication. Laura Shannon Ballman (1971- ,) the daughter of Catherine Shannon Ballman and Gary E. Ballman, a graduate of the University of Minnesota and of Columbia University, and a Foreign Service officer specializing in political and military affairs at the United States Consulate in Milan, Italy, married Rafael Martinez, a senior manager in the tax department at the Geneva offices of Ernst & Young, in 2006. In 1988, Catherine Ballman resided on Carter Avenue in St. Anthony Park. [See note on George W. Freeman for 505 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Milton C. Lightner for 504-506 Summit Avenue.] [See note on William Hurley Lightner for 318 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Milton C. Lightner for 504-506 Summit Avenue.] [See note on the University Club for 420 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Cushman Davis for 710 West Linwood Avenue.] [See note on Frank B. Kellogg for 710 West Linwood Avenue.] [See note for the St. Paul Book & Stationery for 629 North Street.] [See note on Cordenio A. Severance for 710 West Linwood Avenue.] [See note on George Wirth.]

513 Summit Avenue: W. W. Bishop House/Mrs. Porterfield's Boarding House; Built in 1891 (1887 according to Jeffrey A. Hess, Paul Clifford Larson, and Jennifer Kirby, 1891 according to Sandeen and the Minnesota Historical Society, 1896 according to the National Register of Historic Places, and 1900 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Queen Anne with a distinctly Germanic vocabulary in style; John MacDonald, architect and builder (George Wirth and Abraham Haas according to Jeffrey A. Hess, Paul Clifford Larson, and Jennifer Kirby.) The structure is a two story, 5477 square foot, seven bedroom, five bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage. The house features a polygonal tower and parapeted gables. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. The house was built for $10,000 for W. W. Bishop, who was a real estate agent. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that William W. Bishop resided at this address from 1892 to 1900. The 1893 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Bishop and their daughters all resided at this address. In 1914, Robert N. Hare resided in the house. Later, in 1919, this house was known as Mrs. Charles Porterfield's boarding house, operated by Katherine Porterfield, who was the widow of Charles Porterfield. In 1918, the writer Donald Ogden Stewart also boarded at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. O. F. Ohlson and W. A. Williams all resided at this address. World War I veteran Elmer T. Campbell resided at this address in 1919. The 1920 city directory indicates that John DeQuedville Briggs, headmaster at the St. Paul Academy, and Samuel Appleton, an editor of West Publishing Company, both boarded at this address and that Kenneth H. Bayliss, an investment bond dealer who officed at the Merchants Bank, resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mrs. Ellen Leverty and her daughter resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that William A. Brentel, a carpenter, his wife, Barbara Brentel, Louise G. Evyu, a stenographer employed by the Great Northern RailRoad, Gerhardt A. Imm, partner with Martin H. Imm in the Imm Insurance Agency, Martin H. Imm, a teller at the Merchants Trust Company, Mrs. Byrd Schumber, a milliner, and Ethel M. Freeman, a nurse, all resided at this address. Robert Newton Hare married Lenora Lauderdale and the couple had at least one child, Phyllis Hare (Mrs. Oscar) Struss. Robert N. Hare and his wife moved to Minnesota in 1857 and were members of the Minnesota Territorial Pioneers organization. In 1879, Robert N. Hare was a grocer with a store located at the corner of Owatonna Road and Isabel Street and resided at the same address. The 1887 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Robert N. Hare resided at the former 117 Congress Street East. In 1898, Robert N. Hare was a member, with John Copeland, Philip C. Justus, and Ernest L. Mabon, of the board of public works of the city of St. Paul and was the subject of a mandamus action to remove James W. Smith as the deputy clerk of the board of public works as enforcement of a Civil War Union Army Veteran's Preference enactment in State ex rel Mortenson v. Copeland, 74 Minn. 371 (1898.) The 1900 federal census indicates that Robert N. Hare and Leonora Hare resided in St. Paul. Samuel Appleton attended Yale University from 1859 until 1861. Both Stewart and Briggs were friends of F. Scott Fitzgerald, who periodically stopped by the boardinghouse to discuss writing and literature with them in 1919, while he was writing This Side of Paradise. Donald Ogden Stewart (1894-1980), a native of Columbus, Ohio, and a brief resident of St. Paul, was the author of A Parody Outline of History (1921,) Perfect Behavior: A Guide for Ladies and Gentlemen in All Social Crises (1922,) Aunt Polly's Story Of Mankind (1923,) Mr. And Mrs. Haddock Abroad (1924,) The Crazy Fool (1925,) Father William (1929,) wrote or assisted on the screenplays for "Traffic Regulations" (1929,) "Humorous Flights" (1929,) "Laughter" (1930,) "Finn and Hattie" (1931,) "Tarnished Lady" (1931,) "Rebound" (1931,) "Red Dust (1932,) "Smilin' Through" (1932,) "Another Language" (1933,) "The White Sister" (1933,) "Dinner at Eight" (1933,) with Herman Mankiewicz and Frances Marion, "Going Hollywood" (1933,) "The Barretts of Wimpole Street" (1934,) "No More Ladies" (1935,) "Reckless" (1935,) "The Prisoner of Zenda" (1937,) "The Women" (1939,) "Love Affair" (1939,) "Marie Antoinette" (1938,) "Holiday" (1938,) "The Night of Nights" (1939,) "Love Affair" (1939, actually made in 1994,) "Kitty Foyle: The Natural History of a Woman" (1940,) "That Uncertain Feeling" (1941,) "A Woman's Face" (1941,) "Smilin' Through" (1941,) "Tales of Manhattan" (1942,) "Keeper of the Flame" (1942,) "Forever and a Day" (1943,) "Without Love (1945,) "Life with Father" (1947,) "Edward, My Son" (1949,) "The Prisoner of Zenda" (1952,) "Europa '51" (1952,) "Escapade" (1955,) when he was blacklisted (initially credited to Gilbert Holland, Mr. Stewart's father,) "Summertime" (1955,) "An Affair To Remember" (1957,) with Delmer Daves and Leo McCarey, when he was blacklisted (remade from his 1939 screenplay, but without attribution to him,) "Moment of Danger" (1960,) "Love and Death" (1975,) and "Dinner at Eight" (1989,) wrote the screenplay adaptation of Brown of Harvard (1926,) of The Philadelphia Story (1940,) for which he earned an Oscar, and of Cass Timberlane (1947,) acted in the the films "Humorous Flights" (1929,) "Night Club" (1929,) "Not So Dumb" (1930,) "The White Sister" (1933,) and "No More Ladies" (1935,) acted in the Broadway plays "Los Angeles" (1927) and "Holiday" (1928,) and wrote the Broadway plays "Rebound" (1930,) "Fine and Dandy" (1930,) and "How I Wonder" (1947.) After Hitler's rise to power, Stewart became involved in the political activities of the Hollywood Anti-Nazi League, and this association came back to haunt him during the McCarthy era, when it was claimed that the organization had been a cover for a Communist cell. Because of the resulting blacklist, Stewart left Hollywood forever in 1951 and settled in London, where he wrote his 1970 autobiography, A Stroke of Luck, where he died of heart failure. Donald Ogden Stewart married Beatrice Ames in 1924, the couple had two sons, Ames Ogden Stewart and Donald Ogden Stewart, Jr. Donald Ogden Stewart divorced Beatrice Ames Stewart in 1938, and then married Ella Winter in 1939. John DeQuedville Briggs (1885-1965) was the Headmaster of the Saint Paul Academy from 1914 to 1948, and Sarah Converse was the Headmistress of the Summit School from 1917 to 1950. In 1925, John DeQuedville Briggs wrote The Inverse Duplex and Tuned Radio Frequency, which was published locally. John DeQuedville Briggs received an honorary degree from Princeton University in 1947. Mrs. Marjorie Winslow Briggs, of St. Paul, was appointed an instructor in piano in 1943-1944 at Hamline University. John DeQuedville Briggs, Jr. (1911-1993,) was a member of the Class of 1932 at Harvard University. The family members buried in the Briggs plot at Oak Grove & Vine Hills Cemetaries in Massachusetts are LeBaron Russell Briggs (1855-1934,) Mary Frances Briggs (1860-1949,) Lucia Russell Briggs (1887-1960,) John DeQuedville Briggs (1885-1965,) Xenia Sadovnikoff (1892-1963,) Elizabeth Mason Briggs (1894-1974,) LeBaron Russell Briggs (1895-1972,) Marjorie Winslow Briggs (1900-1994,) Henrietta Briggs Payson (1908-1942,) John D. Briggs (1911-1993,) and George I. Briggs (1948-1956.) In 1890, Harvard University appointed LeBaron Russell Briggs, Harvard University Class of 1875, a professor of English, as dean to perform advising as well as disciplinary duties, an appointment that divided the deanship and its labor between the academic dean and a dean of students. In 1891, LeBaron Russell Briggs of Harvard incorporated an orientation component into his freshman English course. LeBaron Russell Briggs served as the Dean of Harvard College from 1891 through 1902, as Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences from 1902 until 1925, and as Chairman of the Committee of Regulation of Athletic Sports for 17 years. LeBaron Russell Briggs was acclaimed for his efforts at improving sportsmanship and became the President of the National Collegiate Athletic Association. Harvard University has established the Lebaron Russell Briggs Prize Honors Essays in English. Lucia Russell Briggs (1887-1960,) the daughter of LeBaron Russell Briggs, long-time dean of Harvard University and president of Radcliffe College, and Mary DeQuedville Briggs, one of the earliest graduates of Radcliffe College, was brought up in Cambridge, was the first daughter of an alumna to graduate from Radcliffe College, with a bachelor's degree in 1909 and a master's degree in 1913, accepted the presidency of Milwaukee-Downer College in 1921, continued in that position until 1951, and died in Plymouth, Massachusetts. Samuel Appleton, Jr. (1841-1925,) was born in Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, the son of Julia Webster and the grandson of Daniel Webster, married Mary Ernestine Abercrombie (1846-1869) in 1863, married Anna Maybin Jones in 1872, and was an editor at West Publishing for 35 years. John Copeland (1845- ) was born in Wigtonshire, Scotland, emigrated to the United States in 1874, moved to St. Paul in 1879, was the general foreman of the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha RailRoad car department until 1900, and sold railway supplies since 1900. Ernest L. Mabon (1858-1908,) the son of James Wallace Mabon (1831-1894) and Sarah Moffet Mabon (1828-1923,) was born in St. Paul, was connected with the postal service in St. Paul for ten years, married Harriet Buck (1865- ) in 1891, afterward was engaged in real estate and fire insurance business, was a St. Paul assemblyman in 1896, where he was involved in a controversy over the building of an armory in the city, and died in White Bear, Minnesota. Ernest L. Mabon and Harriet Buck Mabon had three children, Garda Sickler Mabon (Mrs. Merton W.) Sowle (1892- ,) Wallace John Mabon (1896- ,) and __?__ Mabon. Ernest L. Mabon was the brother of Lester Moffet Mabon, who married Ellen R. Mattocks of Faribault, Minnesota, in 1896. William W. Bishop ( -1917,) Robert Newton Hare ( -1919,) Leonora L. Hare ( -1923,) Samuel Appleton ( -1925,) and William A. Brentel ( -1951) all died in Ramsey County. Barbara A. Brentel (1871-1965) was born outside of Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. Charles Porterfield ( -1927) and Samuel B. Appleton ( -1937) both died in Hennepin County. Ethel M. Freeman (1889-1957) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Freeman, and died in St. Louis County, Minnesota. The property was last sold in 1994 for $626,000. The current owners of record of the property are Eileen B. Meltzer and Lester H. Meltzer. Lester H. Meltzer, son of Yosef Meltzer and Celia Meltzer, served in the U. S. Army Air Corps and is a relative of Kayla Meltzer Drogosz, an editor with E. J. Dionne and Robert E. Litan, of United We Serve: National Service and the Future of Citizenship, published by the Brookings Institution, Washington, D. C., 2003. Lester H. Meltzer was a financial supporter of the Eldridge Street Synagogue Project in the New York City in 2006. Lt. Col. Lester Meltzer USAF (Ret.) is a sponsor of the U. S. Air Force Memorial Foundation. Lester Meltzer is the president of Twin City Tj's Inc., operating Taco John's restaurants. Lester Meltzer and Eileen Meltzer were financial supporters of the Historic Saint Paul Corporation in 2003. The 1885 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Edward Simonton resided at the former nearby 514 Summit Avenue. Edward Simonton (1839- ) was born in Searsport, Maine, graduated from Bowdoin College, taught school in Stockton, Maine, enlisted in the Union Army during the American Civil War, was severely wounded at Petersburg, Virginia, was commissioned as an officer in the U. S. Army, studied law, married Annie E. Hilton in 1866 in Portland, Maine, was admitted to the practice of law in Waldo County, Maine, in 1870, moved to St. Paul in 1870, was a member of the Acker Post No. 21, Grand Army of the Republic, was a law partner of R. J. Reid in 1879, and practiced law in St. Paul. Edward Simonton and Annie Hilton Simonton had two children. The 1879 city directory indicates that Edward Simonton, a partner with R. J. Reid in the law firm of Simonton & Reid, officing at 13 1/2 West Third Street, resided at the corner of Floral Street and Summit Avenue. The 1887 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Edward Simonton and their daughter all resided at the former nearby 514 Summit Avenue. Edward Simonton was a First Lieutenant in the Fourth Regiment of the United States Infantry and was given an award for gallant and meritorious services in the Battle of Petersburg, Virginia. Edward Simonton also served with the First Infantry Regiment of the United States Colored Troops during the American Civil War. In 1882, when the Acker Post, No. 21, of the Grand Army of the Republic reorganized, Edward Simonton was elected as an officer of the post and was a commander of the post before 1912, along with Henry A. Castle, J. B. Chaney, E. S. Chittenden, John W. Cramsie, Frank B. Doran, Mark D. Flower, T. W. Forbes, Gideon S. Ives, R. H. L. Jewett, George N. Lanphere, William J. Sleppy, C. J. Stees, and True S. White. In 1903, Edward Simonton, an attorney, acted as an agent for his wife, Annie Simonton, in attempting to purchase, during a foreclosure sheriff's auction at which the mortgage holder was not present, real estate in St. Paul for which his wife had defaulted on an 1898 mortgage loan, leading to litigation before the Minnesota Supreme Court in Annie E. Simonton v. Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance Company et al., 90 Minn. 24 (1903.) In 1903, Senator Moses E. Clapp (1851- ) introduced a bill, S. 715, to place Edward Simonton on the retired list of the U. S. Army. Moses Edwin Vail Clapp (1851-1920,) the son of Henry Spaulding Clapp (1817-1889,) a salesman, and Jane Abigail Vandercook Clapp and the grandson of Rufus Clapp and Wealthy Parkhurst Spaulding Clapp, was born in Delphi, Indiana, was reared and educated in Wisconsin, graduated from the Wisconsin Law School in 1873, was admitted to the practice of law in Wisconsin in 1873, married Hattie Allen in 1874, was a lawyer, practiced law in Wisconsin from 1873 until 1878, was the county attorney of St. Croix County, Wisconsin, in 1878, moved to Minnesota, practiced law in Fergus Falls, Minnesota, from 1881 until 1891, was the city attorney of Fergus Falls, Minnesota, in 1881, was captain of the state militia from 1882 until 1884, was a Republican, served as Minnesota Attorney General from 1887 until 1893, resettled in St. Paul in 1891 and practiced law, was a co-founder, with Hiram F. Stevens, Ambrose Tighe, Thomas D. O'Brien, and Clarence Halbert, of the William Mitchell College of Law, was a candidate for the Republican nomination for governor in 1896, was a U. S. Senator from Minnesota, suceeding Cushman K. Davis, from 1901 until 1917, was the chair of the Senate Indian Affairs Committee, officed at the Manhattan Block in 1907, and was buried in Fort Lincoln Cemetery in Maryland. Moses E. Clapp and Hattie Allen Clapp were the parents of four children, Catrina Clapp (1880- ,) Harvey Spaulding Clapp II (1881- ,) Ella Grace Clapp (1889- ,) and Hattie Alice Clapp. [See note on F. Scott Fitzgerald for 599 Summit Avenue.] [See note on the Great Northern RailRoad.] [See note on the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha RailRoad.] [See note for Samuel Appleton for 683 Goodrich Avenue.] [See note for Samuel Appleton for 361 Laurel Avenue.] [See note on Henry Anson Castle for 421 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Edwin Sedgwick Chittenden for 95 Wilkin Street.] [See note on Frank B. Doran/Frank Beecher Doran for 175 Congress Street East.] [See note on Charles J. Stees for 27 Crocus Place.] [See note on the William Mitchell College of Law for 875 Summit Avenue.]

516 Summit Avenue: William Butler House; Built in 1882 (1914 according to Ramsey County property tax records and the Minnesota Historical Society;) Renaissance Revival/Mission Revival/Italianate Renaissance/Beaux Arts/Classicial Revival in style; Butler Brothers Company, architects and builders. The structure is a two story, 3988 square foot, nine room, five bedroom, three bathroom, brick house, with a detached garage. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that William Butler resided at this address from 1915 to 1944. William Butler was a partner in the Butler Brothers Company, the building firm which built the State Capitol building. His siblings included Pierce Butler, who became a U. S. Supreme Court justice. The Butler family leased the house to Sinclair Lewis (1885-1951), who lived there in 1917 and 1918, working on a book about James J. Hill that was never completed. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mrs. William Butler and Miss Marie Lee both resided at this address. The 1920 directory indicates that Jennie Butler, the widow of William Butler, resided at this address and that Arnold C. Eggen, who boarded at 1607 Payne Avenue, was a chauffeur at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Charles Patterson and Rudolph Patterson all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Jennie Butler was the widow of William Butler and resided at this address. The 1950 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Watson P. Davidson, Jr. (1909- ,) who attended the school from 1922 until 1926, who attended the Agricultural College of the University of Minnesota, served as a Chief Motor Machine Mate in the U. S. Navy during World War II, and who was the president of Manitoba Dairy Farms, Ltd., of Marchand, Manitoba, Canada, resided at this address. The 1964 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Watson P. Davidson, a member of the Class of 1929, and Oliver W. Welch, a member of the Class of 1961, both resided at this address. William Butler (1865- ) was born in Dakota County, Minneosta, resided in St. Paul, was a building contractor, was a member of the firm, Butler, Ryan & Company, that built the third (current) Minnesota State Capitol building, was a Democratic member of the Minnesota House of Representatives from District 34 (Ramsey County) from 1901 until 1904, and moved to New York City in 1905. Harry Sinclair Lewis was the author of 22 novels and three plays, including Arrowsmith (1925,) Babbitt (1922,) Bethel Merriday (1940,) Cass Timberlane, A Novel of Husbands and Wives (1945,) Cheap and Contented Labor: The Picture of a Southern Mill Town in 1929 (1929,) Dodsworth (1929,) Dr. Olivia (1953,) Elmer Gantry (1927,) Free Air (1919,) The Ghost Patrol and Other Stories (1946,) Gideon Planish (1943,) The God-seeker (1949,) Honestly If Possible (1916,) If I Were Boss (1997,) The Innocents (1917,) An Invitation to Tea (1918,) It Can't Happen Here (1935,) Jayhawker (1935, with Lloyd Lewis,) The Job: An American Novel (1917,) Kanofart i Kanada (1935,) Kingsblood Royal (1947,) Main Street: The Story of Carol Kennicott (1920,) Makin' Faces (1908,) The Man Who Knew Coolidge; Being the Soul of Lowell Schmaltz, Constructive and Nordic Citizen (1928,) Mantrap (1926,) Our Mr. Wrenn: The Romantic Adventures of a Gentle Man (1914,) The Prodigal Parents (1938,) Selected Short Stories of Sinclair Lewis (1937,) Storm in the West (1963, with Dore Schary,) The Trail of the Hawk: a Comedy of the Seriousness of Life (1915,) The Willow Walk (1961,) Work of Art (1934,) and World So Wide (1951.) Sinclair Lewis received the Nobel Prize for Literature from the Swedish Academy in 1930. He was the first American to win the prize. In 1925, Arrowsmith was awarded a Pulitzer Prize, but Lewis declined the prize, arguing against the selection process and the effects of such awards upon literature. He was a member of the National Institute of Arts and Letters and the American Academy of Arts and Letters. He died in Rome of heart disease and advanced alcoholism and is buried in Greenwood Cemetery, Sauk Centre, Minnesota. Lewis was the third son of Dr. Edwin J. Lewis, a country doctor in Sauk Center, and Emma Kermott Lewis, the daughter of a Canadian physician. His mother died when he was six years old and his father married Isabel Warner a year later. His siblings were Fred Lewis (1875-1946) and Dr. Claude Bernard Lewis (1878-1957.) At the age of 13, Lewis ran away from home to become a drummer boy in the Spanish-American War, but his father caught up with him at the railroad station. He sailed on cattleships from America to England during university vacations, entered the Oberlin Academy in 1902, transferred to Yale University, contributed to and edited the Yale Literary Magazine, graduated from Yale University with a masters degree in 1908, tried to find work in Panama during the building of the Canal, served for two months as a janitor at Upton Sinclair's abortive co-operative colony, Helicon Hall, was a newspaper reporter in Iowa and in San Francisco, was a junior editor on a magazine for teachers of the deaf in Washington, D.C., working for Alexander Graham Bell, and worked for a New York publishing house. His first wife was Grace Hegger (1914,) and the couple had a son, Wells Lewis (1917-1944,) and, after a divorce, his second wife was Dorothy Thompson (1928,) an American who had been the Central European correspondent and chef de bureau of the New York Evening Post, and the couple had a son, Michael Lewis (1930-1975.) and divorced in 1942. After 1939, Lewis was often in the company of a young actress, Marcella Powers. Grace Hegger Lewis ( -1981) wrote about her life with Lewis in her novel Half a Loaf (1931) and her autobiography With Love from Gracie (1951.) Grace Hegger Lewis subsequently married Telesforo Casanova in 1933. Dorothy Thompson subsequently married Maxim Kopf in 1943. Lewis had the foresight about the movie industry to tell his publisher, Harcourt, to give him the movie rights to his books rather than an advance. His 23 novels led to 88 movies from which he made royalties. Fred Lewis married Winnie Hanson in 1901 and the couple had two children, Donald Lewis and Edwin Lewis. Claude Lewis married Mary (Wilmelmenia) Freeman ( -1949) in 1907 and the couple had three children, Freeman Lewis (1908-1976,) Virginia Lewis (1912-1986,) and Isabel Lewis (1916- .) Isabel Lewis married Robert Agrell. After Mary Lewis' death, Claude Lewis married Helen Daball ( -1980) in 1950. Michael Lewis first married Bernadette Lewis and the couple had two sons, Jean Paul Lewis and Gregory Lewis. Michael Lewis' second wife was Valerie Cardew Lewis and the couple had a daughter, Lesley Dorothy Lewis. Wells Lewis attended Phillips Academy and Harvard University, was a lieutenant in the U. S. Army, had left the 443rd Antiaircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Battalion to become aide to General John Ernest Dahlquist (1896-1975,) a Minneapolis native, and was killed by a German sniper in the Piedmont Valley, in France, near Alsace-Lorraine, as he stood next to General Dahlquist, during World War II. John Ernest Dahlquist was made a Second Lieutenant in 1917, was an Instructor, Infantry School, 1924-1928, was a student, Command & General Staff School, 1930-1931, served in the Philippines, 1931-1934, was a student, Army War College, 1935-1936, served with Personnel Division, Army General Staff, 1937-1941, became a Brigadier General 1942, was Assistant Chief of Staff, European Theater of Operations, 1942, was Assistant Division Commander, 76th Infantry Division, 1942-1943, became a Major General 1943, was Commanding General, 70th Infantry Division, 1943-1944, was Commanding General, 36th Infantry Division, 1944-1945, served with Secretary of War's Personnel Board, 1945-1946, was the Deputy Director of Personnel & Administration, War Department, 1947-1949, was Commanding General, 1st Infantry Division, 1949-1951, was Commanding General, V U. S. Corps, 1952-1953, became Lieutenant General, 1953, was Commanding General, 4th U. S. Army, 1953, was Chief of Army Field Forces, 1953-1955, became Four Star General, 1954, was Commander-in-Chief, Continental Army Command, 1955-1956, received the Distinguished Service Cross, the Distinguished Service Medal, the Silver Star, the Legion of Merit, and the Bronze Star Medal, retired in 1956, and is buried in Arlington Cemetery in Virginia. Watson P. Davidson, Jr., married Ariel Davis Welch in 1949 and the couple's children/stepchildren were Ariel Welch (1934- ,) Barbara Welch (1937- ,) Ethel Welch (1941- ,) and Oliver William Welch (1943- .) Jennie Nelson Butler ( -1944) died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Jeanne M. Forneris and Michael S. Margulies. Michael S. Margulies and Jeanne M. Forneris were 1975 graduates of Macalester College and were financial supporters of the institution in 2006. Michael S. Margulies (1953- ) was born Rapid City, South Dakota, received a law degree from the University of Minnesota Law School in 1978, was admitted to the practice of law in 1978, was an Appellate Advocacy Instructor at the University of Minnesota Law School from 1977 to 1978, and has been a member of the City of St. Paul Planning Commission since 1998. Jeanne M. Forneris is Vice President and General Counsel of the M. A. Mortenson Company of Minneapolis. The 1885 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. W. H. H. Johnston resided at the former nearby 525 Summit Avenue. The 1887 city directory indicates that W. H. H. Johnston resided at the former nearby 520 Summit Avenue and that Mr. and Mrs. James King, their daughter, and Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Rogers all resided at the former nearby 525 Summit Avenue. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that David C. Price and D. L. Price, husband and wife, resided at the former nearby 520 Summit Avenue in 1900. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. W. D. Dwyer and their daughter all resided at the former nearby 525 Summit Avenue. The 1920 city directory indicates that Charles K. Anderson, a yardman, resided at rear of the former nearby 525 Summit Avenue, that John D. Dwyer, a gateman employed by the St. Paul Baseball Corporation, Thomas D. Dwyer, a clerk, and William D. Dwyer, Jr., a student, all boarded at the former nearby 525 Summit Avenue, and that William D. Dwyer, general counsel for the Twin City Rapid Transit Company, resided at the nearby former 525 Summit Avenue. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. W. D. Dwyer resided at the former nearby 525 Summit Avenue. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Anna Dwyer resided at the former nearby 525 Summit Avenue. The 1939 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that John D. Dwyer, who attended the school from 1912 until 1918, resided at the former nearby 525 Summit Avenue. W. H. H. Johnston (1840- ,) was born in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, served in th 13th New York Regiment during the American Civil War, moved to Madelia, Minnesota, in 1871, moved to St. Paul, was the secretary for the Minnesota State Senate Judiciary Committee from 1876 until 1882, married Amelia R. Parsons, the daughter of William G. Parsons, in New Brunswick, New Jersey, in 1880, was an officer of the Jackson Street Methodist Episcopal Church in 1880, was a member of the Young Men's Christian Association in 1880, and was the private secretary for U. S. Senator Cushman K. Davis from 1888 until 1899. W. H. H. Johnston was appointed to position with the state surveyor general's office in 1876, 1877, and 1880. W. H. H. Johnston litigated a land sale issue in Dakota County in W. H. H. Johnston v. John N. Johnson, 43 Minn. 5 (1890.) In 1884, W. H. H. Johnston received a St. Paul building permit for a 40' x 40' two-story frame double dwelling on the West side of Floral Street between Summit Avenue and Grand Street. In 1886, W. H. H. Johnston was the clerk of the U. S. Senate Pensions Committee and resided at 1329 G Street NW in Washington, D. C. For the period 1900 to 1904, W. H. H. Johnston was a provisional delegate to the General Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church. In 1888, W. H. H. Johnston stayed at the Carlton Hotel in Jacksonville, Florida, according to the Daily Hotel News of Jacksonville, Florida. James King (1834- ) was born in Dublin, Ireland, emigrated with his family to the United States in 1844, initially resided in New York City, then moved to Lafayette, Indiana, in 1854, moved to St. Paul in 1857, opened a restaurant on Third Street in 1858, was a St. Paul city alderman from 1863 until 1868, operated a clothes and auction store on East Third Street in 1870, was a Democrat, was the St. Paul chief of police from 1870 until 1878, and was Ramsey County sheriff from 1878 until 1881, and built the St. Paul Horse Exchange on the corner of Fourth Street and Minnesota Street in 1884. David C. Price (1828-1901) was born in Lyons, New York, settled in St. Paul in 1854, was a dentist, and died in St. Paul. [See note on James Jerome Hill for 240 Summit Avenue.] [See note on the Twin City Rapid Transit Company.] [See the note for the Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA) for 277 Harrison Avenue.]

