Thursday Night Hikes: St. Albans/Lower Crocus Hill Architecture Notes, Part 6

Thursday Night Hikes: St. Albans/Lower Crocus Hill Architecture Notes, Part 6


Observations on Architectural Styles, Part 6

St. Albans/Lower Crocus Hill

Assembled by

Lawrence A. Martin

Webpage Creation: November 20, 2001

681 Oakland Avenue: Built in 1951. The structure is a three story, 11457 square foot, multi-family apartment building. The building is on the National Register of Historic Places. The 1887 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Morton Barrow and Harry S. Noble all resided at this address. In 1995, Richard T. O'Toole resided in Unit # 105 at this address and was paid a claim by the Department of Veteran Affairs of the State of Minnesota as a World War I veteran under Laws of Minnesota 1995, Chapter 228, Section 2, Subdivision 2. The current owner of record of the property is Grand Oaks Apartments, which is located at 1999 Shepard Road. The 1887 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. E. B. Kennedy and Mr. and Mrs. F. C. Bliss all resided at the former nearby 687 Oakland Street. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. P. D. Couture resided at the former nearby 683 Oakland Avenue. The 1920 city directory indicates that Pierre D. Conture, a clerk employed by the Northern Pacific RailRoad, and Peter D. Couture, a clerk, both resided at the former nearby 683 Oakland Avenue and that Cecile Couture, an operator employed by the Tri-State Telephone & Telegraph Company, boarded at the former nearby 683 Oakland Avenue. [See note on the Northern Pacific RailRoad.] [See note for Tri-State Telegraph & Telephone Company for 596 Portland Avenue.]

688-690 Oakland Avenue: Built in 1911 (1903 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Queen Anne in style; N. A. Aleauphilt, architect. The structure is a two story, 2632 square foot, 12 room, six bedroom, two bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided double house, with a detached garage. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. John Ransom and Miss M. E. Ransom all resided at 690 Oakland Avenue. The 1930 city directory indicates that Rev. Archie A. Mackinney, assistant pastor of the First Baptist Church, and his wife, Dorris H. Mackinney, resided at 690 Oakland Avenue. Dr. Archie A. MacKinney, Jr., contributed the article "Preparing Bible Studies for International Students" to the International Student Ministry that he derived from his seminar handout to a North American Conference of the Association of Christians Ministering To Internationals (ACMI) during the 1980's. Dr. Archie A. MacKinney, Jr., was originally a practicing Hematologist and Professor of Medicine at the University of Wisconsin and is now retired. John Ransom ( -1921) died in Ramsey County. Marie E. Ransom (1878-1959) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Emmett, and died in Ramsey County. The property was last sold in 1999 with a sale price of $245,000. The current owner of record of the property is James J. Koktavy, who resides at 557 Ottawa Avenue. James Koktavy is an equestrian associated with the U. S. Eventing Association. The 1887 city directory indicates that Rev. and Mrs. S. G. Anderson resided at the former nearby 689 Oakland Avenue.

692-694 Oakland Avenue: Built in 1900. The structure is a two story, 2184 square foot, 12 room, five bedroom, three bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. The building is on the National Register of Historic Places. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Lillian Brown (1898-1908,) the unmarried daughter of Caroline M. Brown, who was born in the United States and who died of sarcoma, resided at 694 Oakland Avenue in 1908. The records of the 1919-1920 Minnesota World War I Soldier's Bonus Board (#22324) indicate that Walter J. Trumper (1891- ,) a 1918 draftee and a Private in the Students Army Training Corps at the Dunwoody Institute, who was born in New York City, New York, moved to Minnesota in 1914, had hazel eyes, brown hair, and a medium complexion, was 6' tall, was a locomotive fireman at induction, was a stationary engineer employed by F. E. Weyerhaeuser after the completion of service, and was married, resided with his wife, Rose Trumper, at 694 Oakland Avenue. The 1930 city directory indicates that this address was vacant. Lillian Brown ( -1908,) Caroline Marie Brown ( -1936,) and Walter J. Trumper ( -1940) all died in Ramsey County. Walter J. Trumper (1918-1977) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Schlichting, and died in Ramsey County. The last sale of this property was in 1993 and the sale price was $85,000. The current owner of record of the property is Kevin C. Duffey, who resides in Newport, Minnesota. The 1887 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. H. S. Sibley resided at the former nearby 693 Oakland Avenue and that Mr. and Mrs. A. S. Brisbine resided at the former nearby 695 Oakland Avenue. The 1910-1911 Directory of the University of Minnesota indicates that F. Hope Young, a student, resided at the former nearby 695 Oakland Avenue. The records of the 1919-1920 Minnesota World War I Soldier's Bonus Board (#21844) indicate that Daniel C. Collins (1898- ,) a 1918 draftee and a Private in the Air Service Mechanics School in St. Paul, who was born in St. Paul, had blue eyes, light hair, and a fair complexion, was 5' 8" tall, was an electrician at induction, was an electrical repair man employed by the St. Paul Electric Company after the completion of service, and was unmarried, resided with his mother, Mrs. M. C. Collins, at the nearby former 693 Oakland Avenue. The 1920 city directory indicates that Clifford Collins, a clerk employed by St. Clair & Albachten, and Daniel Collins, a clerk employed by the Consolidated Ticket Office, both boarded at the former nearby 693 Oakland Avenue and that Michael C. Collins, a watchman employed by the Minnesota State Agricultural Society, resided at the former nearby 693 Oakland Avenue. Daniel C. Collins (1898-1975) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Toepelman, and died in Ramsey County. Michael C. Collins ( -1924) died in Ramsey County. [See the note on Henry Hastings Sibley for 614 North Fountain Place.]

696-698 Oakland Avenue: Built in 1911; Colonial Revival in style. The structure is a three story, 7861 square foot, multi-family apartment building. The building is on the National Register of Historic Places. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Willis resided at 696 Oakland Avenue and that Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Miner and Mr. and Mrs. R. M. LaBelle all resided at 698 Oakland Avenue. The 1920 city directory indicates that William H. Barnum, a foreman employed by American Railway Express, Edith E. Fisher, a nurse employed by the A. M. Ramer Company, and Rev. George R. G. Fisher all resided at 696 Oakland Avenue and that Charles G. Fisher, a clerk employed by the Merchants National Bank, and Frances W. Fisher, a stenographer employed by the State Hospital Inspector, both boarded at 696 Oakland Avenue. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. R. J. More and Mr. and Mrs. W. N. More all resided at 696 Oakland Avenue and Miss Agnes Budd resided at 698 Oakland Avenue. The 1930 city directory indicates that the residents of the apartment building located at this address were Mrs. Margaret E. Flynn, the widow of James Flynn (Apartment #1,) Stanley J. Scott, a engineer employed by the Northern Pacific RailRoad, and his wife, Geneva R. Scott (Apartment #2,) Martin J. Tobin, an inspector employed by the U. S. Customs Service (Apartment #3,) and Emil Anderson, a music teacher located at 25 West Fifth Street, and his wife, Lydia Anderson (Apartment #4.) Captain George R. G. Fisher was in charge of Red Cross work in Winchester, England, during World War I, later resided in St. Paul, and donated his collection of badges and insignia of British regiments in which Americans served, including the Coldstreams, Grenadiers, Guards, and scot Greys. George R. G. Fisher was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, was a student at Moody's Bible Institute at Chicago, Illinois, was ordained in 1894 by the Presbytery of Central South Dakota, was a pastor at Washington, Minnesota from 1894 until 1896, was a minister at Jordan, Minnesota from 1896 until 1897, was affiliated with the American Sunday School University in 1897, and resided in Rochester, Minnesota, in 1898. James P. Willis (1883-1955) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Murphy, and died in Hennepin County. Julius J. Miner (1884-1964) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Budahl, and died in Lincoln County, Minnesota. Robert Miles LaBelle ( -1916) died in Hennepin county. James W. Flynn ( -1910,) James Flynn ( -1913,) James Flynn ( -1914,) James Flynn ( -1917,) James Flynn ( -1927,) Lydia Anderson ( -1936,) Martin John Tobin ( -1945,) Lydia Anderson ( -1949,) and William Barnum ( -1949) all died in Ramsey County. Wilson N. More (1874-1959) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Bass, and died in Ramsey County. Margaret E. Flynn ( -1931) died in Clearwater County, Minnesota. Margaret Etta Flynn (1878-1961) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Brady, and died in Stearns County, Minnesota. Mrs. Agnes Carmichael Budd (1885-1959) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Carmichael, and died in Ramsey County. Stanley J. Scott (1891-1957) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Gorman, and died in Ramsey County. Geneva Rose Scott (1891-1979) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Wedl, and died in Pipestone County, Minnesota. The current owner of record of the property is Steven L. Carpenter, who resides in Inver Grove Heights, Minnesota. The 1915 Woman's Who's Who of America, compiled by John William Leonard and published by The American Commonwealth Company of New York, indicates that Mary Grant Smyth (Mrs. George Clarke) Squires resided at the former nearby 699 Oakland Avenue. In 1918, Mrs. George C. Squires resided at 21 South St. Albans Street. Mary Grant Smyth (Mrs. George C.) Squires (1859-1926) was born in San Antonio, Texas, the daughter of Henry Murney Smyth (1819-1898,) the founder of the H. M. Smyth Company, and Louise Gregory Smyth, moved to Minnesota with her family in 1867, graduated from the St. Paul High School, studied singing under Francis Korbay in New York City, married George Clarke Squires in St. Paul in 1886, favored woman's suffrage, was an Episcopalian, started the first large art class ever conducted in St. Paul, under the direction of Mrs. J. C. Burbank, chaired the fund raising effort for the anti-tuberculosis campaign in St. Paul, chaired the Civic League, was a State Regent in the Daughters of the American Revolution, was president of the Sibley House Association of Mendota, Minnesota, was a member of the St. Paul Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution and Colonial Dames, was a member of the White Bear Yacht Club, was a member of the New Century Club of St. Paul, pursued trout fishing as a hobby, resided at 21 South St. Albans Street in 1918, and died in Faribault County, Minnesota. George Clarke Squires (1852- ) was born in Greene, New York, attended the law school at the University of Michigan, moved to St. Paul in 1874, was admitted to the practice of law in Minnesota in 1875, married Mary Grant Smyth in 1885 in St. Paul, was the attorney for Cass Gilbert, was the treasurer of the Sons of the American Revolution of the State of Minnesota in 1895, was a law partner with Franklin H. Griggs from 1902 until 1903, resided at 19 Summit Court in 1908, and resided at this address in 1914. George C. Squires and F. W. M. Cutcheon unsuccessfully represented the gaslight company in the U. S. Supreme Court case St. Paul Gaslight Company v. City of St. Paul, 181 U.S. 142 (1901,) to recover the city ordinance prescribed interest on the cost of the construction of gas street lamps that had been replaced by electric street lamps to avoid a impermissible impairment of contract, when no state law causing an impairment was present and no jurisdiction established. George C. Squires and F. W. M. Cutcheon successfully represented the insurance company in the U. S. Supreme Court case Banholzer v. New York Life Insurance Company, 178 U.S. 402 (1900), a challenge to a denial of life insurance policy proceeds because the insurance company did not provide a New York insurance law required payment notice where the premiums were partially paid with a promissory note. George Clarke Squires and Mary Smyth Squires had three children, Mary Rebecca Squires (Mrs. Mackey) Thompson, Cameron Squires, and George Clarke Squires, Jr. ( -1918,) First Lieutenant in the 17th Aero Squadron, United States Army, attached to the No. 1 School of Fighting & Gunnery, Royal Air Force. The George C. Squires House is located at 19 Summit Court. Frank W. M. Cutcheon, the son of Byron M. Cutcheon and Marie Annie Warner Cutcheon and grandson of James McCutcheon, was a member of the Minnesota Society of the Sons of the American Revolution by virtue of great grandfather Phedrais McCutcheon, a Private in the New Hampshire Troops during the Revolutionary War. Franklin Hammond Griggs (1872- ,) the son of George Griggs and Alice Gordon Smith Griggs, the grandson of John W. Griggs, Sr., was born in Faribault, Minnesota, was educated in the public schools of St. Paul, graduated from Williams College in 1893, read the law in office of Young & Lightner in St. Paul, graduated from the University of Minnesota Law Department in 1895, received a Master of Laws degree from the University of Minnesota, was employed by the West Publishing Company as an editorial writer from 1894 until 1898, practiced law in 1898 as a member of the law firm of Hunt, Prendergast & Griggs, was appointed second assistant corporation counsel of the city of St. Paul in 1898, was the first assistant corporation counsel of the city of St. Paul from 1899 until 1902, entered into a law partnership with George C. Squires as Squires & Griggs from 1902 until 1903, was a special assistant to the State Attorney General from 1903 until 1904, was special counsel to the State Public Examiner in connection with an investigation of school lands and railroad earnings, was employed by the State Auditor's office, was a member of the law firm of Douglas & Griggs, married Louise Dyer, the daughter of J. Dyer, in St. Paul in 1899, resided at 26 Floral Avenue in 1907, and officed at the N. Y. Life Building in 1907. Alice G. Smith Griggs was the daughter of R. R. Smith, a prominent lumberman in Minneapolis. [See note for the American Railway Express Company for 47 Douglas Street.] [See note on the Northern Pacific RailRoad.]

701 Oakland Avenue: Built in 1997. The structure is a 2706 square foot, seven room, two bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, condominium/rowhouse, with a basement one car garage. The current owners of record of the property are John C. Holman and Mama C. Holman. John Holman was a 1953 graduate of St. Paul Academy. John C. Holman was a financial supporter of Growth and Justice in 2004, of Eco Education in 2004 and in 2005, of the Brain Injury Association of Minnesota in 2006, of the Friends of the Saint Paul Public Library in 2006, of Historic Saint Paul in 2006, and of Penumbra Theatre in 2007. Mr. and Mrs. John C. Holman were financial supporters of the Dodge Nature Center in 2006. Marna and John Holman were financial supporters of Books for Africa in 2000 and in 2004. John Holman (1935- ) and Marna Holman were featured in a 2002 article by Jane E. Brody in the New York Times about suffering sleep apnea. In 2004, Marna C. Holman, a self employed realtor associated with Coldwell Banker Burnet was a contributor to the Howard Dean and the John Kerry presidential campaigns. [See the note for the St. Paul Academy.]

703 Oakland Avenue: Built in 1997. The structure is a 2368 square foot, seven room, three bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, condominium/rowhouse, with a one car basement garage. The property was last sold for $395,000 and that sale occurred in 2001. The previous owners of record of the property were the trustees of Daniel J. Weisdorf and Pamela J. Weisdorf and the current owner of record of the property is Karin M. Erickson. Daniel J. Weisdorf, M.D., is the Adult Program Director for Fairview-University Blood and Marrow Transplant Services, Affiliated with the University of Minnesota, practices medecine with the University of Minnesota Physicians, and is the contact person and Principal Investigator for Minnesota for the Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Research Network. Daniel J. Weisdorf, M.D., representing the University of Minnesota, is a member of the Research and Publications Committee of the National Marrow Donor Program. Pamela J. Weisdorf is the director of the National Marrow Donor Program's office of patient advocacy. Pamela J. Weisdorf also is a donor to the College of Human Ecology at the University of Minnesota. Daniel Weisdorf and Pamela Weisdorf were donors in 2003 to Habitat for Humanity.

705 Oakland Avenue: Built in 1997. The structure is a 2368 square foot, six room, two bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, condominium/rowhouse. The current owners of record of the property are Noreen L. Conway and Stephen T. Conway. Noreen Conway is the Vice President for Public Relations and Communications of United Healthcare Corporation of Minneapolis. Noreen Conway and Stephen T. Conway were donors to the Summit Hill Association and to the Minnesota Aids Project.

683 West Osceola Avenue: [See Linwoodwest, Part 1, for information on this address.]

685 West Osceola Avenue: Built in 1920; Tudor Revival/Baronial in style. The house is a 2 1/2 story, stone and random rubble, half-timbered structure, with an intersecting hip and gable steeply pitched variegated slate roof which has five dormers (three small rounded arch dormers, one segmented arched wall dormer, and one shed wall dormer.) The house has an asymmetrical design. It has two chimneys and a two story projecting entrance bay on the east side of the house. It has recessed doors with an open porch. It also has irregular window placement. The house sits on an irregularly shaped corner lot. The 1979-1982 architectural survey field worker described the house as being a huge rambling house.

691 West Osceola Avenue: Built in 1890; Victorian in style; E. B. Bergholtz, architect, and E. N. Dodge, builder. The house was built for $5,000. The house is a three bay, 2868 square foot, 2 1/2 story, ten room, four bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, wood frame and asbestos shingle structure with an intersecting hip and gable roof which has one pedimented dormer and with a detached garage. It has a complex roofline. It also has stained and leaded glass, has a rounded west side, and has a two story, three sided, bay window on the east sideof the house. It was built for Charles Straus, who was a member of Robinson, Straus & Company, millinery importers, and who lived at 671 West Osceola Avenue. The 1891 city directory indicates that E. Bruno Bergholtz was an architect located at the Gilfillan Building and resided at 121 Wayzata and that Eben V. Dodge was a contractor and resided at 318 King Street. The 1894 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Charles Straus resided at this address. The 1902 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. E. D. Olmsted resided at this address. The 1910 city directory indicates that Francis E. Moore, associated with J. B. Hoxsie & Company, boarded at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that A. L. Janes resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Alex L. Janes, assistant general counsel for the Great Northern RailRoad, and his wife, Nancy W. Janes, resided at this address. Ernest B. Bergholtz ( -1935) died in Ramsey County. Charles Straus ( -1916) died in Faribault County, Minnesota. Francis E. Moore (1905-1965) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Hacker, and died in Hennepin County. Alexander L. Janes (1880-1959) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Chase, and died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are W. Brooks Donald and Karen L. Mackenzie. W. Brooks Donald, M. D., is a pediatrics physician who graduated from the Univeristy of Alabama Hospital-Birmingham Medical School in 1974, who completed a residency in pediatrics at the University of Minnesota in 1979, who is a Clinical Assistant Professor at the University of Minnesota, Department of Pediatrics, Adolescent Health Program, who is a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics-Minnesota Chapter, Committee for Children with Disabilities, Society for Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, and who practices at the HealthPartners Riverside Clinic in Minneapolis. [See note on the Great Northern RailRoad.]

697 West Osceola Avenue: Built in 1890; Victorian in style. The house is a two bay, 2 1/2 story, 12 room, six bedroom, three bathroom, wood frame and asbestos shingle structure with a truncated hip pedimented gable roof and with a detached garage. It also has a limestone foundation. The gable has a rounded arched attic window. It also has an enclosed pedimented porch and a second floor, three sided, projecting bay window. It also has leaded glass. The 1916, 1918, and 1924 city directories indicate that J. L. Whitaker resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that John L. Whitaker, a fruit broker, and his wife, Irene Whitaker, resided at this address. John L. Whitaker ( -1945) died in Ramsey County. The property was last sold for $187,000 and that sale occurred in 1991. The current owners of record of the property are Richard H. Olson and Wendy J. Olson.

700 West Osceola Avenue: Built in 1910. The structure is a 1 3/4 story, 1923 square foot, seven room, three bedroom, one bathroom, one half-bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. The 1930 city directory indicates that Alphonsa Liedl, a traveling salesman, and his wife, Maude T. Liedl, resided at this address. The previous owners of record of the property were Anthony A. Ackerman and Patricia A. Ackerman and the current owner of record of the property is Anthony A. Ackerman.

708 West Osceola Avenue: Built in 1909. The structure is a two story, 1836 square foot, three bedroom, one bathroom, one half-bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage. Rudolph C. Schneider was a World War I veteran who resided at this address in 1919. The 1920 city directory indicates that Amelia B. Schneider, the widow of Rudolph Schneider, resided at this address and that Martha E. Scheider, a stenographer at Finch, Van Slyke & McConnville, boarded at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Rudolph C. Schneider, a letter carrier at the Commercial Post Office Station, and his wife, Alwine Schneider, resided at this address. In 1994, Cassandra Ordway resided at this address and the Journey North Program World School for Adventure Learning was located at this address. Rudolph C. Schneider (1889-1960) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Runke, and died in Ramsey County. Amelia Schneider (1887-1963) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Mueller, and died in Ramsey County. Cassandra Ordway, a community volunteer, has been a member of the board of the Minnesota Zoo. The last sale of this property was in 1994 and the sale price was $224,000. The previous owner of record of the property was Martha E. Sheppard and the current owner of record of the property is Sean P. McGuire.