533 Summit Avenue: John Rohde/Bainbridge H. Evans House, Built in 1902; Renaissance Revival/Beaux Arts in style; John Rohde, architect. The main structure is a two story (three story according to the Ramsey County property tax records,) 8946 square foot, 19 room, nine bedroom, five bathroom, brick house. It also has a two story, nine room, one bathroom, brick carriage house that was built in 1902. The house cost $20,000 to build. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Bambridge H. Evans resided at this address from 1903 to 1924. The 1908 city directory indicates that Floyd H. Evans and William T. Daly each were department managers at Schuneman & Evans and boarded at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. B. H. Evans resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Bainbridge H. Evans, a partner with Floyd H. Evans in the Evans Investment Company, resided at this address and that Floyd H. Evans, a partner with Bainbridge H. Evans, boarded at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. F. H. Evans and B. H. Evans all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that William P. Kenney, a vice president and director of traffic for the Great Northern RailRoad, and his wife, Margaret Kenney, resided at this address. In 1934, William P. Kenny, Margaret Fallon Kenny, Rosemary Kenny, and Charles Kenny resided at this address. The Kenny family were members of the Somserset Club, the St. Paul Athletic Club, the University Club, the Minneapolis Club, the Minikahda Country Club, and the Womens Club of St. Paul in 1934. Bainbridge H. Evans was a partner in Schuneman & Evans, general merchandisers who sold rugs, furniture, and wallpaper. Bambridge H. Evans, the son of Marcus C. Evans and Nancy Christy Evans and grandson of Peter Evans and Polly Coombs Baker Evans, was a member of the Minnesota Society of the Sons of the American Revolution by virtue of great great grandfather Peter Evans, a Private in the Virginia Continental Line during the Revolutionary War. Floyd Howard Evans, the son of Bambridge H. Evans and Josephine Daly Evans, the grandson of Marcus C. Evans and Nancy Christy Evans and the great grandson of Peter Evans and Polly Coombs Baker Evans, was a member of the Minnesota Society of the Sons of the American Revolution by virtue of great great great grandfather Peter Evans, a Private in the Virginia Continental Line during the Revolutionary War. Bainbridge H. Evans (1850- ,) the son of Marcus C. Evans and Nannie J. Christy Evans, was born at Winchester, Kentucky, was educated at the country schools of North Middletown, Kentucky, was educated at a college of North Middletown, Kentucky, was engaged in a mining business in Kentucky from 1866 until 1870, was a merchant, was employed in the shoe and boot business from 1870 until 1875, married Josephine Daly in Leavenworth, Kansas, in 1875, then was employed in the mercantile business, was a partner in Schuneman & Evans, a wholesale and retail general merchandise business, after 1879, was a member of the Minnesota Club, was a member of the St. Paul Commercial Club, was a member of the St. Paul Town & Country Club, and officed at the corner of Sixth Street and Wabasha Street in 1907. Floyd Howard Evans (1877- ,) the son of Bainbridge Howard Evans, a merchant, and Josephine Daly Evans, was born in Leavenworth, Kansas, was educated at Phillips Academy, Andover, Massachusetts, attended one term of college, spent two years in Europe and Egypt, married Marguerite Spinning, a graduate of the Misses Ely's School, the daughter of William A. Spinning, a merchant and banker, of Dansville, New York, in New York City, New York, in 1906, was a purchasing agent and department manager of Schuneman & Evans, a department store located at Sixth Street and Wabasha Street, resided at this address in 1902, was a member of the University Club, was a member of the St. Paul Town & Country Club, was a member of the Automobile Club, and was a member of the Sons of the American Revolution. Floyd Howard Evans and Marguerite Spinning Evans were the parents of a daughter, Dorothy Evans (1910- .) John Rohde ( -1922,) William Daly ( -1922,) Charles J. Kenny ( -1937,) Bainbridge H. Evans ( -1943,) and Floyd Howard Evans ( -1954) all died in Ramsey County. William P. Kenney ( -1946) died in Hennepin County. The previous owner of record of the property was Carroll M. Gleize and the current owners of record of the property are the trustees for Carroll M. Gleize and Jean Denis Gleize. Carroll Gleize is a Directeur General and Jean-Denis Gleize is the President of Clinique De Regennes. [See note on the Great Northern RailRoad.] [See note on the St. Paul Commercial Club for 505 Summit Avenue.] [See note for the Minikahda Club for 702 Fairmount Avenue.] [See note on the Schuneman & Evans Department Store for 275 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Town & Country Club for 952 Wakefield Avenue.]

534 Summit Avenue: Walter J. S. Traill House/Dr. E. C. Mitchell House/Homer P. Clark House; Built in 1882 (1882 according to Sandeen and the Minnesota Historical Society, 1884 according to Ramsey County property tax records, and 1904 according to the National Register of Historic Places;) Elizabethan/Altered Victorian in style; Abraham M. Radcliffe, architect. The structure is a two story, 5771 square foot, 16 room, ten bedroom, seven bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. The house was built at a cost of $9,000. The house was altered from a Victorian to a Tudor Revival. It has undergone a major restoration. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Walter J. S. Traill resided at this address from 1882 to 1883 and that Reverend Edward C. Mitchell resided at this address from 1884 to 1912. The 1885, 1887, and 1889 city directories indicate that the Reverend and Mrs. E. C. Mitchell resided at this address. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Reverend Edward C. Mitchell and Annie Jungerich Mitchell (1836-1898,) of German extraction who died of nephritis, husband and wife, resided at this address in 1898. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Blanche C. Mitchell (1876-1903,) the wife of Walton S. Mitchell, who was born in the United States and who died of sepsis, resided at this address in 1903. Little Sketches of Big Folks indicates that Edward Craig Mitchell resided at this address in 1907. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Edward Craig Mitchell (1835-1911,) the widower father of Dr. W. J. Mitchell, who was born in Missouri to parents born in the United States and who died of bulbar paralysis, resided at this address in 1911. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Wells and Miss N. E. Walter all resided at this address. John E. Wells was a World War I veteran who resided at this address in 1919. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Homer P. Clark resided at this address from 1922 to 1977. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. H. P. Clark resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Homer P. Clark, the president of West Publishing Company, and his wife, Elizabeth D. Clark, resided at this address. The 1939 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Robert S. Clark (1917- ,) who attended the school from 1928 until 1935 and who attended Yale University in 1939, and Thomas Kimball Clark, who attended the school from 1933 until 1938, both resided at this address. The 1939 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Benjamin Casper Thompson (1888- ,) who was born in St. Paul, who attended the school from 1900 until 1901 and from 1905 until 1906, who graduated from Yale University in 1911, and who was employed by Thompson Lands, resided at this address. The 1939 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory also indicates that Benjamin C. Thompson, Jr. (1918- ,) who was born in St. Paul, who attended the school from 1929 until 1932 and who attended the University of Virginia, resided at this address. In 1879, Reverend Edward C. Mitchell, the pastor of the New Jerusalem Swedeborgian Church, located on Market Street between Fourth Street and Fifth Street, resided at 43 Western Avenue. Edward Craig Mitchell (1836-1911,) the son of Edward Phillips Mitchell (1812- ) and Elizabeth Virginia Tyndale Mitchell and the grandson of James Mitchell and Ann Walton Mitchell, was born in St. Louis, Missouri, graduated from the Central High School of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, from its collegiate department, in 1856, graduated from the University of Pennsylvania Law School in 1859, was a theological student of Bishop William Henry Benade of the New Church of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, entered the ministry in 1860, was elected a member of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1859, was admitted to the practice of law in Pennsylvania in 1859, was a minister at the Frankford New Jerusalem Church of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, from 1860 until 1863, was ordained a religious minister in 1862, was a Swedenborgian clergyman, was a minister in Providence, Rhode Island, from 1863 until 1865, was a minister in Pawtucket, Rhode Island, from 1865 until 1866, was a minister in North Bridgewater, Massachusetts, from 1866 until 1869, first married Louise C. Fernald ( -1876,) was a Swedenborgian pastor in Detroit, Michigan, in 1869, was a member of the committee on ecclesiastical affairs of the General Convention of the New Jerusalem in the United States of America, Massachusetts New-Church Union, in 1871, came to Minnesota in 1872, resided for four years in Minneapolis, moved in 1876 to St. Paul, subsequently married Annie Iungerich (1836-1898) of Philadelphia in 1876, was the pastor of the Minneapolis Society of the New Jerusalem Church from 1871 until 1880, was the pastor of the Saint Paul Society of the New Jerusalem Church from 1873 until 1911, was a Republican, was an originator of the St. Paul Free Kindergarten, was an originator of the St. Paul Day Nursery, was a member of the directors of the St. Paul Relief Society, was a member of the Minnesota Academy of Science in Minneapolis, was a member of the Minnesota Historical Society, was a president of the St. Paul Academy of Science, was a charter member of the Minnesota branch of the Sons of the American Revolution, was a member of the Sons of the Colonial Wars, was a donor of an 21,500 item archaeological collection in the museum of the Minnesota Historical Society, was a member of the Wisconsin Natural History Society, was a member of the Wisconsin Archaeological Society, was the chairman of the museum committee of the Minnesota Historical Society, worked for the Society for the Relief of the Poor, was a member of the National Geographical Society, was a member of the Peace Society of America, was a member of the American Society of Curio Collectors, was a historian for the Sons of the American Revolution, was a member of the Society of the Colonial Wars, was a member of the Keystone League of Pennsylvania, was a member of the Philadelphia Academy of Natural Sciences, was a member of the Young Mens Christian Association, was a member of the St. Paul Commercial Club, was the author of The Parables of the New Testament Spiritually Unfolded, published in 1888, was the author of The Critical Handbook Of The Greek New Testament, published in 1896, was the author of Parables of the Old Testament Explained, published in 1903, was the author of Scripture Symbolism: An Introduction to the Science of Correspondences, or Natural and Spiritual Counterparts, published in 1904, and died in St. Paul. Rev. Edward C. Mitchell was an amateur archeologist who collected spear points, awls, knives, and other copper items from the Old Copper Complex of the Lake-Forest Archaic period, dating from 6000 to 3000 B.P., in the 19th century. Edward C. Mitchell married Annie Iungerich of Philadelphia and the couple had one son, Walton Iungerich Mitchell. Walton I. Mitchell graduated from the Hahnemann Medical College of Philadelphia in 1903 and returned to New Mexico to begin his medical practice and to conduct bird studies, but was a 1904 member of the executive committee of the Wilson Ornithological Chapter of the Azassiz Association as a resident at this address. In 1948, Dr. Walton I. Mitchell and Eben Farnsworth began a private publication entitled Postal Stationery, which contained information on foreign stationery items, but Mitchell discontinued contributing to the publication in 1952 due to failing eye sight. Edward Craig Mitchell, the son of Edward Phillips Mitchell and Elizabeth V. Mitchell and the grandson of James Mitchell and Ann Walton Mitchell, was a member of the Minnesota Society of the Sons of the American Revolution by virtue of great grandfather Edward Mitchell, a Quartermaster in the Virginia Troops under Colonel Campbell during the Revolutionary War. Walton Iungerich Mitchell, the son of Edward Craig Mitchell and Annie Iungerich Mitchell, the grandson of Edward Phillips Mitchell and Elizabeth Virginia Tyndale Mitchell and the great grandson of James Mitchell and Ann George Walton Mitchell, was a member of the Minnesota Society of the Sons of the American Revolution by virtue of great great grandfather Edward Mitchell, a Captain and Quartermaster in the Virginia Troops during the Revolutionary War. Walton Iungerich Mitchell (1877-1960) was born in St. Paul, received a medical degree from the Hahnemann Medical College of Philadelphia in 1903, practiced medicine in several States, served for two years in the U.S. Army Medical Corps in France, was the surgeon for 805th Pioneer Infantry Regiment stationed at Chatel-Chehery, France, in 1919, moved to Berkeley, California in 1928, was a life member of the American Philatelic Association, and died in Berkeley, California. Eric Hoffman is the current pastor at the Virginia Street Swedenborgian Church, followers of Emanuel Swedenborg ( -1772,) in St. Paul. Swedenborg was a Renaissance man, knowledgeable in algebra and cosmology, a manufacturer of one of the first working fire extinguishers, a member of the Swedish parliament, a designer of a rudimentary machine gun, a mine assessor for the Swedish crown, a discoverer of fossils, and, in 1744, a man who started to have religious visions. In his numerous mystical writings, Swedenborg departed from the Lutheran thought of the day, constructing a belief system that could be described as Unitarianism with a Christology that was adopted by some Anglican clerics, who formed the Swedenborgian denomination. Walter John Strickland Traill (1847-1932/1933,) the son of Thomas Traill (1792-1862) and Catherine Parr Strickland (1802-1899,) was born in Ontario, was an employee of the Hudson's Bay Company, was appointed as postmaster of Fort Ellice, British North America, in 1870, was in charge of five Hudson's Bay Company posts in the United States in 1874, liquidated the Hudson's Bay Company's holdings in the Dakota Territory from 1874 until 1876, took a leave of absence and travelled in the southern United States until 1877, resigned from the Hudson's Bay Company in 1877, was a grain dealer and elevator company manager in St. Paul, married Mary E. Purdy Gilbert in 1881, operated a ranch in Kalispell, Montana, from 1890 until 1910, moved to Grand Forks, British Columbia, Canada, where he built a fruit farm, then moved to the American Okanogan Valley, returned to British Columbia in 1927, and died at Grand Forks, British Columbia, Canada. Traill County, North Dakota, was named in 1875 for Walter J. S. Traill. In 1868, apprentice clerk Walter J. S. Traill was put in charge of the Riding Mountain, Manitoba, winter post by the Hudson's Bay Company, in an area that was still Ojibway Nation territory at the time. Traill was the youngest son of Catharine Parr Strickland Traill (1802-1899,) the sister of the Canadian writer Susanna Strickland (Mrs. John) Moodie (1803-1885,) who married an Orkney Islander, former English Army officer and widower Thomas Traill (1793-1859,) came to Canada in 1832, and was famous for her writings about family life in Ontario in the days of early European settlement and for her books, Canadian Wild Flowers (1867,) Studies of Plant Life in Canada (1885,) Pearls and Pebbles (1894,) The Backwoods of Canada (1836,) and Canadian Crusoes (1852.) Walter Traill had six siblings, Kate Traill, William Edward Traill, James Traill, Mary Traill (Mrs. Tom) Muchall, Henry "Harry/Hal" Traill, and Annie Traill (Mrs. Clinton) Atwood. Walter Traill set out for Rupert's Land in 1866 as a clerk with the Hudson's Bay Company, based on a family connection to James J. Hargrave, chief factor at York Factory, secretary to Governor William MacTavish (1815-1870), and an officer of the Hudson's Bay Company. Traill first arrived at St. Paul, where he was befriended by Norman Kittson. After his retirement from the Hudson's Bay Company, he lived at Pembina, Minnesota, and Kalispell, Montana. Walter Traill married Mary E. Purdy Gilbert in West Lynn, Rupert's Land, in 1881. Two books have been written about Walter Traill by Mae Atwood, In Rupert's Land: Memoirs of Walter Traill (1970) and Dawn Across Canada: Oxcart to Railway in Ten Years. William Traill spent a career with the Hudson's Bay Company. E. C. Mitchell resided at this address in 1895. In the 1930's, Homer P. Clark resided here. Homer Pierce Clark (1868-1970,) the son of Charles Henry Clark (1836-1906) and Martha Cowper Pierce Clark (1837- ,) was born in Boston, Massachusetts, graduated from the St. Paul High School in 1887, graduated from the University of Minnesota Law School in 1894, was admitted to the practice of law in Minnesota in 1894, was an executive with West Publishing Company, including being the treasurer of West Publishing Company in 1907 and being the president of West Publishing Company between 1921 and 1932, was the vice president of the American Law Book Company of New York, resided at 467 Holly Avenue in 1907, married Elizabeth "Bessie" Turner Dunsmoor (1886-1977) in Minneapolis in 1910, was an agnostic Unitarian, was the president of the Inland Lake Yachting Association, was a member of the Minnesota Club, was a member of the St. Paul Commercial Club, was a member of the St. Paul Town & Country Club, was a member of the White Bear Yacht Club, was a member of the Nushka Curling Club, and was a member of the St. Paul German Club. Homer P. Clark also was a director of the Waldorf Paper Products Company, of the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, and of the St. Paul Fire & Marine Insurance Company, was on the executive council of the Minnesota Historical Society, and was a trustee of the James Jerome Hill Reference Library. Clark also was a member of the Minnesota State Veterans Service Building Commission from 1947 to 1966. Charles Henry Clark (1836-1906,) the son of Lott Clark and Mary Bonner Clark, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, attended the Cushing School in Boston, Massachusetts, was a shoe store clerk, moved to St. Paul in 1856, opened a hardware store as a partner of his cousin, Charles Edwin Mayo, Mayo & Clark, returned to Boston, Massachusetts, from 1865 until 1871, married Martha C. Pierce, the daughter of Samuel B. Pierce and Hannah Rea Pierce, returned to St. Paul in 1872, reentered the hardware business and engaged in real estate investing. Charles Henry Clark and Martha C. Pierce Clark were the parents of two children, Homer Pierce Clark and Mary Barnard Clark (Mrs. Charles H.) Putnam (1871-1962.) Charles H. Putnam was the superintendent of the Great Northern RailRoad shops in Spokane, Washington. Robert Homer Clark, the son of Thomas Kimball Clark (1922-1959) and Elizabeth Griggs Clark, was a grandson of Homer P. Clark. Thomas K. Clark died in Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, and is buried in Roselawn Cemetery in Roseville, Minnesota. Robert Stuart Clark (1917-1943,) a Lieutenant in the U. S. Naval Reserve during World War II who went missing in action, with a memorial marker in Brewster, Massachusetts, was the other son of Homer P. Clark and Elizabeth Turner Clark (1923- ,) Catherine Pierce Clark (1925- ,) and Helen Dunsmoor Clark (1928- ) were the three daughters of Homer P. Clark. Homer P. Clark and Lucius Pond Ordway jointly owned the racing boat "Crusader" in 1902, which raced in the New York Yacht Club races in Oyster Bay, Long Island Sound. The Virginia Street Swedenborgian Church began with the formation of the first Swedenbogian group in the state in 1860 under the leadership of William R. Marshall, which disbanded when Marshall became Lieutenant Colonel in the Minnesota reserves during the American Civil War and then as Governor, and was reactivated in 1873, when the Saint Paul Society of the New Jerusalem Church) was organized with Marshall as president and with the Rev. Edward Craig Mitchell as pastor. Homer Pierce Clark (1868-1970) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Clark, and died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is Hubert Nelson. Hubert Nelson was a financial supporter of the Minnesota Historical Society in 2002 and 2003. The 1887 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. W. D. Cornish and W. H. Williams resided at the former nearby 540 Summit Avenue. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Nella Russell Dalrymple (1862-1906,) the widowed mother of Mrs. Victor H. Smalley, who was born in Pennsylvania to parents born in the United States and who died of chronic hepatic cirrhosis, resided at the nearby former 541 Summit Avenue in 1906. Little Sketches of Big Folks indicates that Samuel M. MaGoffin resided at the former nearby 540 Summit Avenue in 1907. The book of Minnesotans: a biographical dictionary of leading living men of Minnesota, edited by Albert Nelson Marquis, indicates that Timothy Foley resided at the former nearby 544 Summit Avenue in 1907. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that George C. Power (1860-1912,) the husband of Edna A. Power, who was born in the United States to parents also born in the United States and who died of pleurisy-bronchopneumonia, resided at the former 541 Summit Avenue in 1912. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Samuel M. McGoffin, their daughters, Samuel S. McGoffin, and John McGoffin Rogers all resided at the former nearby 540 Summit Avenue. The 1920 federal census indicates that Samuel M. McGoffin (1860- ,) a general practice lawyer and head of household, who was born in Kentucky to parents who were born in Kentucky, his wife, Elizabeth B. McGoffin (1863- ,) who was born in Kentucky to parents who were born in Kentucky, his son, Samuel F. McGoffin (1888- ,) a building contractor, who was born in Minnesota, another son, John R. McGoffin (1905- ,) who was born in Minnesota, his daughter, Elizabeth R. C. McGoffin (1890- ,) who was born in Minnesota, and another daughter, Leticia S. McGoffin (1903- ,) who was born in Minnesota, resided at the nearby former 540 Summit Avenue. Little Sketches of Big Folks indicates that George C. Power resided at the former nearby 541 Summit Avenue in 1907. In 1911, George C. Power resided at the former nearby 541 Summit Avenue. The 1924 city directory indicates that S. M. Magoffin resided at the nearby former 540 Summit Avenue and that Mr. and Mrs. B. C. Thompson resided at the former nearby 541 Summit Avenue. The 1930 city directory indicates that Samuel M. Magoffin resided at the nearby former 540 Summit Avenue and that Benjamin C. Thompson resided at the nearby former 541 Summit Avenue. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Alton R. Dalrymple resided at the nearby former 541 Summit Avenue from 1889 to 1906, that George C. Power resided at the nearby former 541 Summit Avenue from 1907 to 1912, and that the house was razed in the 1970's. Samuel M. MaGoffin (1859- ,) the son of Beriah MaGoffin (1815-1885,) Governor of Kentucky from 1859 until resignation in 1862, and Anna Nelson Shelby Magoffin (1818-1880,) was born in Harrodsburg, Kentucky, was educated in private schools at Harrodsburg, Kentucky, graduated from Centre College in Danville, Kentucky, in 1878, was admitted to the practice of law in Kentucky in 1879 and in Minnesota in 1882, was a lawyer and a real estate investor, practiced law in St. Paul after 1882, was the administrator of the estate of William G. Ewing, Jr., in 1883, married Elizabeth Moran Rogers (1862- ,) the daughter of William Edward Rogers and Margaret Varnon Rogers, in 1884, was a member of the Ramsey County Bar Association, resided at 350 Summit Avenue in 1888, and officed at the Pioneer Press Building. Samuel M. MaGoffin and Elizabeth Moran Rogers MaGoffin were the parents of Vernon Marguerite MaGoffin (1886- ,) Samuel St. Paul MaGoffin (1888- ,) and Elizabeth Rogers MaGoffin (1891- .) Samuel S. Magoffin was a Lieutenant Colonel in the 16th United States Engineers in 1917. Samuel S. Magoffin founded the Golden Retriever Club of America in 1938, and acted as the first president the Golden Retriever Club of America. Timothy Foley (1838/1848-1920,) the son of John Foley (1808-1873) and Hannah/Johanna O'Brien Foley (1816-1859,) was born in Lanark County, Ontario, Canada, was educated in common schools of Lanark County, Ontario, Canada, started, with his brother, a saw-mill and lumber business in Canada in 1858 or 1868, married Mary Louise Guthrie (1847-1931,) the daughter of James Guthrie (1791-1868) and Margaret Reid Guthrie (1806-1873,) in Almonte, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada, in 1870, came to St. Paul, 1879, was a railroad contractor, organized the firm of Foley Brothers, general railroad contractors, was the president of Foley Brothers, was the president of Foley Brothers & Kelly, wholesale grocers, after 1896, was the president of the Foley-Bean Lumber Company, located in Milaca, Minnesota, after 1896, was the president of Foley, Lock & Larson, located in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, after 1902, was a Roman Catholic, was a member of the Minnesota Club, was a member of the St. Paul Town & Country Club, and officed at the Gilflllan Bldg in 1907. Alton R. Dalrymple (1853-1901,) the son of Reuben Dalrymple (1823- ) and Isadora P. Jackson Dalrymple, was born in Sugar Grove, Warren County, Pennsylvania, moved to Minnesota in 1877, owned a large farm near near Casselton, Dakota Territory, in the Red River Valley of the North, managed a 40,000 acre farm, steamboats, and grain elevators for his uncle, Oliver Dalrymple, for 24 years, was a millionaire "Bonanza farm" farmer, moved to St. Paul in 1886, died in St. Paul, and is buried at Oakland Cemetery. Nella R. Dalrymple, the wife of Alton R. Dalrymple, in honor of her late husband and of Josephine Dalrymple ( -1915,) donated in 1915 the Dalrymple memorial altar at the Episcopal Church of St. Paul on the Hill in St. Paul, built by the Fond du Lac Church Furnishing Company of Fond du Lac, Wisconsin. Oliver Dalrymple (1830-1908) was born in Warren County, Pennsylvania, graduated from Yale College and Yale Law School, was admitted to the practice of law in 1855, moved to Chatfield, Fillmore County, Minnesota, in 1856, settled in St. Paul in 1860, married Mary E. Steward (1846- ,) the daughter of John Steward, Jr. (1806-1885) and Joanna Glidden Steward (1808-1896,) made considerable money handling Euro-American's claims against the Dakota Indians growing out of the Minnesota Uprising of 1862, with which he purchased farm land, engaged in intensive farming after 1866, owned a 2,500 acre farm in Washington County, Minnesota, from 1866 until 1876, was a member of the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota from 1872 until 1873, lost his farming profits by speculating in the grain trade, developed, at the request of General George W. Cass, the president of the Northern Pacific RailRoad, and Benjamin P. Cheney, a member of the board of the Northern Pacific RailRoad, a 30,000 acre "Bonanza" wheat farm in the Dakota Territory after 1876, with the advantage of low land prices occasioned by the Panic of 1873, and died in Casselton, North Dakota. In 1890, Oliver Dalrymple unsuccessfully stood for nomination for Minnesota Governor with the Farmer's Alliance. The Cass-Dalrymple "Bonanza Farm" partnership dissolved in 1896 and the Dalrymples divided their land into ten units. Word of 35 bushel an acre "Bonanza Farm" wheat yields spurred an immigration boom to North Dakota that lasted for a generation. Oliver Dalrymple and Mary E. Steward had two children, William Dalrymple and John Dalrymple. Benjamin C. Thompson, Sr., married Lillian Mudge in St. Paul in 1916 and the couple had one child, Benjamin C. Thompson, Jr. William D. Cornish, the son of William Otis Cornish and Susannah Bennett Wood Cornish, the grandson of William Cornish and Eunice Soule Cornish, and the grandson of David Wood and Olive Cobb Wood, was a member of the Minnesota Society of the Sons of the American Revolution by virtue of great grandfathers or great great grandfathers William Cornish, a Private in Whitney's Massachusetts Militia, Andrew Cobb, a Second Lieutenant in the Rhode Island Troops, Peter Wood, a Private in the Massachusetts Troops, Edmund Wood, a Private in the Rhode Island Troops, James Soule, a Private in the Massachusetts Troops, William Soule, a Private in the Massachusetts Troops, and Ebenezer Thompson, a Private in the Massachusetts Militia, during the Revolutionary War. William Dalton Cornish (1849-1908,) the son of William Otis Cornish and Susan Bennet Wood Cornish, was born in Middleboro, Massachusetts, read the law in Binghamton, New York, was admitted to the practice of law in 1870, moved to Minnesota and settled in St. Paul in 1870, married Alice Francelia Olmsted (1847- ) of Vestal, New York, the daughter of Richard Henry Olmsted (1811- ) and Elizabeth Seymour Olmsted (1818- ,) in 1872, was a St. Paul City alderman from 1880 until 1885, was an organizer of the Minnesota State Bar Association in 1883, was a member of the Minnesota House of Representatives, representing Ramsey County (District 27,) from 1883 until 1886, was a judge for the Second Judicial District from 1890 until 1893, was appointed a Special Master in Chancery by the United States Court for the Eighth Circuit in the Northern Pacific RailRoad and Union Pacific RailRoad cases, then moved to Orange, New Jersey, became the vice president of the Union Pacific RailRoad in 1898, was a member of the board of directors of the Greene Consolidated Copper Company of Mexico in 1906, was the vice president of the Oregon Short Line RailRoad, was the vice president of the Oregon RailRoad and Navigation Companies, was the president of the Southern Pacific RailRoad, was a member of the board of directors of the Leavenworth, Kansas & Western RailRoad, was a member of the board of directors of the Northern Pacific Terminal Company of Oregon, was a member of the board of directors of the Portland and Asiatic Steamship Company, was a member of the board of directors of the San Pedro & Los Angeles & Salt Lake RailRoad Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Spokane Union Depot Company, was the president of the Union Pacific Land Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Wells Fargo Express Company from 1904 until 1909, and died of heart disease in Chicago. In 1872, W. D. Cornish was the vice president of the Grant Republican Club of St. Paul. W. D. Cornish was the Worshipful Master of the Masonic Ancient Landmark Lodge, No. 5, located at Third Street and Wabasha Street, in 1879, and was the Grand Commander of the Sir Knights of Damascus Commandery in 1885. William Dalton Cornish and Alice F. Olmsted Cornish had one child, Alice Elizabeth Cornish (1874- .) In 1927, Mrs. W. D. Cornish made a 4,000-mile motor trip from the Mediterranean shore of the African continent, through the interior, to South Africa accompanied only by her cousin, a Miss Hooper. Alice Elizabeth Cornish was a member of the National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution. George C. Power (1858- ,) the son of James B. Power and Helen A. Buckhart Power, was born in Burlington, Iowa, was educated in the common and high schools of St. Paul, rose from messenger to second vice president over the period at the Merchants National Bank of St. Paul from 1873 until 1899, married Edna Alice Smith (1859- ,) an Oberlin College graduate, in 1883, was a banker, was a national bank examiner for Minnesota and Wisconsin from 1899 until 1902, was the president of the Second National Bank of St. Paul after 1902, succeeding S. R. Flynn, was a member of the board of directors of the Northwestern Trust Company of St. Paul in 1907, was a member of the board of trustees of the Minnesota Mutual Life Insurance Company in 1909, was an officer with the Morris Plan Bank of Minneapolis before 1918, was appointed the assistant Minnesota bank examiner by F. E. Pearson, the state banking commissioner, in 1918, was a member of the board of directors and a member of the executive committee of the North West Trust Company, was a member of the St. Paul Commercial Club, resided at 403 Laurel Avenue in 1885 and 1887, and officed at the Second National Bank Building in 1907. [See the note for the Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA) for 277 Harrison Avenue.] [See note on the West Publishing Company for 415 Summit Avenue.] [See note on the White Bear Yacht Club for 18 Kenwood Parkway.] [See note for the Northern Pacific RailRoad.] [See note on Radcliffe.]