712 West Osceola Avenue: Lettau/Michaud House; Built in 1888 and altered in the 1930's; Victorian in style; Mould and McNicol, original architects, Ellerbe Architects, alteration architect, and William Lettau, original builder. The house is a three bay, 3719 square foot, 2 1/2 story, 13 room, six bedroom, three bathroom, brick and shingle structure with an intersecting hip gable roof which has three gabled dormers. The house has two chimneys. The house also has a complex roofline and has a projecting gable end on top of a two story rectangular projecting bay. The house was built for $8,000. The alteration to the house included the removal of the original front porch and the addition of a bay window. The house is now a duplex. William Lettau was the original owner of the house. The 1930 city directory indicates that J. Abundius Michaud, the treasurer of Michaud Brothers Inc., his wife, Rebecca Michaud, Larry E. Jasperson, a scaler employed by the North Western Hardwood Company, and his wife, Lilly Jasperson, resided at this address. The Michaud family were Lowertown wholesale grocers. Achille Michaud and Charles Michaud owned the Michaud Bros. Wholesale Grocers in the 1880's and 1890's. The duplex was still owned and occupied by the Michaud family in 1979-1982. City directories indicate that residents at this address were Mr. and Mrs. William Lettau (1890,) Mr. and Mrs. John McCullough and William McCullough (1892,) Mr. and Mrs. John McCullough and their daughter and Miss Annie Campbell (1894,) John McCulloch (1895 and 1897,) N. B. Jungeblut (1897,) Mr. and Mrs. H. C. Dodge and their daughter and Elwood F. Paxson (1902,) B. A. Ledy (1904 and 1906,) and F. A. Maas (1910, 1912, and 1914.) World War I veterans Francis J. Flanagan and Frank J. Flanigan (1897- ,) a Seaman, resided at this address in 1919. B. A. Ledy was born in Hamburg, Germany, came to the United States in 1892 and to St. Paul in 1894, began in the insurance business, incorporated the Minnesota Mutual Casualty Company, and became its president, and became the secretary of the St. Paul Auto Club. Ledy married Elise Meyer and the couple had two sons, Jay F. H. Ledy and Herbert Ledy. In 1912, the Ledy family resided at this address. Jay H. Ledy (1894-1968) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Meyer, and died in Ramsey County. Herbert Ledy (1896-1956) was born in Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. Bernard Ledy ( -1912,) Charles Michaud ( -1928,) and Achille Michaud ( -1935) all died in Ramsey County. Francis James Flanagan (1933-1992) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Robichek, and died in Stearns County, Minnesota. Frank J. Flanigan (1915-1986) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Hopkins, and died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is Robert M. Morse. [See note on Franklin Ellerbe for 590 Summit Avenue.]

716 West Osceola Avenue: Built in 1914. The structure is a 1 3/4 story, 2515 square foot, ten four bedroom, two one bathroom, one half-bathroom, stucco house, with an attached one car garage. The 1930 city directory indicates that Lincoln E. Penny, a physician who officed at the Hamm Building, and his wife, Elsie Penny, resided at this address. The property was last sold in 2005 with a sale price of $690,000. The previous owners of record of the property were Diana M. Drake and Peter M. Lloyd and the current owners of record of the property are Noreen D. Shaughnessy and Terrence P. Shaughnessy.

728 West Osceola Avenue: C. A. Eckman House Built in 1892 (1891 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Victorian in style; Walter Ife, architect, and E. J. Daly, builder. The house was built for $5,000. The house is a two bay, 2 1/2 story, limestone foundation, 2907 square foot, 12 room, six bedroom, three bathroom, woodframe, clapboard, and shingle structure with an intersecting gable roof. It utilizes an asymmetrical design with a strong vertical emphasis. It also has a wraparound porch. C. A. Eckman was from Mankato, Minnesota, and was the original owner. The 1916 and 1918 city directories indicate that A. L. Sibley resided at this address and the 1924 city directory indicates that B. O. Chapman resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Benjamin O. Chapman, president-treasurer of Merrill Greer Chapman Company, and his wife, Ethel Chapman, resided at this address. In 1934, Benjamin Ogden Chapman, Ethel Brown Chapman, Ann Calvert Chapman, Helen S. Chapman, and Priscilla Ogden Chapman resided at this address. Clarence H. Johnston, Sr., developed proposals for the Benjamin O. Chapman house in 1917 and 1926, but the plans were never executed. Carl August Eckman (1878-1962) was born outside of Minnesota and died in Hennepin County. Edward J. Daly ( -1937) died in Ramsey County. Benjamin Ogden Chapman ( -1934) died in Ramsey County. Ethel Chapman ( -1951) died in Blue Earth County, Minnesota. Helen Sophia Chapman ( -1924) died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is Sharon Rice Vaughn.

736 West Osceola Avenue: Built in 1917. The structure is a two story, 3267 square foot, 11 room, six bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, brick house, with a detached garage. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Achille Michaud resided at this address from 1917 to 1935. The 1930 city directory indicates that Achille Michaud, the president of Michaud Brothers, Inc., and his wife, Mary E. Michaud, resided at this address. The current owners of record of the property are Joan H. Mishek and Mark G. Mishek. Mark G. Mishek (1951- ) graduated from the University of Minnesota Law School, is the president of United Hospital, and is a 2004-2005 member of the board of directors of the American Health Lawyers Association, a nonpartisan, Internal Revenue Code, Section 501(c)(3), educational organization devoted to legal issues in the healthcare field. Joan Mishek was the co-chair of the 2004 United Hospital women's fashion show, for United Breast Center, that occurred at the White Bear Yacht Club.

744 West Osceola Avenue: Eugene Patterson House/Karl Elsinger Residence; Built in 1912; Tudor Revival in style; Thomas Holyoke, architect, and Joseph Morin, builder. The house was built for $20,000. The house is a four bay, 2 1/2 story, sandstone foundation, stone and random ashlar structure with a red ceramic tile intersecting gable roof which has two gabled dormers. It has one chimney. It utilizes simple bargeboards with a pendant. The house also has a stone garage. Eugene L. Patterson was vice president of the Patterson Company, a land and mortgage dealer, and was the original owner and resident of the house. The 1914, 1916, and 1918 city directories indicate that E. L. Patterson resided at this address, the 1920 city directory indicates that Shreve M. Archer, vice president of the Orville W. Hert Company, Inc., resided at this address, and the 1924 city directory indicates that S. M. Archer resided at this address. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Karl W. Elsinger resided at this address from 1925. The 1930 city directory indicates that Karl W. Elsinger and his wife, Ernestine Elsinger, resided at this address. Shreve Archer was president of the Archer, Daniels, Midland Company, which manufactured linseed oil and paint. George A. Archer ( -1932) founded the company with John W. Daniels ( -1931) in 1902. In 1923, the Archer-Daniels Linseed Company acquired Midland Linseed Products Company. Shreve M. Archer, Sr. ( -1947,) became the president of the company in 1924 and served as Chairman of the Board of Directors from 1932 to 1947. Shreve M. Archer, Jr. (1922-2004,) was born in St. Paul, attended the Phillips-Exeter Academy in Exeter, New Hampshire, and Princeton University in Princeton, New Jersey, served three years in the Air Force as a flying instructor, joined the Archer, Daniels, Midland Company in 1945 as a grain merchandiser, was named a member of the Board of Directors in 1948, retired from the Board of Directors in 1998 and was named Director Emeritus. Shreve Archer was the second owner of a 1932 Duesenberg J Judkins Fixed-Top Coupe, Chassis #2162, Engine #J-137, one of two Judkins Fixed-Top Coupes built, purchasing it from Joseph P. Wright, President of Continental Diamond Fiber Company. The Archer, Daniels, Midland Company is a world leader in agricultural processing, is one of the world's largest processors of soybeans, corn, wheat and cocoa, is a leader in the production of soy meal and oil, ethanol, corn sweeteners and flour, and produces value-added food and feed ingredients. In 2003, Archer, Daniels, Midland Company had over 26,000 employees, more than 270 processing plants, and net sales of $30.7 billion. Shreve Archer and Doris Archer purchased 990 Summit Avenue in 1927. The last sale of this property was in 2005 and the sale price was $1,550,000. The previous owner of record of the property was Mary T. Zehring and the current owners of record of the property are the trustees for Frederick C. Kaemmer and Katherine R. Tilney. [See note on Holyoke.] [See note on the Archer, Daniels, Midland Company and Shreve Archer for 744 West Osceola Avenue.]

745 West Osceola Avenue: Nathaniel B. Hinckley House; Built in 1891; Clarence H. Johnston, Sr., architect. The house was built for $8,000. The structure is a two story, 5064 square foot, 12 room, five bedroom, three bathroom, one half-bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage. The last sale of this property was in 2002 and the sale price was $682,500. The 1894 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. N. B. Hinckley resided at this address. The 1902 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. N. B. Hinckley resided at this address. World War I veterans Robert M. Hinckley and Thomas L. Hinckley resided at this address in 1919. The 1930 city directory indicates that Nathaniel B. Hinckley, who officed at the Endicott Building, and his wife, Isabella M. Hinckley, resided at this address. Nathaniel B. Hinckley ( -1936) died in Ramsey County. The last sale of this property was in 2002 and the sale price was $682,500. The current owners of record of the property are the trustees for Laura Nista and Maurizio Nista. [See note on Johnston.]

752 West Osceola Avenue: Built in 1905. The structure is a two story, 2743 square foot, ten room, four bedroom, two bathroom, two half-bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage. World War I veteran Ralph P. Nienhauser resided at this address in 1919. The 1930 city directory indicates that Francis D. Butler, a lawyer and a partner in the law firm of Doherty, Rumble, Bunn & Butler, and his wife, Alida Butler, resided at this address. The current owners of record of the property are Mary R. Gilbertson and Rolf E. Gilbertson.

757 West Osceola Avenue: Built in 1914 (1915 according to Minnesota Historical Society records.) The structure was built as a duplex. Unit 1 is a 2786 square foot, nine room, two bedroom, three bathroom brick condominium unit which was last sold in 1997 with a sale price of $310,000, which was previously owned by Susan B. Buzenberg and William E. Buzenberg, and which is currently owned by A. W. Clapp III and Sharon R. Clapp. Unit 2 is a 3000 square foot, eight room, two bedroom, two bathroom brick condominium unit, with a detached two car garage, which was last sold in 1997 with a sale price of $290,000, and which is currently owned by Suzanne K. Swan and James Tracy. James Tracy, a professor at the University of Minnesota, contributed to the John McCain for President campaign in 2007-2008. The 1930 city directory indicates that John Leuthold, who officed at 360 Robert Street, his wife, Aurelia W. Leuthold, and William L. Goodkind, the vice president of Schunemans & Mannheimers, resided at this address. William E. Buzenberg is a former vice president for News and Information at National Public Radio and was the Senior Director of News and Information at Minnesota Public Radio and was the Executive Producer at American RadioWorks. [See note for A. W. Clapp III and Sharon R. Clapp for 785 Goodrich Avenue.]

758 West Osceola Avenue: Built in 1887. The structure is a two story, 3300 square foot, ten room, six bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage. The 1894 and 1902 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. S. H. Dyer resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Louis C. Roller and his wife, Frances Roller, resided at this address. Samuril H. Dyer ( -1915) died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Anna Kieselbach and Thomas P. Kieslebach.

761 West Osceola Avenue: Built in 1904. The structure is a two story, 3034 square foot, 14 room, five bedroom, four bathroom, two half-bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided house, with a detached garage. The 1930 city directory indicates that Frederick E. Foley, a physician and a partner with Phillip F. Donohue in the medical practice partnership of Foley & Donohue, and his wife, Elizabeth D. Foley, resided at this address. The 1930 federal census indicates that Frederick E. B. Foley (1891- ,) a self-employed physician and general surgeon and the head of household, who was born in Minnesota to parents who were born in English Canada, his wife, Elizabeth D. Foley (1891- ,) who was born in Minnesota to a father who was born in Maine and a mother who was born in Minnesota, his daughter, Jessie Anne Foley (1916- ,) a student who was born in Minnesota, and his daughter, Elizabeth D. Foley (1918- ,) a student who was born in Minnesota, and a servant, Paris Basco (1900- ,) a butler who was born in Poland to parents who were born in Poland, all resided at this address. In 1934, Dr. Frederic E. B. Foley, Elizabeth Dearth Foley, Jessie A. Foley, and Elizabeth Foley resided at this address. Frederic Eugene Basil Foley was born in St. Cloud, Minnesota, was initially a language major, teaching English as he earned his bachelor's degree from Yale in 1914, received his medical degree from The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in 1918 and worked for the next two years with William Halsted, M.D., in the general surgical wards, then worked with Harvey Cushing, M.D., was a member of the surgical house staff of the Peter Brigham Hospital in Boston from 1920 to 1921, and was certified by the American Board of Urology in 1937, although there is no record that he ever had formal training in urology. In 1937, Frederic E. B. Foley authored the article "A new plastic operation for stricture at the uretero-pelvic junction. Report of 20 operations" in the Journal of Urology, in 1950, authored the article "A new cysto-urography and transurethral operating table: hydraulic operation providing prompt wide range position change" in the Journal of Urology, in 1958, authored the article "Fluid supply apparatus for cystoscopy and transurethral operations" in the Journal of Urology, in 1962, authored the article "A self-inflating bag catheter" in the Journal of Urology, and, in 1964, also authored the article "A Catheter-Inflating Cartridge" in the Journal of Urology. Frederic E. B. Foley also authored several articles with other doctors and researchers, including "The Effect Of Salt Ingestion On Cerebro-spinal Fluid Pressure And Brain Volume" with Tracy Jackson Putnam in 1920 in The American Journal of Physiology, "Massive electrocoagulation of deeply infiltrating bladder tumors combined with ligation of the vena cava for prevention of pulmonary embolism" with E. J. Richardson, W. P. Mulvaney, and I. Victor in 1953 in the Journal of Urology, "Placental transmission of the lupus erythematosus factor" with R. G. Bridge in 1954 in the American Journal of Medical Science, "Endobronchial hamartoma: report of two cases" with J. M. Young, E. Jones, F. A. Hughes, and J. R. Fox, Jr., in 1954 in the Journal of Thoracic Surgery, "Chronic recurrent pancreatitis due to injury to the duct of Santorini: a complication of subtotal gastrectomy" with J. T. Kilpatrick and S. F. Crabtree in 1956 in the Annals of Surgery, "Scalene node excision" with J. T. Kilpatrick, Mo Mansfield, and P. H. Philbin in 1956 in Surgery, "Serum hepatitis following dental procedures: a presentation of 15 cases, including three fatalities" with R. N. Gutheim in 1956 in The Annals of Internal Medicine, "Panel discussion on hydronephrosis" with W. J. McMartin, O. S. Culp, R. H. Flocks, F. E. Foley, T. E. Gibson, and T. D. Moore in 1957 in Urology Surv., "Rehabilitation of the flyer following thoracotomy" with S. H. Bear, J. A. Jarman, and W. R. Whitsell, Jr., in 1959 in The Journal of Aviation Medicine, "Thoracic surgical problems in flying personnel" with H. C. Green, Jr., W. R. Whitsell, Jr., and D. P. Douglass in 1960 in The Journal of the Medical Association of the State of Alabama, and "Hypertension due to unilateral renal disease" with J. A. Wilson in 1960 in Minnesota Medicine. The "Foley catheter," a one-piece latex self-retaining balloon catheter, originally known as the "hemostatic bag catheter," was used to control bleeding following transurethral resection of the prostate, eventually was also found to retain the catheter in position perfectly and the catheter could thus be used for continuous drainage of the bladder, and was named after Frederic E. B. Foley. Dr. Foley demonstrated the first production model at the annual meeting of the American Urological Association in 1935, but lost the patent for the device in a dispute with Paul Raiche of the Davol Rubber Company. Dr. Foley also invented a hydraulic table, was probably the first to describe an artificial sphincter, and developed a rotatable resectoscope that did not succeed because it was too bulky. Frederic E. B. Foley and Paris Basco were both World War I veterans. Frederic E. B. Foley (1891-1966) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Craig, and died of lung cancer in Ramsey County. Frederic E. B. Foley was an early developer of the balloon catheter. The current owner of record of the property is Marilyn Murray.

762 West Osceola Avenue: Built in 1900. The structure is a two story, 1963 square foot, eight room, four bedroom, one bathroom, one half-bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage. The 1902 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. D. Risser resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that John B. Baird resided at this address. C. Daniel Risser (1864-1957) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Hubner, and died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Rita S. Hanle and Robert V. Hanle.

767 West Osceola Avenue: Built in 1894. The structure is a two story, 2704 square foot, ten room, six bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. The 1894 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. M. F. Kain resided at this address. The 1902 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. R. H. Walker resided at this address. Michael F. Kain (1860- ) moved to St. Paul in 1883, was a printer, was the Ramsey County auditor from 1887 until 1892, and was assistant Minnesota public examiner after 1905. Richard H. Walker ( -1917) died in Ramsey County. Richard H. Walker ( -1990) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Adams, and died in Ramsey County. The last sale of this property was in 2006 and the sale price was $610,000. The previous owner of record of the property was John C. Kopchik and the current owners of record of the property are Kai P. Hovde and Michelle D. Mitchell. Kai P. Hovde was a member of the men's basketball team at St. Olaf College from 1992 until 1996. Kai Hovde (1974- ) was an account manager at Comdisco, was a vice president in network services sales at Datatrend Technologies, Inc., and is currently a senior account manager at Direct Source. Michelle D. Mitchell, an insurance attorney, was a 1999 graduate of the William Mitchell College of Law.

768 West Osceola Avenue: Frank E. Hitchcox House; Built in 1902; Colonial Revival/Tudor Revival in style; Louis Lockwood, architect, and P. A. Anderberg, builder. The house was built for $5,000. The house is a three bay, 2488 square foot, 2 1/2 story, limestone foundation, eight room, five bedroom, one bathroom, one half-bathroom, half-timbered, woodframe and clapboard structure with an intersecting hip and gable roof and with a detached garage. It has one chimney. It also has a two story, three sided, bay window and an open porch with Tuscan columns. The 1930 city directory indicates that Walter E. Kunze, the assistant trust officer employed by the Merchants Trust Company, and his wife, Caroline F. Kunze, resided at this address. Frank E. Hitchcox was the assistant manager of the Mutual Life Insurance Company of New York and he originally lived in White Bear Lake, Minnesota. City directories indicate that residents at this address were J. B. Johnston (1906 and 1908,) F. E. Hitchcox (1910, 1912, 1914, 1916 and 1918,) and F. P. Fellows (1924.) The Mutual Life Insurance Company was established in 1842, MONY was established in 1997 in conjunction with the mutual to stock conversion of The Mutual Life Insurance Company of New York, and the Mutual Life Insurance Company changed its name to the MONY Life Insurance Company in 1998. In 2000, MONY had total assets of $24.6 billion. In 2001, the MONY Group Inc. (MONY) and its subsidiary, MONY Acquisition Corp. (MONYAC,) acquired AGI and the Advest Bank and Trust Company of Hartford, Connecticut, with AGI merged into MONYAC and with MONYAC renamed as The Advest Group, Inc. MONY merged with AXA Financial, Inc. in 2004. Frank Everett Hitchcox ( -1951) died in Hennepin County. Peter A. Anderberg ( -1944) died in Ramsey County. Fred P. Fellows ( -1951) died in Pine County, Minnesota. The last sale of this property was in 2005 and the sale price was $689,900. The previous owners of record of the property were Max C. Ramsey III and Rose S. Ramsey and the current owners of record of the property are Joan Collins Kenny and Timothy M. Kenny. [See note on Lockwood for 1118 Summit Avenue.]

770 West Osceola Avenue: Built in 1908. The structure is a two story, 2440 square foot, ten room, six bedroom, two bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that John M. Reilly resided at this address from 1904 to 1914. The 1930 city directory indicates that Roger E. Reilly, the president of the John Martin Lumber Company, and his wife, Mary K. Reilly, resided at this address. The property was last sold in 1998 with a sale price of $440,000. The current owner of record of the property is John J. Reinartz. John J. Reinartz, M.D., a graduate of the University of Minnesota School of Medicine, is with the Department of Pathology at United Hospital and was a contributor to The Molecular Basis of Human Cancer, edited by William B. Coleman and published by Humana Press in 2001.

775 West Osceola Avenue: Built in 1941. The structure is a two story, 2475 square foot, nine room, three bedroom, three bathroom, one half-bathroom, brick house, with a detached garage. The last sale of this property was in 2001 and the sale price was $590,000. The current owners of record of the property are Candace A. Gislason and Scott H. Gislason. Candace Gislason is an assisted living nurse and the Regional Director for Farr Development, located in Maple Grove, Minnesota. Scott H. Gislason graduated from Gustavus Adolphus College, graduated from the William Mitchell College of Law in 1983, serves as the Estate and Business Planning Counsel for the North Star Resource Group, an independent financial advisory firm, and is an active member of the Rotary Club of Minneapolis, the Skylight Club, and the Minneapolis Ski Club.

780 West Osceola Avenue: Built in 1907. The structure is a two story, 2622 square foot, nine room, five bedroom, two bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage. The 1910 city directory indicates that George A. Roberts was a special agent for the Detroit Fire & Marine Insurance Company, officed at the Pioneer Press Building, and resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that George A. Roberts, an insurance agent who officed at the Merchants Bank Building, resided at this address. George A. Roberts ( -1935) died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is Penelope D. Scott.