545 Summit Avenue: 545 Summit Avenue; Built in 1890 (1888 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Queen Anne in style. The structure is a two story (three story according to Ramsey County property tax records,) 3812 square foot (5308 according to Ramsey County property tax records,) five bedroom, four bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Andrew Muir resided at this address from 1887 to 1892. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mrs. Thomas Foley resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Mary L. Foley, the widow of Timothy Foley, resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mrs. Thomas Foley resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Mary L. Foley, the widow of Timothy Foley, resided at this address and that Bride Lynch was a maid at this address. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that the house located at this address was razed in 1944 and a house from 554 Holly was moved to this address in 1954. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. The house that was moved to this site in 1954 replaced the Andrew Muir House. The 1889, 1891, and 1893 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Muir resided at this address. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Alton R. Dalrymple and Nella R. Dalrymple, husband and wife, and Josephine R. Dalrymple all resided at the former nearby 541 Summit Avenue in 1901. Alton R. Dalrymple ( -1901) came to Minnesota from Pennsylvania in 1877, and owned a large farm in the Red River Valley, managed his uncle, Oliver Dalrymple's, 40,000 acre farm, his steamboat and grain elevators, and lived in St. Paul after 1886. Nella R. Dalrymple (1862-1906) was born in the United States and died in Ramsey County. Andrew Muir ( -1919) died in Rice County, Minnesota. Mary L. Foley ( -1931) and Mary L. Foley ( -1943) both died in Ramsey County. The house was last sold in 1998 for $247,500. The current owners of record of the property are Claudia L. Fercello and John W. Smaby, who reside at 1005 Como Boulevard East. Claudia Fercello, M.S.W., was the author of "Woodbury Police Department's Restorative Justice Community Conferencing Program: An Initial Assessment of Client Satisfaction", published in St. Paul by the Center for Restorative Justice & Peacemaking of the University of Minnesota in 1997. John Smaby is a broker-manager at Edina Realty. [See note on the Dalrymples for 265 Summit Avenue]

550 Summit Avenue: Oakland Apartments, Built in 1898 (1920 according to the National Register of Historic Places and 1904 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Renaissance Revival/Classical Revival in style; Alan Black, architect. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. Unit 101 is a 1825 square foot, two bedroom, one bathroom, brick condominium which was last sold in 2006 for $386,000, was previously owned by Lois West Duffy, and is currently owned by the trustee for Margaret Ann Hennen. Unit 102 is a 1825 square foot, two bedroom, one bathroom, brick condominium which was last sold in 1991 for $132,000, and is currently owned by Mary Ellen Anderson. Unit 201 is a 1945 square foot, two bedroom, one bathroom, brick condominium which was last sold in 2006 for $281,000, was previously owned by Virginia H. Rahja, and is currently owned by Teri Dimond. Unit 202 is a 1825 square foot, two bedroom, one bathroom, brick condominium, and is currently owned by the trustee of Ann E. Kenefick. Unit 301 is a 1945 square foot, two bedroom, one bathroom, brick condominium which was last sold in 2001 for $287,000, and is currently owned by Nan R. Bailly and Samuel S. Haislet. Unit 302 is a 1825 square foot, two bedroom, one bathroom, brick condominium which was last sold in 2003 for $285,000, and is currently owned by Mary Kay Hicks. The original owner of the apartment building was Alan Black, who was also the architect. The building was constructed for $30,000 and is now condominiums. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that William G. Carling and Margaret I. Carling (1860-1901,)who was born in Canada to Canadian parents, who was married, and who died of a brain tumor, resided at this address in 1901. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Sarah A. O. Randall (1832-1902,) the wife of John Randall, who was born in the United States to parents also born in the United States and who died of peritonitis, resided at this address in 1902. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Eugene Burt (1841-1906,) the husband of Ann Lucretia Burt, who was born in New York to parents born in the United States and who died of a carcinoma of the liver, resided at this address in 1906. The American Jewish Year Book for 1907 indicates that S. Greve, the secretary of the Standard Club, resided at this address. Little sketches of Big Folks indicates that Henry D. Lang and Rollin A. Lanpher both resided at this address in 1907. The book of Minnesotans: a biographical dictionary of leading living men of Minnesota, edited by Albert Nelson Marquis, indicates that William Beckwith Geery resided at this address in 1907. The 1908 city directory indicates that Henry D. Long was a clerk of the U. S. Circuit Court and resided at this address. The 1910-1911 Directory of the University of Minnesota indicates that Walter B. Lang, a student, resided at this address. In 1916, William Beckwith Geery was a member of the Minnesota Historical Society and resided at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that the residents at this address were Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Bigelow, Leon G. Bigelow, E. L. Van Dresar, Mr. and Mrs. S. B. Walsh, their daughter, Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Geery, Mr. and Mrs. Siegmund Greve, and Mrs. R. R. Sanborn and his daughter. Fred Sanborn was a World War I veteran who resided at this address in 1919. The records of the 1919-1920 Minnesota World War I Soldier's Bonus Board (#27921) indicate that Knute Ivar Helding Johnson (1893- ,) a 1918 draftee and a Private in Company C of the 354th Infantry, who was born in Smoland, Sweden, moved to Minnesota in 1914, had blue eyes, light hair, and a fair complexion, was 6' 1" tall, was a truck driver at induction, served in the American Expeditionary Force in France, including Meuse-Argonne, was a truck driver employed by Doctor Boeckmann after the completion of service, and was unmarried, resided at this address. The 1920 federal census indicates that William B. Geary (1868- ,) a bank vice president and head of household, who was born in Ohio to parents who were born in the United States, his wife, Mable L. Geary (1875- ,) who was born in Minnesota to a father who was born in New York and to a mother who was born in Pennsylvania, his son, William B. Geary (1918- ,) who was born in Minnesota, and a servant, Anna Christensen (1901- ,) who was born in norway to parents who were born in Norway, resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that the residents at this address were Mr. and Mrs. Sigmund Greve, Mr. and Mrs. R. L. Kennedy, Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Norbeck, Mrs. R. R. Sanborn, Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Van Dresar, Mrs. Mary P. Walsh, and Mrs. G. B. Ware and her daughters. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Mary B. Morrison, the widow of John H. Morrison, resided at apartment #1, that Albert J. Lizee, the general superintendent of A. Guthrie & Company, and his wife, Genevieve Lizee, resided at apartment #2, that Mrs. Elsie Galt, the widow of Herbert R. Galt, resided at apartment #3, that Paul R. Merrill, the financial secretary of the Union Gospel Mission, and his wife, Alice H. Merrill, resided at apartment #4, that Andrew Gibson and his wife, Jennie Gibson, resided at apartment #5, and that Mark D. Orton, a salesman employed by Kalman & Company, and his wife, Margaret Orton, resided at apartment #6. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Andrew Gibson resided at this address in 1930. In 1934, Jean McLaren Ingersoll, the widow of George E. Ingersoll, resided at this address and was a member of the Minikahda Country Club and the Womens Club of St. Paul. The 1939 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that John R. Galt (1913- ,) who was born in St. Paul, who attended the school from 1927 until 1929, who was a 1936 graduate of the University of Minnesota, who was a Second Lieutenant in the Air Corps of the Minnesota National Guard, who pursued the hobbies of communication and aviation, and who was employed by the Northern States Power Company, and that Charles T. Kenney, Jr. (1907- ,) who attended the school from 1920 until 1926, both resided at this address. Charles T. Kenney, Jr., married Mary C. DeR. Powers in 1936. Henry D. Lang (1860- ,) the son of Charles Lang and Fredericka Beiswanger Lang, was born in St. Paul, was educated in the public schools of St. Paul until 1872, attended the First State Normal School at Winona, Minnesota, from 1872 until 1876, attended the University of Minnesota from 1876 until 1880, was engaged in law office of John B. Sanborn and W. H. Sanborn from 1880 until 1897, married to Loucie Isabel Barnes, was the clerk of the U. S. Circuit Court for the District of Minnesota after 1897, was a member of the St. Paul Town & Country Club, was a member of the Junior Pioneers, and officed at the Federal Building. In 1909, the clerk of the U. S. Circuit Court and the clerk of the U. S. District Court were compensated from fees ($10 per complaint filed in 1906.) Eugene Burt (1841-1906) and Ann L. Burt (1843-1926) are both buried in Oakland Cemetery. In 2003, Lois West Duffy was a financial supporter of the Randy Kelly for St. Paul Mayor campaign and resided at this address. In 1941, Walter B. Lang funded a set of three photography prizes to be awarded by the University of Minnesota Alumni Association. William Beckwith Geery was a member of the executive council of the Minnesota Society of Colonial Wars in 1911. William Beckwith Geery (1867- ,) the son of Josiah McClelland Geery (1840- ,) a professor at Ripon College, Ripon, Wisconsin, was born in Medina, Ohio, was educated at the Ripon, Wisconsin, High School, was educated at Ripon College, Ripon, Wisconsin, began in the banking business in 1885, was a messenger employed by the First National Bank of Ripon, Wisconsin, entered St. Paul National Bank as the paying teller in 1890, then became the assistant cashier of the St. Paul National Bank, became the cashier of the St. Paul National Bank in 1902, became the vice president of the Capital National Bank when the St. Paul National Bank merged into the Capital National Bank in 1906, was a Congregationalist, was a Republican, was a member of the Minnesota Club, was a member of the Town & Country Club, was a member of the St. Paul Commercial Club, was a member of the St. Paul Roosevelt Club, resided at 550 Summit Avenue in 1907, and officed at the corner of Fifth Street and Robert Street in 1907. William B. Geery was the assistant treasurer of the St. Paul National Bank in 1913, was the treasurer of the St. Paul Commercial Club in 1913, was the Deputy Governor from 1920 until 1927 at the Minneapolis Federal Reserve Bank, and was the governor of the Minneapolis Federal Reserve Bank from 1927 to 1933. William Beckwith Geery, Jr. (1917- ) was born in St. Paul and William Beckwith Geery III (1946- ) also was born in St. Paul. Herbert Huse Bigelow (1870- ,) the son of Andrew S. Bigelow ( -1874) and Celeste Huse Bigelow, was born in Blooksfield, Orange County, Vermont, graduated from Le Mars, Iowa, High School in 1889, graduated from married Mrs. Frances Gillette, a widow, in 1893, married to Nina Penny ( -1897) of Fullerton, Nebraska, in 1894, was a traveling salesman for Osborne, Murphy & Company from 1893 until 1895, became the president of Brown & Bigelow, an advertising specialties manufacturer formed with Hiram Brown ( -1905,) a St. Paul printer, married Mrs. Frances Gillette ( -1934,) a widow, in 1897, and was a director of the Wabasha Mill Company. William G. Carling ( -1913,) George Edmund Ingersoll ( -1924,) Jean Mac Laren Ingersoll ( -1935,) Mary Morrison ( -1935,) Andrew Gibson ( -1939,) Henry Long ( -1946,) and Mary Morrison ( -1950) all died in Ramsey County. Mary Morrison (1883-1960) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with the maiden name of Long, and died in Ramsey County. Elsie Galt (1878-1974) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Robinson, and died in Ramsey County. Mark DeForrest Orton ( -1938) died in Otter Tail County, Minnesota. [See note for Rollin A. Lanpher for 32 Irvine Park.] [See note on the Northern States Power Company and Henry M. Byllesby for 21-27 South St. Albans Street.] [See note on the Standard Club for 832 Osceola Avenue.] [See note on Town & Country Club for 952 Wakefield Avenue.] [See note for the Minikahda Club for 702 Fairmount Avenue.]

552 Summit Avenue: Built in 1997. The building is a 2982 square foot, three bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, condominium/row house, with a basement garage, that was last sold in 2000 for $523,000. The current owner of record of the property is Noreen A. Farrell.

555 Summit Avenue: Built in 1980. Unit 1 is a 1663 square foot, two bedroom, two bathroom, stucco condominium, and is currently owned by Dorothy D. Hosking. Unit 4 is a 1077 square foot, two bedroom, one bathroom, stucco condominium, and is currently owned by Dorothy D. Hosking. Previously located on this site was the William Rhodes house, which was designed by Clarence H. Johnston, Sr., in 1883-1884, at a cost of $14,000, which was razed in 1969. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that William Rhodes resided at this address from 1885 to 1886. The 1885 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. William Rhodes and Mrs. L. Rhodes all resided at this address. The 1887 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. E. I. Frost resided at this address. The 1891 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. L. H. Maxfield and Mrs. Marshall Cathcart resided at this address and that Henry Morris was a coachman who was employed at this residence and who boarded at 385 Walnut Street. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Louis H. Maxfield (1850-1892,) who died of paralysis, and Adelaide Maxfield, husband and wife, resided at this address in 1892. The 1893 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Borup and P. D. Ferguson all resided at this address. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Theodor C. Borup (1834-1904,) the husband of Elizabeth Curran Borup, who was born in Wisconsin to a father born in Denamrk and a mother born in the United States and who died of arterio sclerosis of the heart, resided at this address in 1904. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Paul Dudley Ferguson (1850-1905,) the widowed father of Pauline Annie Ferguson, who was born in the United States to parents also born in the United States and who died of pneumonia, resided at this address in 1905. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mrs. T. C. Borup resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Charles W. Borup resided at this address. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Elizabeth A. Borup (1834-1920,) the widowed mother of Charles W. Borup, who was born in Ireland to parents born in Ireland and who died of arteriosclerosis, resided at this address in 1920. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that the Junior League Convalescent Home was located at this address from 1927 to 1931 and that the building was razed in 1970. William Rhodes was the president of the board of alderman of the City of St. Paul in 1879. Mrs. William Rhodes was a vice president of the Christian Home, founded in 1871 and located at 11 Nash Street. Charles William Wolff/Wulff Borup (1806-1859) was born in Copenhagen, Denmark, emigrated to the United States in 1829, came to Mackinaw, Lake Superior, in 1831, connected with the Northern Outfit, lived at an American Fur Company outpost in La Pointe (Madeleine Island, Wisconsin) on the western shore of Lake Superior, was a physician, came to St. Paul in 1848, established a banking house, in 1854, with Charles H. Oakes, the first bank in Minnesota, was Minnesota's first Danish consul in 1859, and died of heart disease. In 1849, the American Fur Company left La Pointe, Wisconsin, and moved to St. Paul. Charles W. Borup was a medical doctor, but did not practice while in he resided in Minnesota. He had earlier worked for the American Fur Company in the Lake Superior region, and had lived in Wisconsin before coming to Minnesota around 1848. Once in St. Paul, he initially associated with the fur trading company of Pierre Chouteau, Jr., & Company and made his living in banking after 1853, was a merchant, and made numerous investments. Charles W. Borup married Elizabeth Beaulieu (1790- ,) the daughter of Bazil Hudon de Beaulieu (1785-1838) and Margaret O-ge-mau-gee-zhi-go-qua/Ogemaugeeeshigoquay (Queen of the Skies.) C. W. W. Borup and Elizabeth Borup (1817- ) had at least seven children, who were Theodore Borup (1833- ,) Sophia Borup (1835- ,) Virginia Borup (1837- ,) Augustan Borup (1841- ,) Marion Borup (1845- ,) Julia Borup (1847- ,) and Marcus Borup (1849- .) His sons, Gustav J. Borup (1841-1897,) born in La Pointe, Wisconsin, and Theodore Borup (1834-1904,) born in St. Paul, were also prominent businessmen in St. Paul. Gustav J. Borup settled in St. Paul in 1849, initially was engaged in the frieght business, and then engaged in banking. In 1879, G. J. Borup was the agent for the Erie & Pacific Despatch, was the agent for the Fast Freight Lines, and was the agent for the Great Western Despatch South Shore Line, all located at 122 East Third Street, and resided at 280 East Sixth Street. Gustav J. Borup married Laura A. Howland (1846- ) in 1866 and the couple had seven children, who were Helen Borup (1867- ,) Sophia C. Borup (1869- ,) Georgia W. Borup (1870- ,) Elizabeth W. Borup (Mrs. Charles J.) Gray (1872- ,) Virginia Borup (1874- ,) Alice Borup (1876- ,) and Maude Borup (1877- .) Theodore Borup came to St. Paul in 1851, initially engaged in the commission business, then became a frontier suttler, and resettled in St. Paul after 1890. Charles H. Oakes (1803- ) was born in Rockingham, Vermont, was a Indian trader after 1825 employed by the American Fur Company in Minnesota and Wisconsin, settled in St. Paul in 1850, was a brother-in-law of C. W. W. Borup, and with C. W. W. Borup formed the first legitimate banking house in St. Paul as a partnership. As part of loaning money to the various logging companies, Oakes & Borup also became involved in the lumber trade and rafted logs to St. Louis in 1856. Although badly affected by the Panic of 1857, Oakes & Borup reorganized and reopened for business, continuing in banking as Oakes & Borup until 1866. C. W. W. Borup made the first recorded gift to the University of Michigan, a highly-regarded German language encyclopedia set, the Brockhaus Conversations-Lexicon, in 1840, before the University of Michigan offered its first class. C. W. W. Borup also built the Sintominie Hotel, on the corner of Sixth and John street, but it burned down in 1852. Charles W. Borup, serving from 1853 to 1855, was among several prominent Minnesota pioneers in serving on the governing board of the Oakland Cemetery in St. Paul, including Alexander Ramsey, serving from 1853 to 1864, Augustus L. Larpenteur, serving from 1853 to 1856, John B. Sanborn, serving from 1855 to 1859, William R. Marshall, serving from 1855 to 1859, Jacob W. Bass, serving from 1856 to 1859 and from 1860 to 1863, Alexander H. Cathcart, serving from 1864 to 1869, Horace Thompson, serving from 1865 to 1880, Charles Nichols, serving from 1868 to 1874 and from 1875 to 1894, Henry Hastings Sibley, serving from 1869 to 1891, Amherst H. Wilder, serving from 1869 to 1870, Charles Scheffer, serving from 1874 to 1875, Conrad Gotzian, serving from 1875 to 1887, Henry M. Rice, serving from 1877 to 1885, Frederick Driscoll, serving from 1881 to 1890, Henry P. Upham, serving from 1885 to 1909, Judson W. Bishop, serving from 1891 to 1917, Maurice Auerbach, serving from 1891 to 1911, Theodore L. Schurmeier, serving from 1891 to 1906, William B. Dean, serving from 1895 to 1922, Charles P. Noyes, serving from 1898 to 1921, Rudolph M. Weyerhaueser, serving in 1922, Frederick G. Ingersoll, serving from 1911 to 1922, Charles L. Spencer, serving from 1909 to 1922, and Albert H. Lindeke, serving from 1912 to 1922. Maud Borup had a personal passion for candy, making it in her home kitchen and giving it to friends and family as gifts. In 1907, Maud Borup began selling chocolates on a card table in the back of the Holm & Olson flower shop on the corner of Fifth Street and St. Peter Street, developed enough business to open a whole counter in the small shop, and then went into business for herself. Over the years, the business grew and Maude Borup Chocolates continues, although the production operations have moved to Perham, Minnesota, where the warehouse was destroyed by a railroad derailment in February, 2004. Charles Nichols (1832-1894) was born in Williston, Vermont, moved to Minnesota in 1855, settled in St. Paul in 1858, was the postmaster of St. Paul from 1861 until 1865, then was involved in the railroad and banking businesses, and died in St. Paul. In 1890, Charles Nichols was a member of the executive committee, of the nominations committee, and of the property and finance committee of the St. Paul Chamber of Commerce. In 1896, Adelaide A. Nichols was the executrix of the estate of Charles Nichols. The Great Western Dispatch was the first of the fast freight transmission companies, a private line system from the 1850's, where the company furnished its own railroad cars, had its own freight agencies, and entered into contracts with various connecting railroads for the privilege of transporting loads over their rail lines. In 1877, there were at least 15 fast freight lines, the Red Line, the White Line, the Blue Line, the Hoosiac Tunnel Line, the International Line, the Canada Southern Line, the Merchant Dispatch Transportation Line, the Milwaukee Line, the Erie Dispatch, the South Shore Line, the Great Western Dispatch, the Commercial Express Line, the Diamond Line, the Erie and North Shore Line, and the Waverly Line. The fast freight lines eventually reduced railroad profits and the railroads reformulated their freight operations and absorbed the former private line systems in the 1880's and 1890's. William Rhodes ( -1911,) Charles W. Borup ( -1921,) and Adelaide Cathcart Maxfield ( -1938) all died in Ramsey County. [See note on Johnston.] [See note on Alexander Ramsey for 265 South Exchange Street.] [See the note on Auguste L. Larpenteur for 393-399 Eichenwald Street.] [See note on John Benjamin Sanborn for 572 Lincoln Avenue.] [See note for William Rainey Marshall for 30 Irvine Park.] [See note on Jacob Wales Bass and Martha Bass for 365 Summit Avenue.] [See note for Alexander H. Cathcart for 627 Goodrich Avenue.] [See note on Horace E. Thompson for 808 Summit Avenue.] [See the note for Charles Nichols for 555 Summit Avenue.] [See the note on Henry Hastings Sibley for 614 North Fountain Place.] [See note on Amherst Holcomb Wilder for 226 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Conrad Gotzian for 297 Bates Avenue.] [See note on Edmund Rice and Henry Mower Rice for 4 Crocus Hill.] [See note on Frederick Driscoll for 266 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Judson Wade Bishop and Mary Libania Axtell Bishop for 720 Fairmount Avenue.] [See note on Maurice Auerbach for 400 Summit Avenue.] [See the note for Theodore Leopold Schurmeier for 297 Bates Avenue.] [See the note for Charles P. Noyes for 2100 Stevens Avenue South.] [See note on William Blake Dean for 353 Summit Avenue] [See note on Frederick G. Ingersoll for 542 Portland Avenue.] [See note on Charles L. Spencer and Marjorie Clough Spencer for 500 Summit Avenue.]

556 Summit Avenue: Built in 1997. The building is a 2012 square foot, two bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, brick condominium/row house, with a basement garage, that was last sold in 1998 for $299,900. Architect Clarence H. Johnston, Sr., designed a set of flats for this address for George P. Gould in 1901, with the cost of the building of $93,000, but the work was stopped before completion. George Paige Gould ( -1947) died in Hennepin County. The current owners of record of the property are Mary B. Kennedy and Mark C. Larson.

557 Summit Avenue: Built in 1980. The building is a 1657 square foot, five room, two bedroom, two bathroom, stucco condominium/row house. The current owners of record of the property are John C. McNulty and Marcy S. Wallace. John C. McNulty (1924- ) was born in Minneapolis, graduated from the University of Minnesota Law School in 1957, is a member of the law firm of Cox, Goudy, McNulty & Wallace in the practice areas of Professional Discipline Defense, Arbitration, and Mediation, was a member of the Hennepin County Bar Association, is a member of the Ramsey County, Minnesota State, and American Bar Associations, is a member of the Panel of Arbitrators of the American Arbitration Association from 1962 to date, and is a member of the American Judicature Society. Marcy S. Wallace (1947- ) was born in Peoria, Illinois, graduated from the William Mitchell College of Law, is a member of the law firm of Cox, Goudy, McNulty & Wallace in the practice areas of Civil Litigation, Commercial Law, Personal Injury, Malpractice, Professional Discipline, and Arbitration, is a member of the Ramsey County Bar Association, the Minnesota State Bar Association, and the American Bar Association, the Minnesota Trial Lawyers Association and the Association of Trial Lawyers of America, was a member of the Board of Trustees of the William Mitchell College of Law from 1975 to 1987, was a member of the Board of Trustees of the YWCA of St. Paul from 1991 to 2003, and was the President of the YWCA of St. Paul from 2000 to 2002. John C. McNulty, a retiree, was a contributor to the John Kerry for President campaign in 2004. [See the note the Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA) for 198 Western Avenue North.]

558 Summit Avenue: Built in 1997. The building is a 2012 square foot, two bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, brick condominium/row house, with a basement garage, that last sold in 1998 for $320,000. The current owners of record of the property are Kathleen R. Goff and Richard D. Goff. Richard D. Goff grew up at 2015 Summit Avenue and previously resided at 1649 Summit Avenue for roughly 30 years.

559 Summit Avenue: Built in 1980. The building is a 759 square foot, one bedroom, one bathroom, stucco condominium/row house. The current owner of record of the property is Dorothy D. Hosking, who resides at 555 Summit Avenue.

562 Summit Avenue: Built in 1997. The building is a 2706 square foot, two bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, brick condominium/row house, with a basement garage. The current owner of record of the property is Martha Nelson.

566 Summit Avenue: Built in 1997. The building is a 2878 square foot, three bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, brick condominium/row house, with a basement garage. The last sale of the property occured in 2006 and the sale price was $800,000. The previous owners of record of the property were Keith W. Johnson and Mary B. Johnson and the current owners of record of the property are Jan D. Halverson and Sue R. Halverson.

573 Summit Avenue: W. D. Blumenthal House; Built in 1926; Twenties Villa in style. The building is a two story, 2846 square foot, six bedroom, three bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage, which was last sold in 1993 with a sale price of $150,000. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. The house was originally constructed for $10,000. The 1930 city directory indicates that John E. Burchard, in the real estate business, Charles B. Hall, the assistant secretary and the assistant treasurer of the Tri-State Telephone & Telegraph Company, his wife, Elisabeth Hall, and Leo C. McGee all resided at this address. The 1939 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Harold H. Rose (1907- ,) who was born in St. Paul, who attended the school from 1918 until 1925, who attended Yale University in 1929, who took University of Minnesota Extension courses, was employed by the Rose Fur Company, located at 237 East Sixth Street, and who pursued the hobbies of amateur rowing, Minnesota history, outdoor sports, and the Rotary Club, resided at this address. Harold H. Rose married Barbara M. Selig in Los Angeles, California, in 1936. John Ely Burchard (1865- ,) the son of Henry McNeil Burchard ( -1898) and Eliza Clark Burchard, was born in Clinton, Oneida County, New York, moved to Minnesota with his family in 1867, graduated from the Winona, Minnesota, High School, in 1882, attended the University of Michigan from 1883 until 1886, married Marie Corwin Hitt (1864-1934,) the daughter of Samuel Washington Hitt (1817- ) and Sarah B. White Hitt (1824- ,) in Urbana, Ohio, or Champaign, Ohio, in 1888 or 1890, was admitted to the practice of law, was one of the owners and editors of the Winona, Minnesota, Daily Herald in 1892, became the owner and editor of the Soo-Democratof Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan, from 1892 until 1895, was collector of customs at Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan, during President Grover Cleveland's second term, practiced law in Marshall, Minnesota, from 1895 until 1900, was the city attorney of Marshall, Minnesota, for three years and was also its mayor for three terms, practiced law and handled investments and lands in St. Paul after 1900, resided at 675 Goodrich Avenue in 1912, was a member of Park Congregational Church, was a member of the board of the St. Paul YMCA, was a member of the board of the St. Paul Institute, was a member of the University Club, was a member of the Town and Country Country Club, was president of the John E. Burchard Company, was president of the Burchard-Hulburt Investment Company, was president of the Lyon Land Company, was president of the Pembina Coal Company, was president of the Southwest Land & Orchard Company, and was president of the St. Paul Machinery Manufacturing Company, was the vice-president and director in several other companies and banks, resided at 675 Goodhue Avenue in 1907, officed at the Manhattan Building in 1907, officed at the Pioneer Building in 1912, was a 32nd degree Mason, was a member of the Elks, was a member of the Knights of Pythias, was the president of the Northwestern Alumni Association of the University of Michigan, was a lieutenant colonel of the Uniform Ranks, was a member of the Minnesota State Democratic Party Central Committee, was a member of the executive committee of the Minnesota State Democratic Party, was the chairman of the Ramsey County Democratic Party, was the chairman of the St. Paul City Democratic Party, was a director of the Minnesota Mutual Life Insurance Company, owned the Angus Hotel, was a member of the Minnesota Club, was a member of the St. Paul Commercial Club, and was appointed to Governor John Johnson's staff, with the rank of colonel, in 1907. John Ely Burchard and Mary/Marie C. Hitt were the parents of two children, Helen Burchard and Henry McNeil Burchard. John E. Burchard, the son of Henry McNeil Burchard and Eliza H. Clark Burchard and the grandson of Ely Burchard, a Presbyterian minister, and Harriet McNeil Burchard, was a member of the Minnesota Society of the Sons of the American Revolution by virtue of great grandfathers Jonathan Burchard, an artificer in Captain Hawes' Massachusetts Corps, and Henry McNeil, a private in the Connecticut Troops, during the Revolutionary War. James Clark Burchard (1851-1924) and Elizabeth Burchard (Mrs. D. B.) Woodbury were siblings of John E. Burchard. Henry M. Burchard (1825-1898) was born in New York, graduated from Hamilton College, Clinton, New York, attended Harvard University, practiced law in New York, was a judge of surrogate court in New York, was a colonel on the staff of the New York governor in 1861, came to Minnesota in 1866 or 1867, was a lawyer, was the land commissioner of the St. Peter & Winona RailRoad, and was a member of the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Winona County (District 8) from 1872 to 1873 and from 1875 to 1876. John Ely Burchard ( -1934} died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Elmo Wesley McCarty and Lucille C. McCarty. [See note for Tri-State Telegraph & Telephone Company for 596 Portland Avenue.] [See note on the Minnesota Mutual Life Insurance Company for 1730 Portland Avenue.] [See note on the St. Peter & Winona RailRoad.]

574 Summit Avenue: George D. Taylor House, Built in 1904 (1904 according to Sandeen and the Minnesota Historical Society, 1899 according to the National Register of Historic Places, and 1910 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Spanish Colonial Revival/Islamic/Renaissance Revival in style. The building is a two story, 5192 square foot, eight bedroom, three bathroom, brick house, with a detached garage. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. The house was built for George D. Taylor and Eve Taylor. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that George D. Taylor resided at this address from 1905 to 1906. In 1914, F. P. Wright was a resident of the house. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. D. H. Wright, Mrs. F. P. Wright, and C. F. Wright all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Charles Donnelly, the president of the Northern Pacific RailRoad, and his wife, Berthanin Donnelly, resided at this address. In 1934, Charles Donnelly and Bertha McMichael Donnelly resided at this address and were members of the Minikahda Country Club, the White Bear Yacht Club, and the Town & Country Country Club. Gretchen Bonham and David Bonham resided at this address in 1984. George D. Taylor operated a wholesale glass and wooden ware business in St. Paul. Charles Donnelly ( -1939) and George D. Taylor ( -1944) both died in Ramsey County. The property was last sold for $810,000 and that sale occurred in 2003. The current owners of record of the property are Robert L. Anderson and Vetnita R. Anderson. [See note on the Northern Pacific RailRoad.]

579 Summit Avenue: The Colonial; Built in 1895 (1896 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Renaissance Revival/Colonial Classial Revival in style; Hermann Kretz, architect. The building was a multifamily apartment house and is now a condominium building that is currently owned by the RLM Development Company, located in Woodbury, Minnesota. The building was constructed for $21,000. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. Along with apartments at 442 Summit Avenue, 550 Summit Avenue, and 672-676 Summit Avenue, the construction of this apartment building prompted zoning on Summit Avenue. Unit #101 is a 597 square foot, three room, one bedroom, one bathroom, condominium unit. Unit #102 is a 578 square foot, three room, one bedroom, one bathroom, condominium unit. Unit #103 is a 783 square foot, three room, one bedroom, one bathroom, condominium unit. Unit #104 is a 874 square foot, four room, two bedroom, one bathroom, condominium unit. Unit #105 is a 861 square foot, four room, two bedroom, one bathroom, condominium unit. Unit #106 is a 678 square foot, three room, one bedroom, one bathroom, condominium unit. Unit #201 is a 820 square foot, four room, two bedroom, one bathroom, condominium unit. Unit #202 is a 1088 square foot, four room, two bedroom, one bathroom, condominium unit. Unit #203 is a 905 square foot, four room, two bedroom, one bathroom, condominium unit. Unit #204 is a 705 square foot, three room, one bedroom, one bathroom, condominium unit. Unit #301 is a 843 square foot, four room, two bedroom, one bathroom, condominium unit. Unit #302 is a 1080 square foot, four room, two bedroom, one bathroom, one half-bathroom, condominium unit. Unit #303 is a 898 square foot, four room, two bedroom, one bathroom, condominium unit. Unit #304 is a 707 square foot, three room, one bedroom, one bathroom, condominium unit. The original owner of the building was Hermann Kretz, who was the architect and who also lived in the building. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Alexander A. McKechnie and May R. McKechnie (1867-1896,) who died of pulmonary tuberculosis, husband and wife, resided at this address in 1896. The 1906 Jubilee Manual of the House of Hope Presbyterian Church indicates that Warren H. Mead, a member of the church since 1870, Dr. Parks Ritchie, a member of the church since 1898, Emma (Mrs. Parks) Ritchie, a member of the church since 1898, Edward R. Sanford, Jr., a member of the church since 1888, and C. L. (Mrs. E. R., Jr.) Sanford, a member of the church since 1893, all resided at this address. Little Sketches of Big Folks indicates that Angus MacDonald resided at this address in 1907. The book of Minnesotans: a biographical dictionary of leading living men of Minnesota, edited by Albert Nelson Marquis, indicates that Dudley B. Finch resided at this address in 1907. The 1910-1911 Directory of the University of Minnesota indicates that Paul H. Kelly, a student, resided at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that the residents at this address were Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Hughes, Mr. and Mrs. H. W. Allen, their daughter, W. P. Allen, Dr. William D. Kelly, Dr. and Mrs. Wilhelm Lerche, Daniel Kelly, his daughter, Mr. and Mrs. E. K. Punnett, Mrs. A. E. Senkler, and her daughter. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that James R. Walsh (1841-1919,) the widowed father of S. P. Walsh, who was born in New York to parents who were born in the United States and who died of a cerebral hemorrhage, and was buried in New York, resided at this address in 1919. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Edward K. Punnett ( -1919,) the husband of Elizabeth Punnett, who died of arteriosclerosis, resided at this address in 1919. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Henry B. Walsh (1861-1920,) the husband of Nellie N. Walsh, who was born in Connecticut to parents born in the United States and who died of prostate cancer, resided at this address in 1920. The 1920 city directory indicates that Freeman Authier, a partner with Eph Mounsey in the Authier Company, a ladies wearing apparel retailer, resided at this address and that Irene Authier, a musician, boarded at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that the residents at this address were Dr. and Mrs. W. D. Kelly and their daughter, Mr. and Mrs. D. A. Mudge, Mr. and Mrs. V. J. Mullery, Mrs. Elizabeth Punnett, Theo Reamer, Mr. and Mrs. Paul Seabury, and Mr. and Mrs. F. G. Stutz. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Elizabeth Punnett, the widow of Edward K. Punnett, resided at apartment #1, that Alice MacGregor, the widow of Alex MacGregor, resided at apartment #2, that George W. Griffin, a manufacturers agent, and his wife, Mary Griffin, resided at apartment #3, that apartment #4 was vacant, that Daniel A. Mudge and his wife, Eva Mudge, resided at apartment #5, and that Joseph X. Gooris, the assistant advertising director employed by the Dispatch-Pioneer Press Company, and his wife, Mildred Gooris, resided at apartment #6. In 1934, Alice Phelps MacGregor, the widow of A. L. MacGregor, resided at this address. The 1939 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Justus J. Schifferes (1907- ,) who attended the school from 1920 until 1925, who attended the University of Minnesota, who graduated from Yale University in 1929, and who was employed by Modern Medicine, resided at this address. In 1972-1973, Lucian Strong III, a Freshman at Macalester College, resided at this address. Angus MacDonald (1843-1919,) the son of Alexander Macdonald and Hannah Macdonald, was born in Glengarry, Ontario, Canada, was educated at Ottawa College, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, and McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, graduated in medicine in 1863, was a physician, spent some time in the military hospitals of Washington, D. C., practiced medicine in Cornwall, Ontario, Canada, from 1863 until 1872, married Christine Macdonnell in 1871, practiced medicine in St. Cloud, Minnesota, from 1872 until 1878, moved to St. Paul in 1878, was the president of the Ramsey County Medical Society, was a member of the Minnesota State Medical Association, and was a member of the American Medical Association, officed at the Lowry Building in 1907, and died in St. Paul. Angus MacDonald and Christine Macdonnell MacDonald were the parents of Edward MacDonald, Rupert MacDonald, and George MacDonald. Wilhelm Lerche was a medical doctor, was the author of the paper "Spastic Tumor of the Pyloric Canal and Other Spastic Conditions of the Stomach: Their Surgical Treatment" in Surgery, gynecology & obstetrics in 1914, was the author of the article "A Tack in the Eparterial Branch of the Right Main Bronchus" in the Journal of the American Medical Association in 1914, and officed at the Lowry Building in 1915. Warren Hewitt Mead (1836- ,) the son of Lockwood Mead (1803- ) and Susan/Susannah Miller Mead and was the grandson of Hewitt Mead, was born in Genoa, Cayuga County, New York, graduated from the Cazenovia Seminary in 1857, moved to Kentucky in 1857, taught at the Bradfordsville, Kentucky, Institute from 1857 until 1861, served in the Union Army, in Company B of the Sixth Kentucky Cavalry, during the American Civil War, was taken prisoner during the battle of Chickamauga in 1862, was held at the Libby Prison, Macon, Georgia, Charleston, South Carolina, and at Camp Sorghum at Columbia, South Carolina, escaped from the Winnsborough, South Carolina, Prison, in 1864, was recaptured, escaped again, was mustered out of the Army in 1865, returned to Kentucky to study law, was admitted the to the practice of law in Louisville, Kentucky, in 1865, married Frances A. Hughes (1841- ,) the daughter of Henry C. Hughes and Charlotte Loomis Hughes, in Camillus, Onondaga County, New York, in 1866, came to Minnesota in 1866, settled at Northfield, Minnesota, was admitted to the practice of law in 1868, moved to St. Paul in 1870, was a lawyer, was a partner with Cyrus J. Thompson in the law firm of Mead & Thompson, was a partner with Cyrus J. Thompson and Edward Retort in the law firm of Mead, Thompson & Retort officing at the McQuillan Block in 1879, was a Presbyterian, was a Republican, was a member of the House of Representatives representing Ramsey County (District 24) from 1878 until 1880, authored the paper "Southern Military Prisons and Escapes" for the Minnesota Commandery of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States in 1890, resided at 597 Summit Avenue in 1907, and officed at the Manhattan Building in 1907. Warren Hewitt Mead and Frances A. Hughes Mead were the parents of two children, George Hughes Mead (1867/1868- ) and Charlotte Loomis Mead (1870/1871- .) In 1879, Warren H. Mead resided at 126 Pleasant Avenue. Cyrus J. Thompson (1834- ) was born in Castile, New York, graduated from the University of Michigan, was admitted to the practice of law in 1862, settled in St. Paul in 1868, married Sarah C. Defrees of Elkhart County, Indiana, and was a lawyer. Parks Ritchie (1845- ,) the son of James Ritchie and Hannah E. Parks Ritchie, was born in Bainbridge, Indiana, was educated in private schools and at the Franklin, Indiana, Academy, graduated from Ohio Medical College in Cincinnati, Ohio, with a medical degree in 1870, was a physician, was a professor of obstetrics college of medicine at the University of Minnesota, practiced medicine and surgery in St. Paul, married Emma Bates in 1871, and officed at the Lowry Arcade in 1907. Dudley B. Finch (1852-1909,) the son of Sherman Finch, was born at Delaware, Ohio, was educated in the public schools of Ohio, graduated from the Mount Vernon, Ohio, High School, moved to St. Paul in 1861, married Mary Eliza Dexter (1856- ,) the daughter of Charles E. Dexter and Mary Remington King Hoyt Dexter, at Hudson, Wisconsin, in 1878, was a capitalist, was an organizing partner with Ernst Albrecht and Obed P. Lanpher of the firm of Albrecht, Lanpher & Finch and of its successor, Lanpher, Finch & Skinner, was the president of Lanpher, Finch & Skinner until 1906, was a member of the board of directors of French, Finch & Henry, wholesale dealers in boots, shoes and rubber goods, had commercial interests in other mercantile and financial enterprises, was a member of the Minnesota Club, was a member of the St. Paul Commercial Club, resided at 172 Summit Avenue in 1878, and officed at 225 East Fourth Street in 1907. Dudley B. Finch and Mary Eliza Dexter Finch were the parents of Lilla Shepherd Finch (Mrs. Sewall Dabois) Andrews (1879- ) and Florence Dudley Finch (Mrs. Edward B.) Holbert (1881- .) Alexander A. McKechnie ( -1931,) Hermann Kretz ( -1931,) Elizabeth B. Punnett ( -1931,) and Alice Livingston Mac Gregor ( -1936,) Daniel A. Mudge ( -1936,) and George W. Griffin ( -1954) all died in Ramsey County. Helena B. Kretz (1866-1960) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Lies, and died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is Troy Dewitt, who resides at 945 Grand Avenue. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Charles Donnelly resided at the former nearby 580 Summit Avenue. [See note on Parks Ritchie for 46 Crocus Hill.] [See note on the St. Paul Pioneer Press/Dispatch for 343 Maple Street.] [See note for Sewall D. Andrews for 2117 Second Avenue South.] [See note on Obed P. Lanpher for 482 Portland Avenue.] [See note on the St. Paul Commercial Club for 505 Summit Avenue.]

582 Summit Avenue: Built in 1999. The building is a two story, 4024 square foot, three bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided house that was last sold in 2003 for $1,250,000. The current owners of record of the property are Pamela C. Birch and Robert F. H. Birch.

587-601 Summit Avenue: Farrar Rowhouse/Summit Terrace/F. Scott Fitzgerald residence ; Built in 1889; Richardsonian Romanesque in style; William Willcox (1832-1929) and Clarence H. Johnston, Sr., architects. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. 587 Summit Avenue is a two story, 3298 square foot, six bedroom, three bathroom, brick row house, with a detached garage, and is currently owned by the trustees of Harold R. Adams and Robert N. Prentiss. 589 Summit Avenue is a two story, 2990 square foot, three bedroom, three bathroom, brick row house, with a detached garage, which was last sold in 1994 for $170,000, and is currently owned by Mark O. Stutrud. 591 Summit Avenue is a two story, 3750 square foot, two bedroom, three bathroom, brick row house, with a detached garage, with the last sale of the property occurring in 1997 at a purchase price of $330,000, and is currently owned by Daryl C. Natz and Marilyn K. Natz. 593 Summit Avenue is a two story, 3314 square foot, three bedroom, three bathroom, brick row house, with a detached garage, and is currently owned by Richard J. Tollefson. 595 Summit Avenue is a two story, 3314 square foot, six bedroom, three bathroom, brick row house, with a detached garage, and is currently owned by John E. Mullen. 597 Summit Avenue is a two story, 3314 square foot, six bedroom, two bathroom, brick row house, which was last sold in 1995 for $315,000, and is currently owned by Thomas R. Knoll. 599 Summit Avenue is a two story, 2990 square foot, six bedroom, two bathroom, brick row house, which was last sold in 1997 for $360,000, was previously owned by Thomas R. Knoll, and is currently owned by Michael J. Jones and Nancy D. Jones. 601 Summit Avenue is a two story, 2990 square foot, six bedroom, two bathroom, brick row house, which was last sold in 1993 for $270,000, and is currently owned by Elisabeth Silber Paper. Tom Knoll, the owner of Anderson & Dahlen, contributed to the Mitt Romney for President campaign in 2007-2008. The rowhouse buildings were built for a total of $48,000 (Sandeen and Larson.) The building was built for the firm of Farrar & Howe. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Nelson C. Thrall resided at 593 Summit Avenue from 1890 to 1892. In 1897, there was a basement laundry gasoline fire at a three story residence located at 589 Summit Avenue which was owned and occupied by C. A. Severance. Little Sketches of Big Folks indicates that Lawrence G. Washington resided at 587 Summit Avenue and that Wescott W. Price resided at 591 Summit Avenue in 1907. The book of Minnesotans: a biographical dictionary of leading living men of Minnesota, edited by Albert Nelson Marquis, indicates that Robert R. Dunn resided at 597 Summit Avenue in 1907. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Margaret A. Castle (1843-1908,) the wife of Henry A. Castle, who was born in the United States to parents also born in the United States and who died of a pulmonary embolism, resided at 589 Summit Avenue in 1908. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. L. G. Washington and R. M. Washington all resided at 587 Summit Avenue, that the Misses Long all resided at 589 Summit Avenue, that Col. and Mrs. W. W. Price and Mrs. D. C. Price all resided at 591 Summit Avenue, that Mr. and Mrs. Ed Fitzgerald resided at 593 Summit Avenue, that Mr. and Mrs. A. A. White resided at 595 Summit Avenue, that Mr. and Mrs. R. R. Dunn and R. R. Dunn, Jr., all resided at 597 Summit Avenue, that Mrs. H. B. Willis and Mrs. A. T. MacGregor both resided at 599 Summit Avenue, and that Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Tipton resided at 601 Summit Avenue. The 1920 city directory indicates that Allen R. Anderson, a bookkeeper employed by Gauger-Korsmo Construction Company, boarded at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Foster Carling and Mrs. G. A. Washington all resided at 587 Summit Avenue, that the Misses Long resided at the former nearby 589 Summit Avenue, that Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Price resided at the former nearby 591 Summit Avenue, that Mr. and Mrs. B. S. Benson and Mr. and Mrs. G. S. Smith all resided at the former nearby 593 Summit Avenue, that Mr. and Mrs. A. A. White resided at the former nearby 595 Summit Avenue, that Mr. and Mrs. Charles B. Dunn resided at the former nearby 597 Summit Avenue, and that Mrs. L. M. Barker and Mrs. Caroline E. Meader both resided at the former nearby 601 Summit Avenue. The 1930 city directory indicates that William C. Gilbert and Justine Long resided at this address. 599 Summit Avenue is known as the F. Scott Fitzgerald House and was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1971 because of its connection with a famous person. The 1891 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Severance resided at 589 Summit Avenue, that Mr. and Mrs. G. M. Nelson resided at 591 Summit Avenue, that Mr. and Mrs. N. C. Thrall resided at 593 Summit Avenue, that Major and Mrs. G. E. Glenn and Mrs. S. C. Foote all resided at 595 Summit Avenue, and that Dr. and Mrs. J. F. Fulton and Miss Nellie D. Wheaton all resided at 601 Summit Avenue. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Cordenio A. Severance resided at this address in 1895. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that William F. Phelps and Caroline S. Phelps, husband and wife, resided at this address in 1903. The book of Minnesotans: a biographical dictionary of leading living men of Minnesota, edited by Albert Nelson Marquis, indicates that Henry Anson Castle resided at 589 Summit Avenue in 1907. The 1908 city directory indicates that Robert R. Dunn, involved in mortgage loans and commercial paper, resided at 597 Summit Avenue and that Charles B. Dunn, a clerk at Finch, Van Slyke & McConnville, boarded at 597 Summit Avenue. The 1910 city directory indicates that Edward B. Swygart was a manufacturing agent officed at the Gilfillan Building and resided at 593 Summit Avenue. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Frederick E. Bird (1846-1910,) the husband of Mrs. Frederick E. Bird, who was born in Massachusetts to parents who were born in the United States and who died of chronic nephritis, resided at the nearby former 601 Summit Avenue in 1910. World War I veteran Robert R. Dunn resided at 597 Summit Avenue in 1919. The 1920 city directory indicates that Nellie P. O'Dell, the widow of H. Allen O'Dell, boarded at 591 Summit Avenue. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Lawrence G. Washington (1861-1922,) the husband of Gertrude Washington, who was born in Minnesota to parents who were born in the United States and who died of nephritis, resided at this address in 1922. In 1934, Douglas H. Wright, Anita Van Kleeck Wright, Nancy Wright, Margaret Wright, and Roxanna Wright all resided at this address. The 1950 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that F. Scott Fitzgerald ( -1940,) who attended the school from 1908 until 1911, who graduated from Princeton University in 1917, and who was a First Lieutenant in the 67th Infantry during World War I, previously resided at 593 Summit Avenue. The 1964 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Warren E. Olson, a member of the Class of 1963, resided at 601 Summit Avenue. Wescott W. Price (1864- ,) the son of David C. Price and Sally Stirling Skillman Price, was born in St. Paul, was educated in the common schools of St. Paul, graduated from the St. Paul High School in 1884, was employed in the Peoples Bank from 1884 until 1887, was a member of the Price-McGill Printing Company from 1887 until 1904, was a Democrat in 1896, was a lieutenant colonel in the 13th Regiment of the Minnesota National Guard in 1898, participated in the Battle of Manila in the Philippines during the Spanish-American War, married Hildegarde Risley in 1904, was a real estate and financial agent, was the manager of The London & Northwest American Mortgage Company Ltd. after 1904, was the president of the St. Paul Abstract Company, was the secretary of the Merriam Realty Company, was a member of the firm of Cathcart, Price & Company, was a member of the First Regiment Minnesota of the National Guard for 20 years, was a member of the Minnesota Club, was a member of the Commercial Club, was a member of the Town & Country Club, was a life honorary member of the German Club, and officed at 115 East Fourth Street in 1907. Robert R. Dunn (1863- ,) the of Charles B. Dunn, a member of firm of Dunn Brothers, bankers in New York and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and Margaret H. Dunn, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, was educated in private schools of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and Haverford College, Haverford, Pennsylvania, married Mary E. George at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1886, moved to St. Paul in 1888, was a private banker, was the vice president of the St. Paul Title & Trust Company, was the vice president of the Union Bank, then was the vice president of the Northwestern Trust Company until 1906, was the receiver of the Commercial Light & Power Company of Duluth, Minnesota, was the treasurer of the General Electric Company of Duluth, Minnesota, until the plant was sold in 1906, was, for eight years, the receiver for the water company of West Duluth, Minnesota, after which the plant was sold to the city, was a member of the board of directors of the Superior Light & Power Company of Superior, Wisconsin, was the president of the Interstate Traction Company of Duluth, Minnesota, engaged in private banking, mortgages and loans in 1901, was a Democrat, was a member of the Minnesota Club, the Kitchi Gammi Club of Duluth, Minnesota, was a member of the Northland Golf Club, engaged in the hobbies of fishing and automobiling, and officed at the State Savings Bank Building in 1907. Professor William F. Phelps ( -1911,) the son of Halsey Phelps and Lucinda Hitchcock Phelps, the grandson of Friend Phelps (1745-1826) and Rachel Phelps (1755-1817,) and the great grandson of Benjamin Phelps (1713-1780) and Rachel Brown Phelps (1704-1776,) was a member of the Minnesota Society of the Sons of the American Revolution by virtue of great great grandfather William Phelps (1684- ,) a member of the Committee of Safety of Northhampton, Massachusetts, during the Revolutionary War. William Franklin Phelps (1822-1907) was born in Aurelius, Cayuga County, New York, the son of Halsey Phelps (1792-1859) and Lucinda Hitchcock Phelps (1788-1876,) married Caroline Chapman (1820-1903) in 1854, died in St. Paul, and was buried at Woodlawn Cemetery in Winona, Winona County, Minnesota. Lawrence G. Washington (1860-1922,) the son of Richard Washington, a Confederate cavalry officer under General James Ewell Brown "Jeb" Stuart during the American Civil War, and Ellen Center Washington, was a grandson of a nephew of George Washington, was born in Hastings, Minnesota, was educated in public schools, moved to St. Paul in 1880, was employed by the Robinson-Gary Company from 1880 until 1886, was a contractor, was in the Portland stone business after 1886, was the proprietor of the Portland Stone Company after 1892, married Gertrude A. Miller, the daughter of William M. Miller, a Hartford, Connecticut, merchant, in Minneapolis in 1897, was a Democrat, was an Episcopalian, was a Mason, was a member of the Minnesota Club, was a member of the St. Paul Commercial Club, was a member of the Association of Commerce, was a member of the Rotary Club, was a member of the St. Paul Town & Country Club, and officed at the New York Life Building in 1907. Gertrude A. Miller Washington was educated in Faribault, Minnesota, and Hartford, Connecticut, was a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution, and was a member of the Daughters of Colonial Dames. Lawrence G. Washington and Gertrude A. Miller Washington were the parents of two children, Richard M. Washington (1899- ) and Martha A. Washington (1909- .) F. Scott (Francis Scott Key) Fitzgerald (1896-1940) was born a few months after his two older sisters died, at ages one and three, in an epidemic. His great-grandfather's brother on his mother's side was Francis Scott Key (1779-1843), the composer of "The Star Spangled Banner," and the author was named after him. His father's aunt was Mrs. Mary Suratt, one of the alleged conspirators who was hanged for the John Wilkes Booth assassination of Abraham Lincoln. After he was born, his mother, Mary (Mollie) McQuillan Fitzgerald (1860-1936), was anxious and protective of him, and after he nearly died a year later of bronchitis, she lavished most of her attention on him, even after her youngest child, Annabel Fitzgerald (1901- ,) was born. Mollie McQuillan was educated at the Visitation Convent in St. Paul and at the Manhattanville College in New York City. Mollie McQuillan was considered eccentric, gauche, and vague as a teenager and as an adult. F. Scott Fitzgerald's father, Edward Fitzgerald (1853-1931), was never an astute businessman, failed as a wicker furniture manufacturer, The American Rattan & Willow Works, then worked as a salesman for Proctor & Gamble in upstate New York before being dismissed in 1908, when F. Scott Fitzgerald was twelve years old. F. Scott Fitzgerald was baptized at the old (pre-1906) cathedral in St. Paul. Mollie McQuillan married Edward Fitzgerald at age 29. His father's failure left the family in an ambiguous financial and social position. Returning to St. Paul, the $125,000 legacy that Mollie Fitzgerald had inherited from the estate of her father, a wealthy grocery wholesaler, allowed them lived rather comfortably. The Fitzgeralds lived in the prestigious section of town, but they had far less money than the young Fitzgerald's wealthy playmates. Fitzgerald's playmates included Alida Bigelow, Elisabeth Dean at 415 Summit Avenue, Lucius Ordway, Jr., Elizabeth Magoffin, and Benjamin Griggs at 365 Summit Avenue. The Fitzgerald family moved almost annually and they lived in various rental houses and apartments. Mollie Fitzgerald enrolled her son at the St. Paul Academy in 1909. The young F. Scott Fitzgerald was involved in St. Paul society, but he always felt like he was an outsider. While in high school at the St. Paul Academy (1908-1911), Fitzgerald attended Professor William H. Baker's dancing classes at Ramaley Hall and attended dances at Mrs. Backus's School for Girls with a new girlfriend, Margaret Armstrong. F. Scott Fitzgerald also wrote plays for the school's Elizabethan Club. Fitzgerald's first story, in 1909, was "The Mystery of Raymond Mortgage." This sense of alienation was heightened when he enrolled in the Newman School in Hackensack, New Jersey, a private academy that drew its students from the wealthiest Catholic families in the United States. At the Newman School (1911-1913), Fitzgerald found a father figure in Monsignor Cyril Sigourney Webster Fay, a school trustee and later headmaster, and had conversations with him that often involved an analysis of literature and sophisticated upper class Eastern Catholics. Fitzgerald maintained a close relationship with Fay up until Fay's death in 1919. Fay was a Philadelphian from a wealthy background, a convert from Episcopalianism to Roman Catholicism, and a startling figure, not of the working-class Irish background that Fitzgerald was ashamed of, who liked to eat and sing, gossip, and play the piano, said Mass in Greek or in the Celtic rite, and would discuss the saints and theologians Augustine and Newman. The book This Side of Paradise is dedicated to Sigourney Fay and Fitzgerald wrote him into the novel. Fitzgerald also was influenced by an Anglo-Irish author, Shane Leslie (1885-1971), who ignited his literary ambitions and encouraged him. Fitzgerald was always aware of his being the poorest boy at a rich boy's school, and those feelings helped to drive his apparent relentless need for recognition and achievement. He fulfilled this need through writing. After failing the Princeton University entrance exam twice, Fitzgerald convinced the administration to accept him in 1913. In 1914, F. Scott Fitzgerald's parents moved into the 593 Summit unit of this rowhouse, while Fitzgerald was in his second year at Princeton University (1913-1917). The year 1914 saw the production of Fie! Fie! Fi-Fi!, Fitzgerald's first Princeton Triangle Club show. At Princeton University, Fitzgerald met Edmund Wilson and John Peale Bishop. Fitzgerald spent time in his parents' house during breaks from school in 1914 and 1915. When Fitzgerald was nineteen, coming home from Princeton for Christmas, he met Ginerva King (1898-1980,) the daughter of Ginevra King and Charles Garfield King, who became his great love. The Lake Forest, Illinois, native, Ms. King, was rich and beautiful and Fitzgerald was intoxicated by her. He took her to dances at the St. Paul Town & Country Club, they corresponded, he visited her, she visited him, he was jealous towards the other men who were attracted to her, and he never forgot her. Ginerva King is believed to have become the character Judy Jones in "Winter Dreams," the character Isabelle in This Side of Paradise, and the character Daisy Buchanan in The Great Gatsby. Fitzgerald returned from Princeton University prematurely at age 19. A mild case of either malaria or tuberculosis was the excuse for coming home, but actually Fitzgerald was flunking out of Princeton University because he spent all of his time at college writing for the Triangle Club, the Princetonian, the school newspaper, and The Tiger, a humor sheet, and acting in Triangle Club stage shows. He was depressed about his failures, unhappy about his writing, and in anguish over his separation from Ginevra King. The two exchanged letters until Ginevra King broke off their relationship, stating that she was not ready for a long-term commitment, but Fitzgerald assumed it was because of differences in their social status. Ginerva King went on to marry first William Mitchell in 1918 and then John T. Pirie, Jr., in 1937. Fitzgerald went back to Princeton in the Fall of 1916, but because of his poor grades, he was barred from extracurricular activities, he could no longer become the editor of the Princetonian nor the president of the Triangle Club, and he could no longer be a campus hero. Fitzgerald dropped out of Princeton University finally, and he enlisted in the Army, hoping to go to war in Europe. After stints at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, at Camp Taylor, Louisville, Kentucky, and at Camp Gordon, Georgia, Fitzgerald was transferred to Camp Sheridan, near Montgomery, Alabama, where he met Zelda Sayre (1900-1948,) the youngest daughter of Anthony D. Sayre, an Alabama Supreme Court Justice, at a country club dance and fell in love with her. Zelda Sayre's mother, Minnie Buckner Machen, was born in Eddyville, Kentucky. In September, 1918, Fitzgerald's parents moved into the unit at 599 Summit. After being discharged from the Army, without going overseas or seeing combat, in 1919, Fitzgerald moved to New York and worked for the Barron Collier advertising agency. After quitting the advertising agency, Fitzgerald joined his parents in St. Paul in July of 1919. While staying in the rowhouse, Fitzgerald rewrote and polished the manuscript for his second (first published) novel, This Side of Paradise, originally titled The Education of a Personage. Fitzgerald got a letter from Maxwell Perkins at Scribner's in mid-September, 1919, that This Side of Paradise was accepted for publication. Fitzgerald's success as an author came early. His Triangle Club shows earned him recognition at Princeton, and his first novel, This Side of Paradise (1920,) made him a national celebrity at the age of 23. Fitzgerald and Zelda Sayre married, at rectory of St. Patrick's Cathedral in New York because Zelda Sayre was an Episcopalian, after the publication of This Side of Paradise and, two years later, in the fall of 1921, he and Zelda came back to St. Paul for the birth of their daughter, Frances Scott (Scottie) Fitzgerald (1921-1986.) Although publicly antagonistic to the Catholic Church, Fitzgerald had Scottie baptized and a priest friend, Fr. Joe Barron, Dean of Students at the St. Paul Seminary, met regularly with Fitzgerald and was the godfather to Scottie. The Fitzgeralds lived for a time at the White Bear Yacht Club. F. Scott Fitzgerald was famous, he had money and was spending it wildly, and he was drinking enough to get himself thrown out of the Yacht Club. Fitzgerald's stories for magazines sold at about $3,000 apiece at the time and Fitzgerald ultimately published about 90 pieces for the Saturday Evening Post and 160 magazine pieces in total. Fitzgerald, however, was not among the highest-paid writers of his time, and his novels earned comparatively little, and most of his income came from magazine stories. The Fitzgeralds left St. Paul in 1922 and never returned to St. Paul again. In 1924, Zelda Fitzgerald became involved with the French naval aviator Edouard Jozan and her marriage to Fitzgerald after this was never the same. Fitzgerald published two collections of short stories, Flappers and Philosophers (1920) and Tales of the Jazz Age (1922.) He also wrote The Beautiful and Damned (1922,) The Vegetable: From President to Postman (1923,) The Great Gatsby (1925,) All the Sad Young Men (1926,) Tender Is the Night (1934,) The Last Tycoon (1941,) The Crack-Up (1945,) and The Portable F. Scott Fitzgerald; (1945.) Zelda Fitzgerald was the author of Save Me the Waltz (1932,) an autobiographical novel that Fitzgerald thought pre-empted material that he was using in his novel-in-progress, provisionally titled The Boy Who Killed His Mother, Our Type, and The World's Fair. H. L. Mencken, an editor of The Smart Set and, later, of The American Mercury, was an important supporter of Fitzgerald's work and Fitzgerald admired Mencken. In 1927, Fitzgerald was asked to write a screenplay and went to Hollywood. Although Fitzgerald went to Hollywood three times, was employed by the M-G-M, Paramount, Universal, Twentieth Century-Fox, Goldwyn, and Columbia studios, and worked on numerous screenplays, including "Gone With The Wind", his work on "Three Comrades" (1938) was his only screen credit. Zelda Fitzgerald was diagnosed as suffering from schizophrenia and was hospitalized on several occasions. In the summer of 1935, while at a plush resort hotel in western North Carolina, F. Scott Fitzgerald met Laura Guthrie, a woman separated from her husband and working as a palmist for the hotel who became his typist and companion for the summer, although there was no romance between them. Fitzgerald was a member of the Screen Writers' Guild in 1938. After age 14, Scottie Fitzgerald did not live with her parents and Harold Ober (1881-1959,) Fitzgerald's literary agent, and his wife, Anne Ober, functioned as her foster parents while she was at boarding school and at Vassar College. Harold Ober Associates, Inc., eventually with three London affiliates (David Higham Associates (1965-1972,) Bolt & Watson Limited (1971-1972,) and Hughes Massie Limited (1968-1972),) was established by Harold Ober in 1929 after he left the Paul Revere Reynolds literary agency, quickly grew in size and reputation, and has been considered one of the leading representatives for American and British writers in the world. In 1939, Fitzgerald broke with Harold Ober. Frances Kroll Ring (1916- ) was Fitzgerald's secretary in the last few years of his life, when Fitzgerald hired her in 1939 to type the manuscript of the novel Fitzgerald was just beginning, The Last Tycoon, and was the author of Against the Current: As I Remember F. Scott Fitzgerald in 1985, which was the basis for the teleplay, Last Call, scripted by writer-director Henry Bromell. Fitzgerald, an alcoholic, ultimately died of a heart attack at the Hollywood apartment of Sheilah Graham (1904-1988,) a gossip columnist with whom he had an affair since 1937, and was buried in Rockville Union Cemetery, Rockville, Maryland, which was Edward Fitzgerald's hometown, after a funeral service that was conducted by the Rev. Raymond P. Black, pastor of the Christ Episcopal Church of Rockville. Graham authored a memoir of Fitzgerald's last days in Beloved Infidel. Fitzgerald left an estate of "over $10,000". Zelda Fitzgerald died in a fire at the Highland Hospital in Ashville, North Carolina, and was buried with her husband. The epitaph on their headstone reads "So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past." In 1975, F. Scott Fitzgerald and Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald were reinterred in the cemetery of St. Mary's Catholic Church, Rockville, Maryland, at the instigation of The Women's Club of Rockville, and in 1986, Scottie Fitzgerald was buried with her parents. A total of 15 members of the family, the Fitzgeralds, the Delihants, the Scotts, and the Robertsons, are buried at the Saint Mary's Cemetery in Maryland. The former World Theater in St. Paul, currently owned and operated by the parent company of Minnesota Public Radio, was renamed the "Fitzgerald Theater" in honor of F. Scott Fitzgerald, despite Fitzgerald's tortured relationship with the city. Philip Francis McQuillan (1834- ) was F. Scott Fitzgerald's grandfather, was the son of James McQuillan and Mary McQuillan, married Louisa E. Allen, and the couple had six daughters and two sons, Mary Mollie McQuillan (1860-1939,) F. Scott Fitzgerald's mother, Allen McQuillan (1863-1945,) Agnes McQuillan (1865-1866,) Annabella McQuillan (1866-1963,) Clara McQuillan (1869-1911,) Josephine Frances McQuillan (1871-1872,) John F. McQuillan (1872-1874,) and Philip Francis McQuillan, Jr. (1877-1938.) Mary Mollie McQuillan married Edward Fitzgerald and the couple had four daughters and one son, Louisa F. Fitzgerald (1892-1896,) Mary Ashton Fitzgerald (1893-1895,) Francis Scott Fitzgerald (1896-1940,) Unnamed daughter Fitzgerald (1900-1900,) and Annabell Fitzgerald (1901-1987.) Frances Scott Fitzgerald Lanahan Smith (1921-1986) attended Vassar College 1938-1942, where her education was financed by friends of her father, and was a reporter on the staffs of Time, The New Yorker, The Democratic Digest, and The Northern Virginia Sun, where she was later the chief political writer. She also wrote for both The New York Times and The Washington Post, was a playwright, was a composer and producer of musicals, and was a Democratic Party insider. She also authored two books, Don't Quote Me, with Winzola McLendon, in 1970, and An Alabama Journal in 1976, and edited two books, Bits of Paradise in 1973, and The Romantic Egotists in 1974. Frances Scott Fitzgerald Lanahan Smith married and divorced Samuel Jackson Lanahan, married and divorced C. Grove Smith, and had four children, Thomas Addison Lanahan, Eleanor Anne Lanahan (1948- ), Samuel Jackson Lanahan, Jr., and Cecelia Scott Lanahan. On the surface, Scottie Fitzgerald seems to have been largely unaffected by her parent's frailities, but developed into a maddeningly controlling person who manipulated her four children until they were driven to rebellion and were subject to their grandparent's problems. One of her sons (Thomas Addison Lanahan) killed himself in 1973, after years of instability, another son was unstable, and the two girls lived with emotional anguish. Samuel Jackson Lanahan, Sr., ( -1998) graduated from the St. Paul's School, was a 1941 graduate of Princeton University, where he rowed, majored in English, and boxed under his friend and coach, sculptor Joe Brown, and won the Maryland state championship in Golden Gloves competition in 1939, was a navigator on aircraft carriers in World War II as a Navy lieutenant, attended Columbia Law School, managed the campaign of Thacher Longstreth for mayor of Philadelphia, practiced law in New York City and Washington as a partner in the Washington firm of Wilmer, Cutler and Pickering, raced sailboats in Chesapeake Bay, first married Frances Scott Fitzgerald Lanahan in 1943, then married Sheila Lanahan, was a trustee of the F. Scott Fitzgerald Foundation, was instrumental in the donation of many Fitzgerald works to Firestone Library, and retired to Dartmouth, England. Eleanor Anne Lanahan authored Scottie the Daughter Of...: The Life of Frances Scott Fitzgerald Lanahan Smith, published in New York by Harper Collins in 1995, and edited Dear Scott, Dearest Zelda: the Love Letters of F. Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald, published in New York by St. Martin's Press in 2002, and Zelda, an Illustrated Life: the Private World of Zelda Fitzgerald, published in New York by Harry N. Abrams in 1996. Shane Leslie was the author of The Irish Issue in its American Aspect; A Contribution to the Settlement of Anglo-American Relations During and After the Great War (1917) and American Wonderland; Memories of Four Tours in the United States of America (1936.) Frances Kroll Ring became the editor of the Automobile Club of Southern California's Westways magazine, the successor to Davis Dutton, and broadened the scope of the magazine to reflect Southern California's multicultural population. C. Grove Smith ( -2001) graduated from St. Alban's, was a 1948 graduate of Princeton University, where he majored in economics, served with the 14th Armored Division in combat in Europe during World War II, married Marie Theetten in Paris, France, in 1949, was a vice president with Young & Rubicam, then with J. Walter Thompson, worked in the U. S. Commerce Department from 1966 to 1972, married Frances Scott Fitzgerald Lanahan in 1967, then worked full-time with Democratic presidential campaigns until his 1981 divorce from Scottie Fitzgerald, then was a travel magazine agent in St. Thomas, Virgin Islands, and retired to Sarasota, Florida. The Douglas H. Wright family were members of the Minikahda Country Club in 1934. Professor William H. Baker also was a bartender at the White Bear Yacht Club. Ramaley Hall was subsequently razed and is currently the site of the Ramaley Liquor Store. Annabell Fitzgerald married Clifton A. Sprague and the couple had two daughters, Courtney Sprague and Patricia Sprague. Alexandra Severance (1895-1895) was the infant daughter of Cordenio Severance. The Gauger-Korsmo Construction Company was formed by Paul C. Gauger and E. O. Korsmo in 1919 and officed at the Central Bank Building in 1919 and at the Endicot Building in 1921. The Gauger-Korsmo Construction Company built the Saint Benet Hall at Saint John's University, Collegeville, Minnesota, in 1921, built the Elba School in Gilbert, Minnesota, in 1921, built the engineering building at the Montanan State College in 1922, built the Equity Cooperative Exchange building, built an electrical substation for the St. Paul Gas Light Company, built the Carlton Hotel, and built a dental and hospital building at Rochester, Minnesota. Paul Charles Gauger was a 1913 graduate of the University of Illinois, worked on construction projects in Minnesota for architect Clarence H. Johnston and consulting engineer Charles L. Pillsbury, was an engineer and construction superintendent for the George J. Grant Construction Company, and was the secretary of the St. Paul Engineers' Society. E. O. Korsmo was a 1908 graduate of the University of Illinois, was an estimator and building superintendent for Butler Brothers, was the office engineer for the Toltz Engineering Company, was a lecturer on architecture at the University of Minnesota, and was the treasurer of the St. Paul Engineers' Society. Justine Long ( -1945) and William Clifton Gilbert ( -1947) both died in Ramsey County. William F. Phelps (1821-1907) died in Ramsey County. Cordenio Arnold Severance (1862-1925) was a partner in the law firm of Davis, Kellogg & Severance with former Governor Cushman Davis and Frank Billings Kellogg (1856-1937). Nellie Wheaton ( -1949) died in Houston County, Minnesota. William F. Phelps (1821-1907) was born in the United States and died in Ramsey County. Edward Bennett Swygart ( -1928) died in Ramsey County. Douglas H. Wright (1881-1958) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Irvine, and died in Ramsey County. Anita Wright (1895-1967) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Gorman, and died in Ramsey County. [See note on Henry Anson Castle for 255 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Finch, Van Slyck & McConnville for 969 West Osceola Avenue.] [See note on Cordenio A. Severance for 710 West Linwood Avenue.] [See note on the St. Paul Town & Country Club for 952 Wakefield Avenue.] [See note on Clarence Howard Johnston, Sr.] [See note on Max Toltz.]