784 West Osceola Avenue: Built in 1910. The structure is a two story, 2641 square foot, ten room, five bedroom, two bathroom, two half-bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided house, with a detached garage. The 1930 city directory indicates that Matthew/Mathew A. Stewart and his wife, Emma Stewart, resided at this address. The last sale of the property occurred in 1998 and the sale price was $364,000. The current owners of record of the property are Mark W. Conrad and Sarah M. McKenzie. Sarah McKenzie was a reporter for the Skyway News in 2004 and was a reporter for the Star-Tribune in 2001.

787 West Osceola Avenue: John A. Swain House; Built in 1888; Victorian in style; George Laurent, architect, and John Barnes, builder. The house was built for $5,000. The house is a two bay, 1796 square foot, 2 1/2 story, eight room, four bedroom, one bathroom, wood frame and clapboard, intersecting hip and gable roof structure. It has a two story bay window and a porch with Tuscan columns. The 1891 city directory indicates that John A. Swain was a clerk for Allen, Moon & Company, wholesale grocers, and resided at this address. The 1892 and 1894 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Swain resided at this address. The 1895, 1897, 1902, 1904, 1906, 1908, 1910, 1912, 1914, 1916, and 1918 city directories indicate that J. A. Swain resided at this address. The 1902 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Swain and their daughters resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Anton Amborn resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that J. A. Burns resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that John A. Burns, a lawyer and a partner with Harold C. Kerr, Arthur E. Nelson, and Roy J. Mohan in the law firm of Kerr, Nelson, Burns & Mohan, and his wife, Genevieve G. Burns, resided at this address. John A. Swain was a clerk for Moon & Company, a wholesale grocer. John Arthur Burns was born in Danville, Wisconsin, in 1882, was the son of Michael Burns and Sarah Mullen Burns, moved to St. Paul in 1901, graduated from the St. Paul College of Law in 1904, received a Master of Legal Letters from the University of Minnesota Law School in 1905, was the city attorney for West St. Paul, Minnesota, from 1905 to 1906, and was the assistant city attorney for St. Paul in 1909. John A. Burns drafted the city charter for the City of West St. Paul, Minnesota, in 1905. John A. Swain ( -1913,) John A. Burns ( -1919,) and John A. Burns ( -1921) all died in Ramsey County. John L. Barnes (1867-1936) was born in Ohio and died in Ramsey County. The Law Offices of Gordon J. Apple, P.C., are currently located at this address. The current owners of record of the property are Gordon J. Apple and Susan A. Thornton. Gordon Apple has a health law practice and is a frequent speaker on the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) and other health law topics at professional and corporate meetings. Susan Thornton is the Executive Director of the Minnesota Legislative Citizens Commission on Minnesota Resources. The 1879 city directory indicates that George Laurent, an architect employed by George Knight, roomed at 186 Wabasha Street. The 1880 federal census indicates that George Laurent (1843- ,) an architect, was born in Canada to parents who were both born in France, was single, and resided in the St. Paul household of J. Lunkenheimer. The Lunkenheimer household included J. Lunkenheimer (1849- ,) a saloon keeper who was born in Wisconsin, whose parents were born in Wittenberg, Germany, and who was married, Gertrude Lunkenheimer (1852- ,) who was born in Michigan, whose parents were born in Germany, and was the wife of J. Lunkenheimer, John Lunkenheimer (1871- ,) who was born in Minnesota, who was a student, and who was a son of J. Lunkenheimer, Henry Lunkenheimer (1876- ,) who was born in Minnesota and who was a son of J. Lunkenheimer, George E. Lunkenheimer (1879- ,) who was born in Minnesota and who was a son of J. Lunkenheimer, George Laurent, and A. F. Knight (1832- ,) who was an architect, who was born in New York, whose parents were both born in Maine, and who was single. John Lunkenheimer, Sr. (1819- ,) was born in Germany, was a carpenter, emigrated tom the United States in 1842, initially settled in Wisconsin and farmed for nine years, moved to Minnesota in 1852, settled in St. Paul, worked as a carpenter until 1853, operated the Darmstaeter Hoff, a German boarding house, until 1857, when the structure burned, built the American House on the corner of Fourth Street and Wabasha Street in 1860, sold the hotel to __?__ Pottgeiser, and then operated a boarding house on Wabasha Street. John Lunkenheimer, Jr. (1843-1889,) was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, resided in St. Paul after 1851, 1852, or 1853, served for one year in the Minnesota Mounted Rangers during the American Civil War, fought against the Dakota in the battle of Birch Coulee, Minnesota, in 1862, was a Major in the First Regiment of the Minnesota Militia, was Captain of the St. Paul Hook & Ladder Company in 1869, married Gertrude Smith in 1870, was the St. Paul Market Master in 1870, was a member of the St. Paul fire department for 18 years, its foreman for 12 years, and its president for five years, was a member of the St. Paul Volunteer Fire Department in 1886, represented the St. Paul Fire Department Association at the 1880 State Fireman's Association, was engaged in the livery business, was a Democrat, was a member of the House of Representatives representing Ramsey County (District 23) from 1876 until 1878, and was a Ramsey County deputy sheriff. Augustus F. Knight ( -1914) died in Ramsey County.

788 West Osceola Avenue: Built in 1890. The structure is a two story, 3060 square foot, ten room, five bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage. The property was last sold in 1994 with a sale price of $250,000. The 1894 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. S. W. Raudenbush resided at this address. Samuel Wesley Raudenbush subsequently resided at 791 West Linwood Avenue. The 1902 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. K. H. Beckjord resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that H. Thomas Quinlan and Lucille Quinlan, the assistant director of the State Board of Control, resided at this address. Samuel W. Raudenbush (1896- ,) a Private, was a World War I veteran, who resided at 2382 Doswell in 1919. Jesse B. Raudenbusch (1894- ,) a Sergeant, Stacy D. Raudenbusch (1888- ,) a Private, and Henry A. Raudenbush (1896- ,) a Sergeant, were World War I veterans who also resided at 2382 Doswell in 1919. Raudenbush & Sons Piano Company, established in 1883, produced both upright and grand pianos in small numbers. Macalester College has a Samuel Wesley Raudenbush Memorial that was established in 1956 by Mrs. Alma M. Raudenbush as a memorial to her husband and is awarded to a Protestant woman junior music major at the college. Samuel W. Raudenbush ( -1940) died in Ramsey County. Alma Hartman Raudenbush (1871-1956) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Stelzer, and died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is Kathleen A. Wilson.

789 West Osceola Avenue: Built in 1912. The structure is a two story, 2922 square foot, nine room, five bedroom, three bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage. World War I veterans John W. Condon and Jas. A. Strachan resided at this address in 1919. The 1920 city directory indicates that James L. Barry, associated with the Battle Cattle Company, roomed at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Alan G. Cary, the proprietor of Alan G. Cary & Company, a contractors equipment dealer, and his wife, Bonnie B. Cary, resided at this address. In 1934, A. G. Cary, Bonnie Blakely Cary, Alan Cary, Sheldon Cary, and Eleanor Cary resided at this address. Bonnie B. Cary (1885-1968) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Wampler, and died in Ramsey County. Alan G. Cary (1911-1968) had a mother with a maiden name of Blakeley and died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are James J. Fennell and Jane Fennell.

792 West Osceola Avenue: Built in 1897. The structure is a two story, 2554 square foot, ten room, five bedroom, one bathroom, one half-bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided house, with a detached garage. The 1902 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. John Wade resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that George W. Markham, a lawyer who officed at the Merchant Bank Building, and his wife, Rachel C. Markham, resided at this address. John Wade ( -1943) died in Ramsey County. The property was last sold for $193,000 and that sale occurred in 1997. The current owners of record of the property are David M. Thompson and Jody E. Thompson.

793 West Osceola Avenue: Built in 1922. The structure is a two story, 2756 square foot, seven room, four bedroom, two bathroom, stucco house, with a detached one car garage. The 1890, 1892, and 1894 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Stillwell resided at this address. The 1891 city directory indicates that Eugene J. Stilwell, associated with Wright, Barrett & Stilwell, resided at this address. The 1902 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Stillwell and their daughter all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Albert J. Dickinson, the passenger traffic manager employed by the Great Northern RailRoad, and his wife, Elizabeth Dickinson, resided at this address. Eugene Jay Stilwell (1849- ,) the son of Hiram Stilwell and Elizabeth Salisbury Stilwell, was born in Newburg, Wisconsin, moved to Minnesota with his parents in 1852, settled in St. Paul, was educated in common schools and high school of St. Paul, was a merchant, engaged in the mercantile business, Wright, Barrett & Stilwell, married Katherine "Katie" M. Goewey in 1878, moved to Minneapolis in 1901, was the second vice president of the Minnesota State Agricultural Society in 1920, was employed in the mercantile business until 1873, was employed in the paper business with Averill, Russell & Carpenter from 1873 until 1886, was a partner in Averill, Carpenter & Company until 1891, was a partner in its successor, Wright, Barrett & Stilwell Company, in 1891, sold his interest in Wright, Barrett & Stilwell Company in 1905, purchased an interest in the Minneapolis Paper Company in 1893, was the president and treasurer of the Minneapolis Paper Company, moved to Minneapolis in 1901, was a Mason, was a member of the Minneapolis Commercial Club, was a member of the Lafayette Club, resided at 1900 Park Avenue in Minneapolis in 1907, and officed at 400 South Fifth Street in Minneapolis in 1907. Eugene J. Stilwell was an organizer of the Junior Pioneer Association of St. Paul and was its first treasurer in 1889. Eugene Jay Stilwell ( -1933) died in Ramsey County. The property was last sold in 1991 with a sale price of $450,000. The current owners of record of the property are Jessie E. King and Michael J. King. [See note on the Great Northern RailRoad.]

796 West Osceola Avenue: Built in 1910. The structure is a two story, 2340 square foot, nine room, five bedroom, one bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage. The 1930 city directory indicates that Perry A. Swenson resided at this address. The property was last sold for $382,000 and that sale occurred in 1998. The current owners of record of the property are Ann Peddle Meitz and David W. Meitz. Ann Peddle Meitz is a graduate of Iowa State University and is a manager in the optical system division at 3M and a 1997 donor to the Iowa State University Department of Engineering. Dr. David Meitz is a graduate of the University of Illinois-Urbana and DePaul University, received his doctorate in polymer physical chemistry and rheology at Carnegie-Mellon University, is a Senior Research Specialist in the 3M Traffic Control Materials Division, involved in the development of retroreflective signage systems, and teaches the Polymers/Plastics portion of a course on Engineering Materials with Dr. Dennis Stephens and Dr. Kent Budd at University of St Thomas School of Engineering.

799 West Osceola Avenue: Built in 1913. The structure is a two story, 2834 square foot, nine room, five bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, brick house, with a detached garage. The 1930 city directory indicates that Max H. Herrmann and Eleanor Herrmann, an assistant, both resided at this address. The last sale of this property was in 1995 and the sale price was $220,000. The current owners of record of the property are Catherine W. White and Mark M. White.

803 West Osceola Avenue: Alfred J. Krank House; Built in 1906; Mildly Tudor Revival in style; Augustus F. Gauger, architect, and Krapp & Holm, builder. The house was built for $20,000. The house is a three bay, 2 1/2 story (two story according to Ramsey County property tax records,) 3711 square foot, 12 room, six bedroom, three bathroom, one half-bathroom, stone and random ashlar structure with an intersecting gable slate roof and with a detached garage. It has one chimney. It also has a two story three sided bay window on the west side of the house. It has rockfaced stone sills and an entrance on the east side of the house. It has a flat open porch. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Emma Krank, the widow of Alfred J. Krank, and Erma Krank, a clerk, both resided at this address. Alfred J. Krank (1866- ) was born in New Ulm and came to St. Paul in 1877. He apprenticed for the cutlery firm of Christian Franke & Herman Schnell, then became a partner in the firm. He took over the firm in 1903 and renamed it Alfred J. Krank Inc. He also expanded the firm to include retail and wholesale barber and beauty shop furniture and supplies. He also later manufactured cosmetics, creams, and shampoos. In 1920, his firm had 220 employees. In 1926, the firm moved to 1885 University Avenue, in the St. Paul Midway area. The Krank building features glazed terra cotta panels with brightly carved floral and classical motifs to adorn an otherwise utilitarian structure and has recently been renovated and renamed "Iris Park Place." Krank's Review, a publication for the benefit of the barber and beautician, was published monthly from 1925 to 1930 and eight times per year from 1930 to 1931. Alfred J. Krank was killed in an automobile-trolley car accident near Lake Minnetonka in 1928. The 1910, 1912, 1914, 1916, 1918, and 1924 city directories indicate that A. J. Krank resided at this address. Herman Schnell (1843-1905) was born in Germany and died in Ramsey County. Alfred Jacob Krank, Sr. ( -1928,) died in Hennepin County. Alfred Jacob Krank, Jr. (1928-1985,) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Gauer, and died in Washington County, Minnesota. Lancer Catering is now located at this address. The current owners of record of the property are Glenn P. Baron and Kathryn M. Holum. [See note on Augustus F. Gauger.]

806 West Osceola Avenue: Built in 1916. The structure is a two story, 2792 square foot, ten room, five bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, stucco house, with a detached one car garage. The 1920 city directory indicates that Elmer S. Albriton, Second Vice President of the Minnesota Mutual Life Insurance Company, resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Carl C. Chatterton, a physician and surgeon and a partner with William H. von der Weyer in the medical office of Chatterton & von der Weyer, located at the Lowry Medical Arts Building, and his wife, Laura Chatterton, resided at this address. The last sale of this property was in 1997 and the sale price was $264,000. The current owners of record of the property are Jayne Barnard McCoy and Patrick D. McCoy.

807 West Osceola Avenue: Built in 1884. The structure is a 1 3/4 story, 1381 square foot, seven room, three bedroom, one bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. The 1920 city directory indicates that Eugene Bryan, a lawyer at the Hackney Building, resided at this address and Pauline G. Bryan, a stenographer at the Hackney Land Company, boarded at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Harry C. Palmer, the president of the St. Paul Structural Steel Company, and his wife, Elizabeth Palmer, resided at this address. The St. Paul Structural Steel Company was a steel supplier and was involved in the construction of the Mounds Park beacon light in 1929, the Alonzo Ward Plaza in Aberdeen, South Dakota, the Ecolab Corporate Center in St. Paul in 1968, and the IDS Tower in Minneapolis in 1973. Eugene Bryan ( -1929) died in Sherburne County, Minnesota. The current owners of record of the property are Louise C. Wolfgram and Richard G. Wolfgram.

812 West Osceola Avenue: Built in 1904. The structure is a two story, 2028 square foot, eight room, four bedroom, one bathroom, frame house. The 1930 city directory indicates that Harry J. Murray, a director with Gordon & Ferguson, and his wife, Alice Murray, resided at this address. The current owner of record of the property is Janice Duschane Smith. [See note on Richards Gordon and the Gordon-Ferguson Company for 378 Summit Avenue.]

813 West Osceola Avenue: Built in 1895; Victorian in style. The house is a three bay, 2 1/2 story, 2425 square foot, ten room, five bedroom, one bathroom, one half-bathroom, coursed ashlar limestone foundation, wood frame, clapboard and shingle structure with an intersecting hip and gable roof structure which has one hip dormer and one gable dormer. It has two chimneys. The house has a narrow polygonal three story tower with a polygonal tower with a finial. It also has two stained glass transom windows. The house also has an open porch with Tuscan columns and a two story bay window on the east side. It also has a detached garage. The house is one of the most intact houses on the block. The 1979-1982 architectural survey fieldworker described the house as being basically box-like. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that George R. Foley resided at this address from 1893 to 1904. City directories indicate that residents at this address were George Foley (1895, 1897, and 1902,) J. B. Foley (1904,) W. J. Towle (1906, 1908, 1910, 1912, 1914, 1916, and 1918,) and C. J. Nimis (1924.) The 1930 city directory indicates that Carl T. Nimis, proprietor of Nimis & Nimis, electrical contractors, and his wife, Bertha Nimis, resided at this address. George D. A. Foley ( -1911,) George Richard Foley ( -1924,) and George A. Foley ( -1926) all died in Ramsey County. William J. Towle ( -1929) died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is William E. Steinman.

817 West Osceola Avenue: R. L. Ware House; Built in 1890; Queen Anne in style; Albert Zschocke, architect. The structure is a two story, 3154 square foot, 13 room, seven bedroom, one bathroom, one half-bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. The 1894 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. William P. Murray and Mrs. Winifred Deming all resided at this address. The 1902 city directory indicates that Dr. and Mrs. Richard Price resided at this address. The 1910 city directory indicates that Mary A. Converse, widow of Albert B. Converse, boarded at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Arthur W. Burch resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Arthur N./W. Burch, a manufacturers agent, and his wife, Alberta Burch, resided at this address. William Pitt Murray (1825/1827-1910,) the son of John L. Murray and Jane Wilson McCullough Murray, was born in Hamilton, Butler County, Ohio, attended the common schools of Hamilton, Ohio, until 1844, attended Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, from 1844 until 1846, read the law in the office of Oliver P. Morton, graduated from the University of Indiana law school in 1849, was admitted to the practice of law in Indiana in 1849, moved to Minnesota in 1849, settled in St. Paul in 1849, was a lawyer, was an unsuccessful candidate for the Minnesota Territorial House in the 1850 election, was a Methodist, was a member of the territorial legislature, elected on on the People's Ticket, representing Ramsey County (District 2) from 1852 to 1855 and again in 1857 and subsequently was its president, assisted Joe Rolette in blocking the enactment of legislation that would have changed the territorial capitol from St. Paul to St. Peter, Minnesota, married Caroline S. Conwell in 1853 at Laurel, Indiana, was involved in the acquisition of the charter for Hamline University, named for and financially supported by Methodist Bishop Leonidas Hamline, in Red Wing, Minnesota, in 1854, served as a member of the Minnesota constitutional convention representing Ramsey County (District 2) and was a member of the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Ramsey County (District 1) in 1863 and in 1868, served as a Minnesota state senator representing Ramsey County (District 1) from 1866 to 1867 and representing Ramsey County (District 23) from 1875 to 1876, was a Democrat in 1853 and in 1868, served on the St. Paul City Council for 21 years, was a St. Paul City Attorney from 1876 to 1889, was the editor of The Municipal Code of Saint Paul in 1884, was a member of the Ramsey County board of commissioners, was on the board of the St. Paul Work House in 1906, was the manager of State Reform and Training School for 15 years, visited Venezuela in 1866, was a member of the Freemasons for 53 years, was a member of the Ancient Order Of United Workmen, was a member of the Druids, was the president of the Fraternal Beneficial Association, settled the estate of Joseph R. Brown, led an attempt to remove Territorial Governor Willis A. Gorman (1816-1876) from office, was a notary public for over 50 years, was a St. Paul census official in 1890, and was involved in a legal challenge to the Minneapolis census count, was a land speculator, was involved with the establishment of the Minnesota Salt Company, was a member of the executive council of the Minnesota Historical Society, resided at 691 Dayton Avenue in 1907, officed at the Globe Building in 1907, and died in St. Paul. Murray County, Minnesota, in 1872, and the St. Paul Murray High School were both named for William Pitt Murray. William Pitt Murray and Caroline Conwell Murray were the parents of two sons and one daughter. Caroline Conwell Murray ( -1911) died in Ramsey County. Richard Price was a doctor of veterinary medicine who, in 1897, with Drs. C. C. Lyford and M. H. Reynolds, the only veterinarian employed at the University of Minnesota, called the meeting at which the Minnesota Veterinary Medical Association was founded. Richard Price ( -1909,) Richard Price ( -1919,) Richard Price ( -1920,) and Richard Price ( -1948) all died in Ramsey County. Mary Ann Converse (1887-1968) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Lotzer, and died in Red Lake County, Minnesota. Willis A. Gorman served in the United States House of Representatives from 1849 to 1853 from Indiana, was the second Territorial Governor of Minnesota from 1853 to 1857 as an appointee of President Franklin Pierce, served in the Minnesota House of Representatives from 1858 to 1859 as a Democrat, graduated from the University of Indiana law school, was a lawyer by profession, was a clerk in the Indiana state senate and was later elected to the Indiana state senate, fought in the Mexican-American War in 1846, was the civil and military governor of Puebla, Mexico, in 1848, served in the United States House of Representatives from Indiana from 1849 to 1853, masterminded as Governor of Minnesota an unsuccessful plan to move the capital of the territory from St. Paul to St. Peter, Minnesota, where he owned land for use as the new capitol grounds, but the plan was sidetracked by Pembina, Minnesota, legislator Joe Rolette, was colonel of the First Minnesota Volunteer Regiment, was appointed a brigadier-general in 1861, resumed a law practice in St. Paul in 1864, and was the St. Paul city attorney from 1869 to 1876. The previous owners of record of the property were Madelene M. Sachs and William J. Weisert and the current owner of record of the property is William J. Weisert. Walksport America also is currently located at this address. [See note for Albert Zschocke.]

820 West Osceola Avenue: Built in 1890. The structure is a two story, 2460 square foot, nine room, five bedroom, two bathroom, frame house, with a detached one car garage. The 1891 city directory indicates that Richard A. Carrington was the superintendent of the Northwest Fuel Company and resided at this address. The 1892 and 1894 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. R. A. Carrington and C. Crooks resided at this address. The 1902 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Van Bergen resided at this address. James J. Hill had an interest in the Northwest Fuel Company between 1877 and 1879. Edward Nelson Saunders, who was president and treasurer of the Northwestern Fuel Company, built the house at 323 Summit Avenue. In 1904, 1906, 1908, and 1910, the city directories indicate that A. B. Van Bergen resided at 886 West Osceola Avenue. Richard Adams Carrington, the son of Major Theodore Carrington ( -1875) and Anna Elizabeth Whitehall Carrington, was born in Arlington, Virginia, was educated in the private schools of Virginia, moved to Bayfield, Wisconsin, was employed as an assistant civil engineer by the Wisconsin Central RailRoad Company, moved to Minnesota in 1875, was employed in the freight department of the St. Paul & Pacific and the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba RailRoad, married Emilie Crooks, the daughter of Col. William Crooks, in 1882, then was employed as the foreman of the freight warehouse of the St. Paul & Pacific and the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba RailRoad, then was employed as the chief bill clerk by the St. Paul & Pacific and the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba RailRoad, then was employed by the North Western Fuel Company, was the superintendent of yards for the North Western Fuel Company, was in the coal business continuously after 1883, was a member of St. Clement's Episcopal church, and was a member of the Royal Arcanum. Richard Adams Carrington ( -1931) and Allen Bushnell Van Bergen ( -1948) both died in Ramsey County. The property was last sold in 1994 with a sale price of $227,000. The current owners of record of the property are Collin C. Rust and Pamela W. Scott. [See note on the NorthWestern Fuel Company for 1322 West Osceola Avenue.]

821 West Osceola Avenue: Built in 1890. The structure is a two story, 2533 square foot, eight room, four bedroom, two bathroom, asbestos-sided house, with a detached garage. The 1890 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. T. W. Forbes resided at this address. The 1891 city directory indicates that Thomas W. Forbes was a cashier at the Minnesota Mutual Life Insurance Company and resided at this address. The 1892 and 1894 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. T. W. Forbes and their daughter resided at this address. The 1902 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. F. V. Bartlett and their daughter and Mr. and Mrs. S. W. Raudenbush resided at this address. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Ina Russell Raudenbush (1860-1909,) the wife of Samuel W. Raudenbush, who was born in the United States to parents also born in the United States and who died of gangrene, died at St. Lukes Hospital in 1909. Parnell Maxwell (1895- ,) a Private, and George L. Carufel (1891- ,) a Private, were World War I veterans who resided at this address in 1919. The 1920 city directory indicates that Edward Carlson, a bookkeeper, resided at this address. Samuel Wesley Raudenbush ( -1940) was a partner in Raudenbush & Sons Piano Company, founded in either in 1883 or 1887. Samuel W. Raudenbush was a Pennsylvania native who became associated with the Kimball Piano Company in Chicago before he moved to Minnesota and began his own piano manufacturing firm. Before his death, Samuel Raudenbush estimated that he had manufactured and sold 40,000 pianos. He became widely known in the music trade over the northwest. Alma M. Raudenbush established the Samuel Wesley Raudenbush Memorial at Macalester College in 1956 as a memorial to her husband and under the memorial, $500 is awarded to a Protestant female junior music major. The current owners of record of the property are Julie Ann Wallschlaeger O'Brien and Michael Dillon O'Brien. [See note on the Minnesota Mutual Life Insurance Company for 1730 Portland Avenue.]

822 West Osceola Avenue: Built in 1954. The structure is a 2145 square foot, seven room, three bedroom, three bathroom, stucco rambler, with an attached garage. The current owners of record of the property are Mark A. Berman and Rae Berman.

825 West Osceola Avenue: Built in 1898. The structure is a two story, 2674 square foot, ten room, four bedroom, two bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided house, with a detached garage. The 1894 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. D. Olmsted and E. Benton Olmsted resided at this address. The 1902 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. E. S. Durment resided at this address. Edmund S. Durment (1860-1916,) the son of George W. Durment, a Methodist minister, and Henrietta Hoggart Durment, was born in Brown County, Indiana, was educated in public schools, attended the School of Mines of Rolla, Missouri, for two years, attended Drury College, a Congregational school, in Springfield, Missouri, graduated from the law school at Columbia University (now George Washington University) in Washington, D.C., in 1884, taught public school in Indiana, clerked in the War Department in Washington, D. C., for two years, was a pension examiner in Kentucky, arrived in St. Paul in 1885, was admitted to the practice of law in Minnesota in 1885, practiced law in St. Paul, was a member of the law firm of Lawler & Durment from 1886 until 1894, married Rose Smith of Iowa in 1887, was a member of the law firm of Lawler, Durment & Bigelow from 1894 until 1896, was a solo practitioner from 1896 until 1899, was a member of the law firm of Durment & Moore after 1899, was a member of the law firm of Durment, Moore & Oppenheimer with Albert R. Moore, William H. Oppenheimer, and H. J. Swanson after 1909, was a member of the faculty of the College of Law at the University of Minnesota, was a Republican member of the Minnesota State Senate representing Ramsey County (District 36) from 1907 until 1910, was a vice president of the St. Paul Commercial Club, was a member of the St. Paul Chamber of Commerce, was the president of the Ramsey County Bar Association, was a member of the Minnesota Club, was a member of the St. Paul Lincoln Club, was a member of the St. Paul Roosevelt Club, was a member of the Minnesota Society of New York, resided at 611 Holly Avenue in 1907 and 1909, officed at the Germania Bank Building in 1907, and died in Ramsey County. In 1886, Edmund S. Durment and Daniel W. Lawler established Lawler & Durment, the predecessor to the Oppenheimer, Wolff & Donnelly law firm. Edmund S. Durment was a member of the State Board of Corrections and Charities from 1895 to 1896. Edmund S. Durment, Jr., was a World War I veteran who resided at 611 Holly Avenue in 1919. The current owners of record of the property are Shirley V. Eggers and Paul E. Manly. [See note for Daniel Lawler for 882 West Linwood Avenue.]

826 West Osceola Avenue: Built in 1922. The structure is a two story, 3309 square foot, 14 room, six bedroom, three bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. The current owner of record of the property is Maria S. Ceplecha. Maria Ceplecha was a donor to the Guild Incorporated and The Guild of Catholic Women, Inc. in 2002 and 2003. Maria Stella Ceplecha is a freelance writer and a Spanish language and culture professor who lives part of the year in Avila, Spain.

829 West Osceola Avenue: Built in 1912. The structure is a two story, 1800 square foot, seven room, four bedroom, one bathroom, one half-bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. The 1920 city directory indicates that George A. Anderson and Helen E. Anderson both resided at this address and that Margaret Anderson, the widow of Hector Anderson, boarded at this address. George Andrew Anderson ( -1942) and Margaret Anderson ( -1948) both died in Ramsey County. The property was last sold in 2006 with a sale price of $454,000. The previous owner of record of the property was Laura E. Billings and the current owners of record of the property are Hugh P. Johnson and Sarah S. G. Johnson.

832 West Osceola Avenue: Built in 1890. The structure is a two story, 2887 square foot, nine room, five bedroom, three bathroom, half-bathroom, stucco house. The 1891 city directory indicates that Henry S. Haas was an insurance agent, that Abram H. Haas was an architect, and that Louis H. Haas was associated with Leffman & Haas, engaged in the real estate and loan business, and that the three men all resided at this address. The 1892 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. H. S. Haas, their daughter, L. H. Haas, A. H. Haas, S. H. Haas, and Edward Haas all resided at this address. The 1894 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. F. E. Foster resided at this address. The 1902 city directory indicates that Mrs. Olive Culbertson, Glover Culbertson, and A. P. Culbertson all resided at this address. Louis Haas was a member of the Standard Club in 1884. William Arthur Culbertson, a St. Paul banker, married Olive Glover of Evansville, Indiana, and the couple had two children, Glover Culbertson and Arthur Percy Culbertson. In 1887, W. P. Warner, Olive H. Culbertson, Stewart G. Culbertson, and Arthur Percy Culbertson owned property on Summit Avenue between Selby Avenue and Dale Street and were exempted from a street paving assessment based on their objection. In 1923, Olive Glover Culbertson resided at San Angelo, Texas. Arthur Percy Culbertson married Hazel May Hersey, resided in Tarrant County, Texas, and the couple had a daughter, Rebe May Culbertson (1926- .) St. Paul German-Jewish merchants organized the Standard Club in 1875, located at 79 Jackson Street, as a place to make social contacts. Louis Goodkind was an organizer of the Standard Club, the upper class Jewish club in St. Paul, which folded into the St. Paul Athletic Club when it was formed. In 1879, B. Goodkind was the financial secretary of the Standard Club. Floyd Elmer Foster (1906-1982) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Johnson, and died in Ramsey County. Louis H. Haas ( -1976) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Parchen, and died in Hennepin County. Louis H. Haas (1902-1979) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Landmann, and died in Dakota County. The last sale of this property was in 1996 and the sale price was $201,900. The current owners of record of the property are Amy K. Dickson and Michael J. Dickson. Michael J. Dickson was a senior vice president of the Minnesota Council on Foundations in 2006 and was associated with the Friends of the St. Paul Library in 2009.

835 West Osceola Avenue: Built in 1910. The structure is a two story, 1872 square foot, seven room, four bedroom, one bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. The current owners of record of the property are David J. Coleman and Rosalind H. Coleman.

839 West Osceola Avenue: Built in 1890. The structure is a two story, 3627 square foot, nine room, five bedroom, two bathroom, four half-bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided house, with a detached garage. The 1891 city directory indicates that Francis M. Finch, associated with the Finch Jewelry Company, resided on Bald Eagle Lake, Minnesota. The 1892 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. F. M. Finch resided at this address. The 1894 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. William H. Isom resided at this address. The 1902 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. James Forrestal resided at this address. Harold C. Freeman was a World War I veteran who resided at this address in 1919. James Forrestal ( -1922) died in Ramsey County. Harold C. Freeman ( -1935) died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Brian G. Belisle and Robin J. Belisle.

840 West Osceola Avenue: Built in 1898. The structure is a two story, 3085 square foot, eight room, four bedroom, one bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage. The 1902 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. S. A. Forest and Mr. and Mrs. M. J. Forest resided at this address. Samuel A. Forest (1828-1905) was born in the United States and died in Ramsey County. The property was last sold in 1997 with a sale price of $305,000. The current owner of record of the property is Catherine R. Gulsvig Wood. International Homestay Services Inc. also currently is located at this address.

845 West Osceola Avenue: Built in 1909. The structure is a two story, 1879 square foot, ten room, four bedroom, one bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage. The property was last sold for $511,530 and that sale occurred in 2004. The current owners of record of the property are Alexis D. Dubois and Christian M. Dubois. Christian M. Dubois, M.D., is an orthopedic surgeon at St. Croix Orthopaedics in Stillwater, Minnesota, who received his medical degree from the University of Chicago, Pritzker School of Medicine, and did his surgical internship and residency in orthopaedic surgery at the Yale University School of Medicine, and completed a fellowship in spinal surgery at the Rush University Medical Center in Chicago. Alexis D. Dubois ran in the 29th Annual Get in Gear 10K Run/Walk in 2006.

846 West Osceola Avenue: Built in 1900. The structure is a two story, 2554 square foot, eight room, four bedroom, two bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage. The 1902 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. H. P. Fahnestock resided at this address. Halleck P. Fahnestock (1861- ,) the son of Dr. Edward G. Fahnestock and M. Louise Tate Fahnestock, was born in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, was educated at the Pennsylvania College at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, received a doctorate from the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy in 1880, was a member of the Sigma Chi fraternity, enlisted and served in the South Dakota National Guard, engaged in the drug business in Watertown, South Dakota, from 1884 until 1886, was employed by the Sioux Banking Company as a land examiner from 1886 until 1893, was a travel representatives employed by the Youghiogheny & Lehigh Coal Company from 1893 until 1900, married Carrie Stevens in 1889, was the manager of the St. Paul branch of the Youghiogheny & Lehigh Coal Company from 1901 until 1903, was employed as the city agent by the Northwestern Fuel Company after 1903, was a member of the board of directors of the St. Paul Commercial Club, was a Mason, resided at 629 Grand Avenue in 1907, and officed at 346 Robert Street. The current owners of record of the property are Eunice Sobolewski and M. J. Sobolewski. Maxwell and Eunice Sobolewski were financial supporters of Cretin-Derham Hall High School in 2006. [See note on Cretin-Durham Hall High School for 1371 Osceola Avenue.]

849 West Osceola Avenue: Built in 1904. The structure is a two story, 2709 square foot, eight room, four bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage. The last sale of this property was in 1998 and the sale price was $318,000. The current owners of record of the property are Teresa A. Borzcik and Andrew W. Rabins. Teresa A. Borzcik was employed by 3M Speciality Materials in 2002. Andrew Rabins competed in the 2003 Grand Old Day 8K Men's Division Race.

852 West Osceola Avenue: P. M. Roberts House; Built in 1895 (1898 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Queen Anne in style. The structure is a two story, 3191 square foot, nine room, five bedroom, two bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. The 1902 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. P. M. Roberts resided at this address. The property was last sold in 2003 with a sale price of $693,450. The current owners of record of the property are Joseph J. Shaffer and Kristina K. Shaffer. Joseph J. Shaffer graduated from United Medical and Dental Schools of Guys and St. Thomas's Hospitals at London, England, in 1993, interned at Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio, did a dermatology residency at St. Luke's/Roosevelt Hospital Center in New York City, New York, and is a physician with Dermatology Consultants, P.A. Joseph Shaffer, with Dermatology Consultants, contributed to the Barack Obama for President campaign in 2007-2008.

853 West Osceola Avenue: Built in 1904. The structure is a two story, 1745 square foot, six room, three bedroom, two bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage. The 1910 city directory indicates that Louis J. Consigny was a credit manager for Armour & Company who resided at this address. The current owners of record of the property are Jeffry W. Peters and Kaye Thompson Peters.

856 West Osceola Avenue: Built in 1911. The structure is a two story, 2112 square foot, nine room, four bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, frame house, with an attached garage. The last sale of this property was in 2003 and the sale price was $460,000. The current owners of record of the property are Heidi L. Staloch and Mark P. Staloch. Heidi L. Staloch was born in Waukesha, Wisconsin, graduated from Augsburg College in 1993, graduated from the William Mitchell College of Law in 1996, and practices debt collection law with the Gurstel Law Firm. Heidi L. Staloch and Mark P. Staloch are members of the House of Hope Presbyterian Church, have a son, Porter Gray Staloch, and were donors to Bolder Options, a child mentoring organization, in 2002.

859 West Osceola Avenue: Mott House; Built in 1905; Eclectic in style; Romer & Son, builder. The house was built for $10,000. The house is a three bay, 2 1/2 story, 4178 square foot, 16 room, eight bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, stucco structure with a hip roof which has one gabled dormer and which has a detached garage. It also has flared overhanging eaves and exposed rafters. It also has a two story recessed porch that is supported by colossal columns and has a cast iron balustrade. The house was built for George C. Mott and Edwin Mott. George C. Mott was born in St. Paul in 1861, worked for the St. Paul Fire & Marine Insurance Company for 20 years, moved to Chicago in 1892, returned to St. Paul, and was an agent for the New York Underwriters Agency in 1900. Edwin Mott was an assistant cashier for the Second National Bank. The house is currently a duplex and has been substantially altered from its original appearance. City directories indicate that residents at this address were Edwin Mott, G. C. Mott, and Mrs. E. J. Mott (1908, 1910, 1912, 1914, 1916, and 1918,) and Charles Wood and W. H. Wood (1924.) Romer & Son was a contracting business founded by Frederick J. Romer (1840-1906) in 1906. Frederick H. Romer (1875- ) was born in St. Paul, was the son of Frederick J. Romer and Sophia Wilcken Romer, was employed by Cass Gilbert and by Reed & Stem, and was married to Edythe Amelia Rapp Romer. Frederick H. Romer was one of the charter members of the Rotary Club of St. Paul #10, founded in 1910. William H. Wood (1844- )was born in Sandwich, Canada, was the son of William R. Wood and Harriet Marsh Wood, and was an astronomer and engineer who was employed by the Chicago, Burlington & Northern RailRoad in 1885, by the Mexican Central RailRoad from 1887 to 1889, by the Mexican Southern RailRoad from 1889 to 1892, by the Northwestern Coal RailRoad in 1893, and by the U. S. Government in Montana and Wyoming in 1896. William H. Wood married Frances Guiteau in 1874 and the couple had four children, a daughter who became Mrs. E. G. Lee, Mary Wood, Katherine Wood, and William R. Wood, who became the superintendent of the Great Western RailRoad shops. George Clark Mott ( -1928,) William Harry Wood ( -1930,) William Henry Wood ( -1935,) Edwin Mott ( -1938,) and Frederick H. Romer ( -1948) all died in Ramsey County. The previous owner of record of the property was Ruth Anne Depitera and the current owner of record of the property is the trustee for Ruth Anne Teisburg. [See note on the St. Paul Fire & Marine Insurance Company for 297 Bates Avenue.]

20 North St. Albans Street: Sorrento Apartments; Built in 1912. The brick building is a former apartment house that has been converted to condominium units. Unit 1-S is a 1050 square foot, five room, two bedroom, one bathroom condominium, which was last sold for $58,599 and that sale occurred in 1991 and which is owned by Jeffrey A. Walkup. Unit 2-S is a 1050 square foot, seven room, three bedroom, one bathroom condominium, which was previously owned by Elsa E. Frettem, which sold in 2004 for $240,000, and which is currently owned by Elizabeth L. Koosman. Unit 3-S is a 1050 square foot, five room, two bedroom, one bathroom condominium, which was last sold in 2004 with a sale price of $170,000 and which is owned by Jared A. Erdmann. Unit 4-S is a 1050 square foot, five room, two bedroom, one bathroom condominium, with the last sale of this property in 2003 at a sale price of $172,000, and is owned by Laurel W. McQueen. Gonzalez, Ltd., is currently located at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that Rev. and Mrs. Benjamin Longley, Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Copley, their daughter, and Rev. R. G. Fletcher all resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Charles W. Copley, a clerk employed by the Commissioner of Public Safety, and Julia M. Flynn both resided at this address and that Mary E. Copley, a teacher at the Mechanic Arts High School, and Martha B. Flynn both boarded at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Longley, Mrs. C. W. Copley, her daughter, Dr. J. C. Staley, Miss Katherine Staley, and Miss Mary Staley all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that the residents of the apartment building located at this address were Carl J. Woodrow, a clerk employed by the Farmers Union Terminal Association, and his wife, Hazel F. Woodrow (Apartment #1,) Mrs. Lulu B. Shuman, the widow of Milton G. Shuman (Apartment #2,) Gertrude Sinclair, a teacher at the Neill School (Apartment #3,) Mrs. Harriet M. Longley, the widow of Benjamin Longley (Apartment #4,) Frank M. Wilkins, a clerk employed by the St. Paul Union Stockyards Company, and his wife, Margaret Wilkins (Apartment #5,) Edmund Mottershead (Apartment #6,) Frank H. Chase, a sales manager employed by the Griggs Cooper & Company (Apartment #7,) and Mrs. Florence L. Fosbroke, a teacher at Mechanics Arts High School (Apartment #8.) Benjamin Longley (1848- ,) the son of Edmund Longley and Annis Matilda Kilborn Longley, was born at Waterloo, Quebec, Canada, attended the Frost Village Academy in Quebec, Canada, from 1860 until 1863, was educated at the Waterloo Academy in Quebec, Canada, from 1863 until 1865, served with Canadian volunteers against Fenian raiders in 1866, graduated from Victoria University of Ontario, Canada, from 1870 until 1874, received a divinity doctorate from Hamline University in St. Paul in 1905, was a Methodist Episcopalian, was a minister of religion, was a pastor of various churches in the provinces of Quebec, Canada, and Ontario, Canada, from 1868 until 1888, was a pastor of various churches in Minnesota from 1889 until 1897, was the pastor of the Central Park Church of St. Paul from 1897 until 1906, was a principal spokesperson against Sunday baseball games, and resided at 899 Iglehart Street in 1907. Dr. John C. Staley (1875- ,) the son of John C. Staley, was born in Bureau County, Illinois, moved to North Dakota with his parents, graduated from the Bismarck, North Dakota, High School, attended the Valley City, North Dakota, Normal School, was a 1903 graduate of the University of Minnesota Medical School, was a member of the Alpha Kappa Kappa fraternity, interned at St. Luke's Hospital from 1903 until 1904, was a physician and surgeon, was a clinical assistant in medicine at the University of Minnesota Medical School in 1909, was attached to the American Ambulance Hospital, Paris, France, during World War I, was a volunteer assistant in urology at the University of Minnesota Medical School in 1918, was a member of the medical staff at the City and County Hospital/Ancker Memorial Hospital, was a member of the medical staff at St. Luke's Hospital, was a member of the American Medical Association, was a member of the Minnesota State Medical Association, was a member of the Ramsey County Medical Society, was a Scottish Rite Mason, was a member of the Royal Arcanum, officed at 421 West University Avenue in 1907, officed at the Lowry Building in 1916, resided at 624 Selby Avenue in 1907, and resided at the Angus Hotel in 1916. Mary E. Copley was a teacher at Mechanics Arts High School in 1928. Charles W. Copley ( -1922,) Florence Longley Fosbroke ( -1937,) Edmund Mottershead ( -1943,) Harriet M. Longley ( -1945,) and Frank H. Chase ( -1948) all died in Ramsey County. Mary E. Copley (1884-1970) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Smith, and died in Ramsey County. Margaret J. Wilkins (1898-1982) was born outside of Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. Elsa E. Frettem is a former Peace Corps volunteer in India from 1968 to 1970, is the Communications chair for the Minnesota Returned Peace Corps Volunteers organization, is a communications specialist for the Intelligent Femmes Alliance, a Twin Cities alliance of women working in all forms of new media, is currently employed by Minnetronix Inc., a medical device design and development firm, and previously worked for 3M. Jared A. Erdmann is a former Peace Corps volunteer in Honduras from 1995 to 1997, is board member at large for the Minnesota Returned Peace Corps Volunteers organization, and is employed by the University of Minnesota, School of Public Health, Hispanic Advocacy Consumer Empowerment through Research (HACER.) [See note on the Mechanic Arts High School for 656 Portland Avenue.] [See note for St. Paul Union Stockyards for 537 Ohio Street.]