590 Summit Avenue: Kalman-Oppenheimer House/Greve Oppenheim and Lillian Oppenheim House:Built in 1892 (1913 according to Ramsey County property tax records and according to the Minnesota Historical Society;) Prairie School in style; Franklin Ellerbe (1870-1921) and Olin Round (ca. 1867-1927,) architects. The building is a two story, 4092 square foot, six bedroom, four bathroom, one half-bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Greve Oppenheim resided at this address from 1914 to 1916. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Greve Oppenheim resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. O. Kalman resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Lyman S. Baird, treasurer of the Dampier-Baird Mortuary, and his wife, Pauline S. Baird, resided at this address. The 1950 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Dr. Edward P. Burch (1906- ,) who was born in St. Paul, who attended the school from 1916 until 1921, who graduated from Princeton University in 1928, who graduated from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in 1933, who was an ophthalmologist, was a Colonel in the U. S. Marine Corps during World War II, was an Assistant Clinical Professor of Ophthamology at the University of Minnesota Medical School, married Conradine Sanborn, and was a member of the Minnesota Club, the University Club, and the Somerset Club, resided at this address. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. Charles Oscar "Collie" Kalman (1872-1956,) the son of Arnold Kalman and Sarah W. Greve Kalman, was born in New York City, New York, was educated at the St. Paul High School, attended Phillips Exeter Academy, married Alexandra "Xandra" Robertson in 1890, graduated in Finance from Yale University in 1893, was employed by the Union Bank from 1893 until 1895, was a railroad official, was the treasurer of the Chicago Great Western RailRoad from 1895 until 1902, was the general auditor of the Chicago Great Western RailRoad from 1902 until 1908, started the brokerage firm C. O. Kalman & Company (eventually RBC Dain Rauscher) in 1909, was a member of the New York Stock Exchange, was the president of the Watertown & Sioux Falls RailRoad in 1918, was the treasurer of Bliss & Laughlin, Inc., purchased the South Dakota Central Railway Company in foreclosure in 1916, was the assistant chairman of several Liberty Bond drives, was the second vice president of the newly formed Minneapolis-St. Paul Stock Exchange at the Roanoke Building, Minneapolis, in 1929, was chairman of the committee in charge of the judging for the 1924 American Legion National Drum and Bugle Corps Championship, loaned F. Scott Fitzgerald $7,500 in 1936, was a member of the Minnesota Club, was a member of the St. Paul Athletic Club, was a member of the White Bear Yacht Club, was a member of the University Club of St. Paul, was a member of the University Club of Chicago, was a member of the St. Paul Town & Country Club, was a member of the Somerset Club, was a member of the Yale Club of New York, was a long-time friend of the Minneapolis Symphony in St. Paul, resided at 172 Summit Avenue in 1907, resided at 251 Summit Avenue in 1912, resided at 590 Summit Avenue in 1920 and 1922, resided at the former 779 Summit Avenue in 1930, resided at Captiva Island, Florida, in the early 1940's, officed at the Chicago Great Western Railway Building in 1907, and officed at the Endicott Building in 1922. Greve Oppenheim was the youngest son of Ansel Oppenheim. Charles Oscar Kalman and Alexandra Robertson Kalman were the parents of two children, Margaret Kalman and Charles Arnold Kalman. Charles Eric Kalman, a descendant of Charles Oscar Kalman and Xandra Kalman, owns some of the art work of Zelda Fitzgerald. Ansel Oppenheim (1847-1916,) the son of Isaac Oppenheim, a New York City, New York, merchant, and Henrietta Worms Oppenheim, was born in New York City, was educated at New York, New York, public schools, was a graduate of the College of the City of New York, where he studied law, was a member of 37th Regiment of the National Guard of the State of New York, studied law in Wisconsin and Minnesota, came to Minnesota in 1875, was admitted to the practice of law in Minnesota in 1878, initially was the law partner of John B. Brisbin, was a prominent lawyer, real estate investor, and financier, was associated with the firm of Oppenheim & Kalman, was the vice president of the Chicago Midwest Railroad, was a founder and president of the South St. Paul Union Stockyards, was a partner with Herman Greve in H. Greve & Company, a real estate venture, which bought the St. Paul City RailRoad, was a member of Oppenheim & Kalman who, with associates, built the Metropolitan Opera House, was the president of the Union Stock Yards when they were built, had an interest in the Chicago, St. Paul & Kansas City RailRoad, was an incorporator of the Chicago Transfer Railway Company, was vice president of the Chicago Great Western RailRoad in 1909, was the vice president of the Interstate Investment Trust Ltd., was a director of the Bank of Minnesota, was on the Minnesota Board of Equalization in 1880, was a member of the National Democratic Convention of 1884, was a St. Paul City assemblyman in 1890, was the chairman of the Democratic Party of Ramsey County, was the chairman of the State Committee of the Democratic Party, was a member of the board of directors of the St Paul Union Stock Yards, was a member of the board of directors of the Metropolitan Opera House, lived in both St. Paul and New York City, was elected to a life membership in the Minnesota Historical Society in 1890, was a member of the Minnesota Club, was a member of the Minnesota Commercial Club, was a member of the St. Paul Town and Country Club, was a Mason, was a Democrat, was chairman of the Ramsey County Democratic Committee, was chairman of the Minnesota Democratic Committee, was a Minnesota committee member on the National Democratic Party Committee in 1884, was a director of the Metropolitan Opera Company, resided at 436 Portland Avenue in 1907, officed at the Chicago Great Western Railway Building in 1907, and died in New York. Ansel Oppenheim married Josephine "Josie" Greve in 1869 and the couple had three children, Herman Oppenheim, Lucius Julius Oppenheim, who initially was traveling freight agent of the Chicago Great Western RailRoad and subsequently was a New York Stock Exchange member, and Greve Oppenheim, who married Lillian King Oppenheim in 1911. Herman Oppenheim (1870- ,) the son of Ansel Oppenheim and Josephine Greve Oppenheim, was born at Sparta, Wisconsin, attended the Sparta, Wisconsin, public schools, attended the St. Paul public schools, attended the St. Paul High School, graduated from the Shattuck School at Faribault, Minnesota, attended the University of Wisconsin Law School from 1889 until 1891, attended the Harvard University Law School from 1891 until 1893, was a lawyer, was associated with Stevens & O'Brien, lawyers, from 1893 until 1895, then was associated with Judge Jaggard, was a St. Paul city prosecutor from 1895 until 1897, was in the firm of Oppenheim & Hunt from 1897 until 1906, practiced alone after 1906, resided at The Arundel Flats in 1907, and office at New York Life Building in 1907. Josephine Greve Oppenheim (1849-1915,) the daughter of Herman Greve and Marie Lindeman Greve, was born in Johnstown, Pennsylvania, married Ansel Oppenheim in 1869, was a published author under the pen name of John Emersie, and died in New York City, New York. She was the author of Allisto: A Romance (1884, under the name John Emersie,) Evelyn: A Story of the West and Far East (1909, again under the name of John Emersie,) and of a copyrighted play "Ruby (The) Ring" in 1915. Herman Greve was a native of the province of Westphalia, Germany, came to St. Paul in 1855, invested largely in real estate, then spent much of his life in farming in Vernon County, Wisconsin, and in 1880, moved to St. Paul again and engaged actively in business as one of the largest holders of real estate in that city. In 1879, Herman Greve, a partner with Ansel Oppenheim in H. Greve & Company, a real estate company located at 76 East Third Street, resided in Sparta, Wisconsin. Ansel Oppenheim's house, at 275 Summit Avenue, burned down from an overheated chimney in the winter of 1895. In 1911 or 1912, Greve Oppenheim married Lillian King of Minneapolis. Greve Oppenheim worked as a real estate investor. The house was built for $11,000. The property was last sold in 1999 and the sale price was $610,000. The current owners of record of the property are Julia M. Ferguson and Richard J. Rinkoff. Richard J. Rinkoff has a B.S. in Mathematics and an M.B.A. from Carnegie Mellon University, started in the investment business in 1975 as an analyst with Pittsburgh National Bank, then was an investment analyst and manager for the First Asset Management, a division of First Bank System/US Bancorp, was the managing partner of the Dynamic Materials Corporation in 1997, joined ThinkEquity Partners, a research-centric investment boutique focused on the growth sectors of the knowledge economy, as Director of Research in 2002, and is currently the Director of Research and Managing Partner at Craig-Hallum Capital Group LLC. Richard W. Jensen, Elizabeth M. Lilly and Richard J. Rinkoff jointly owned Woodland Partners LLC, a small cap investment management firm, in 1999. In 1897, there was a second floor kerosene oil lamp fire at the three story stone and brick structure at the former nearby 595 Summit Avenue which was owned by N. C. Thrall and which was occupied by Arthur Sweeney. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Lucie F. Heath resided at the former nearby 593 Summit Avenue in 1900. Little Sketches of Big Folks indicates that Edward B. Swygart resided at the former nearby 593 Summit Avenue in 1907. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Sarah S. Price (1835-1924,) the widowed mother of W. W. Price, who was born in Louisiana to parents who were born in the United States and who died of angina pectoris, resided at the nearby former 591 Summit Avenue in 1924. The 1920 city directory indicates that Edward Fitzgerald, a broker who officed at the Guardian Life Building, resided at the former nearby 599 Summit Avenue. Lucie J. Heath was the mother of Lucie F. Heath. Edward B. Swygart (1859- ,) the son of George Washington Swygart and Caroline M. Swygart, was born in South Bend, Indiana, was educated in the public schools of South Bend, Indiana, attended Hillsdale College, Hillsdale, Michigan, attended Notre Dame College, South Bend, Indiana, married Anne G. Bradford in 1883, moved to St. Paul, was a manufacturer's agent, represented James Kirk & Company, Chicago, soaps and other merchandise, for 26 years, moved to Chicago in 1890 as a distributor for James Kirk & Company, returned to St. Paul in 1893, engaged in the merchandise brokerage business after 1893, representing James S. Kirk & Company, the Schumacher Cereal Company, and the National Cereal Company, was a Mason, was a Knights Templar, was a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, was a member of the Knights of Pythias, was a member of the Loyal Legion, was a member of the St. Paul Commercial Club, and officed at the Drake Block in 1907. In 1921, Edward B. Swygart was an assignee of a one-half interest in a U. S. patent (#1,378,860) for a method and an apparatus for making specially-shaped bars invented by Albert W. Heinle. In 1923, Edward B. Swygart, Anne G. Swygart, and Charles D. Russell, were granted a Canadian patent (#229940) for a spike making machine invented by Weber Gottlieb. Lucie J. Heath ( -1925) died in Ramsey County. [See note on the Chicago, St. Paul & Kansas City RailRoad.] [See note on the Chicago Great Western RailRoad.] [See note on the St. Paul City RailRoad.] [See note on St. Paul Town & Country Club for 952 Wakefield Avenue.] [See note on Edwin Ames Jaggard for 284 South Exchange Street.] [See note on the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks for 334 Cherokee Avenue.] [See note on Knights of Pythias for 2225 East Lake of the Isles Parkway.] [See note on the St. Paul Commercial Club for 505 Summit Avenue.] [See note for the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States (MOLLUS) for 30 Irvine Park.] [See note on Arthur Sweeney for 865 Fairmount Avenue.]

596-604 Summit Avenue: Ron House Apartments/Summit Terrace; Built in 1888 (1890 according to Sandeen and Larson;) Richardsonian Romanesque/Victorian in style; Clarence H. Johnston, Sr., architect. The rowhouses have an irregular brownstone front facade, with ashlar cut trim at the windows, and a symmetrical facade. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. Around 1929, the individual units were subdivided into several apartments. 596 Summit Avenue is a two story (three story according to Ramsey County property tax records,) 3389 square foot, four bedroom, three bathroom, brick row house, with Unit #1 a one story, 1075 square foot, four room, two bedroom, one bathroom, condominium owned by the Florence L. Gifford Revocable Trust, located in Elkader, Iowa, and last sold in 2006 for $256,200, with Unit #2 a one story, 1050 square foot, four room, two bedroom, one bathroom, condominium owned by Robert R. Zamacona and last sold in 2006 for $226,900, and with Unit #3 a one story, 716 square foot, four room, two bedroom, one bathroom, condominium owned by Mary B. Clark and last sold in 2006 for $194,900. 598 Summit Avenue, built in 1900 according to Ramsey County property tax records, is a two story, 2319 square foot, four bedroom, three bathroom, brick row house, with Unit #1 a one story, 959 square foot, four room, two bedroom, one bathroom, condominium owned by Jennifer L. Pierce and last sold in 2005 for $225,230, with Unit #2 a one story, 980 square foot, four room, two bedroom, one bathroom, condominium owned by 596-604 Summit LLC, and with Unit #3 a one story, 739 square foot, three room, one bedroom, one bathroom, condominium owned by Bonita S. Avolesi and last sold in 2007 for $175,000. 600 Summit Avenue is a two story, 2960 square foot, four bedroom, three bathroom, brick row house, with Unit #1 a one story, 1053 square foot, four room, two bedroom, one bathroom, condominium owned by Barbara S. Walters and last sold in 2006 for $246,725, with Unit #2 a one story, 1004 square foot, four room, two bedroom, one bathroom, condominium owned by Maureen E. Bird and last sold in 2006 for $217,000, and with Unit #3 a one story, 655 square foot, three room, one bedroom, one bathroom, condominium owned by Michael Flodquist and last sold in 2006 for $195,000. 602 Summit Avenue is a two story, 3000 square foot, four bedroom, three bathroom, brick row house, with Unit #0 a one story, 1334 square foot, four room, two bedroom, one bathroom, condominium owned by 596-604 Summit LLC, with Unit #1 a one story, 997 square foot, four room, two bedroom, one bathroom, condominium owned by Lindsay K. Chamings and last sold in 2007 for $209,000, and with Unit #2 a one story, 982 square foot, four room, two bedroom, one bathroom, condominium owned by Benjamin James Ranson and last sold in 2006 for $241,250. 604 Summit Avenue is a two story, 3060 square foot, four bedroom, three bathroom, brick row house, with Unit #1 a one story, 1049 square foot, three room, one bedroom, one bathroom, condominium owned by Renee M. Des Jarlais and last sold in 2006 for $255,400, with Unit #2 a one story, 1111 square foot, three room, one bedroom, one bathroom, condominium owned by David L. Meisenburg and last sold in 2006 for $232,000, and with Unit #3 a one story, 781 square foot, three room, one bedroom, one bathroom, condominium owned by Jody L. Mikasen and was last sold in 2007 for $170,000. The row houses were built for $45,000. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Hiler H. Horton resided at 598 Summit Avenue in 1879. The 1893 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Charles Paul resided at 596 Summit Avenue, that Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Horton resided at 598 Summit Avenue, that Dr. and Mrs. I. L. Mahan and their daughter all resided at 600 Summit Avenue, that Mr. and Mrs. Jerome Platt and Mrs. Priscilla Trumbull all resided at 602 Summit Avenue, and that Mr. and Mrs. Howard C. Levis resided at 604 Summit Avenue. In 1896, Louis B. Smith (1852-1896,) a member of the Eureka Lodge No. 9 of the A. O. U. W., resided at this address and was buried in Hudson, Wisconsin, according to the St. Paul Globe. The 1899 Minnesota Legislative Manual indicates that Hiler Hosmer Horton resided at 598 Summit Avenue. The 1903 city directory indicates that Pauline Schitzrock was a domestic at this address. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Caroline Livingston Phelps (1817-1903,) the wife of William Phelps, her second husband, who was born in the United States to parents who were born in England, who died of La Grippe, and who was buried in New York City, resided at 599 Summit Avenue in 1903. The 1906 Jubilee Manual of the House of Hope Presbyterian Church indicates that Mary M. (Mrs. E. G.) Rogers, a member of the church since 1885, and Julia McC. Rogers, a member of the church since 1893, both resided at this address. Little Sketches of Big Folks indicates that Edward G. Rogers resided at 596 Summit Avenue in 1907. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Caroline Cuyler Macomber (1823-1915,) the widowed mother of Mary Louise Abel, who was born in New York to parents who were born in the United States and who died of La Grippe, resided at this address in 1915. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that John H. Randall (1828-1916,) the widower father of Mrs. George P. Lyman, who was born in Massachusetts and who died of cerebral apoplexy, resided at this address in 1916. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Mulhern and their daughters resided at 596 Summit Avenue, that Mrs. Hiler Horton, her daughter, and Hiler Horton all resided at 598 Summit Avenue, and that Mr. and Mrs. H. N. Lyon and their daughters resided at 600 Summit Avenue. Hiler Hosmer Horton (1893- ,) a First Lieutenant, was a World War I veteran who resided at 598 Summit Avenue in 1919. The records of the 1919-1920 Minnesota World War I Soldier's Bonus Board (#13145) indicate that Hiler Hosmer Horton (1891- ,) a 1918 draftee and an Ordnance Sergeant in the First Company, Sixth P. O. D. Battery, First Regiment, who was born in St. Paul, had brown eyes, brown hair, and a fair complexion, was 5' 11" tall, was a businessman at induction, was a salesman employed by the Sifo Products Company after the completion of service, and was unmarried, resided with his mother, Jessie S. Horton, at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Agnes B. Budd, the widow of Roy Budd and the chief clerk for the Minnesota Secretary of State, resided at 600 Summit Avenue, that Frank J. O'Connor, an accountant, boarded at 602 Summit Avenue, that Ruth Carmichael, a clerk employed by the Great Northern RailRoad, boarded at 600 Summit Avenue, and that Lambert Fairchild, a real estate agent located at the Exchange Bank Building, resided at 600 Summit Avenue. In 1920, the United States Adjutant-General's Office U. S. Army Register, Volume VIII, indicates that Hiler Hosmer Horton (1892- ,) a Second Lieutenant in the Ordnance Section, resided at 598 Summit Avenue. Charles Paul lived in the house at 245 Summit Avenue until 1885 and was a real estate agent in St. Paul in 1887. Isaac Lennox Mahan resided at 600 Summit Avenue in 1893. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that George Loomis Becker (1829-1903,) the husband of Susannah I. Becker, who was born in the United States to parents who were also born in the United States and who died of uraemia, resided at 601 Summit Avenue in 1903. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that William Thomas Kirke (1859-1910,) the husband of Nellie L. B. Kirke, who was born in England to parents who were also born in England and who died of apoplexy, resided at the corner of Summit Avenue and Dale Street in 1910. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. L. Lambert and George Lambert all resided at 598 Summit Avenue, that Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Linehan resided at 602 Summit Avenue, and that Rev. and Mrs. E. C. Prosser and Mr. and Mrs. T. A. Boyd all resided at 604 Summit Avenue. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Mary M. Rogers, the widow of Edward G. Rogers, resided at 596 Summit Avenue, that Leon L. Lambert resided at 598 Summit Avenue, that Henry Ruehl and his wife, Margaret Ruehl, resided at 600 Summit Avenue, and that Louis Abrahamson, engaged in the clothing business at 57 West Third Street, and his wife, Ida Abrahamson, resided at 604 Summit Avenue. Edward G. Rogers (1842/1843-1910,) the son of Jabey N. Rogers and Esther E. __?__ Rogers, was born in St. Joseph, Michigan, graduated from University of Michigan, moved to Minnesota in 1866, was a lawyer, engaged in the practice of law, was a Republican, was the Ramsey County attorney from 1877 until 1881, married Mary E. McCord in 1878, was a member of the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Ramsey County (District 27) from 1887 until 1889, traveled in Europe in 1888, was a delegate from the Fourth Ward of Ramsey County to the Republican State Convention in 1888, was involved in a Washington County, Minnesota, property dispute that ultimately was resolved by the U. S. Supreme Court in Henessey v. Bacon et al., 137 U.S. 78 (1890,) was the clerk of the Ramsey County District courts from 1894 until 1906, briefly was forwarded as a candidate for a U. S. Senate seat held by William Washburn in 1895, was a delegate to Republican National Convention from Minnesota in 1904, was a member of the St. Paul city council in 1910, was a member of the Minnesota Club, was a member of the St. Paul Commercial Club, was a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, was a member of the Knights of Pythias, was a member of the International Order of Foresters, was a member of the St. Paul Chamber of Commerce, and officed at the National German American Bank Building in 1907. Rogers Street in the West End was named for Edward G. Rogers in 1887. Rogers Lake in Dakota County was named for E. G. Rogers, who owned a farm on the South East side of the lake. Josias N. Rogers (1846-1895,) the brother of Edward G. Rogers, also was a St. Paul lawyer, was a Republican, was the Republican Party candidate for Ramsey County Attorney in 1869, and also was a member of the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Ramsey County (District 23) from 1873 until 1875. Rogers Park, a three acre park near Lake Como, was donated to the City of St. Paul by Josias N. Rogers and Belle Rogers in 1883. Isaac Lennox Mahan (1841-1928,) the son of Dr. William Lyle Mahan and Mary Frances Standeford Mahan, a descendant of Col. Thomas Cresap, was born in Bowling Green, Indiana, attended private schools in Putnam County, Indiana, attended private schools in Clay County, Indiana, attended the public schools of Terre Haute, Indiana, was a member of the Ft. Harrison Guard of Terre Haute, Indiana, for several years before the American Civil War, was mustered into the U. S. Army in 1861 as part of the llth Indiana Volunteer Regiment, commanded by Col. Lew Wallace, retired from the U. S. Army as a Captain in 1865, attended Whitewater College at Centerville, Indiana, apprenticed as painter, paperhanger, and decorator and served three years, returned to Greencastle, Indiana, attended Old Asbury University/Depau College in Greencastle, Indiana, graduated from Rush Medical College in Chicago, Illinois, in 1866, married Sarah E. Barrere of Hillsboro, Ohio, practiced medicine in Terre Haute, Indiana, from 1866 until 1869, was in the U. S. Internal Revenue Service from 1870 until 1872, was the Indian agent at the La Point, Wisconsin, Agency during the Grant and Hayes administrations, was the Indian inspector at La Point, Wisconsin, covering the territory from Keweenaw Bay, Michigan, to Lake Vermilion, Minnesota, from 1879 until 1881, settled in St. Paul, was a partner of David D. Lambie in Lambie & Company, a manufacturer of dental equipment at Third Street and Wabasha Avenue, in 1881 and 1882, was a librarian, was the librarian of the U. S. Circuit Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit) after 1892, was the commander of the Acker Post of the Grand Army of the Republic in 1896, was the deparment commander of the Minnesota Grand Army of the Republic in 1903, was a Mason, was a Knight Templar, was a charter member of the Roosevelt Club, was the organizer and president of the "Old Boys" Fremont and Lincoln clubs in 1903, resided at 495 Dayton Avenue in 1907, officed at the Federal Building in 1907, and died of arteriosclerosis and a cerebral hemorrhage in St. Louis, Missouri. Hiler Hosmer Horton (1857-1906) was born in Washington County, Wisconsin, graduated from the Milwaukee, Wisconsin, public school system, graduated from Washington University and the Law Department of Washington University at St. Louis, Missouri, moved to St. Paul in 1878, was the managing clerk of the law firm of Davis, O'Brien & Wilson from 1878 until 1880, was a lawyer and a member of the law firm of Horton & Greene in Minneapolis in 1881, was a member of the law firm of Horton & Morrison from 1884 until 1889, was a member of the law firm of Horton & Denegre from 1892 until 1906, married Jessie Stillwell in Hannibal, Missouri, in 1886, was a Judge Advocate in the First Minnesota National Guard Regiment, was a member and president of the St. Paul Board of Park Commissioners, was a Republican, was a supporter of Major William McKinley for U. S. President in 1896, was a member of the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Ramsey County (District 27) from 1893 until 1895, was a member of the Minnesota Senate representing Ramsey County (District 36) from 1899 until 1907, and died in Nassau, Bahama Islands. Horton Park in St. Paul, near Hamline University, was named in honor of Hiler Hosmer Horton. There is a Hiler H. Horton scholarship at the University of Michigan for worthy and needy students from the Kansas City, Missouri area. James Denis Denegre (1868-1927,) the son of William O. Denegre and Antoinette Morgan Denegre, was born in New Orleans, Louisiana, was educated in the New Orleans, Louisiana, public schools, graduated from Philips-Exeter Academy in 1885, graduated with a bachelor's degree from Princeton University in 1889, graduated with a master's degree from Princeton University in 1891, moved to St. Paul in 1891, graduated from the University of Minnesota Law School in 1891 with a bachelor of laws degree, graduated from the University of Minnesota Law School in 1893 with a masters of law degree, was a clerk in the Quartermaster's Corp of the U. S. Army at St. Paul from 1889 until 1892, was a law clerk in Hiler Hosmer Horton's law office before becoming his partner, was the lead partner in the law firm of Denegre, McDermott, Stearns & Weeks, was a Republican, was a member of the Minnesota State Senate from 1911 until 1926, was a president of the Ramsey County Bar Association, was the president of the National Order of Amateur Oarsmen in 1920, was a regional trustee for Princeton University, was the president of the Minnesota Association of Princeton Alumni, was a trustee of St. Mary's Hall in Faribault, Minnesota, was a member of the Ancient Landmark Lodge No. 5 of St. Paul, was a member of the Summit Chapter No. 45, was a Knight Templar in Paladin Commandery No. 21, was a Potentate of Osman Temple, was a member of the Red Cross of Constantine, was a 33rd Degree Scottish Rite Mason, was a member and Council Commander of the Woodmen of the World order, was a member of the Minnesota Club, was the president of the Minnesota Boat Club from 1905 until 1906, was a Junior Warden of St. John's Episcopal Church, officed at the Commerce Building in 1916, and resided at 307 West Sixth Street in 1916. John Henry B. Randall (1831-1916,) the son of William H. Randall and Elizabeth Colburn Randall, was born in Roxbury, Massachusetts, grew up in New York City, went to a private school in New York, went into a wholesale silk business in 1847, married Emma Louise Boggs in 1851, arrived in Minnesota in 1856, ran his father's real estate business in St. Paul from 1857 until 1862, was a member of the First Baptist Church of St. Paul in 1858, divorced his first wife for her habitual drunkenness in 1865, was married a second time, to Sarah Arvilla Oakes (1843-1902,) the daughter of John Mead Oakes and Minerva G. Kenyon Oakes, in 1866, was the superintendent of the Bible School of the First Baptist Church of St. Paul from 1866 to 1879, was employed in chief engineer's department of the St. Paul & Pacific Railroad Company, later was the general freight agent, assistant treasurer, and chief clerk of the St. Paul & Pacific Railroad Company from 1862 until 1879, when James J. Hill and his associates took over the company, was the church clerk of the First Baptist Church of St. Paul from 1868 to 1878, was elected Deacon of the First Baptist Church of St. Paul in 1870, was the president of the YMCA in St. Paul from 1868 until 1870, was employed by the St. Paul Harvester Works from 1879 until 1887, was the comptroller of the St. Paul & Northern Pacific/Northern Pacific RailRoad from 1887 until 1907, retired in 1907, was the author of the paper "The Beginning of Railroad Building in Minnesota," published by the Minnesota Historical Society, died of a stroke of apoplexy in St. Paul, and was buried in Oakland Cemetery. A daughter of John Henry B. Randall, Grace Randall (Mrs. George Pusey) Lyman (1867-1959,) resided at 604 Summit Avenue. John Henry B. Randall's other children were Rev. William H. Randall (1853- ,) of Andover, New York, from his first marriage, Rev. John Herman Randall (1871-1946) of New York, Ruth Randall (1880-1880,) and Henry Hulbert Randall (1874-1933,) a railroad official. John Herbert Randall (1853-1902,) the son of John Steele Randall and Ann White Randall, was born in Auburn, Maine, graduated from Bates College, moved to Minneapolis in 1876, was admitted to the practice of law in Minnesota in 1878, was a Freemason, was the grand master of the Knights Templar in Minnesota, was the secretary of the St. Paul City RailRoad Company, was the president of the Minneapolis Foundry Company, was the vice president of the Minneapolis, Lyndale & Minnetonka RailRoad Company, was the author of The Beginning of Railroad Building in Minnesota, published in 1915, and died in Minneapolis. William Hannaford Randall (1806-1861) was born in Roxbury, Massachusetts, married Elizabeth Colburn (1806-1877) in 1828, engaged in business in New York from 1830 until 1846, was a Democrat, was appointed the customs officer for the Port of New York by President Andrew Jackson, settled in St. Paul in 1846, purchased an interest in the business of William Hartshorn, also bought much real estate, was one of the proprietors of St. Paul when the town was organized, but lost heavily in the panic of 1857, and died of heart disease in St. Paul. Edward G. Rogers (1842-1910,) the son of J. N. Rogers, a lawyer, and Esther E. Hager Rogers, was born in St. Joseph, Michigan, moved with his family to Berlin, Wisconsin, graduated from the Berlin, Wisconsin, High School, graduated from the University of Michigan Law School in 1863, was admitted to the practice of law in Green Lake County, Wisconsin, was an unsuccessful candidate for Green Lake County, Wisconsin, county attorney, settled in St. Paul in 1866, initially was a partner with his brother, J. N. Rogers, in the law firm of Rogers & Rogers, from 1869 until 1872, was a partner with his brother, F. L. Rogers, in the law firm of Rogers & Rogers, from 1872 until 1886, was the Ramsey County county attorney from 1878 until 1879, married Mary E. McCord in New Albany, Indiana, in 1878, was a Republican, was a law partner of Emerson Hadley from 1885 until 1890, was a member of the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Ramsey County (District 27) from 1887 until 1889, was the clerk of the Ramsey County District Court from 1895 until 1907, was a member of the St. Paul City Council in 1910, was a member of the Minnesota Club, was a member of the St. Paul Commercial Club, was a member of the St. Paul Chamber of Commerce, was a member of the Knights of Pythias, was a member of the Odd Fellows, was a Presbyterian, and died at West Baden, Indiana. Charles Paul ( -1943) died in Ramsey County. The row houses were restored in 1984 by Paul Sween and Mark Sween. The row houses were previously owned by VF Associates LLC, located at 61 St. Albans Street South, and are currently owned by 596-604 Summit LLC, located in St. Louis Park, Minnesota. Little Sketches of Big Folks indicates that Warren Hewitt Mead resided at the former nearby 597 Summit Avenue in 1907. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Elizabeth Willis (1843-1917,) the widowed sister of Crawford Livingston, who was born in New York to parents who were born in the United States and who died of a cerebral hemorrhage, resided at the nearby former 599 Summit Avenue in 1917. The 1920 city directory indicates that John P. Curran, a manager employed by the S. S. Kresge Company, resided at the former nearby 601 Summit Avenue, that Charles B. Dunn, a department manager employed by Gordon & Ferguson, boarded at the former nearby 597 Summit Avenue, and that Robert R. Dunn, a partner with McNeil Stringer in Dunn & Stringer, real estate brokers, resided at the former nearby 597 Summit Avenue. The 1930 city directory indicates that Wescott W. Price, a real estate agent located at 360 Robert Street, and his wife, Hildegarde R. Price, resided at the former nearby 591 Summit Avenue, that Joseph J. McGibbon resided at the former nearby 593 Summit Avenue, that Frank G. McFadden, manager of the McFadden-Lambert Company, and his wife, Irene McFadden, resided at the former nearby 595 Summit Avenue, that the former nearby 597 and 599 Summit Avenue were vacant, and that Mrs. Margaret H. McFadden, the widow of Michael J. McFadden, resided at the former nearby 601 Summit Avenue. [See note for the St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad.] [See note for the Minneapolis, Lyndale & Minnetonka RailRoad.] [See note for the Great Northern RailRoad.] [See note on Richards Gordon and the Gordon-Ferguson Company for 378 Summit Avenue.] [See note for the St. Paul & Northern Pacific RailRoad.] [See note for the Northern Pacific RailRoad.] [See note on McNeil Seymour Stringer for 30 Kenwood Parkway.] [See note on Clarence Howard Johnston, Sr.]

603 Summit Avenue: Built in 1987. The building is a two story, 1471 square foot, three bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. The property was last sold in 1999 for $289,000. The current owners of record of the property are Barry L. Engen and Dianne L. Engen. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that William H. Randall and William H. Jarvis resided at the former nearby 604 Summit Avenue in 1854. William H. Randall (1806-1861) was born in Massachusetts, moved to New York, moved to Minnesota in 1846, and was a real estate investor, but was ruined by the Panic of 1857.

605 Summit Avenue: Built in 1987. The building is a two story, 1471 square foot, three bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. The property was last sold in 1999 for $281,000. The current owners of record of the property are Michael H. Tonry and Penelope T. Tonry.

610 Summit Avenue: New York Apartments/610 Summit Avenue; Built in 1927; Classical Revival/Late Classical Revival in style; Ganley Brothers, architect. The structure is a multi-family apartment building which was last sold in 1997 with a sale price of $685,000. Before 1927, the lot had been vacant and was owned by Arthur W. Drewry in 1922. The building was built at a cost of $70,000 for the Atlas Housing Corporation of Minneapolis. This building and its twin at 616 Summit Avenue make an interesting comparison with apartment buildings built on Summit Avenue at the turn of the century. These two buildings rely on decorative brickwork to achieve texture and ornamentation, while earlier builders adorned their buildings with much more lavish applied decoration. The 1930 city directory indicates that Ray Okoneski, a salesman employed by the Burns Lumber Company, and his wife, Laura Okoneski, resided at apartment #B-1, that Gordon A. Richardson, a clerk employed by the Great Northern RailRoad, resided at apartment #B-2, that William R. Sassmann, a traveling salesman employed by the National Leather Company, and his wife, Josephine Sassman, resided at apartment #101, that William J./R. McGuinn, a hotel manager, and his wife, Marie McGuinn, resided at apartment #102, that Florian F. Chapek, manager of the W. T. Grant Company, and his wife, Bernice Chapek, resided at apartment #103, that Aage Nickelsen/Nickelson, a bookkeeper employed by the St. Paul Fire & Marine Insurance Company, and his wife, Elsie A. Nickelsen, resided at apartment #104, that Mrs. Elizabeth Kearney, the widow of Thomas Kearney, and Elizabeth A. Kearney, a student, resided at apartment #105, that Walter L. Kelly, the manager of Buckie Printers Ink & Roller Company, resided at apartment #106, that Harry W. Starn, a trader employed by Kalman & Company, and his wife, Juanita Starn, resided at apartment #107, that Frank T. Denny, employed by the Northern Jobbing Company, and his wife, Maurine Denny, resided at apartment #108, that Harvey E. Hart, an advertising man, and his wife, Lottie S. Hart, resided at apartment #201, that Frank L. Bradford, superintendent for the American Can Company, and his wife, Dorothy Bradford, resided at apartment #202, that Richard A. Conely, a salesman for the Worthington Pump & Machinery Corporation, and his wife, Marjorie Conely, resided at apartment #203, that apartment #204 was vacant, that Alphonse J. Krumpelmann, a salesman employed by Seeler-Farnum, and Mrs. Mary Krumpelmann, the widow of August Krumpelmann, both resided at apartment #205, that Harry J. Ruehl, the sales manager employed by Cleland Hughes Motor Company, and his wife, Marie Ruehl, resided at apartment #206, that Van B. Emerick resided at apartment #207, but moved to St. Louis, Missouri, later in 1930, that Martin F. Kirby, a barber with a shop at 517 Rice Street, and his wife, Mabel Kirby, resided at apartment #208, that Willard E. Beanblossom, a state rep, and his wife, Elizabeth Beanblossom, resided at apartment #301, that John V. Cowling, vice president of the Ramapo Ajax Corporation, and his wife, Edna H. Cowling, resided at apartment #302, that Mrs. Armelia J. Bibeau, the widow of Peter Bibeau and a chiropodist, resided at apartment #303, that Mrs. Beryl W. Carlson, the widow of K. Edward Carlson and a clerk employed by the St. Paul Fire & Marine Insurance Company, resided at apartment #304, that Charles W. Moore, a warden employed by the State Game & Fish Department, and his wife, Mary L. Moore, resided at apartment #305, that Mrs. Ethel Ryan resided at apartment #306, that apartment #307 was vacant, and that Carl J. Grove, a dentist, and his wife, Louella Grove, resided at apartment #308. The building is on the National Register of Historic Places. The 1991 St. Paul's on-the-Hill Episcopal Church directory indicates that Kirby Vann resided at this address. Arthur W. Drewry ( -1948) died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is CLZ Partnership, which is located at 8 Crocus Hill. [See note for the Great Northern RailRoad.] [See note on Kalman & Company for 777 Lincoln Avenue.] [See note on the St. Paul Fire & Marine Insurance Company for 297 Bates Avenue.]

611 Summit Avenue: Cyrus C. DeCoster House; Built in 1887 (1910 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Elizabethan/Tudor Revival in style; J. M. Carlston, architect. The building is a two story, 3410 square foot, six bedroom, three bathroom, one half-bathroom, stone house, with a detached garage. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. C. De Coster and Mr. and Mrs. B. F. Rogers all resided at this address. Donald W. De Coster was a World War I veteran who resided at this address in 1919. The 1920 city directory indicates that Cyrus C. DeCoster resided at this address. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Julia W. De Coster (1856-1924,) the wife of Cyrus C. De Coster, who was born in New York to parents born in the United States and who died of myocarditis, resided at this address in 1924. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. C. De Coster resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Cyrus C. De Coster resided at this address. The 1939 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Cyrus C. De Coster, Jr. (1914- ,) who was born in Leesburg, Virginia, who attended the school from 1928 until 1933, who graduated from Harvard University in 1937, who attended the Sorbonne in Paris, France, from 1937 until 1938, resided in Rosemount, Minnesota. The 1950 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory additionally indicates that Cyrus C. DeCoster, Jr., graduated with a master's degree from the University of Chicago in 1940, served as an Lieutenant in the U. S. Navy during World War II, was a member of the board of directors of the Foreign Policy Association of St. Paul, married Barbara Krause in 1948, pursued his Ph. D. in 1950, was an Assistant Professor of Romance Languages at Carlton Collgee, and resided in Northfield, Minnesota. The 1964 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Cyrus C. DeCoster, a member of the Class of 1933, resided at Lawrence, Kansas. Cyrus Cole DeCoster (1846- ) was a member of the DeCoster & Clark Company. Donald W. De Coster ( -1939) died in Ramsey County and Cyrus Cole DeCoster ( -1948) died in Dakota County, Minnesota. The current owners of record of the property are the trustees for Marsha C. Gorman and Mark B. Gorman. Marsha Gorman, a homemaker, contributed to the Barack Obama for President campaign in 2007-2008. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Fox resided at the former nearby 612 Summit Avenue. [See note for Donald DeCoster for 890 Fairmount Avenue.]

615 Summit Avenue: Built in 1883; Tudor Villa in style. The building is a two story, 2131 square foot, four bedroom, two bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage, which was last sold in 1993 for $136,000. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. The house was moved to the site from 623 Wabasha Street in 1948 according to the Minnesota Historical Society. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Martin J. McDonough resided at this address from 1952. The current owners of record of the property are Ann E. Kraker and Michael D. Kraker.

616 Summit Avenue: Minnesota Apartments; Built in 1928. The building is on the National Register of Historic Places. Unit B1 is a 385 square foot, one bathroom, brick condominium. Unit B2 is a 385 square foot, one bathroom, brick condominium. Unit B3 is a 345 square foot, one bathroom, brick condominium. Unit B4 is a 345 square foot, one bathroom, brick condominium. Unit 101 is a 510 square foot, one bedroom, one bathroom, brick condominium. Unit 102 is a 510 square foot, one bedroom, one bathroom, brick condominium. Unit 103 is a 345 square foot, one bathroom, brick condominium. Unit 104 is a 345 square foot, one bathroom, brick condominium. Unit 105 is a 345 square foot, one bathroom, brick condominium. Unit 106 is a 345 square foot, one bathroom, brick condominium. Unit 107 is a 510 square foot, one bedroom, one bathroom, brick condominium. Unit 108 is a 510 square foot, one bedroom, one bathroom, brick condominium. Unit 201 is a 510 square foot, one bedroom, one bathroom, brick condominium. Unit 202 is a 510 square foot, one bedroom, one bathroom, brick condominium. Unit 203 is a 345 square foot, one bathroom, brick condominium. Unit 204 is a 345 square foot, one bathroom, brick condominium. Unit 205 is a 345 square foot, one bathroom, brick condominium. Unit 206 is a 345 square foot, one bathroom, brick condominium. Unit 207 is a 510 square foot, one bedroom, one bathroom, brick condominium. Unit 208 is a 510 square foot, one bedroom, one bathroom, brick condominium. Unit 301 is a 510 square foot, one bedroom, one bathroom, brick condominium. Unit 302 is a 510 square foot, one bedroom, one bathroom, brick condominium. Unit 303 is a 345 square foot, one bathroom, brick condominium. Unit 304 is a 345 square foot, one bathroom, brick condominium. Unit 305 is a 345 square foot, one bathroom, brick condominium. Unit 307 is a 510 square foot, one bedroom, one bathroom, brick condominium. Unit 308 is a 510 square foot, one bedroom, one bathroom, brick condominium. Wagner & Lang Construction is located at Unit B3. James Ramsay, a freelance photographer, resides at Unit B4. Anderson Architecture Inc., founded by Mark Carsten Anderson AIA, and specializing in designing liturgical space, is located at Unit 104. Annette Marie Ray resided at Unit #302 in 2003. Nathan Berndt, a freelance photographer, resides at Unit #308 currently. The notorious gangster John Dillinger rented one of the front one-bedroom apartment in the 1920's. The 1930 city directory indicates that Casper O. Hoverson, the caretaker, his wife, Tillie Hoverson, and Lynn Hoverson, a watchman employed by Oxidite Battery Corporation, all resided at apartment B-1, that Ernest W. Winter, a clerk employed by the St. Paul Foundry Company, and his wife, Evelyn Winter, resided at apartment B-2, that Peter E. Hess, the secretary-treasurer of Kalman & Company, and his wife, Nora Hess, resided at apartment #101, that apartment #102 was vacant, that James L. Dow/Daw, the treasurer of the Louis F. Dow Company, engaged in advertising novelties business, resided at apartment #103, that Floyd H. Davison, a salesman, and his wife, Margaret Davison, resided at apartment #104, that Elmer N. Nelson resided at apartment #105, that Lillian C. Raasig, a stenographer employed by the State Game & Fish Department, resided at apartment #106, that Mrs. Margaret Lantry, the widow of Daniel F. Lantry, resided at apartment #107, that apartment #108 was vacant, that Fred E. Berry, president of the F. E. Berry Cattle Company, and his wife, Jessie Berry, resided at apartment #201, that Robert Everett Berryman, the classified manager at the St. Paul Daily News, and his wife, Agnes E. Berryman, resided at apartment #202, that apartment #203 was vacant, that John O. Briggs, manager of the Skelly Oil Company, and his wife, May Briggs, resided at apartment #204, that Mrs. Marie M. Fitzsimmons, the widow of Charles Fitzsimmons, and Ann V. Fitzsimmons, a teacher at the Jefferson School, resided at apartment #205, that apartment #206 was vacant, that James H. Tyrrell, a druggist with a shop located in the Endicott Building, resided at apartment #207, that Walter J. Hunt, an assistant department director employed by the Northern Pacific RailRoad, and his wife, Marcella Hunt, resided at apartment #208, that William W. Walsh, the secretary-treasurer of the Walsh Investment Company, and his wife, Henrietta Walsh, resided at apartment #301, that Alan R. McGinnis, the president of Harman-McGinnis Inc., and his wife, Florence McGinnis, resided at apartment #302, that Owen A. Garretson, a salesman employed by the Webb Publishing Company, and his wife, Marjorie Garretson, the assistant manager of the Renick Music Company, resided at apartment #303, that Mrs. Frances Abell, the widow of Ashley J. Abell and a saleswoman employed by Pierce Millinery, resided at apartment #304, that Walter M. Feist, the manager of the Tower Theatre, and his wife, Anna Feist, resided at apartment #305, that John J. Davis, secretary to Mayor Gerhard J. Bundlie, and his wife, Catherine Davis, resided at apartment #306, that Sigurd B. Qvale, the superintendent of permits employed by the Bureau of Industrial Alcohol of the U. S. Treasury Department, and his wife, Mayme Qvale, resided at apartment #307, and that Gilbert S. Lobstein, a department manager employed by the Webb Publishing Company, resided at apartment #308. Ernest W. Winter (1905-1999) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Bauer, and died in Beltrami County, Minnesota. Peter E. Hess ( -1947) died in Ramsey County. Margaret E. Lantry (1875-1963) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Mackensie, and died in Ramsey County. Robert Berryman (1880-1956) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Scaife, and died in Hennepin County. James H. Tyrrell ( -1936) died in Ramsey County. Walter Jason Hunt (1900-1978) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Servis, and died in Ramsey County. A property code enforcement action was taken by the City of St. Paul against this address in 2000. [See note on Kalman & Company for 777 Lincoln Avenue.] [See note on the St. Paul Foundry Company for 1074 West Linwood Avenue.] [See note on Louis F. Dow for 1943 Summit Avenue.] [See note on the Northern Pacific RailRoad.] [See the note for Webb Publishing for 291 Goodrich Avenue.]