28 North St. Albans Street: Built in 1912. The brick building is a former apartment house that has been converted to condominium units. Unit 1-N is a 1050 square foot, seven room, three bedroom, one bathroom condominium, which is currently owned by Steven L. Kaplan. Unit 2-N is a 1050 square foot, four room, one bedroom, one bathroom condominium which was previously owned by Mark W. Isom, which was last sold for $189,900 and that sale occurred in 2006, and which is currently owned by Terry A. Grigg. Unit 3-N is a 1050 square foot, five room, two bedroom, one bathroom condominium, which is owned by Dyan Matczynski. Unit 4-N is a 1050 square foot, five room, two bedroom, one bathroom condominium, with the last sale of this property in 1994 at a sale price of $66,500, which is owned by Alicia M. Thompson. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mrs. C. C. Hoyt, T. J. McCoy, and P. J. Herges all resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. F. N. Hille, Mrs. Amanda Schwennsen, and her daughters all resided at this address. Thomas Joseph McCoy ( -1950) died in Ramsey County. Peter Joseph Herges (1882-1965) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Melchoir, and died in Ramsey County. Friedrich H. "Jack F." Hille (1904-1990) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Hofeman, and died in Hennepin County. Mark W. Isom is employed by Broadcast Strategy Advisors, previously was the assistant news director with Hubbard Broadcasting's CONUS Communications, and was employed by Media Rare in 2003 in an expansion of its broadcast services. Dyan Matczynski was a long term civil service employee at the University of Minnesota in 2001 and is an employment consultant at the Job Center at the University of Minnesota.

47 North St. Albans Street: Built in 1907 (1906 according to the 1979-1982 Ramsey County Historic Sites Survey;) Fake Italianate in style. The structure is a 805 square foot, five room, two bedroom, one bathroom, one half-bathroom, brick house. The building originally was built as the boiler house for the apartment buildings at 682-688 Holly Avenue. The structure is a two bay, 1 1/2 story, soft painted brick and stretcher bond building with a steeply pitched hipped roof with five large gabled wood shingled, open wall, dormers and topped by a rectangular cuppola, with 1/1 rectangular fenestration, and a limestone foundation. The roof mass rises from a wide parallel frieze with large paired brackets. The dormers have paired wood panels in a full sun motif at the level of the roof eaves. The window frames have incised carvings. The first floor has an open entrance porch with turned columns and balusters, brackets at the cornice, a slight pediment over the entrance. The windows have hoods with an incised floral motif. The front door has a segmental stained glass panel. The window sills are brick. The house appears to have been significantly altered from its original design, with the 1979-1982 Ramsey County Historic Sites Survey worker indicating that the building is a classic case of misguided preservation efforts, adding a fanciful Italianate appearance to a straightforwardly designed boiler house. The property was last sold in 2003 with a sale price of $310,000. The previous owner of record of the property was VF Associates LLC, located at 61 South St. Albans Street, and the current owner of record of the property is Margaret L. Lynden, who resides at 439 Portland Avenue. Margaret Lynden was president of Muggles Magical Toys, Inc., doll and stuffed toy manufacturing, in St. Paul in 2001.

51 North St. Albans Street: Built in 1907. The structure is a one story, 797 square foot, five room, two bedroom, one bathroom, one half-bathroom, brick house. The last sale of this property was in 2003 and the sale price was $316,000. The current owners of record of the property are Alan W. Domin and Jessica Walsh.

67-75 North St. Albans Street: Webster School; Built in 1926 (1925 according to the Minnesota Historical Society.) The property is a three story, 193272 square foot, school building. The current owner of record of the property is Independent School District No. 625 (St. Paul.)

72 North St. Albans Street: Built in 1900. The structure is a two story, 1672 square foot, eight room, three bedroom, two bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage. The 1902 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Fitzgerald resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Mary M. Flanagan, a clerk employed by the Northern Pacific RailRoad, boarded at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that this address was vacant. Thomas Fitzgerald ( -1916,) Thomas Fitzgerald ( -1920,) Thomas Fitzgerald ( -1921,) Thomas J. Fitzgerald ( -1921,) Thomas A. Fitzgerald ( -1940,) and Thomas Fitzgerald ( -1943) all died in Ramsey County. Thomas Fitzgerald (1867-1958) was born outside of Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. The property was last sold for $145,000 and that sale occurred in 1999. The current owners of record of the property are Rebecca A. Masterman and Thomas B. Masterman, who reside at 658 Third Street East. Rebecca Melton Masterman (1970- ) has a bachelor's degree and a doctorate degree in Entomology (2000) from the University of Minnesota, has been a real estate agent with Independent Brokers Realty Realty since 2001, and ran in the Las Vegas Six Tunnels Half Marathon, in the Time To Fly 5K, and in the Junior League of Saint Paul Halloween Hustle in 2006, and ran in the Charities Challenge Arthritis 5K Run, in the Human Race 5K Women, the Bolder Options Bolder Dash, in the Brian Kraft Memorial 5K, and in the Minnesota Vikings Gridiron Gallop 5K in 2007. [See note on the Northern Pacific RailRoad.]

9 South St. Albans Street: Built in 1893. The structure is a stone condominium/rowhouse. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that the house, with the house at 684 Summit Avenue, was a double house built by Joseph Lockey, who never lived in the structure. Unit 1A is a 1775 square foot, four room, one bedroom, one bathroom, one half-bathroom, condominium/rowhouse unit, with the last sale of this property in 1993 and a sale price of $151,500, which is owned by Marilyn Bach. Unit 2A is a 1780 square foot, five room, two bedroom, two bathroom, condominium/rowhouse unit with the last sale of this property in 2004 and a sale price of $349,000, which is owned by Bonnie Sue Ralstad. Unit 3A is a 1780 square foot, four room, two bedroom, one bathroom, one half-bathroom, condominium/rowhouse unit, which was previously owned by Jennifer L. Spangler Wagner and Robert W. Wagner, which was last sold in 2005 with a sale price of $416,000, and which is currently owned by Lorelei D. Ritter and Scott F. Ritter. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that George Sommers, Sr., resided at this address from 1894 to 1920. The 1896 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. George Sommers and their daughters, Benjamin Sommers, George Sommers, Jr., and Charles L. Sommers all resided at this address. The 1898 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. George Sommers and their daughters, Benjamin Sommers, George Sommers, Jr., Charles L. Sommers, and Henry S. Sommers all resided at this address. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that George Sommers and Amalia Sommers, husband and wife, resided at this address in 1899. The 1900 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. George Sommers, the Misses Sommers, Benjamin Sommers, Henry S. Sommers, and Charles L. Sommers all resided at this address. The 1902 city directory indicates that Mrs. George Sommers, the Misses Sommers, Benjamin Sommers, Henry S. Sommers, and C. L. Sommers all resided at this address. The University of Minnesota Alumni Record indicates that Henry S. Sommers, an 1898 graduate and a buyer employed by G. Sommers & Company, resided at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mrs. George Sommers and her daughter both resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Randall and I. S. Randall all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Clara S. Randall, the widow of Henry E. Randall, and Imbert S. Randall, a bond dealer, both resided at this address. In 1934, Clara Sommers Randall, the widow of Henry E. Randall, and Imbert Randall both resided at this address and were members of the Women's City Club of St. Paul. Amalie Stern Sommers was the wife of George Sommers and Benjamin Sommers and Charles L. Sommers were their sons. Charles L. Sommers was an initial member of the board for the Ramsey County Troop #1 (ultimately the Indianhead Council and now the North Star Council) of the Boy Scouts of America in 1910, with C. F. Proctor, Foster Hannaford, Clarence B. Randall, George M. Brack, Frank R. Neibel, the Honorable Grier M. Orr, the Honorable Carlton F. McNally, Charles Bunn, Webster Wheelock, and Frederic D. McCarthy. The former Charles L. Sommers Service Center, remodeled and renamed as the Hulings Scout Service Center to honor the long commitment and support of Betty Hulings and A. D. "Bill" Hulings of Bayport, Minnesota, is the office or headquarters for the former Indianhead Council/current Northern Star Council of the Boy Scouts of America. The council operates the Charles L. Sommers Canoe Base in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area as a high adventure trip location. The 1917 Catalogue of the Beta Theta Pi Fraternity, published by James T. Brown of New York, indicated that Charles Leissring Sommers received a B. L. degree from the University of Minnesota in 1890, was a wholesale merchant, and was a member of the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota. The 1915 city directory indicates that Harry S. Sommers was the treasurer of G. Sommers & Co., a general merchandise, toys, and department store supplies firm, resided at 936 Portland Avenue. The 1920 city directory indicates that Henry S. Sommers, the treasurer of the G. Sommers Company, resided at 794 West Linwood Avenue. The G. Sommers Company, incorporated in 1904, was the successor of a wholesale and general merchandising company that existed from 1851. The company disbanded in 1941. G. Sommers & Company was one of the largest wholesale catalog firms in business at the turn of the 20th Century with an area of distribution from the Great Lakes west to the Pacific and from the Canadian border south to San Francisco. Clara Sommers Randall (1861-1953) was the author of Story of George and Amalie Sommers, published in St. Paul in 1959. The Nathan and Theresa Berman Upper Midwest Jewish Archives at the University of Minnesota has in its collection an essay and correspondence by Charles Sommers and Amalie Stern Sommers regarding Professor William A. Schaper, an American-born son of a German immigrant, and his dismissal by University of Minnesota in 1917 and a copy of Amalie Sommers' will from 1923. Dr. William August Schaper (1869-1955) was born in La Crosse, Wisconsin, graduated from the University of Wisconsin in 1895, studied at Columbia University and at the University of Berlin, resided in Minneapolis, and was the chair of the political science department of the University of Minnesota in 1917 when he was dismissed by a unanimous vote of the Board of Regents from the University faculty for alleged disloyalty during the anti-German scare of World War I because he came out publicly against the United States involvement in the war. In 1938, the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota rescinded the 1917 dismissal action, reinstated Dr. Schaper as Professor Emeritus, and paid the sum of $5,000 in lieu of salary for the 1917-1918 academic year. Future U. S. Supreme Court justice Pierce Butler was one of three prominent attorneys serving as regents of the University of Minnesota in 1917 and, with Board of Regents President Fred Snyder, took the lead in the Schaper dismissal, which had been initiated by a complaint from an unidentified member of the State Public Safety Commission. The American Association of University Professors, in response to a complaint filed by Schaper, advocated procedural safeguards in potential dismissals of professors, including specific charges, impartial investigations, fair hearings, definite findings referring to precise acts, but never specifically addressed Schaper's dismissal, which lacked any procedural safeguards. Investigations by Max Lowenthal and Felix Frankfurter, while connected with the United States Labor Conciliation Commission in December, 1917, raised a number of questions about the Schaper dismissal and requested the University to reopen its consideration of the action, but the University Board of Regents declined. In 1927, Dr. William A. Schaper was the head of the department of finance and professor of finance in the school of business of the University of Oklahoma at Norman, Oklahoma, where there is a William A. Schaper Memorial Fund. In 1913, the Board of Regents established an independent department of political science, with professor William A. Schaper, a University of Wisconsin (B.A. and M.A.) and Columbia University (Ph. D.) alumnus, as professor and chair, after having operated as a department within the College of Science, Literature and the Arts since 1879 and after a name change to the Department of Economics and Politics in 1906. Schaper's dissertation, published as Sectionalism and Representation in South Carolina, won for him the Justin Winsor prize of the American Historical Association in 1900. Before World War I, Schaper had established himself as an expert on local government, gained the reputation of being something of a populist, and earned the enmity of powerful business and financial interests in the state. There is a Snyder Hall on the St. Paul (Farm) Campus of the University of Minnesota, presumably named after Fred Snyder. Charles Lysring Sommers (1870- ,) the son of George Sommers and Amelia Stern Sommers, was born in Green Bay, Wisconsin, graduated from Green Bay, Wisconsin, High School in 1886, graduated from the University of Minnesota in 1890, was a wholesale merchant, was the secretary of G. Sommers & Company, Inc., after 1882, a wholesale catalogue general merchandiser, married Rosa Davidson in 1904, was a member of Phi Belta Kappa, was a member of the St. Paul Commercial Club, was a member of the Minnesota Boat Club, was a member of the Amateur Athletic Association of St Paul, resided at 592 Grand Avenue in 1907, and officed at the corner of Sixth Street and Wacouta Street in 1907. Imbert S. Randall was a soldier from Ramsey County during World War I. Henry E. Randall was a lawyer. Grier M. Orr (1856- ,) the son of Hunter Orr (1812- ) and Margaret Lawson Orr (1812- ,) was born in Pike Furnace, Pennsylvania, moved with his family to Oconto County, Wisconsin, graduated from Heidelberg College, Tiffin, Ohio, in 1878, moved to Ohio in 1880, graduated from the Cincinnati Law School in 1883, was admitted to the practice of law in Ohio, practiced law for two years at Lima, Ohio, moved to St. Paul in 1884/1885, was the court commissioner of Ramsey county, married Mrs. Etta Soule White, the daughter of J. W. Soule, in Rochester, Minnesota, in 1896, was a jurist, was a judge of the St. Paul municipal court from 1894 until 1902, was a judge of the Second Judicial District (Ramsey County) after 1903, presiding over the juvenile court, was the author of History of the Juvenile Court of Ramsey County in 1930, was a member of the House of Hope Presbyterian Church, was a Mason, was a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, was a member of the Knights of Pythias, was a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, was a member of the Society of the Sons of the American Revolution, was a member of the Minnesota Club, was a member of the Saint Paul Commercial Club, was a Republican, resided at 1040 Laurel Avenue, and officed at the Ramsey County Court House. Helen James (1878-1976,) the daughter of Henry Clay James and Frances Haynes James, married Henry S. Sommers (1873-1960.) Grier M. Orr and Etta Soule White Orr were the parents of one daughter, Helen S. Orr. Grier M. Orr's siblings were Wilber R./Robert Wilberforce Orr (1837- ,) Isabelle D. Orr (1841- ,) Fanny N./Mary Orr (1843- ,) David T. Orr (1845-1865,) Samuel Culverson "Sammie" Orr (1847- ,) and James Ross Orr (1852- .) Amalie Sommers ( -1922,) Henry E. Randall ( -1929,) Benjamin Sommers ( -1943,) Imbert Scott Randall ( -1946,) and George Sommers ( -1946) all died in Ramsey County. Charles L. Sommers (1870-1964) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Stern, and died in Ramsey County. Henry/Henery S. Sommers (1877-1964) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Stern, and died in Ramsey County. Heel to Toe Publications is located at this address.