623 Summit Avenue: William West House/Louisa McQuillan House/Allen McQuillan Residence; Built in 1896 (1896 according to Sandeen and the Minnesota Historical Society and 1894 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Jacobethan/Victorian/late Gothic Revival in style. The building is a two story, 4433 square foot, six bedroom, four bathroom, one half-bathroom, brick house, with a detached garage, which was last sold in 2000 for $600,000. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. Louisa McQuillan had the house built and resided at this address from 1897 to 1899. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Allen McQuillan resided at this address from 1897 to 1899. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Cooper and their daughters all resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that James D. Denegre, a lawyer and a partner with Thomas McDermott and Harry S. Stearns in the law firm Denegre McDermott & Stearns, located at the Commerce Building, resided at this address. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Elizabeth S. Simpson (1835-1923,) the widowed mother of Mrs. James D. Denegre, who was born in Wisconsin to parents born in the United States and who died of chronic bronchitis, resided at this address in 1923. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Denegre resided at this address. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that James D. Denegre (1868-1926,) the husband of Marion S. Denegre, who was born in Louisiana to parents born in the United States and who died of a pulmonary embolism, resided at this address in 1926. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Marion S. Denegre, the widow of James D. Denegre, resided at this address. James Denis Denegre (1868-1926,) the son of William O. Denegre and Antoinette T. Morgan Denegre, was born in New Orleans, Louisiana, graduated from Phillips Exeter Academy in 1885, graduated with a bachelor's degree from Princeton University in 1889, graduated from the University of Minnesota Law School in 1891, graduated with a master's degree from Princeton University in 1892, graduated with a master's in law degree from the University of Minnesota Law School in 1892, was a clerk in the law office of State Senator Hiler H. Horton, settled in St. Paul in 1891, was a lawyer, practiced law in St. Paul, was a member of the Denegre, McDermot, Stearns & Weeks Law Firm, then the Denegre, McDermot & Stearns Law Firm, and then the Denegre & McDermot Law Firm, was an Episcopalian, was a member of St. John's Episcopal Church, was a regional trustee for Princeton University, was the president of the Minnesota Association of Princeton Alumni, was a trustee of St. Mary's Hall in Faribault, Minnesota, was unmarried, was a Mason, was a member of the Ancient Landmark Lodge No. 5 of St. Paul, and Summit Chapter No. 45, was a Knight Templar in Paladin Commandery No. 21, was a Potentate of Osman Temple, was a member of the Red Cross of Constantine, was a 33rd Degree Scottish Rite Mason, was a member and Council Commander of the Woodmen of the World Order, was a member of the Minnesota Club, was a member of the St. Paul Athletic Club, was a member of the St. Paul Association, was a member of the American Bar Association, was a member of the Minnesota State Bar Association, was a member of the Ramsey County Bar Association, was a member of the Minnesota Boat Club, was president of the National Amateur Rowing Association, was a Republican, was a member of the Minnesota State Senate representing Ramsey County (District 36) from 1911 until 1914 and representing Ramsey County (District 40) from 1915 until 1926, officed at the Gilfillan Block in 1907, resided at 307 West Sixth Street in 1907, and died in Ramsey County. Louisa McQuillan was the grandmother of F. Scott (Francis Scott Key) Fitzgerald and the widow of wholesale grocer P. F. (Philip Francis) McQuillan. P. F. McQuillan (1834-1887) was born in Ireland, moved to the United States in 1842, moved to Minnesota in 1857, and went into the grocery business. McQuillan began as a bookkeeper in a wholesale grocery business. In two years, he opened up his own wholesale firm, first as P. F. McQuillan & Company and then McQuillan, Beaupre & Company, and married his Galena, Illinois, sweetheart, Louisa Allen. They raised eight children, Mary "Mollie" McQuillan (1860-1936,) Allen McQuillan (1863-1940,) Agnes Frances McQuillan (1865-1866,) Annabell McQuillan (1866-1963,) Clara McQuillan (1868-1911,) Josephine McQuillan (1871-1872,) John F. McQuillan (1872-1874,) and Philip Francis McQuillan, Jr. (1877-1938.) In 20 years, McQuillan built up an enormously successful wholesale business literally from nothing. McQuillan was a totally self-made man and his business grew to be the largest grocery business in St. Paul. He became ill and died at an early age. He was well respected for his honesty and integrity, and was a strong supporter of the Catholic church. Philip McQuillan's wife, Louisa McQuillan, lived for 36 years after his death. Mrs. McQuillan also maintained a winter home in Washington D.C., and traveled regularly to Europe. Louisa McQuillan was the daughter of Joseph Allen and Catherine (Mahoney) Allen of Galena. Her parents moved to St. Paul in 1866. Joseph Allen (1813-1898) was born in Queens County, Ireland, emigrated to the United States with his family as an infant, moved to St. Paul in 1866, was a building contractor, and died in St. Paul. Philip McQuillan and Louisa McQuillan are buried in Calvary Cemetery in St. Paul. In 1879, Louisa McQuillan, the widow of Philip F. McQuillan, resided at 249 East Tenth Street. F. Scott Fitzgerald's mother, Mollie McQuillan Fitzgerald, married Edward Fitzgerald in 1890 in Washington, D.C. After their honeymoon in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald and Mollie Fitzgerald came back to St. Paul, where Edward Fitzgerald initially ran a furniture store. Between 1898 and 1908, the family lived in New York State before they moved back to St. Paul and lived comfortably on Mollie Fitzgerald's inheritance. When they first came back to St. Paul, they lived with Mollie Fitzgerald's brother, Philip McQuillan, at 514 Holly Avenue, and Edward Fitzgerald went to work as a broker at "the brokerage house." In 1911, they moved to 499 Holly Avenue, and in 1915, they moved to 593 Summit Avenue. Finally, in 1919, they moved to 599 Summit Avenue. Later, they moved to Washington, D.C., where both Mollie Fitzgerald and Edward Fitzgerald died. The Fitzgeralds had five children, of whom only two survived infancy. As a small child, F. Scott Fitzgerald often visited his grandmother in this house. Thomas Cooper resided in the house in 1914. The current owners of record of the property are Jane A. Graupman and Thomas E. Raya. Paul R. Jacobson, a self-employed musician who resides at this address, was a contributor to the John Kerry for President campaign in 2004. [See note on Hiler Hosmer Horton for 598 Summit Avenue.]

624 Summit Avenue: C. H. Schlick House/Charles H. Schliek and Elizabeth Schliek House; Built in 1890 (around 1899 according to Ramsey County property tax records and 1899 according to the Minnesota Historical Society;) Queen Anne in style. The structure is now a multi-family apartment house, which was last sold in 1997 and the sale price was $325,000. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. The 1885 and 1887 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Garland, their daughter, R. D. Garland, and W. H. Garland, Jr., all resided at this address. The 1889 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Garland, their daughter, R. D. Garland, W. H. Garland, Jr., and Samuel Daggett all resided at this address. The 1891 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Garland, their daughter, and R. D. Garland all resided at this address. The 1892 city directory indicates that William H. Garland, a trunk manufacturer, resided at this address and that William H. Garland, Jr., and Robert D. Garland both boarded at this address. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Charles H. Schliek resided at this address from 1899 to 1946. The 1902 Central Presbyterian Church directory indicates that Miss Lillian Grotjan resided at this address. Little Sketches of Big Folks indicates that Charles H. Schliek resided at this address in 1907. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Schliek resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. Schliek resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Charles H. Schliek, a creditman employed by the L. D. Coddon & Brothers, and his wife, Elizabeth Schliek, Benjamin F. Powers, president of Powers Motor Car Company, Inc., his wife, Edna S. Powers, secretary-treasurer of Powers Motor Car Company, Inc., and Charles T. Powers, vice president of Powers Motor Car Company, Inc., all resided at this address. The 1939 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Benjamin F. Powers (1916- ,) who attended the school from 1929 until 1930, and Charles T. Powers (1909- ,) who attended the school from 1921 until 1926, both resided at this address. In 1972-1973, Beverly McNeilly (#4,) a student at Macalester College, resided at this address. Charles H. Schliek (1853-1943,) the son of Henry A. Schliek (1818- ) and Kersting Schliek, was born in St. Paul, was educated in St. Paul schools and colleges, married Elizabeth Botzet (1859-1946) in St. Paul in 1878, was a partner with Edward H. Schliek and Henry A. Schliek in Schliek & Company, a boot and shoe firm located at 59 East Third Street, in 1879, succeeded as owner of the retail shoe business of Schliek & Company in 1886, established by Henry A. Schliek in 1862, was a manufacturer, was a partner with Jasper B. Tarbox in the wholesale firm of Tarbox, Schliek & Company, shoe manufacturers, from 1888 until 1900, established and was president of the Schliek Shoe Manufacturing Company in 1900, was a member of the Junior Pioneers, resided at 33 Fort Road in 1879, and officed at 318 Sibley Street in 1907. Charles H. Schliek and Elizabeth Botzet Schliek were the parents of Lizzie Marie Schliek (1879-1879,) Edna Elizabeth Schliek Powers (1881-1977,) Florence Schliek Harris (1884-1973,) and Edith M. Schliek Crosby (1887-1960.) William H. Garland (1825-1905) was born in Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. Charles Henry Schliek ( -1943) died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the rental property is Gwynne L. Evans, who resides at 1405 Summit Avenue. Barbara Solberg, a college student at Macalester College who resides at this address, was a contributor to the Howard Dean for President campaign in 2004. The 1885 and 1887 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. William West and F. C. West all resided at the former nearby 625 Summit Avenue. [See note for the fifth entry after the entry for 1605 Summit Avenue for information on Macalester College.] [See the note for the St. Paul Academy.] [See note for Jasper B. Tarbox for 221 South Exchange Street.]

629 Summit Avenue: William T. Kirke and Nellie Kirke House, Built in 1905 (1896 according to Sandeen and Larson and to the Minnesota Historical Society and 1890 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Elizabethan/Mildly Queen Anne in style; Clarence H. Johnston, Sr., architect. The building is a two story, 5054 square foot, five bedroom, four bathroom, brick house, with a detached garage. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. William T. Kirke worked for the St. Paul Apartment House Company. The house was built for $7,000 (Sandeen and Larson.) Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that William T. Kirke resided at this address from 1897 to 1910. The 1908 city directory indicates that William T. Kirke was engaged in the surety bond, burglary insurance, and liability insurance business at the Pioneer Press Building and resided at this address. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Nellie L. B. Kirke resided at this address in 1910. In 1914, H. P. Clark resided at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Burchard resided at this address. In 1918, John E. Burchard, the father of World War I veteran Henry McNiel Burchard, resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Alfred Burchtedt was a janitor and boarded at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. E. P. Winter resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Everett P. Winter, who officed at the Pioneer Building, his wife, Marion Winter, and Everett P. Winter resided at this address. In 1934, Everett P. Winter, Marion Kirke Winter, and Dorothy Winter resided at this address. The Winter family were members of the Minikahda Country Club, the Summit Club, and the Women's City Club of St. Paul in 1934. The 1939 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Everett P. Winter, who attended the school from 1902 until 1903 and who served as a Captain in the 333rd Field Artillery in the American Expeditionary Force during World War I, resided at this address. Nellie L. Kirke ( -1938) died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Susan M. Elfstrom and Richard A. Nordquist III. [See note on Johnston.]

635 Summit Avenue: Robert C. Wright House; Built in 1926. The building is a two story, 3110 square foot, three bedroom, four bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Robert C. Wight resided at this address from 1926 to 1946. The 1930 city directory indicates that Robert C. Wight, proprietor of the Wight Insurance Agency, his wife, Grace Wight, Adelaide McConville, and James H. McConville, a manufacturers agent located at the Pioneer building, all resided at this address. In 1934, Robert C. Wight and Grace Griffith Wight resided at this address and were members of the St. Paul Athletic Club. Robert C. Wight ( -1947) died in Ramsey County. Grace L. Wight ( -1933) died in Ramsey County. The house cost $13,000 to build. The last sale of the property occurred in 2005 and the sale price was $629,000. The previous owner of record of the property was Patrick J. Roedler and the current owner of record of the property is Mya Honeywell. Patrick J. Roedler was a contributor to the John Kerry for President campaign in 2004. Mya Honeywell serves on the Board of Directors of and is the chair of the Events Committee of the St. Paul Area Association of Realtors. Mya Honeywell and her sister, Cedar Honeywell, are real estate agents for Coldwell Banker Burnet Real Estate - Crocus Hill office. Mya Honeywell graduated from Winona Senior High School in Winona, Minnesota, and graduated with honors from St Cloud State University, earning a double major in Biology and Biomedical Science, initially was pharmaceutical sales representative, and in 2002, became a real estate agent specializing in the urban housing market. Mya Honeywell was a contributor to the Norm Coleman for Senate campaign in 2006.

638 Summit Avenue: Augustus B. Schliek House; Built in 1894; Georgian Revival/Queen Anne/Colonial Revival in style. The building is a two story, 5837 square foot, four bedroom, four bathroom, two half-bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. In 1893, the city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Schliek resided at this address. The 1903 city directory indicates that Emily Newman was a domestic at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. R Shepley resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Floyd H. Evans, associated with the Evans Investment Company, and his wife, Greta S. Evans, resided at this address. In 1934, F. H. Evans, Margaret Spinning Evans, Dorothy Evans, and Williams Evans resided at this address. The house was converted to a triplex in 1975 by John Mannillo and Lee Mannillo. Van Nelson and Linda Nelson owned the house in 1984. Augustus B. Schliek was part of Schliek & Co., a boot and shoe business. Martin H. Schliek also lived at this address. John Mannillo, a Long Island, New York, native who moved to St. Paul in 1974, was the president of St. Paul Building Owners & Managers Association in the early 1980's, and launched the Downtown Building Owners Association in 2002. Mannillo was a longtime critic of former St. Paul mayor and former U. S. Senator, Norm Coleman, who ran for mayor against him in 1994 and worked in the St. Paul Mayor Jim Scheibel administration. Mannillo owns the five-story Gilbert Building, located at 413 Wacouta Street. Lesley James Lehr, a lawyer, officed at this address in 2002 and represented WorldCom, Inc., before the Minnesota Public Utilities Commission. The last sale of the property occurred in 2004 and the sale price was $1,250,000. The previous owners of record of the property were Lesley J. Lehr and Steven R. Lehr and the current owners of record of the property are Bruce Leasure and Lauren Hill. Bruce Leasure is a member of the Twin Cities Race Walkers club and is the chairman of Racewalk-MN, which promotes race walking for the state branch of USA Track and Field. Lauren Hill is also a race walker and is an AmSAT Certified Teacher of the Alexander Technique to reduce pain and stress.

641 Summit Avenue: Built in 1983. The building is a two story, 2378 square foot, two bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, brick house, with a detached garage. The current owners of record of the property are Joseph R. Kingman III and Kathleen P. Kingman. Joseph R. Kingman, a retiree, and Kathleen Kingman, a retiree, were contributors to the John Kerry for President campaign in 2004.

643 Summit Avenue: Built in 1983. The building is a two story, 2378 square foot, two bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, brick house, with a detached garage, which was last sold in 2004 for $715,000. The current owner of record is Jerilyn L. Seely. David R. Anderson, an executive with Staywell Health Management who resides at this address, was a contributor to the John Kerry for President campaign in 2004.

644 Summit Avenue: C.A. Dibble House/Charles A. Dibble House; Built in 1880 (1889 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Queen Anne/Victorian in style; Havelock E. Hand, architect. The structure is now a multi-family apartment building with a detached garage. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Charles A. Dibble maintained an office at 502 Pioneer Building. The house was built for $12,000. The 1891 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Dibble resided at this address. The 1893 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Matthew Clark and Mrs. Sarah L. Stinson resided at this address. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Franklin Treat Parlin (1854-1909,) the husband of Harriet Parlin, who was born in the United States to parents also born in the United States and who died of chronic myocarditis, resided at this address in 1909. G. T. Schurmeier resided at this address in 1914. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mrs. William Lindeke and Mrs. G. T. Schurmeier both resided at this address. World War I veteran Gust R. Schurmeier resided at this address in 1919. The records of the 1919-1920 Minnesota World War I Soldier's Bonus Board (#7971) indicate that Gustave Benjamin Schurmeier (1896- ,) a 1918 enlistee and a Private First Class in the U. S. Army Air Service, unassigned, who was born in St. Paul, had grey eyes, light brown hair, and a ruddy complexion, was 5' 10" tall, enlisted in the American Field Service in 1917, was attached to the French Army, was in T. M. U. 133, served in region de l'Aine, was discharged from the French Army in Paris later in 1917, served at the School of Military Aeronautics, Berkeley, California, in 1918, enlisted in the Canadian Expeditionary Force in British Columbia in 1918, was discharged from the Canadian Expeditionary Force in 1919, was a student after the completion of service, and was unmarried, resided with his mother, Mrs. G. T. Schurmeier, at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Jule Hannaford, Jr., resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Jule M. Hannaford, Jr., the secretary of Gordon & Ferguson Inc., and his wife, Caroline Hannaford, resided at this address. In 1934, Jule M. Hannaford, Jr., Caroline Schurmeier Hannaford, Jule M. Hannaford III, John Hannaford, and Gertrude Hannaford resided at this address. The 1950 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Jule M. Hannaford III (1912- ,) who was born in St. Paul, who attended the school from 1923 until 1930, who graduated from Yale University in 1935, who graduated from the Yale University Law School in 1938, served as the General Counsel of the Illinois Office of the Office of Price Administration during World War II, who was the Assistant General Counsel to the Joint Congressional Committee to Investigate the Pearl Harbor Attack, who was chairman of the St. Paul Foreign Policy Association, who was a director of the World Affairs Center of the Northwest, who was a member of the University Club, who was a member of the White Bear Yacht Club, and who was a partner in the law firm Dorsey, Colman, Barker, Scott & Barber, resided at Manitou Island, White Bear, Minnesota. William Lindeke was a Ramsey County commissioner in 1879. The Hannaford family were members of the White Bear Yacht Club, the St. Paul Athletic Club, the Minikahda Country Club, and the Womens Club of St. Paul in 1934. Jule M. Hannaford, Jr., was a graduate of Yale University. Franklin Treat Parlin (1864- ) was born in Monroe, Wisconsin, graduated from Monroe High School in 1879, was in business in Wisconsin until 1884, joined the Yale University Class, Sheffield Scientific School, of 1887, engaged in business after his Freshman year, joined the Yale University Class of 1888 at the beginning of its Junior year, moved to St. Paul and engaged in the dry goods business after graduation in 1888, farmed in North Dakota from 1889 to 1892, traveled to Alaska in 1891, then engaged in the life insurance business, first in Fargo, North Dakota, from 1892 to 1897, unsuccessfully ran for North Dakota Insurance Commissioner on the "Fusion" ticket in 1896, married Harriet Bolinger in San Francisco, California in 1897, and then engaged in the life insurance business in St. Paul was the manager of a branch office of the Germania Life Insurance Company. Jule Murat Hannaford, Jr., (1850-1934) was born at Claremont, New Hampshire, was chief clerk in the general freight office of the Vermont Central RailRoad, became chief clerk in the general freight office of the Northern Pacific RailRoad in 1872, was promoted to assistant general freight and passenger agent in 1879 of the Northern Pacific RailRoad, was general freight agent of the Eastern Division 1881-1883, was assistant superintendent of freight traffic of the Northern Pacific RailRoad 1883-1884, and was the general freight agent and general traffic manager of the Northern Pacific RailRoad 1884-1899. From 1890 to 1893, Jule M. Hannaford, Jr., was also general traffic manager of the Wisconsin Central line, was elected third vice-president of the Northern Pacific RailRoad in 1899, and second vice-president of the Northern Pacific RailRoad in 1902, was also vice-president and general superintendent of the Northern Pacific Express Company, was president of the Northern Pacific Express Company company in 1906, and became president of the Northern Pacific RailRoad to succeed Howard Elliott in 1912. Jule M. Hannaford III was an Assistant Counsel for the Joint Committee on the Investigation of the Pearl Harbor Attack in 1946. Jule M. Hannaford III won the Class E trophy of the Inland Yachting Association in 1936 and 1940, in Lady Luck II. The Jule M. Hannaford III Memorial Trophy was presented to the Inland Yachting Association in 1982 by Mrs. Jule M. Hannaford III, her family, and friends as a trophy to be awarded annually to the winner of the Inland Yachting Association Class E Invitational Regatta. The Dibble burial plot at Oakland Cemetery include Charles A. Dibble (1843-1932,) Julia Barry Dibble (1850-1926,) Walter Gordon Dibble (1883-1905,) and Edmund Barry Dibble (1887-1908.) Matthew J. Clark (1888-1969) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Culhane, and died in Ramsey County. Jule M. Hannaford ( -1934) and Jule Murat Hannaford ( -1952) both died in Ramsey County. Jule M. Hannaford (1912-1981) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Schurmeier, and died in Washington County, Minnesota. The current owners of record of the property are Nancy F. Lunning and Robert B. Lunning. [See note on Charles A. Dibble for 1317-1319 Summit Avenue.]

649 Summit Avenue: K. C. Manson House/DuVander House/Luman H. Gilbert House/Kessler & Maguire Funeral Home; Built in 1874 (1874 according to the Minnesota Historical Society, 1897 according to the National Register of Historic Places, and 1878 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) French Second Empire in style. The building is a two story, 3672 square foot, nine bedroom, five bathroom, brick house, with a detached garage, which was last sold in 1999 for $550,250. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. It has a Mansard roof with many dormers, brackets at the eaves, paired entry doors, and cresting along the roof line. The first floor porch, removed prior to 1973, has been restored in a style very similar to the original porch. The house was built for A. G. Manson. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Albert G. Manson resided at this address from 1875 to 1878. K. C. Manson was a real estate investor or agent, working at Bridge Square in St. Paul. The 1885 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. L. H. Gilbert, their daughter, and C. A. Gilbert resided at this address. The 1887 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Hoxsie and Mrs. Thomas Hoxsie resided at this address. The 1889 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Hoxsie and Mrs. Theresa Hoxsie resided at this address. The 1891 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Hoxsie resided at this address. In 1885, L. H. Gilbert lived at this address and, in 1890, J. B. Hoxsie resided at this address. The 1893 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Hoxsie resided at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Sheehan and their daughter resided at this address. In 1919, the house was purchased by John W. Kessler and Thomas S. Maguire, who planned to establish a funeral home in the house. Because of the neighborhood protest, the St. Paul city council passed a resolution later in 1919 prohibiting the location of funeral homes in residential neighborhoods. The zoning resolution was challenged in court and the case was appealed all the way up to the Minnesota Supreme Court, which upheld the lower court rulings supporting the resolution. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that the Kessler & Maguire Funeral Home was located at this address. The house is said to be a rarity on Summit Avenue, both because of its style and because it predates most of the houses on the Avenue. It is reputed to be the only French Second Empire-style house remaining of the four originally built between 1867 and 1883 on Summit Avenue. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Kessler and T. S. Maguire all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that the Institute of Musical Art was located at this address and that Amendola Francesco resided at this address. John W. "Jack" Kessler's wife was Helen T. "Nellie" O'Brien Kessler, who was a sister of Dewey Joseph O'Brien, the owner and operator of the O'Brien Funeral Home on University Avenue until his death in 1962. In 1877, A. G. Manson was a partner with A. M. Radcliff and A. D. Condit in operating a commercial concern in the McClung Block. A. G. Manson represented St. Paul's Fourth Ward of the 1879 Board of Education. John B. Hoxsie (1839-1903) was born in Marengo, Michigan, moved to St. Paul in 1871, engaged in the wholesale fruit and produce business, and died in St. Paul. In 1879, John B. Hoxsie, a partner with Jehiel W. Jaggar in Hoxsie & Jaggar, commission merchants located at 14 Jackson Street, resided at 8 Pleasant Avenue. In 1901, John B. Hoxsie had a fruit and produce business located at 103 East Third Street. Albert Manson (1836-1878) was born in Limington, York County, Maine, the son of of George Manson (1806-1887) and Emeline Harding Meeds Manson (1809-1891,) and died in St Paul. John Walter Kessler (1888-1969) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Schnieder, and died in Ramsey County. Thomas S. Maguire (1889-1962) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Burns, and died in Ramsey County. Helen T. Kessler (1889-1965) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Hickey, and died in Ramsey County. Dewey Joseph O'Brien (1898-1962) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Hickey, and died in Ramsey County. The last sale of the property was in 2004 and the sale price was $1,125,000. The previous owner of record of the property was Susan Bartlett/Barlett Foote and the current owners of record of the property are Jessica L. Stoltenberg and Phillip H. Stoltenberg. In 2003, Susan Foote was a contributor to the Randy Kelly for Mayor campaign and resided at this address. Susan Bartlett Foote received a B.A. in American & Latin American History from Case Western Reserve University in 1968, a M.A.in American & Latin American History from Case Western Reserve University in 1970, and a J.D. from Boalt Hall School of Law at the University of California, Berkeley in 1977, is a Professor in the Division of Health Policy and Management, School of Public Health of the University of Minnesota, is Director of the Medical Technology Leadership Forum at the School of Public Health, and serves on the Medicare Coverage Advisory Committee at the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services of the U. S. Department of Health and Human Services. Susan Barlett Foote was a member of the St. Paul Heritage Preservation Commission in 2007. Susan Barlett Foote was the author of the article "Loops and Loopholes: Hazardous Device Regulation Under the 1976 Medical Device Amendments to the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act" in Ecology Law Quarterly in 1978. Susan Bartlett Foote is a member of the Board of Directors of Haemonetics and left the board of directors of Urologix, Inc., in 2005. Phillip H. Stoltenberg completed his undergraduate and medical school degrees at the University of Minnesota in 1976, performed both his internship and residency at the University of Minnesota Hospitals assigned as Chief Resident in the Department of Internal Medicine, completed his fellowship in gastroenterology in 1982, was appointed as Assistant Professor of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, at the University of Minnesota Medical School, then was Assistant Professor of Medicine, Senior Staff Physicians and Consultant, and Associate Professor at the Department of Medicine at the Texas A & M University Health Science Center, moved to Hutchinson, Minnesota, in 1994, in its Department of Medicine, and has practiced medicine in the St. Paul area since 1995, currently at Minnesota Gastroenterology P.A. Jessica Stoltenberg is the spokesperson for Medtronic Inc. of Fridley, Minnesota.