21-27 South St. Albans Street: Henry M. Byllesby Rowhouse; Built in 1893 (1890 according to Ramsey County property tax records; 1892-1893 according to the Ramsey County Historical Society;) Romanesque Revival/Victorian Romanesque in style; Clarence H. Johnston, Sr., architect; C. P. Wildung, builder. The structure cost $22,000 to construct. The building is a nine bay, 2 1/2 story brick and stretcher bond structure with an intersecting hip and gable roof, which has three hipped dormers. It has a limestone foundation. It has four units, each with a different facade. It also has two story bay windows and features stepped gables, bow windows, and Romanesque details, such as rounded arched window and door openings. The building is on the National Register of Historic Places. It was converted to condominiums before 1982. Unit 1 (21 South St. Albans Street) is a 3120 square foot, nine room, four bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, condominium/rowhouse unit, which is owned by Gary R. Cook and Mary E. Cook. Unit 2 (23 South St. Albans Street) is a 940 square foot, three room, one bedroom, one bathroom, condominium/rowhouse unit, which is owned by Timothy G. Fleming. Unit 3 (23 South St. Albans Street) is a 2040 square foot, seven room, two bedroom, two bathroom, condominium/rowhouse unit, which was previously owned by Richard P. Keller and which is currently owned by Richard P. Keller and Jennifer L. Miller. Unit 4 (25 South St. Albans Street) is a 860 square foot, four room, one bedroom, one bathroom, condominium/rowhouse unit, which is owned by Jacqueline C. Wessel. Unit 5 (25 South St. Albans Street) is a 1920 square foot, six room, two bedroom, two bathroom, condominium/rowhouse unit, which was last sold in 1992 with a sale price of $180,000, which is owned by Susan C. St. John. Unit 6 (27 South St. Albans Street) is a 1890 square foot, six room, two bedroom, one bathroom, one half-bathroom, condominium/rowhouse unit, which has a detached one car garage, and which is owned by Kathleen R. Gearin. Unit 7 (27 South St. Albans Street) is a 1850 square foot, five room, two bedroom, one bathroom, condominium/rowhouse unit, with a detached one car garage, which was previously owned by Joseph E. Commers, which was last sold in 2006 with a sale price of $449,900, and which is currently owned by Michelle M. Loken. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that William S. West resided at 21 South St. Albans Street in 1892. The 1894, 1896, 1898, 1900, and 1902 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Shepley resided at 21 South St. Albans Street. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. M. J. Thompson and Mrs. George C. Squires resided at 21 South St. Albans Street. The 1920 city directory indicates that William H. Churchill, an accountant, resided at 21 South St. Albans Street. The 1894 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Kiessel resided at 23 South St. Albans Street. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Edward R. Sanford, Sr., resided at 23 South St. Albans Street from 1895 to 1902. The 1896 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. F. M. Dudley, Miss L. M. Hechtman, and Henry Hechtman resided at 23 South St. Albans Street. In 1916, Mrs. George Squires was a member of the Minnesota Historical Society and resided at 21 South St. Albans Street. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mrs. S. A. Henderson and Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Matteson all resided at 23 South St. Albans Street. The 1898 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Sloane and Miss L. W. Hoyt resided at 25 South St. Albans Street. The 1900 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Sloane resided at 25 South St. Albans Street. The 1902 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. F. I. Towle resided at 25 South St. Albans Street. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Hannaford, Jr., resided at 25 South St. Albans Street. The 1894 and 1896 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. H. M. Byllesby resided at 27 South St. Albans Street. The 1898 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Driscoll and their daughter and W. J. Driscoll resided at 27 South St. Albans Street. The 1900 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Lockey resided at 27 South St. Albans Street. The 1902 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Lockey and J. Rudolph Miller all resided at 27 South St. Albans Street. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mrs. Joseph Lockey and Miss C. J. Griffing resided at 27 South St. Albans Street. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Katherine E. Pearce (1892-1907,) the unmarried daughter of Hiram M. Pearce, who was born in the United States to parents also born in the United States and who died of scarlet fever, resided at 25 South St. Albans Street in 1907. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Joseph Lockey resided at 27 South St. Albans Street from 1897 to 1930. The 1898 and 1900 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. E. R. Sanford and E. R. Sanford, Jr., resided at 23 South St. Albans Street. The 1902 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. E. R. Sanford, E. Rollin Sanford, Jr., and Dr. and Mrs. J. M. Welsh resided at 23 South St. Albans Street. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that J. Cora Griffing resided at the former nearby 27 South St. Albans Street in 1904. World War I veterans Charles D. Matteson, George R. Matteson, and Herbert S. Matteson resided at 23 South St. Albans Street in 1919. The records of the 1919-1920 Minnesota World War I Soldier's Bonus Board (#9521) indicate that Charles D. Matteson (1898- ,) a 1917 enlistee and a Private in the U. S. Marine Corps, who was born in Great Falls, Montana, had blue eyes, light brown hair, and a fair complexion, was 5' 5 3/4" tall, served in Cuba from 1917 to 1919, was a student at Mechanics Arts High School after the completion of service, and was unmarried, resided with his father, H. H. Matteson, at 23 South St. Albans Avenue. The 1920 city directory indicates that Amy Brown, a clerk employed at Macey's, boarded at 21 South St. Albans Street. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Sarah A. Henderson (1830-1923,) the widowed mother of Sarah A. Matteson, who was born in Ohio to parents born in the United States and who died of diptheria, resided at 23 South St. Albans Street in 1923. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Herbert H. Matteson resided at 23 South St. Albans Street in 1923. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Matteson resided at 23 South St. Albans Street, that Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Lindeke and William Lindeke all resided at 25 South St. Albans Street, and that Miss J. C. Griffing and Mrs. Josephine E. Lackey all resided at 27 South St. Albans Street. The 1930 city directory indicates that 21 South St. Albans Street, 23 South St. Albans Street, and 25 South St. Albans Street were vacant and that Mrs. Josephine E. Lockey, the widow of Joseph Lockey, resided at 27 South St. Albans Street. In 2004, Rolf Lokensgard appealed two variances to the St. Paul Board of Zoning Appeals in order to build a new attached garage to the north end of the rowhouse at 21 St. Albans Street South. The 1897 Catalogue of the Legal Fraternity of Phi Delta Phi, edited by George Anthony Katzenberger and published by the Inland Press of Ann Arbor, Michigan, indicates that George Clarke Squires (1852- ) was born in Greene, Chenango County, New York, was a scriptor, was the Circuit Court Commissioner of Ramsey County from 1879 until 1882, was the Minnesota editor of the American Law Review, was the assistant editor of the General Statutes of Minnesota in 1878, was a member of the law firm of Flandrau, Squires & Cutcheon, and practiced railroad and corporation law. Henry Hechtman (1823-1897) was born in Bavaria, emigrated to the United states with his parents, initially resided at Erie, Pennsylvania, moved to Minnesota in 1851, engaged in the mercantile business, married Sophia K. Weinell, was a member of the Territorial House of Representatives representing Hennepin County (District 3) in 1857, was an alderman in St. Anthony, Minnesota, from 1859 until 1860, established the Minnesota Soap Company, then resided in St. Paul, and died in Spokane, Washington. Frederick M. Dudley (1861- ) was educated at the University of California, was admitted to the bar in 1885, was corporation counsel for the City of Spokane, served successively as land attorney, general land attorney, and division counsel for the Northern Pacific Railway from 1887 to 1899, and subsequently was an attorney for the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad in Seattle, Washington. Dudley represented the Northern Pacific RailRoad in the U. S. Supreme Court case, Northern Pacific Ry. Co. v. Department of Public Works of Washington, 268 U.S. 39 (1925.) Dudley, Washington, located 47 miles from Yakima, and part of the Stampede Pass section of the railroad, was named for Frederick M. Dudley in 1890. Henry Hechtman was a representative of the Third District, Minneapolis, in the 1857 Minnesota Territorial Legislature. In 1879, H. Hechtmann was the president of the Minnesota Soap Company, located at 26 Eagle Street and in Minneapolis. Hechtman's daughter, born in St. Paul in 1862, was Clara Anna Hechtman (Mrs. George Washington) Corlett (1862-1946,) who eventually moved to Cleveland, Ohio. George Washington Corlett (1852-1927,) the son of Daniel Kirk Corlett and Elizabeth Southard Bevins Corlett, and Clara Anna Hechtman Corlett had two children, Spencer Dudley Corlett (1892-1963) and Harvey Albert Corlett (1893-1971.) Edward Rollin Sanford, Jr., was the son of Edward Rollin Sanford (1840- ) and Julia Adelaide Wright Sanford, the grandson of George Sanford and Louise Cornelia Gibbs Sanford, and the great-grandson of David Sanford and Amy Hartwell Sanford. In 1905, Edward R. Sanford, Jr., resided at 656 Summit Avenue. Edward Rollin Sanford (1836-1910) married Charlotte Mead Sanford (1871- ) and they had a daughter, Frances Hughes Sanford Anderson (1906- .) Edward Rollin Sanford, Jr., the son of Edward Rollin Sanford, Sr., and Julia Adelaide Wright Sanford, the grandson of George Sanford and Louise Cornelia Gibbs Sanford and of Rial Wright and Anne Gray Wright, and the great grandson of David Sanford and Amy Hartwell Sanford, of Preserved Wright and Jemima King Wright, and of Leonard Gibbs and Betsy Robards Gibbs, was a member of the Minnesota Society of the Sons of the American Revolution by virtue of great grandfather David Gray, a Private in the New York Militia, and of great great grandfathers Zachariah Sanford, a member of the recruiting committee in New Milford, Connecticut, Solomon Wright, a Sergeant in the Connecticut Militia, William Gray, a Private in the Sixteenth/Cambridge New York Regiment, William King, a Lieutenant in the Massachusetts Troops, William Robards, a Private in the New Jersey Troops, and Isaac Gibbs, a Private in the Connecticut Troops, during the Revolutionary War. Charlotte Mead Sanford was the daughter of Warren H. Mead, who served as a lieutenant in the Sixth Kentucky Cavalry, U. S. Volunteers, during the Civil War, was captured, escaped, and ultimately authored the article "Southern Military Prisons and Escapes" in the book Glimpses of the Nation's Struggle , published on behalf of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States (MOLLUS) of Minnesota, was involved in numerous land transactions, and was involved in the Netherlands American Land Company of Amsterdam. Charlotte Sanford's mother was Frances Hughes Mead (1841-1900.) Charlotte Sanford was educated in Germany and France (1884-1893,) had a career as a vocalist, taught at Macalester College, engaged in numerous social and cultural activities in St. Paul, and worked with Fatherless Children of France organization. Mrs. Edward Rollin Sanford was the chair of a program "Croisade des enfants/The children's crusade: a musical legend," which was an offering in 1918 of the musicians of St. Paul for the benefit of the fatherless children of France that was offered under the auspices of the French Section of the St. Paul Institute. Charlotte Sanford's grandfather was Henry Charles Hughes of New York. The Charlotte M. Sanford Scholarship Foundation at Carlton College was established in 1993 through a bequest from Charlotte Mead Sanford to provide financial aid for deserving music, art, and modern language students. During World War I, Marshal Jaffe, the president of France, realized that there were hundreds of thousands of children who were orphans or who at least had lost their fathers and their mothers were unable to care for them, leading to the creation of the Fatherless Children of France organization. Jaffe appealed to the citizens of America to assist in their care and suggested that a dime a day would buy enough food for one child to survive. The society was organized in October, 1915, and was initially a branch of the American Society for the Relief of French War Orphans until the parent organization merged with the Red Cross. The Fatherless Children of France engaged in postwar propaganda work for France that included the sponsorship of films and speeches depicting the war devastation in France. By the end of World War I, over 200,000 French children had found their "marraine" or "parraine" in America. The Fatherless Children of France operated until at least 1922. David Sanford (1825-1908,) the son of John Sanford and Aurora Farnam Sanford, was born in Egremont, Berkshire County, Massachusetts, received a school and academic education in Massachusetts, attended the Lenox Academy, read the law with Judge I. Sumner at Great Barrington, Massachusetts, was admitted to the practice of the law in Massachusetts in 1847, was the law partner of Judge I. Sumner from 1847 until 1849, moved to California in 1849, was admitted to the practice of law in San Francisco, California, practiced law in California from 1849 until 1852, returned to Massachusetts, moved to Minnesota in 1853, was admitted to the practice of law in the Territory of Minnesota, was a lawyer, practiced law in St. Paul, married Mary M. Ray of Great Barrington, Massachusetts, in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, in 1859, resided at 602 Canada Avenue in 1907, officed at 349 Wabasha Street in 1907, and died in St. Paul. Frederick Driscoll (1834-1907,) the son of John Driscoll and Hannah Driscoll, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, moved to Minnesota in 1857, was a state legislator representing Scott County in 1860, moved to St. Paul in 1870, and was the business manager of the St. Paul Pioneer Press for 30 years. Mr. Driscoll resigned from the management of the Pioneer Press when the newspaper was sold in 1889. He also was one of the founders of the Associated Press and helped found the National Board of Arbitration of the American Newspaper Publishers Association. He also was a member of the House of Hope Presbyterian Church. Frederick Driscoll married Anne Brown in 1859 and the couple had three sons, Frederick Driscoll, Jr., Arthur Brown Driscoll, and Walter J. Driscoll. Following the death of Anne Brown Driscoll in 1880, he married Lucy Norris Stiles in 1882. In 1884, Frederick Driscoll built the house at 266 Summit Avenue, which he later sold to Frederick Weyerhauser. Arthur Brown Driscoll (1862-1938,) the son of Frederick Driscoll and Anne L. Brown Driscoll, was born in St. Paul, was educated in Jefferson School in St. Paul, in Fogg's Private School in St. Paul, and in the Hopkins Grammar School in New Haven, Connecticut, was a clerk employed in the carpet department by Auerbach, Finch & Culbertson 1883, was a clerk in the paper and stationery department by the St. Paul Pioneer Press in 1884, became a partner in the firm of McKibbin, Driscoll & Company in 1884, manufacturers and jobbers of hats, gloves, furs, and sheep line coats, married Helen Evelyn Gotzian (1863- ,) the daughter of Conrad Gotzian and Caroline Busse Gotzian, in 1885, was a member of the board of directors of C. Gotzian & Company, a manufacturer of boots and shoes, was a Republican, was a member of the House of Hope Presbyterian Church, was an incorporator of the St. Paul Commercial Club, was a member of the St. Paul Town & Country Club, was a member of the board of directors of the Minnesota Club, was a member of the board of directors of the St. Paul Relief Society, was a member of the St. Paul Credit Men's Association, was a member of the White Bear Yacht Club, was president of the St. Paul Young Men's Christian Association from 1898 until at least 1907, resided at 312 Summit Avenue in 1907, officed at Fifth Street and Broadway Street, and died in St. Paul. Arthur Brown Driscoll and Helen Evelyn Gotzian Driscoll were the parents of seven children, Conrad Gotzian Driscoll (1887- ,) Arthur Gotzian Driscoll (1888- ,) Helena Gotzian Driscoll (1889- ,) Robert Driscoll (1891- ,) Theodore Gotzian Driscoll (1892- ,) Donald Gotzian Driscoll (1897- ,) and Egbert Gotzian Driscoll (1897- .) Joseph Lockey resided at 712 Summit Avenue in 1890. The Joseph Lockey House, built in 1893, is at 682 Summit Avenue. Joseph Lockey (1836-1909,) the son of Thomas Lockey (1805-1882) and Elizabeth Daykin Lockey (1810-1877) and the grandson of Barnagham Lockey (1778- ) and Morrell (Mally) Fawcett Lockey (1771- ,) was born in Gunnerside, Yorkshire, England, emigrated with his parents to the United States in 1842, was engaged in gold mining in California from 1854 until 1857, relocated to Dubuque, Iowa, settled in Minnesota in 1860 as a general merchandise merchant at Lake City, Minnesota, served in the Sixth Minnesota Regiment during the Dakota War in 1862 and 1863, was later employed in the U. S. disbursing office in St. Paul from 1863 until 1865, was in the banking business with the First National Bank of Red Wing, Minnesota, from 1865 until 1870, was the corresponding secretary for the Goodhue County, Minnesota, Young Men's Christian Association in 1867, was U. S. deputy commissioner of pensions from 1870 until 1876, appointed by President U. S. Grant, was a national bank examiner from 1876 until 1883, was cashier and later president of the National German American Bank of St. Paul from 1883 until 1903, platted Hardenbergh Street in St. Paul's North End, in 1886, was a member of the Minnesota Historical Society in 1899, was president of the American National Bank from 1903 until 1909, was president of the Stock Yards Bank of South St. Paul, was the vice president of the Twin City Telephone Company, was the treasurer of the Minnesota Independent Telephone Association in 1904, was an honorary pallbearer, with Gen. L. F. Hubbard, Gen. C. C. Andrews, Judge William Lochren, Henry W. Childs, and L. A. Rosing, for William Colvill in 1905, was a member of the Acker Post of the Grand Army of the Republic, became a member of the Minnesota Historical Society in 1899, officed at the American National Bank Building in 1907, died in St. Paul, and was buried in Dubuque, Iowa. Thomas Barnigham Lockey (1842-1863,) a brother of Joseph Lockey, a private in Company C of the 21st Iowa Volunteer Regiment, died at Siege of Vicksburg, Mississippi, during the American Civil War. The 1895 city directory indicates that C. P. Wildung was a contractor who resided at 323 Von Minden Street, now renamed Michigan Street. Charles D. Matteson, the son of Sumner W. Matteson ( -1895) and the husband of Louise M. Matteson, was the secretary of the Security Trust Company in St. Paul in 1902. Henry M. Byllesby was the president of the Northwest General Electric Company. He also formed the H. M. Byllesby & Company, one of the large utility holding-companies of the pre-Depression era. Lake Byllesby is named for Henry M. Byllesby, whose company built the dam on the Cannon River which forms the lake. Lake Byllesby is located approximately 40 miles SouthEast of the Twin Cities. The Byllesby dam structure consists of a 56 foot high Ambursen dam and a 2.2 MW powerhouse. In 1910, the coffer dam was started and 17,000 cubic yards of earth and 21,500 cubic yards of rock were excavated for the dam. Ultimately, 16,500 reinforced yards of concrete were poured for the dam and powerhouse construction. The dam is 1125 feet long with a height of crest above the tailwater at 55.5 feet. The lake holds over five billion gallons of water. The Northern States Power (NSP) Company's use of the Byllesby Dam was discontinued in 1967. Dakota and Goodhue counties subsequently assumed responsibility for the dam and began power generation in the 1980's, with actual operation of the dam undertaken by the North American Hydro, which has a lease to the year 2035 with the counties for the operation of the generating facilities and the powerhouse. The two counties have expended approximately $1.75 million on upgrades and repairs of the dam since 1968. These expenditures have been required to strengthen the dam, increase spillway capacity, and provide better gate operation. Even with the repair costs, the revenue gained from the lease with North American Hydro makes the dam a self-sufficient operation. Byllesby was involved in electric power generation for a considerable period. In 1885, the Electric Lighting Company of Mobile (Alabama) began operations. Colonel H. M. Byllesby, who worked as a draftsman on Thomas Edison's original electrical system, designed the generating and distribution systems for the Electric Lighting Company of Mobile (Alabama.) In 1904, Byllesby headed a utility management company with headquarters in Chicago and the Byllesby company was managing the Enid, Oklahoma electric utility. In 1904, Byllesby assumed the management of the Oklahoma Gas & Electric Company on a percentage basis. Colonel Byllesby's organization was chock full of experts in electrical and gas engineering, management and operating, and the Colonel himself was a shrewd manager. In the early 20th Century, Byllesby began acquiring local gas and electric power generating and distribution companies. In 1905, the San Diego Gas & Electric Light Company was sold to H. M. Byllesby & Company, of Chicago, and incorporated as the San Diego Consolidated Gas & Electric Company. In 1909, Byllesby organized the Washington County Light & Power Company, then purchased the Stillwater Gas & Electric Company, and the united the two companies in a holding company as the Consumers Power Company. In 1910, Byllesby acquired the Minneapolis Electric Company, the successor to the Minnesota Brush Electric Company, which was formed in 1882 and which built an electricity generating station at St. Anthony Falls, and renamed the company the Northern States Power (NSP) Company in 1916. Also in 1910, Western States Gas & Electric Company, covering Oregon, was incorporated by the H.M. Byllesby Company as a holding company. The production of electricity frequently led to the development of electric street railways. In 1911, the Fargo (North Dakota) & Moorhead (Minnesota) Street Railway Company was sold to Byllesby's Consumers Power Company. The H. M. Byllesby & Company (Byllesby & Co.) and the Northern States Power Company (NSP) has a history that mirrored these national trends. Henry M. Byllesby, an engineer with a long career in the electric industry, and his partners established Byllesby & Company in 1902. Its purpose was to purchase small struggling utility companies and transform them into well-run operations. Byllesby & Co.'s first acquisitions were in Illinois, Ohio, and Oklahoma. The company eventually turned its attention to Minnesota where one of the partners, Arthur S. Huey, had been in the electric equipment business in Minneapolis. Byllesby & Co.'s first project in the Twin Cities region was the merger of the Washington County Light and Power Company and the Stillwater Gas and Electric Co. into the Consumers Power Company (Consumers Power) in 1909. NSP was organized in Delaware as a holding company and was the source of financing for its subsidiary, Consumers Power, later in 1909. Consumers Power expanded immediately and its holdings soon extended south to Faribault, Minnesota, and Mankato, Minnesota, and Galena, Illinois, and northwest to the Fargo, North Dakota, area. Consumers Power acquired the Minneapolis General Electric Company in 1912 and three years later moved its general office from Chicago to Minneapolis. During the 1910's the company completed several transmission lines that connected the communities it served. Consumers Power increased its generating capacity in 1913 by adding two units to the Riverside plant in Minneapolis and installing a 4,000-kilowatt steam turbine at its Third Street Station in St. Paul. The power company was reorganized in 1916. The changes included the adoption of the name Northern States Power Company and a financial restructuring through the issuance of new securities. NSP remained a subsidiary of Byllesby & Company after 1916. The power company again increased its generating capacity, two-thirds of which was steam generated and one-third of which was hydropower. During the early 1920's, the company expanded again and its acquisitions included several small operations in the Twin Cities area. NSP continued to construct transmission lines and to expand the Riverside Station plant. The High Bridge Power Plant and the Terminal, Aldrich, and Wilson Substations in the Twin Cities were the company's major new construction projects during this period. NSP purchased an important competitor, the St. Paul Gas Light Company, in 1925 and continued to acquire more of the small power companies in Minnesota (Meyer Electric Power for St. Paul. The public utility industry in St. Paul that provided light and heat began with gas companies during the 1850's. A charter was granted to the incorporators of the St. Paul Gas Light Company in 1856. This company expanded its operation to include the generation of electricity in 1882. It acquired a Fuller Electric Company generator and provided electricity to a handful of business firms in downtown St. Paul. The St. Paul Gas Light Company erected an electric power plant on Hill Street in 1885. The company concentrated on its gas service through the 1890's, but in 1894 it purchased the Edison Electric Light and Power Company of St. Paul plant at College and Cedar Streets, which had been in operation since 1886. The availability of electric power from the St. Croix Power Company's Apple River Falls hydroelectric plant after 1899 enabled the St. Paul Gas Light Company to expand its electric service. Although some large buildings in St. Paul had combination steam heat and electric plants and provided electricity to the immediate area, the St. Paul Gas Light Company had no significant competition. This domination of the electric power utility in St. Paul ended when Consumers Power purchased the Northern Heating and Electric Company, which had built a small power station on Third Street. Both the St. Paul Gas Light Company and NSP provided electric power to St. Paul during the 1910's and 1920s. The St. Croix Falls plant, which provided nearly half of the available power in 1912, and the Coon Rapids hydroelectric plant, added to the NSP system during the 1910's, took advantage of the region's waterpower potential. NSP increased the capacity of the Riverside Plant in Minneapolis in 1914, in 1917, and in 1921 and continued to utilize its small Third Street Steam Plant in St. Paul and the Main Street Station in Minneapolis. The Byllesby Engineering & Management Corporation, a subsidiary of Byllesby & Company, designed the plant and oversaw construction of the St. Paul High Bridge Power Plant. H. W. Fuller was vice-president and chief engineer and F. H. Land was the manager of engineering and construction. The plant was designed to be expanded to accommodate eight generating units and to be the big base-load plant of the NSP system. The plan for expansion resulted in the extension of the river side wing beyond the main block of the plant. The High Bridge plant started producing electricity in 1924. As was usual with respect to industrial advancements at the time, St. Paul Mayor Arthur E. Nelson officially started the plant's turbine in a public ceremony held the following month in 1924. H. H. Matteson was vice president and Charles D. Matteson was president of The Matteson Company, Insurance brokers, established in 1881, was located at the Capitol Bank Building in 1919. The Private Art Gallery is located at 25 South St. Alban's Street. In 2003, Joseph Commers, a contributor to the Randy Kelly for Mayor campaign, resided at this address. Ethen Leonard Shepley ( -1917,) and William Churchill ( -1917,) Sarah Anne Henderson ( -1923,) William E. Lindeke ( -1926,) Josephine E. Lockey ( -1930,) Jule M. Hannaford ( -1934,) Arthur B. Driscoll ( -1938,) Hiram M. Pearce ( -1940,) Sallie Ann Henderson ( -1943,) Herbert Hughes Matteson ( -1947,) Jule M. Hannaford ( -1952,) and Walter J. Driscoll ( -1954) all died in Ramsey County. Edward R. Sanford (1869-1965) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Wright, and died in Ramsey County. Frank I. Towle ( -1943) died in Hennepin County. Charles D. Matteson ( -1932) died in Rice County, Minnesota. Arthur E. Nelson ( -1975) was born in Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. [See note on Clarence Howard Johnston, Sr.] [See note on Jule M. Hannaford for 405 Portland Avenue.] [See note on the St. Paul Branch of the Fatherless Children of France for 501 Grand Hill/Former 501 Grand Avenue.] [See note on Frederick Driscoll for 266 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Conrad Gotzian and the Conrad Gotzian Shoe Company for 505 Summit Avenue.] [See note for the National German-American/Germania Bank of St. Paul for 961 Portland Avenue.]

24 South St. Albans Street: St. Albans Apartments; Built in 1901 (1902 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Italian Renaissance/Classical Revival apartment building in style; Hermann Kretz, architect, and Newman & Hoy, builders. The construction of the apartment building cost $23,000. The building is a seven bay, three story, brick and stretcher bond structure with a flat roof. The building has a symmetrical facade, pressed metal cornices, and a large rounded stain glass window. The building's recessed balconies are unusual for the area, according to the 1979-1982 St. Paul architectural survey field worker. The building is on the National Register of Historic Places. The building was altered before 1982 and is now a condominium. Unit 1 is a 1605 square foot, three bedroom, one bathroom, condominium/rowhouse unit, which is owned by Lee E. Snook and Lois M. Snook. Unit 2 is a 1605 square foot, three bedroom, one bathroom, condominium/rowhouse unit, which was last sold in 1998 with a sale price of $133,500, and which is owned by William M. Kronschnabel. Unit 3 is a 1605 square foot, three bedroom, one bathroom, condominium/rowhouse unit, which was last sold for $104,000 and that sale occurred in 1991, and which is owned by Kathryn L. Adam. Unit 4 is a 1605 square foot, three bedroom, one bathroom, condominium/rowhouse unit, which was last sold in 1993 with a sale price of $99,900, and which is owned by Elizabeth M. Glynn and Mary M. Glynn. Unit 5 is a 1605 square foot, three bedroom, one bathroom, condominium/rowhouse unit, which was last sold for $230,000 and that sale occurred in 2001, and which is owned by Kevin K. Nimerfro. Unit 6 is a 1605 square foot, three bedroom, one bathroom, condominium/rowhouse unit, which was last sold in 2002 with a sale price of $268,000, and which is owned by Julie A. Handberg. Unit 7 is a 1342 square foot, three bedroom, one bathroom, condominium/rowhouse unit, which was last sold for $86,000 and that sale occurred in 1998, which is owned by Michael J. Surma. The 1902 Central Presbyterian Church directory indicates that Mrs. Mary E. Braden, Miss Louise Braden, William K. Braden, Harold C. Braden, and Frank L. Braden resided at this address. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that James A. McCaskey (1862-1905,) who was born in the United States, had parents who were born in the United States, and died of a carcinoma of the face, and Matilda McCaskey, husband and wife, resided at this address in 1905. The book of Minnesotans: a biographical dictionary of leading living men of Minnesota, edited by Albert Nelson Marquis, indicates that Conde Hamlin resided at this address in 1907. The 1909 Central Presbyterian Church directory indicates that Mrs. Mary E. Braden, Miss Louise Braden, and Frank L. Braden resided at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mrs. M. E. Braden, her daughter, Mr. and Mrs. S. J. Melady, Mr. and Mrs. Peter McArthur, Mrs. M. D. Kelly, and Mr and Mrs. Henry Yoerg all resided at this address. Herbert H. Kelly, Joseph M. Kelly, and Wallace L. Kelly were World War I veterans who resided at this address in 1919. The 1920 city directory indicates that Shas T. Arrol, a real estate agent who officed at the Endicott Building, resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Miss Marie Barry, Mr. and Mrs. H. S. Johnson, F. J. Kelly, Herbert Kelly, M. D. Kelly, Wallace Kelly, Mrs. E. T. Loag and her daughters, J. J. Watson, and Mr. and Mrs. Henry Yoerg all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that the residents of the apartment building located at this address were Mrs. Faye D. Morrison (Apartment #1,) George R. Slocum (Apartment #2,) Edward L. Pardee, the widow of Jeremiah Pardee (Apartment #3,) Mrs. Caroline D. Bullard, the widow of John Bullard (Apartment #4,) Gordon R. Kamman, a physician located at 350 St. Peter Street, and his wife, Patricia Kamman (Apartment #5,) and William Lindeke, an agent, and his wife, Johanna Lindeke (Apartment #6.) The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. S. J. Melady and S. J. Melady, Jr., all resided at 1399 Summit Avenue. Louise Mary Braden ( -1915,) Emily T. Loag ( -1923,) Mary E. Braden ( -1925,) George R. Slocum ( -1943,) Stephen J. Melady ( -1947,) Edward Lawrence Pardee ( -1948,) William Braden ( -1953,) and Faye D. Morrison ( -1954) all died in Ramsey County. Frank L. Braden ( -1944) died in Hennepin County. Stephen J. Melady (1902-1991) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of O'Rourke, and died in Ramsey County. Henry Yoerg (1925-1993) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Mackenzie, and died in Ramsey County. James McCaskey (1862-1905) was born in the United States and died in Ramsey County. Joseph Michael Kelly ( -1960) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Quinn, and died in Ramsey County. Marie Barry (1897-1967) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Hable, and died in Hennepin County. Marie Barry (1910-1961) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Ross, and died in Hennepin County. Gordon R. Kamman (1898-1961) was born in Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. Patricia G. Kamman (1897-1982) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Bueneman, and died in Hennepin County. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Thomas Jebb and Lillie A. L. Jebb (1847-1893,) who died of stomach cancer, husband and wife, resided at the former nearby 25 South St. Albans Street in 1893. Little Sketches of Big Folks indicates that Joseph Lockey resided at the nearby former 27 South St. Albans in 1907. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Helen Canby Graves (1921-1922,) the infant daughter of Fletcher Graves, who was born in Minnesota to parents born in the United States and who died of acute streptococci, pharyngitis, and laryngitis, resided at the nearby former 25 South St. Albans Street in 1922. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that William E. Lindeke (1875-1926,) the husband of Florence H. Lindeke, who was born in Minnesota to parents born in Germany and who died of pulmonary tuberculosis, resided at the nearby former 25 South St. Albans Street in 1926. Thomas Gladwyn Jebb (1894-1989) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Grignon, and died in Stearns County, Minnesota. Helen Leanby Graves ( -1922) and William E. Lindeke ( -1926) both died in Ramsey County. [See note on Hermann Kretz for 579 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Hermann Kretz.] [See note on Joseph Lockey.]

30 South St. Albans Street: Fillmore Apartments; Built in 1890 (1906 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Classical Revival in style. The structure is a brick condominium/apartment building. The building is on the National Register of Historic Places. Unit 1A is a 1335 square foot, three bedroom, one bathroom, condominium unit, which is owned by Roxann M. Brennan. Unit 2A is a 1335 square foot, three bedroom, one bathroom, condominium unit, which was last sold for $92,000 and that sale occurred in 1991, and which is owned by Nancy J. Baxter. Unit 3A is a 1335 square foot, three bedroom, one bathroom, condominium unit, which was last sold in 1998 with a sale price of $116,000, and which is owned by the trustee for Jeffrey P. Scott. Unit 4A is a 1335 square foot, three bedroom, one bathroom, condominium unit, which was last sold for $211,900 and that sale occurred in 2000, and which is owned by Jan C. Painter and Michael G. Somermeyer. Unit 5A is a 1335 square foot, three bedroom, one bathroom, condominium unit, which is owned by Marit L. Kucera. Unit 6A is a 1335 square foot, three bedroom, one bathroom, condominium unit, which was last sold for $93,200 and that sale occurred in 1992, and which is owned by Daniel L. Tesch. The 1916 University of Minnesota Alumni Directory indicates that John A. Cameron resided at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that the residents at this address were Mr. and Mrs. L. L. Metzger, Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Matschke, Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Stoughton, Mr. and Mrs. A. D. Goodman, and Mr. and Mrs. E. B. Swygart. The 1920 city directory indicates that Henrietta Banford and Margaret Davis both boarded at this address and that Marie I. Davis, the widow of James M. Davis, resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Erback, Mr. and Mrs. L. L. Metzger, Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Gibson and their daughters, Miss Adelade McConville, Miss J. H. McConville, Mr. and Mrs. V. S. Oakes, Mr. and Mrs. R. C. Patterson, and Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Stoughton all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that the residents of the apartment building located at this address were Mrs. Tillie Lefko, the widow of Herman Lefko (Apartment #1,) Gunner B. Bjornson, a commissioner with the State Tax Commission, and his wife, Augustine Bjornson (Apartment #2,) May F. Mills, the proprietor of the Millcrest Chocolate Shop, located at the Bremer Arcade (Apartment #3,) Mary E. Ryan (Apartment #4,) Ruth H. Forrest, a nurse, and Elvira Nelson, an assistant employed by Edwin J. Simon, an exodontist located at the Lowry Medical Arts Building, and his wife, Belle Simon (Apartment #5,) and Boris P. Rosanoff, an employee of the Great Northern RailRoad (Apartment #6.) In 1934, Lulu Kelly Sweeney, the widow of Arthur Sweeney, and Josephine V. Sweeney resided at this address. Thomas Blanchard Stickney, a Fire Controlman Third Class in the USNR, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas B. Stickney, Sr., was a World War II casualty and resided at this address in the early 1940's. Dr. Arthur Sweeney, a St. Paul physician, with Charles W. Ames, the future president of West Publishing Company, arranged for a small group of men to meet for lunch to discuss the idea of holding a series of lectures in St. Paul on hygiene and sanitation in 1906, which became the basis for the founding of the Science Museum of Minnesota. Dr. Arthur Sweeney also was a primary force in organizing the Minnesota Medical Association. Gunnar B. Bjornson was a member of the Minnesota House of Representatives from 1913 until 1916, opposed the introduction of the nonpartisan primary election in 1913, later became the chair of the Republican State Central Committee, was an unsuccessful Republican candidate for Congress in 1924, and was chairman of the State's Board of Tax Appeals in 1938. Gunnar B. Bjornson, an Icelander, was the owner, operator, and editor of the Minneota Mascot, an English-language newspaper which had been founded by Yankees, in Minneota, Minnesota, from 1900 to 1944, was the president of the Minnesota Newspaper Association in 1913, married Ingibjorg Augustine Hurdal of Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, and the couple had at least one child, Kristjan Valdimar "Val" Bjornson (1906-1987.) Val Bjornson was born in Minneota, Minnesota, served with Navy Intelligence stationed in Iceland in WWII, was an associate editor of The St. Paul Pioneer Press and Dispatch in 1947, was treasurer of the State of Minnesota for 22 years (1951-1955 and 1957-1975,) was the Republican nominee for the United States Senate, losing to Hubert H. Humphrey, Jr., in 1954, orated in Icelandic, Finnish, Danish, Swedish and Norwegian, was the Honorary Consul of Iceland at Minneapolis, authored the multi-volume History of Minnesota (1969) and Icelanders of the United States (1976,) was one of the founders of the Exchange Program between the Universities of Iceland and Minnesota, founded the Val Björnson Scholarship Fund, and died of congestive heart failure in Hennepin County. Gunnar Bjornson, of Lincoln County, Minnesota, the father of Gunnar Bjornson and the grandfather of Val Bjornson, married Bertha Josephson of Minneota, Minnesota, in 1898. John A. Cameron was a 1902 graduate of the University of Minnesota Medical School, was a member of the Alpha Kappa Kappa fraternity, was a physician, and officed at the Lowry Building in 1916. Albert D. Goodman ( -1923,) Lewis L. Metzger ( -1923,) John Morton Stoughton ( -1925,) Herman Lefko ( -1927,) Arthur A. Sweeney ( -1928,) Josephine Sweeney ( -1930,) Tillie Lefko ( -1930,) Mary E. Ryan ( -1931,) Robert Crosby Patterson ( -1937,) Andrew Gibson ( -1939,) Lulu K. Sweeney ( -1943,) Mary Elizabeth Ryan ( -1945,) and Margaret Davis ( -1951) all died in Ramsey County. James M. Stoughton ( -1929,) Ingibjorg A. Bjornson ( -1948,) and William B. Matschke ( -1954) all died in Hennepin County. Edward Benjamin Swygart ( -1928) died in Olmsted County, Minnesota. Gunnar B. Bjornson (1872-1957) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Sdottir, and died in Hennepin County. Gunnar Bjorn Bjornson (1908-1994) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Hordal, and died in Hennepin County. May Mills (1882-1965) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Wood, and died in Hennepin County. Mary E. Ryan (1894-1990) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Murphy, and died in Ramsey County. Dr. Michael G. Somermeyer is a nephrologist with Kidney Specialists of Minnesota in Robbinsdale, Minnesota, and with Health Partners and presented an update on electrolyte disorders at the Minnesota Academy of Family Practitioners Spring Refresher in 2006. Michael Somermeyer (1951- ) ran in the 2007 Grandma's Marathon in Duluth, Minnesota. Michael Somermeyer and Jan Painter were financial supporters of the Youth Farm & Market Project in 2006. Michael Somermeyer and Jan C. Painter were the owners of the English Cocker Spaniel Sweet Apple Lily of Kent in 2007 and showed the dog in the Progressive Dog Club Of Wayne County, Inc., dog show. In 2007, Michael Somermeyer had a claim against the City of St. Paul. Marit Kucera is a fiber artist. Marit L. Kucera was a financial supporter of the School of Journalism and Mass Communication of the University of Minnesota in 2006 and of the Lyngblomsten Care Center in 2007. Daniel Tesch was the Director of Administration of the City of Lino Lakes, Minnesota, and was the president of the Minnesota Association of Urban Management Assistants in 2002. Surface Design Minnesota, operated by Marit Kucera or Ann Sommers, is located at this address. [See note on Dr. Arthur Sweeney for 1525 Summit Avenue.]