650 Summit Avenue: Nienaber House, Built in 1892 (1892 according to Sandeen and to the Minnesota Historical Society and 1900 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Georgian Revival/Colonial Revival in style; Clarence H. Johnston, Sr., architect. The building is a two story, 3726 square foot, ten room, six bedroom, three bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage, which was last sold in 2001 for $549,900. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. The Minnesota Historical Society indicates the the house was built by General C. C. Andrews. The 1893 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. W. D. Kirk, Mrs. M. D. Kirk, and Robert H. Kirk resided at this address. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that William D. Kirk (1834-1906,) the husband of Flora H. Kirk, who was born in the United States to parents also born in the United States and who died of cerebral pneumonia, resided at this address in 1906. Charles Patterson resided at this address in 1910 and in 1914 and the 1910 city directory indicates that Charles Patterson was the president and treasurer of the Patterson Street Lighting Company. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. M. W. Griggs resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. D. H. Wright resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Cyrus C. De Coster, Jr., a bondsman, and his wife, Jeanne De Coster, resided at this address. In 1934, Cyrus Cole De Coster, Sr., Jeanne Brulay De Coster, and Cyrus Cole De Coster, Jr., resided at this address. The original owner of this house was Christopher C. Andrews (1829-1922), a lawyer, a Civil War General (Third Minnesota Infantry Regiment,) ambassador during the Grant Administration to Denmark (1869) and to Sweden (1869-1877,) consul general to Brazil (1882-1885,) an author of a travelogue describing an 1856 trip through the Minnesota and Dacotah territory, editor of the St. Cloud Union (subsequently renamed the St. Cloud Times) (1861,) an author of histories of the battle of Mobile Bay (1865) and of the City of St. Paul, the first Chief Fire Warden of the State of Minnesota (1895-1905) and later its Forestry Commissioner (1905-1911, commemorated by the creation of the General C. C. Andrews State Forest in 1943,) between 1895 and 1902, the father of the forest reserves that would become the Chippewa National Forest, the Superior National Forest, and the Boundary Waters Canoe Area (BWCA,) and a member of the state forestry board (1905-1922.) By the time of the American Civil War, Andrews had progressed from an apologist for slavery to a champion of freedom for African-Americans. Christopher Columbus Andrews was the author of Minnesota and Dacotah (1857,) A Practical Treatise on the Revenue Laws of the United States (1858,) The Condition and Needs of Spring Wheat Culture in the Northwest (1882,) History of the Campaign of Mobile (1889,) A History of St. Paul, Minnesota (1890,) and A Narrative of the Third Regiment (189?.) He also was a commissioner for the construction of the Minnesota monument at the Shiloh battlefield, with Lucius F. Hubbard and Henry S. Hurter. Andrews was born in New Hampshire and married Mary Frances Baxter Andrews, who was born at Hillsboro, New Hampshire, in 1837. The couple had a daughter, Alice E. Andrews. General Andrews apparently never lived in this house, but lived at 833 Goodrich during the period 1892-1900. He also owned 656 Summit Avenue, the house next door. The house was built for $8,000 (Sandeen and Larson.) Cyrus Cole DeCoster (1846- ) was a partner with Kenneth Clark in DeCoster & Clark, furniture manufacturers and dealers located at 72-74 Jackson Street, in 1879. Lucius Frederick Hubbard (1836-1913,) the son of Charles F. Hubbard and Margaret Van Valkenberg Hubbard, the grandson of Lucius Hubbard and Anne Pomeroy Hubbard, and the grest grandson of Israel Hubbard, was born in Troy, Rensselaer County, New York, was orphaned in 1846, was educated in the district schools and at an academy in Granville, New York, apprenticed at Poultney, New York, and first worked as a journeyman tinsmith in Salem, New York, and then in Chicago, Illinois, until 1857, moved to Red Wing, Goodhue County, Minnesota, with a hand operated printing press and became the publisher and editor of the Red Wing Republican, was a Republican, was the register of deeds for Goodhue County, Minnesota, for two years, was an unsuccessful candidate for the Minnesota Senate from Goodhue County, Minnesota, in 1861, enlisted in the Fifth Minnesota Regiment in 1861, subsequently became a brevet brigadier general in the Union Army during the American Civil War, participated in the battle of Farmington, Mississippi, the first battle of Corinth, the battle of Iuka, the second battle of Corinth, the battle of Jackson, the battle of Mississippi Springs, the battle of Mechanicsburg, Mississippi, the battle of Satartia, Mississippi, the battle of Richmond, Louisiana, and the siege of Vicksburg, Mississippi, was wounded at the first battle of Corinth, was wounded at the battle of Nashville, was the author of Minnesota in the battles of Corinth, May-October, 1862: An address delivered before the Minnesota Historical Society, engaged in engaged in milling and railroading after the Civil War as a partner in the Midland RailRoad and as the president of the Cannon Valley RailRoad, married Amelia Thomas in Red Wing, Minnesota, in 1868, promoted the Duluth, Red Wing & Southern RailRoad and continued in management of the railroad until 1902, was a member of Minnesota State Senate representing Goodhue County, Minnesota (16th District and 17th District) from 1872 to 1876, served on the commission to investigate the accounts of the state auditor and state treasurer in 1874, served on commission of arbitration to adjust the differences between the state and the state prison factors in 1879, was Governor of Minnesota from 1882 to 1887, securing enactment of the railway and warehouse commission, the state grain inspection system, the state inspection of dairy products, the state sanitary system, the state board of corrections and charities, the establishment of the state public school at Owatonna, the organization of the state National Guard, and the change from annual to biennial elections, served on the commission to investigate the state railroad bonds in 1886, served on the commission to compile and publish a history of Minnesota military organizations in the Civil War and the Indian War in 1889, was a delegate to Republican National Convention from Minnesota in 1896, was a member of Republican National Committee from Minnesota from 1896 until 1900, was a brigadier general in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War (Third Division of the Seventh Army,) resided in St. Paul in 1889, was a member of the Grand Army of the Republic, was a member of the Loyal Legion of the United States, was a member of the Red Wing Royal Arch Masons, was a member of the Loyal Legion, was a member of the Minnesota Society of the American Revolution, was a member of the Society of the Army of the Tennessee, was a member of the Military Order of Foreign Wars, was a member of the Society of American Wars, resided at 303 Dayton Avenue in 1907, and died in Minneapolis. Amelia Thomas Hubbard (1843- ,) the daughter of Charles Thomas, was born in Kingstown, Ontario, came to Minnesota in 1857, and located in Red Wing, Minnesota. Lucius F. Hubbard and Amelia Hubbard were the parents of Charles P. Hubbard, Lucius Virgilious Hubbard, and Julia M. Hubbard. Lucius Virgilious Hubbard served with the 15th Minnesota Regiment during the Spanish-American War, married Mary Ridgway Peacock, and was granted a pension by Congressional enactment (64th Congress, Chapter 167) in 1917. Lucius Virgilious Hubbard and Mary Ridgway Peacock Hubbard were the parents of one child, Mary Peacock Hubbard (Mrs. Jonathan Longfellow) Cilley. Hubbard County, Minnesota, was named for Lucius F. Hubbard. Lieutenant Henry Hurter (1831- ,) a native of Switzerland, and a resident of Chengwatana, Pine County, Minnesota, was promoted in 1862 and 1863, after enlistment in 1861, and commanded the First Minnesota Light Artillery Battery at the battle of Vicksburg in 1863 (see photo of the commemorative plaque) and in Georgia, South Carolina, and Florida in 1864. Jeanne Brulay De Coster was a graduate of Yale University. Christopher Columbus Andrews (1829-1922) is buried in Oakland Cemetery. William Dontater Kirk (1843-1906) was born in Adams, New York, moved to St. Paul, married Flora Horner, the daughter of William Horner and Josephine Taylor Horner and granddaughter of Benjamin Taylor and Zerua Rosecrans Taylor, was employed by the First National Bank of St. Paul from 1869 until 1880, was an organizer, with Lathrop E. Reed, J. L. Forepaugh, J. H. Sanders, Reuben Warner, Kenneth Clark, Alvaren Allen, W. P. Warren, C. C. DeCoster, Reginald Paris, Fred S. Nichols, and S. S. Eaton, of the Capital Bank of St. Paul, with 20 percent of its initially issued shares, was the cashier of the Capital Bank of St. Paul until 1890, and thereafter was the president of the Capital Bank of St. Paul. Upon the death of William D. Kirk, the Capital Bank of St. Paul was sold to outside interests. William Dontater Kirk and Flora Horner Kirk had one child, Charles Kirk. Lathrop Edward Reed (1830-1901) was born in Worthington, Massachusetts, moved to St. Paul in 1851, married Louisa Johnson (1831-1902,) was involved in the establishment with the Thompson Brothers of the First National Bank of St. Paul in 1863, was elected the vice president of the First National Bank of St. Paul in 1873, resided at 101 Eighth Street in 1879, was a partner of George W. Sherwood in Reed & Sherwood, lumber manufacturers located at 80 Robert Street, in 1879, was the president of the Capitol Bank from 1880 until 1890, was a member of the Minnesota Historical Society, was a member of the Knights Templar, and died in his private railway car on a train in Lexington, Kentucky. Edward Lathrop Reed (1855- ,) the son of Lathrop Edward Reed and Louisa Johnson Reed, was born in LaFox, Illinois, and married Susan J. Sherwood in St. Paul in 1877. George W. Sherwood (1833- ,) the son of Alfred Sherwood and Jane Begordes Sherwood, was born in Greenville, New York, was educated in common schools of Green County, New York, learned carpentry, married Adaline Hard in 1853, moved to Minnesota in 1855, settled in St. Paul, was a building contractor and a stock breeder, was engaged in contracting and building, was engaged in bridge construction in 1862, was a member of the firm of Sherwood, Sutherland & Company for 20 years, was engaged in the construction of bridges and grain elevators, and owned a large thoroughbred horse farm, was a member of Reed & Sherwood, a lumber yard, in Anoka, Minnesota, was the proprietor of the Sherwood Stock Farm, raising thoroughbred horses and short horn cattle, in Sheldon, Iowa, was the president of the Union Bank of Sheldon, Iowa, resided on Afton Road in 1907, and officed at the Endicott Building in 1907. "Colonel" Alvaren Allen (1821-1907,) the son of Aaron Allen and Eliza/Elizabeth Gould Allen, was born in Morristown, St. Lawrence County, New York, was educated in the common schools of Morristown, New York, moved to Wisconsin with his parents in 1837, attended school in Beloit, Wisconsin, farmed for five years, worked as a clerk in a jobbing house in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, for two years, married Louisa Chase Sowles/Soula ( -1906) in Kenosha, Wisconsin, in 1851, moved to Minnesota in 1851, engaged in the livery business in St. Anthony, Minnesota, operated a veterinary practice, then added a stage line, purchased the Red & Blue Stage Line from Patterson, Benson & Ward in 1856, was the second mayor of St. Anthony, Minnesota, in 1856, operated, as a partner of Charles L. Chase, the Minnesota Stage Company, including its express business, until 1869, then engaged in railroad contracting, moved to St. Paul, resided on Dayton Avenue, leased the Merchants Hotel from 1871 until 1873, then purchased the Merchants Hotel from Colonel Potter in 1873 and operated it until 1897, rented the Merchants Hotel to F. R. Welz, was a member of the St. Paul City Council for eight years, was the chief promoter of a paid fire department for the City of St. Paul, was the first president of the Minnesota Territorial Association, was a partner, with __?__ Ehle, in arranging a 15 city tour by the Hunkpapa Sioux Chief Sitting Bull, Annie Oakley, and Buffalo Bill Cody in 1884, was a Mason, and resided at the Merchants Hotel in 1907. Flora Ann Kirk ( -1949) died in Todd County, Minnesota. The current owners of record of the property are Christopher Turoski and Jessica Turoski. Kristen Copham, Product Development Director for Message Products who resided at this address, was a contributor to the Democratic National Committee in 2004. [See note on Johnston.]

656 Summit Avenue: 656 Summit Avenue; E. R. Sanford, Jr., House; Built in 1892 (1928 according to the National Register of Historic Places or 1889 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Georgian Revival/Queen Anne/Colonial Revival in style; Clarence H. Johnston, Sr., architect. The building is a two story, 4123 square foot, six bedroom, three bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage. Construction of the house cost $8,000 (Sandeen and Larson.) The house was built by General C. C. Andrews according to the Minnesota Historical Society. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. The owner of this house was Christopher C. Andrews. E. R. Sanford, Jr., lived at this address in 1914. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Joseph E. McWilliams resided at this address from 1893 to 1898 and that Edward R. Sanford, Jr., resided at this address from 1908 to 1967. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Warren Hewitt Mead (1837-1910,) the widower father of George H. Mead, who was born in the United States to parents also born in the United States and who died of old age, resided at this address in 1910. The 1918 and 1924 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. E. R. Sanford and their daughter all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Edward R. Sanford, the proprietor of Sanford & Company, and his wife, Charlotte M. Sanford, resided at this address. Warren Hewitt Mead was born in Genoa, Cayuga County, New York, the son of Lockwood Mead and Susan Miller Mead, graduated from the Cazanovia Seminary in 1857, moved to Kentucky and taught at the Bradsford Institute, was a First Lieutenant in Company F of the Sixth Kentucky Cavalry, was captured at Chickamauga, served in several Confederate prisons, including the Libby Prison, escaped from the Winnsborough, South Carolina, prison in 1864, was mustered out of the Union Army in 1865, returned to Kentucky and was admitted to the practice of law in Kentucky, moved to Northfield, Minnesota, in 1866, moved to St. Paul in 1870, was a partner in Mead & Thompson from 1870 until 1879, served two terms in the Minnesota Legislature, was a Presbyterian, was a temperance advocate, and was a Republican. Warren Hewitt Mead married Frances A. Hughes in Kentucky in 1866 and the couple had two children, George H. Mead and Charlotte L. Mead. Mrs. Joseph E. McWilliams was the regent for the Nathan Hale Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution in 1896. In 1896, the Nathan Hale Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution included Mrs. Charles E. Smith, Mrs. Hascal R. Brill, Mrs. Benjamin S. Cowen, and Miss Alice Andrews and published a daily newspaper, the Daily Bulletin. The current owners of record of the property are Jeffer Ali and Susan Davis Ali. The 1939 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Alfred S. Guiterman, who attended the school from 1917 until 1918 and who officed at 206 East Fifth Street, resided at the former nearby 657 Summit Avenue. [See note on General C. C. Andrews for 650 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Johnston.]

659 Summit Avenue: M. H. B. Gates House; Built in 1889 (1885 according to Ramsey County property tax records and to Minnesota Historical Society records;) Queen Anne/Victorian in style; D. B. Spear, architect. The structure is now a three story, 7324 square foot, multi-family apartment house. The property also includes a one story, 567 square foot, structure, built in 1922. The original owner of this house was Lillie June Bartlett. The house was built for $8,000. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Theodore A. Bartlett resided at this address in 1886 and that Horace B. Gates resided at this address from 1887 to 1893. The 1887, 1889, and 1891 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. H. B. Gates resided at this address. The 1893 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. H. B. Gates and Marshall De Motte all resided at this address. In 1890, H. B. Gates resided at this address according to the city directory. In 1914, J. B. Meagher resided at this address according to the city directory. In 1916, John B. Meagher was a member of the Minnesota Historical Society and resided at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Meagher resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Harry E. Duffy, a chauffeur employed at this address, resided at 1270 Lincoln Avenue. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Meagher resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that John B. Meagher, a real estate agent located at the Hamm Building, and his wife, Katherine Meagher, resided at this address. In 1887, the Mankato, Minnesota, gas plant was purchased by John B. Meagher and H. A. Patterson. John B. Meagher was a student in the Class of 1889 of the University of Notre Dame. Katherine Kelly Meagher, the daughter of P. H. Kelly, a graduate of the Visitation Convent, and the treasurer of the Catholic guild of Women, married John B. Meagher in 1907. John B. Meagher was a member of the Capitol Trust Company in 1912. Horace Butler Gates (1856- ,) the son of William Gardner Gates (1830- ) and Mary Elizabeth Warner Brown Gates (1835- ,) was born in Syracuse, New York, was educated in the public schools of St. Paul, was employed as a clerk by the National Marine Bank, was employed as a clerk by the Merchants National Bank, was employed as a cashier by the Meeker County Bank of Litchfield, Minnesota, from 1878 until 1885, married Jessie Hackett (1858- ,) the daughter of Charles Wesley Hackett ( -1903) and Myra T. Holt Hackett, in 1882, was a partner with Charles Wesley Hackett and Theodore G. Walther in Hackett, Walther & Gates/Hackett, Walther, Gates Hardware Company after 1885, was the president of Hackett, Walther, Gates Hardware Company after 1903, was the vice president of the St. Paul National Bank, was a member of the St. Paul Commercial Club, was a member of the Minnetonka Yacht Club, resided at the Ashland in 1907, and officed at Fourth Street and Rosabel Street in 1907. Horace Butler Gates and Jessie Hackett Gates were the parents of Lewis Harold Gates (1885- ) and Frederic Hackett Gates (1892- .) William G. Gates (1830- ,) the son of Horace B. Gates and Hannah Gardner Gates, was born in Jamesville, New York, married Mary Elizabeth Warner Brown (1835- ,) the daughter of Johnson Butler Brown, moved to Minnesota in 1857, settled in St. Paul in 1862, was in the grain and elevator business until 1895, and was a statistician employed by the St. Paul Chamber of Commerce from 1895 until 1905. William G. Gates and Mary Elizabeth Warner Brown Gates were the parents of Horace Butler Gates (1856- ,) Carolyn Anna Gates (Mrs. Paris) Fletcher (1866- ,) Mary Brown Gates (1869-1871,) Willard Frederic Gates (1870- ,) and Gardner Brown Gates (1872- .) Charles Wesley Hackett (1831- ,) the son of Ephraim Hackett and Iconise Furnham Hackett, was born in Lyndeboro, New Hampshire, was educated at the Hancock, New Hampshire, Academy, entered business in Boston, Massachusetts, was a clerk employed by Chandler & Company, a retail dry goods store in Boston, Massachusetts, started his own retail dry goods business in Lowell, Massachusetts, married Myra T. Holt, the daughter of Ira Holt and Hannah Elliott Robins Holt, in 1853, moved to Minnesota, settled in Lake City, Minnesota, engaged in general merchandising, was elected the register of deeds of Wabasha County, Minnesota, was a captain in the Tenth Minnesota Regiment during the American Civil War and fought against the Dakota Indians, established a hat store in Lake City, Minnesota, after the war, established a private bank in Lake City, Minnesota, moved to St. Paul in 1872, formed a hardware store partnership, Strong, Hackett & Chapin, which became the C. W. Hackett Hardware Company, then became Hackett, Walther & Gates, located at 268-280 East Fourth Street, was the vice president of the St. Paul National Bank, was the president of the St. Paul Chamber of Commerce, was a president of the St. Paul Jobbers Union, was a Republican, was a Mason, and resided at 350 Summit Avenue in 1905. Paris Fletcher (1863-1908,) the son of Albert A. Fletcher and Delia Murray Fletcher, was born at Bridgeport, Vermont, was educated in Vermont common schools, graduated with an engineering degree from the Chester Military College/Pennsylvania Military Academy, Chester, Pennsylvania, in 1882, relocated to Montana in 1882, operated a cattle ranch, moved to Minnesota from Montana, 1887, and located in St. Paul, was a real estate dealer, was a partner of Charles E. Clarke in Clarke & Fletcher, dealers in real estate, after 1887, married Carolyn Anna Gates, the daughter of William Gardner Gates, at St. Paul in 1889, was a member of the board of directors of the Capitol National Bank, was a member of the St. Paul Real Estate Board, was a Republican, was a member of the Sons of the American Revolution, was a member of the Society of Colonial Wars, was a Knight Templar, was a Mason, was a Shriner, was a member of the Minnesota Club, was a member of the White Bear Yacht Club, was an Episcopalian, officed at 303 Jackson Street in 1907, and resided at Dellwood, Minnesota, in 1907. Horace B. Gates was the administrator of the estate of Paris Fletcher in 1911. Horace B. Gates ( -1940) died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is Sonja L. Sudheimer. [See note for the Hackett, Gates, Hurty Company for 454 North Smith Avenue.] [See note on the St. Paul Commercial Club for 505 Summit Avenue.] [See note on the White Bear Yacht Club for 18 Kenwood Parkway.]

660-662 Summit Avenue: Built in 1925; Spanish Colonial Revival/Early Modern Rectilinear in style; Raoul Reed, architect. The building is a two story, 3744 square foot, six bedroom, four bathroom, stucco house, with one detached garage and one tuck-under garage. The house cost $8,500 to build. The 1879 city directory indicates that Robert Craig, a partner with John P. Larkin in Craig & Larkin, a crockery and glassware dealer located at 66 East Third Street, resided at or near this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Bernard G. Bechhoefer, associated with the law firm of O'Brien, Horn & Stringer, and his wife, Estelle Bechhoefer, James Moore, and his wife, Alice Moore, all resided at this address. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. John Philander Larkin (1866- ,) the son of Colvin Larkin and Elizabeth Pendill Larkin, was born in Byron, New York, was educated in the public schools of Byron, New York, attended the Brookport Academy, was educated in the public schools of Oberlin, Ohio, served in Company C of the 20th Michigan Infantry from 1862 until 1865 during the American Civil War, married Frances A. Greene in 1866, was first engaged in the crockery business in Battle Creek, Michigan, from 1866 until 1868, was in the earthenware business in Marshall, Michigan, from 1868 until 1873, moved to St. Paul in 1873, engaged in earthenware business as amember of the firm of Craig & Larkin until 1890, engaged in the railway supply business after 1897, was a member of Grand Army of the Republic, was a Mason, resided at 167 Virginia Avenue in 1907, and officed at the Endicott Building in 1907. Raoul Reed (1894-1980) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Philfe, and died in Ramsey County. The last sale of the property occurred in 2006 and the sale price was $800,000. The previous owners of record of the property were Joseph A. Radecki and Marielena M. Radecki and the current owners of record of the rental property are James R. Councilman and Mary H. Councilman, who reside at 8 Crocus Hill.

665 Summit Avenue: C. E. Rittenhouse House; Built in 1889 (1894 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Queen Anne in style; E. J. Hodgson, architect. The structure is a two story, 3732 square foot, four bedroom, three bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. Building the house cost $6,000. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. The 1891 and 1893 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Rittenhouse resided at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that H. A. Gray resided at this address. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Sarah A. Canner (1850-1919,) the single sister of J. A. Canner, who was born in England to parents who were born in England and who died of myocarditis, resided at this address in 1919. The 1930 city directory indicates that Michael J. Marrinan, the president of the St. Paul Serum Company and treasurer of the Marrinan Medical Supply Company, his wife, Alice Marrinan, James W. Marrinan, vice president of the Marrinan Medical Supply Company and secretary of the St. Paul Serum Company, and his wife, Lillyan M. Marrinan, all resided at this address. The 1964 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Thomas F. Soderberg, a member of the Class of 1960, resided at this address. Charles E. Rittenhouse (1850- ,) the son of John Hughes Rittenhouse (1825-1853) and Jane L./S. Simonton Rittenhouse, grandson of David Rittenhouse and Sarah Hughes Rittenhouse (1778- ,) and great grandson of Benjamin Rittenhouse and Elizabeth Bull Rittenhouse, was a member of the Minnesota Society of the Sons of the American Revolution by virtue of great grandfather Benjamin Rittenhouse, a Private in the Pennsylvania Troops, and great great grandfather John Bull, Adjutant-General commanding a brigade of the Pennsylvania Militia, during the Revolutionary War. John Hughes Rittenhouse was a clergyman of the Presbyterian Church. Charles Edwin Rittenhouse married Grace Hubbell (1860- ) in 1883 and had two children, John Hughes Rittenhouse (1885-1886) and Catherine Rittenhouse (1886- .) Charles Rittenhouse was the president of the People's Bank, St. Paul, Minnesota. In 1884, Eddie Mason, a 16 year old messenger employed by the People's Bank of St. Paul, and his friend, John Parker, were arrested in Wausau, Wisconsin, after stealing $6,021 from the bank. In 1922, the Marrinan Medical Supply Company was located at the Hamm Building. E. J. Hodgson was an Indianapolis, Indiana, architect in the 1880's and 1890's. The current owner of record of the property is Larry R. Johns.

666 Summit Avenue: Built in 1880 (1925 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Spanish Colonial Revival/Early Modern Rectilinear in style; Raoul Reed, architect. The structure is a two story, 3744 square foot, six bedroom, two bathroom, stucco house, with a one car tuck-under garage, which last sold in 1998 for $325,000. Construction of the house cost $8,500. The 1930 city directory indicates that William C. Kenney, the president-treasurer of the Kenney-Michaud Agency, Inc., insurance brokers, his wife, Katherine Kenney, and Paul A. Rumpf all resided at this address. In 1934, William C. Kennedy and Katherine Moroney Kennedy resided at this address and were members of the University Club, the Somerset Club, the St. Paul Athletic Club, and the Womens Club of St. Paul. Also in 1934, Mr. and Mrs. James S. Thompson, Sr., and James S. Thompson, Jr., resided at this address and were members of the Somerset Club, the Minikahda Country Club, and the University Club. Warren Burger, the future U. S. Supreme Court Chief Justice, resided at this address in 1951. In 2004, St. Albans Summit LLC appealed a side yard setback variance to the St. Paul Board of Zoning Appeals in order to build two new garages at this address. William Charles Kennedy ( -1935) died in Ramsey County. Katherine Kennedy (1879-1961) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Conners, and died in Ramsey County. Raoul Reed (1894-1980) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Philfe, and died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are James R. Councilman and Mary H. Councilman, who reside at 8 Crocus Hill. Heidi J. Pederson resided at this address in 2003. Labat Consulting, Inc., is currently located at this address. Kirstin Beach and Mike Beach also reside at this address. Kirstin Beach was a Republican Party of Minnesota candidate for the Minnesota House of Representatives, District 64A. [See note on Burger for 695 Conway Street] [See note for the Minikahda Club for 702 Fairmount Avenue.] [See note on the University Club for 420 Summit Avenue.]

669 Summit Avenue: Dr. J. C./Dr. J. E. Schadle House; Built in 1894; Queen Anne in style; Mould & McNicol, architects. The structure is a two story, 3424 square foot, six bedroom, three bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage. The 1891 and 1893 city directories indicate that Dr. and Mrs. J. E. Schadle resided at this address. Little Sketches of Big Folks indicates that George M. Tibbs resided at this address in 1907. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Jennie R. Schadle (1854-1916,) the widowed sister of J. R. Miller, who was born in Pennsylvania to parents who were born in the United States and who died of illuminating gas poisoning, resided at this address in 1916. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Hebon N. Lyon and Mrs. Mary C. Lyon all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Heber N. Lyon, the vice president of C. B. Lyon & Brother, Inc., and his wife, Mary G. Lyon, resided at this address. In 1934, Mary Gregory Lyon, the widow of Heber N. Lyon, resided at this address and was a member of the Society of the First Families of Virginia. C. B. Lyon & Brother, Inc., a wholesale druggist company, was comprised of Charles B. Lyon and Heber N. Lyon and was a member of the National Wholesale Druggists' Association in 1907. The 1939 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Fendall C. Lyon (1915- ,) who attended the school from 1930 until 1934 and who attended the University of Minnesota, resided at this address. George M. Tibbs (1858- ,) the son of Thomas L. Tibbs and Anna Stults Tibbs, was born in Hightstown, New Jersey, married Mary A. Chattle of Long Branch, New Jersey, in 1887, was educated in the public schools of New Jersey, was engaged in the wholesale dry goods business, was initially employed with a New York commission house for six years, moved to St. Louis, Missouri, in 1881, then moved to St. Joseph, Missouri, and engaged in the wholesale dry goods business until 1886, was a buyer for and a partner in M. E. Smith & Company of Omaha, Nebraska, from 1890 until 1900, purchased a controlling interest, with H. E. Hutchings, in the Powers Dry Goods Company in St. Paul in 1900, changed the name of the firm to Tibbs, Hutchings & Company, was the president of the Tibbs, Hutchings & Company, was a member of the Minnesota Club, was a member of the St. Paul Commercial Club, was a member of the Arkwright Club of New York, and officed at the corner of Fifth Street and Wacouta Street in 1907. In 1951, the property was the subject of litigation about zoning on Summit Avenue, and Warren Burger, a future U. S. Supreme Court Chief Justice, then residing at 666 Summit Avenue, challenged the ability of Alvin J. Jansen to convert the building into a fourplex. Burger prevailed before the Minnesota Supreme Court in Burger v. St. Paul, 241 Minn 285 (1954.) The Order of First Families of Virginia was established in 1912. The First Families of Virginia represent the Cavaliers, the younger sons of 17th Century English gentry who stood to inherit nothing under English law or royalists fleeing Oliver Cromwell's republican victory in England's 1642-1649 Civil War, who were the leading families, but not the first chronologically, of the Virginia Colony, and the class that ruled Virginia until after the American Revolution. Dr. Jacob Evans Schadle (1849-1908) was born in Jersey Shore/Williamsport, Pennsylvania, graduated from the Millersville State Normal School, graduated from Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1881, practiced medicine in Pennsdale, Pennsylvania from 1881 until 1883, practiced medicine in Shenandoah, Pennsylvania, from 1883 until 1888, first used antropine to counteract amanatine poisoning in 1885, married Jennie R. Miller, the daughter of Dr. David H. Miller and Sarah G. Hoffman Miller, moved to St. Paul in 1888, authored several articles for the St. Paul Medical Journal, pursued special medical studies in Europe from 1897 until 1898 and from 1899 until 1900, was a clinical professor in laryngology and rhinology at the University of Minnesota from 1898 until 1908, was a member of the Ramsey County Medical Society, was a member of the Minnesota State Medical Association, was a member of the American Rhinological, Laryngological, and Otological Association, was the president of the Western Section of the American Rhinological, Laryngological, and Otological Association in 1888, was a member of the American Medical Association, and died of cerebral thrombosis and general paralysis in St. Paul. Jennie R. Miller Schadle was a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution. Jacob E. Schadle ( -1908,) Heber Newton Lyon ( -1932,) and Mary Lyon ( -1953) all died in Ramsey County. Alvin J. Jansen (1892-1978) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Schaefer, and died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Elsa Frettem and Bernard Gonzalez. Seeds of Peace, an organization that operates a summer camp that brings together youth from conflict regions, is located at this address. [See note on Burger for 695 Conway Street] [See note on the St. Paul Commercial Club for 505 Summit Avenue.]

Description of Housing Styles

Summit Avenue Hikes - Architectural Style Notes

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Information from the University of Minnesota, Northwest Architectural Archives, was used in this webpage.

This webpage was last modified on July 21, 2011.