42 South St. Albans Street: Walter Apartments; Built in 1906 according to Ramsey County property tax records and according to the 1982 Ramsey County Historic Sites Survey; Classical Revival/Colonial Revival in style; Carl P. Walden, builder. The structure is a three story, three bay, flat roofed, pressed brick and stretcher bond condominium/apartment building. The structure has 1/1 fixed fenestration, a concrete foundation, and two projecting side bays with screened-in porches with turned balusters and supported by brick columns with small cornices for the first two floors and with Corinthian columns supporting a wide entablature on the third floor. The central bay is receding and has an arched and keystoned two story rounded stained glass window. The building cost $20,000 to construct. The structure was identical to the apartment house at 30 South St. Albans Street. The building is on the National Register of Historic Places as a part of the Historic Hill District. Unit 1B is a 1335 square foot, three bedroom, one bathroom, condominium unit, which was last sold in 2001 with a sale price of $207,000, and which is owned by Scott Milne. Unit 2B is a 1335 square foot, three bedroom, one bathroom, condominium unit, which was last sold in 2003 with a sale price of $285,500, and which is owned by Karen M. Grimstad. Unit 3B is a 1335 square foot, three bedroom, one bathroom, condominium unit, which was last sold in 1996 with a sale price of $101,500, and which is owned by Sharon M. Scott, who resides at 2113 Milwaukee Avenue. Unit 4B is a 1335 square foot, three bedroom, one bathroom, condominium unit, which was last sold in 2000 with a sale price of $211,900, and which is owned by Beverly Vavoulis. Unit 5B is a 1335 square foot, three bedroom, one bathroom, condominium unit, which is owned by Garnet B. Holmstadt. Unit 6B is a 1335 square foot, three bedroom, one bathroom, condominium unit, which was last sold for $242,000 and that sale occurred in 2004, and which is owned by Anders L. Carlson and Christopher D. Jozwiak. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Charles B. Bowlby (1852-1907,) the husband of Elma Gene Bowlby, who was born in Nova Scotia to parents born in England and who died of carcinoma of the liver, resided at this address in 1907. The Book of Minnesotans: a biographical dictionary of leading living men of Minnesota, edited by Albert Nelson Marquis, indicates that Charles Byard Bowlby and Benjamin L. Goodkind both resided at this address in 1907. The 1910 federal census indicates that the residents at this address included William K. Braden (1870- ,) a clerk employed by a publishing house and the head of household, who was born in Minnesota to parents born in New York, his wife, Estella A. Braden (1878- ,) who was born in Iowa to a father born in New York and a mother born in England, and his son, William K. Braden, Jr., (1909- ,) who was born in Minnesota, William R. Burkhard (1870- ,) a clerk employed by a sporting goods store and the head of household, who was born in Illinois to parents born in Switzerland, and his wife, Adeline Burkhard (1874- ,) who was born in Minnesota to parents born in Germany, Albert J. Katz (1867- ,) a clerk employed by a retail store and the head of household, who was born in Germany to parents born in Germany, his wife, Mable M. Katz (1871- ,) who was born in Minnesota to parents born in Germany, his first daughter, Florence N. Katz (1895- ,) who was born in Minnesota, and his second daughter, Jocelynn J. Katz (1900- ,) a who was born in Minnesota, and a servant, Lilly Daumann (1886- ,) who was born in Minnesota to parents born in Minnesota, and Valentine Hinrichs (1854- ,) a manager employed by a lumber company and the head of household, who was born in Germany to parents born in Germany, his wife, Mona Hinrichs (1871- ,) who was born in New York to parents born in New York, and his son, Don Y. Hinrichs (1895- ,) who was born in Iowa. The 1918 city directory indicates that the residents at this address were Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Katz and their daughters, Mr. and Mrs. D. D. Crowley, Mrs. Alice Bushnell, F. A. Bushnell, Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Kingman, Alex Sternberg and his daughters, and Mr. and Mrs. T. S. Rishworth. Eugene T. Eldredge (1892- ,) a Second Lieutenant, C. O. Johnson (1893- ,) a Private, R. L. Johnson (1898- ,) a Private, and Joseph Novak (1888- ,) a Private, were World War I veterans who resided at this address in 1919. The records of the 1919-1920 Minnesota World War I Soldier's Bonus Board (#1831) indicate that Carlton E. Ralph (1895- ,) a 1917 enlistee and a Sergeant in the 6th Battery of the Field Artillery R. R., who was born in Minneapolis, had blue eyes, brown hair, and a medium complexion, was 5' 7" tall, was a student at induction, served in the American Expeditionary Force in France, was a student after the completion of service, and was unmarried, resided with his father, F. D. Ralph, at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Phil C. Justus, involved in real estate, resided at this address and that Isaac Fawcett boarded at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Dr. J. R. Doris, Miss Kathryn Doris, Mr. and Mrs. P. C. Justus, Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Katz and their daughter, Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Noble, Mrs. Rudolph Rossum and her daughter, Miss Ann Williams, and Miss Kate D. Williams all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that the residents of the apartment building located at this address were Frank H. Becker, a janitor, and his wife, Lena Becker (Basement Apartment,) Franz E. Huesing, a salesman employed by Schunemans & Mannheimers (Apartment #1,) Mrs. Clara S. Rossum, the widow of Rudolph Rossum (Apartment #2,) Albert J. Katz (Apartment #3,) Charles E. Daniels, a farmer (Apartment #5,) and Mrs. Emily Mendal and Samuel Mendal, a clerk (Apartment #6,) with Apartment #4 vacant. In 1934, Clara Sinker Rossum, the widow of Rudolph Rossum, and Clara Rossum resided at this address. The 1964 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Charles F. Stutz, a member of the Class of 1921, resided at this address. In 2006, Chris Jozniak was a member of the board of directors of the Summit Hill Association and resided at this address. Charles Byard Bowlby (1853-1907) was born in Nova Scotia, Canada, moved to Boston, Massachusetts, with his parents in 1861, was educated in public schools of Boston, Massachusetts, was first employed as an errand boy for the Oak Hall Clothing Store in 1867, subsequently became a salesman for the Oak Hall Clothing Store, married Elmagine G. Sargent at Maiden, Massachusetts, in 1873, with an antenuptial agrrement, moved to Chicago, I11inois, and was employed by the Putnam Clothing House as manager and buyer for the boys and childrens' department in 1874, was a buyer and a manager employed by the Willoughby, Hill & Company, clothiers, from 1877 until 1893, moved to St. Paul in 1893, was the senior proprietor of the Boston Clothing House, was a member of the 1895 St. Paul Winter Carnival Ice Palace grounds committee, was the president of Bowlby & Company, proprietor of the Boston Clothing House, was divorced by Elmagine Bowlby in 1903, was a member of the St. Paul Chamber of Commerce, was a 32 second degree Mason, was a Knight Templar, was a Shriner, was a member of the Royal Arcanum, was a member of the Ancient Order of United Workmen, was a member of the Knights of Honor, was a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, was a member of the St. Paul Commercial Club, and officed at the SouthEast corner of Sixth Street and Robert Street in 1907. Elmagine G. Sargent Bowlby sued Charles Byard Bowlby in 1903, unsuccessfully attempting to enforce a spousal maintenance requirement in the antenuptial agreement, undisclosed to the divorce court, in addition to court awarded alimony in Elmagine Bowlby v. Charles B. Bowlby, 91 Minn. 193, 97 NW 669 (1903.) The Bowlby Building/Chamberlain Building/Browning, King & Company Building, 394-396 Robert Street, was built in 1895 by the Boston Northwest Realty Company, designed by Cass Gilbert, and razed in the 1960's, to house the Boston Clothing Company. The 1887 and 1889 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph Rossum resided at 757 East Sixth Street. The 1890 city directory indicates that Rudolph Rossum, of Scheffer & Rossum, resided at 554 Dayton Avenue. Clara Belle Sinker Rossum (1858-1943,) the daughter of Edward T. Sinker (1820-1871,) a partner in the Western Machine Works of Indianapolis, Indiana, and Sarah Jones Sinker, was born in Indianapolis, Indiana, married Rudolph Rossum in 1878, and died in St. Paul. In 1893, W. R. Burkhard was a bicycle and sporting goods dealer in St. Paul. In 1994, Karen Grimstad was a professor in the Department of German, Scandinavian, and Dutch at the University of Minnesota. Thomas Rishworth was the director of radio station KSTP in St. Paul in 1934 and was involved in disputes over the effect that radio programming was having on children. Thomas D. Rishworth was the vice president of the St. Paul Junior Chamber of Commerce in 1939 and was the president of the St. Paul Junior Chamber of Commerce in 1940, attended the U. S. Junior Chamber of Commerce Central States Conference in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, in 1941, and tied for the title of the most inept bowler with Conrad Ertz of Faribault, Minnesota, in 1941. William R. Burkhard (1870- ,) the son of William R. Burkhard ( -1905) and Afra Pfund Burkhard, was born at Galena, Illinois, came to St. Paul with his parents in 1872, was educated in the public schools of St. Paul, was engaged in the sporting goods business, began his active career in 1890 with the William R. Burkhard Company, an 1855 sporting goods business, was admitted into the partnership of the firm in 1898, succeeded his father as the manager of the William R. Burkhard Company in 1905, was a Republican, was a member of the House of Hope Presbyterian Church, was unmarried in 1907, was married to Adeline __?__ Burkhard sometime before 1912, was a member of the St. Paul Commercial Club, engaged in the hobbies of hunting, fishing and outdoor sports, officed at 319 Robert Street in 1907, and resided at 172 Hoffman Avenue in 1907. Beverly Vavoulis is the widow of George Vavoulis, who was mayor of St. Paul in 1960, and represented her late husband at the Saint Paul-Nagasaki Sister City Committee annual meeting in 1995, the 40th annual meeting of the organization. Beverly Vavoulis was a financial supporter of the Friends of the St. Paul Public Library in 2003 and 2005. George Vavoulis, the owner of a small florist shop, got elected St. Paul mayor in 1960 by 6,000 votes in a nonpartisan (no party designation) election, running as an independent, but was regarded as a Republican in a Democratic-Farmer-Labor (DFL) party town, and repeated the feat by 7,000 votes in 1962. Vavoulis lost to Tom Byrne in 1966 and ran again in 1976, but was defeated by DFLer George Latimer by 3.2 percent of the vote. George Vavoulis was a member of the St. Paul Junior Chamber of Commerce in 1946. was the parish council president of St. George's Greek Orthodox Church in 1960, was a federal Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Department Regional Director in 1972, and was later named special assistant secretary of community development and planning for HUD. Afea Burkhard ( -1912,) Elma Bowlby ( -1916,) Valentine Hinrichs ( -1916,) Alice Bushnell ( -1930,) Lena Becker ( -1941,) Philip C. Justus ( -1942,) Clara S. Rossum ( -1943,) Joseph Novak ( -1945,) Edythe Collins Braden ( -1947,) Ann Williams ( -1949,) D. D. Crowley ( -1950,) and William Braden ( -1953) all died in Ramsey County. William R. Burkhard (1902-1972) was born in Minnesota and died in Stearns County, Minnesota. Adeline Burkhard (1871-1966) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Seifeit, and died in Ramsey County. Thomas Samuel Rishworth (1874-1968) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Summersgill, and died in Ramsey County. Eugene T. Eldredge (1892-1965) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Towle, and died in Ramsey County. Frank De Voe Ralph ( -1950) died in Hennepin County. Frank Henry Becker (1882-1955) was born in Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. George J. Vavoulis (1911-1992) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Genoupolous, and died in Ramsey County. Garnet B. Holmstadt was a financial supporter of University of Wisconsin-River Falls in 2002 and 2003 and of the College of Continuing Education of the University of Minnesota in 2007. Anders L. Carlson, with Susan J. Weller and Rebecca B. Simmons, from the University of Minnesota, authored the paper "Empyreuma species and species limits: Evidence from morphology and molecules," presented at the 54th Annual Meeting of the Lepidopterists' Society held at Olds College, Olds, Alberta, Canada, in 2003. Christopher D. Jozwiak received a bachelors degree from Macalester College in 2000, received a law degree from the School of Law of the University of Minnesota, and is a lawyer with the firm of Halunen & Associates. Chris Jozniak was a member of the Summit Hill Association Board of Directors in 2004 and 2005. Anders L. Carlson and Chris Jozwiak were financial supporters of Outfront Minnesota in 2006. The 1916 University of Minnesota Alumni Directory indicate that John Walter Marshall resided at the former nearby 45 South St. Albans Street. Frederick Ritzinger (1885- ,) a First Lieutenant, was a World War I veteran who resided at the former 45 South St. Albans Street in 1919. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that William L. Goodkind resided at the nearby former 43 South St. Albans Street from 1892 to 1909 and that Benjamin L. Goodkind resided at the nearby former 45 South St. Albans Street from 1892 to 1909. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Edgar B. Ober, associated with the Omaha RailRoad, resided at the former nearby 43 South St. Albans Street in 1895. The Twelfth General Catalogue of the Psi Upsilon Fraternity indicates that Frederick Ritzinger resided at the nearby former 45 South St. Albans Street in 1917. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. W. L. West resided at the former nearby 43 South St. Albans Avenue and that Mr. and Mrs. Fred Ritzinger resided at the former nearby 43 South St. Albans Avenue. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. W. L. West resided at the former nearby 43 South St. Albans Street and that Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Ritzinger resided at the nearby former 45 South St. Albans Street. The 1930 city directory indicates that Floyd E. Huntley, editor in chief for West Publishing Company, resided at the former nearby 43 South St. Albans Street and that Mrs. Cecil Lund, the widow of Arthur E. Lund, resided at the former nearby 43 South St. Albans Street. The 1917 federal draft registration form indicates that Eugene T. Eldredge resided at 777 Grand Avenue and the 1920 federal census indicates that Eugene T. Eldredge resided at 591 Lincoln Avenue. John Walter Marshall graduated with a bachelor's degree from the University of Wisconsin in 1898, was a graduate of the University of Minnesota Law School in 1903, was a member of the Delta Tau Delta fraternity, was in the lumber, land and security businesses, was a member of the Minnesota Club, was a member of the St. Paul Commercial Club, was a member of the Lafayette Club, and officed in the Pioneer Building in 1916. Arthur Edward Lund ( -1928,) Arthur Edward Lund ( -1929,) and William Louis Goodkind ( -1935) all died in Ramsey County. Edgar Buchanan Ober ( -1937) died in Washington County, Minnesota. Eugene T. Eldredge (1892-1965) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Towle, and died in Ramsey County. [See note on Benjamin Goodkind, Leo Goodkind, Louis Goodkind, and William Goodkind for 40 Crocus Place.] [See note for Edgar Buchanan Ober for 265 South Exchange Street.] [See note on the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha RailRoad.] [See note on the West Publishing Company for 415 Summit Avenue.] [See note on the St. Paul Commercial Club for 505 Summit Avenue.]

61 South St. Albans Street: The Apollo Apartments; Built in 1904. The structure is a four story, 16585 square foot, multi-family apartment building. The 1909 Central Presbyterian Church directory indicates that William K. Braden and Edith Collins Braden both resided at this address. The 1916 University of Minnesota Alumni Directory indicates that Albert De Forest Tyler resided at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that the residents at this address were Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Abernethy, H. W. Austin, Miss H. H. Austin, Mrs. M. B. Baker, Mr. and Mrs. William T. Cox, Mrs. L. A. Hamlin, Mr. and Mrs. E. H. Matschke, Mrs. M. A. Reaney, Mr. and Mrs. R. C. Patterson, Mr. and Mrs. M. E. Nichols, Mr. and Mrs. G. S. Ring, Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Schwartz and their daughter, and J. A. Schwartz. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. H. W. Austin, Miss H. H. Austin, Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Bailey, Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Dadmun, Hon. and Mrs. O. B. Lewis, Mr. and Mrs. M. E. Nichols, Mr. and Mrs. N. S. Poole, Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Scanlan, and Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Schwartz all resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that John Armstrong, private secretary with the Nichols Expert Business & Secretarial School, and Helen H. Austin, a teacher employed by Central High, both boarded at this address and that Herbert W. Austin, a city purchasing agent, resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that the residents of the apartment building located at this address were Mrs. Sunny A. Kenny, the widow of John Kenny (Apartment #A,) Olin B. Lewis and his wife, Della Lewis (Apartment #C,) Mrs. Katherine Klinkerfues, the widow of George E. Klinkerfues and secretary employed by Klinkerfues Brothers Company (Apartment #D,) Herbert W. Austin, the purchasing commissioner at the State Department of Administration & Finance (Apartment #E,) Walter E. Dadmun and his wife, Ida N. Dadmun (Apartment #F,) Wilton H. Zinn, a dentist with an office at 26 South Albert Street, and his wife, Pearl Zinn (Apartment #G,) and Frederick C. Zinn, a painter, and his wife, Mary Zinn (Apartment #H,) with Apartment #B vacant. In 1934, J. Batelle Meagher and Katherine Kelly Meagher resided at this address. The 1964 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Thomas H. Patterson, a member of the Class of 1957, resided at this address. William K. Braden was a banjo player. Albert De Forest Tyler was born in Fergus Falls, Minnesota, was a sophomore at Macalester College in 1888, was an 1893 graduate of the University of Minnesota Law School, was a member of the Phi Delta Phi fraternity, was an editor employed by the West Publishing Company in 1916, was the author of the discussions of the topics "deposits in court," "district and prosecuting attorneys," "drains," "embezzlement," and "eminent domain" in Volume 20 of Corpus Juris, resided at the Hotel Barbeau in 1898, and officed at 41 West Third Street in 1916. George S. Ring, the son of James Henry Ring and Mary Jane Simpson Ring and the grandson of George Ring and Susannah Ludwig Ring, was a member of the Minnesota Society of the Sons of the American Revolution by virtue of great grandfather Joseph Ring, a Private in the Ninth Massachusetts Continental Regiment, during the Revolutionary War. Olin Bailey Lewis (1861-1936,) the son of Z. D. Lewis and Rebecka Horning Lewis and the grandson of Miner Lewis, was born in Weyauwega, Waupaca County, Wisconsin, graduated from the Omro, Wisconsin, High School, graduated from the University of Wisconsin in 1884, was an instructor in chemistry at the University of Wisconsin from 1884 until 1885, taught public school, was in the collection department of the Walter. A Wood Harvester Company, graduated from the University of Wisconsin Law School in 1889, was admitted to the practice of law in 1889, moved to St. Paul in 1889, was a partner with Oscar Hallam in the law firm of Lewis & Hallam, and was a Second Judicial District Court judge after 1897. The 1902 Residence Directory of the Sigma Chi Fraternity, published by R. R. Donnelley & Sons Company of Chicago, indicated that Olin Bailey Lewis received a bachelors degree from the University of Wisconsin in 1884, married Della Barnett of Oshkosh, Wisconsin, in 1885, received a law degree from the University of Wisconsin Law School in 1889, was a Republican, was a member of the St. Paul City Assembly in 1894 and 1896, was a member of the Central Methodist Episcopal Church of St. Paul, was a Mason, was a member of the Modern Woodmen of America, was a master of the Ancient Order of United Workmen, and was a judge of the Second Judicial District of Minnesota in 1902. Olin Bailey Lewis of Omro, Wisconsin, was a member of Hesperia Literary society at the University of Wisconsin, was a charter member of the Sigma Chi fraternity at the University of Wisconsin, was a chemistry major, was an instructor in the Chemistry Department at the University of Wisconsin from 1884 to 1886, was employed by the Wood Harvester Company, graduated from law school at the University of Wisconsin, again was employed by the Wood Harvester Company, was a law partner with Judge Oscar Hallam in St. Paul, was elected an assemblyman in the St. Paul city council in 1894 and 1896, was named a district court judge in 1896, and served as a judge until 1929, when poor health caused him to resign. Olin B. Lewis presided over the murder trial of William Williams in 1906, ultimately resulting in a botched hanging and the elimination of capital punishment in Minnesota. Olin Bailey Lewis and his wife had two daughters and one son. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Olin Bailey Lewis (1861-1936) resided at the former 444 Hall Avenue in 1900. George Simpson Ring (1865- ,) the son of James H. Ring and Mary Simpson Ring, was born in Dewitt County, Illinois, was educated in the public schools of Logan County, Illinois, was educated at the business college of Danville, Indiana, graduated from the Central Illinois Normal School in 1886, was initially employed as salesman for Ogden, Merrill & Greer, crockery, from 1886 until 1901, married Mary Hayes Reaney in 1901, was a bond broker, with W. J. Hayes & Sons, bankers in Cleveland, Ohio, as the manager of their St Paul office after 1905, was a member of the St. Paul Commercial Club, was a member of the White Bear Yacht Club, resided at 494 Ashland Avenue in 1907, and officed at the Pioneer Press Building in 1907. The Ancient Order of United Workmen was an all-male association that was founded in 1868 in Meadville, Pennsylvania, by John Jordan Upchurch, a Mason and a railroad worker, with the aim of adjusting "all differences which may arise between employers and employees. The AOUW was the first fraternal benefit society to provide life insurance to its members. The emblems and symbols used by the AOUW are steeped in Masonic attributes, featuring the All-Seeing Eye, the Holy Bible, Anchor and Square and Compasses, over which the motto "Charity, Hope and Protection" are displayed. It even boasts of having three independent degrees as a rite of passage into the order. Its membership numbered in excess of 318,000 in 1895. Local decentralized lodges merged into grand lodges in the early 20th Century. In 1930, the Grand Lodge of Arkansas ceased underwriting their own policies, and eventually liquidated, passing policyholders on to other companies. The Grand Lodge of West Virginia mutualized in 1964, changing its name to Protected Home Mutual Life Insurance Company. The Grand Lodge of North Dakota mutualized in 1948, changing its name to Pioneer Mutual Life Insurance Company. The Grand Lodge of Kansas changed its name to First Kansas Life Insurance Association in 1957. The Degree of Honor was the "ladies auxillary" of the Ancient Order of United Workmen, working in much the same way and structure regarding ritual, membership, and insurance. Also, much like the Ancient Order of United Workmen, during the period of falling interest in the fraternal qualities of the group, the Degree of Honor removed the Masonic trappings and became a fully-fledged fraternal insurance company, still in operation today. The Ancient Order of United Workmen dwindled in the early to mid-20th Century and does not exist today. Lora Hamlin ( -1924,) Emil H. Matschke ( -1927,) George S. Ring ( -1927,) Olin Bailey Lewis ( -1936,) Della Barnett Lewis ( -1936,) Robert Crosby Patterson ( -1937,) Ida N. Dadmun ( -1939,) Dr. Walter E. Dadmun ( -1944,) Alfred W. Bailey ( -1947,) Edythe Collins Braden ( -1947,) Margaret Barnum Baker ( -1948,) Herbert W. Austin ( -1953,) and William Braden ( -1953) all died in Ramsey County. William T. Cox (1878-1961) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Andrew, and died in Ramsey County. Lillian Hamlin (1895-1974) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Urban, and died in Ramsey County. John M. Schwartz (1899-1977) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Wilson, and died in Ramsey County. Helen Hoyt Austin (1905-1997) was born in Connecticut, had a mother with a maiden name of Ezolamott, and died in Faribault County, Minnesota. Katherine Klinkerfues (1867-1969) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Murray, and died in Le Sueur County, Minnesota. Dr. Wilton Harry Zinn (1905-1992) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Russell, and died in Ramsey County. Fred C. Zinn (1880-1966) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Fredericks, and died in Ramsey County. Mary E. Zinn (1884-1959) was born in Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is J. P. Fritz, who resides in Newport, Minnesota. [See note for Olin Bailey Lewis for 865 Fairmount Avenue.] [See note on the White Bear Yacht Club for 18 Kenwood Parkway.] [See note on the St. Paul Commercial Club for 505 Summit Avenue.]

62 South St. Albans Street: Olympia Apartments. Built in 1903 (1902 according to the Minnesota Historical Society and 1901 according to the 1982 Ramsey County Historic Sites Survey;) Classical Revival/Colonial Revival in style; Louis Lockwood, architect; Thomas Brady, builder. The structure is a five bay, three story, brown pressed brick and stretcher bond condominium/apartment building with a flat roof. The building is on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the Historic Hill District. The structure has 1/1 segmantal arched and rectangular fenestration, has a symetrical design with two three story porches using classically-inspired columns and wide balusters flanking the central bay, and has a recessed entrance with two engaged sandstone Ionic columns. It has flanking double doors, a single sidelight, and a supported large round arch with sandstone voussoirs. The arch features an intricate leaded glass transom. The building has large brackets and dentils at the lintel. It also has leaded glass windows that light the stairwell at the second and third floors and has two story bay windows that flank the central bay. The sills, lintels, and watertable use rockfaced and smooth sandstone. It has pressed metal cornices with modillions at the roofline and at the top of the porches. The original owner of the building was Demetrius P. Roussopolis, who was the secretary-treasurer of the Northwest Stamp Works located at 110 East Third Street and who resided at 660 Goodrich Avenue. The building cost $20,000 to construct. Unit A is a 1956 square foot, three bedroom, one bathroom, condominium unit, which was last sold in 2002 with a sale price of $229,900, and which is owned by Darci R. Stiff and Michael A. Stiff. Unit B is a 1956 square foot, three bedroom, one bathroom, condominium unit, which was last sold for $267,500 and that sale occurred in 2003, and which is owned by Carla J. Hagen and Leroy N. Soremson. Unit C is a 1956 square foot, three bedroom, one bathroom, condominium unit, which is owned by Bruce E. Johnson. Unit D is a 1956 square foot, three bedroom, one bathroom, condominium unit, which was last sold for $275,000 and that sale occurred in 2003, and which is owned by Helen Jerlach and Lars B. Jerlach. Unit E is a 1956 square foot, three bedroom, one bathroom, condominium unit, which is owned by Kathleen A. Lilly. Unit F is a 1956 square foot, three bedroom, one bathroom, condominium unit, which was last sold for $115,000 and that sale occurred in 1996, and which is owned by Angelynn Marsden. Little Sketches of Big Folks indicates that Frank Everett Otis and George Simpson Ring both resided at this address in 1907. The book of Minnesotans: a biographical dictionary of leading living men of Minnesota, edited by Albert Nelson Marquis, indicates that Hendrik Brusse resided at this address in 1907. The 1918 city directory indicates that the residents at this address were Mr. and Mrs. D. A. Cudworth, Mr. and Mrs. R. L. Cudworth, Mrs. J. G. Donnelly, Miss J. M. Donnelly, Mr. and Mrs. G. H. Emerson, Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Williams, Mr. and Mrs. Julius Maxman, Mrs. Edward O'Connor, Miss Teresa Mullery, and the Misses Van Duzer. World War I veteran Robert Boynton (1891- ), a First Lieutenant, resided at this address in 1918. The 1920 city directory indicates that Marie O'Connor, the widow of Edward O'Connor, resided at this address and that Julia M. Donnelly, a clerk employed by the Northern Pacific RailRoad, boarded at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Miss Anna Grant, Mrs. Albert Lammers, Julius Maxman, Miss Teresa M. Mullery, Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Nelson and their daughter, Mrs. Edward O'Connor, and Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Sargent all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that the residents of the apartment building located at this address were Mrs. Margaret M. Rice, the widow of Valentine Rice (Apartment #B,) Hon. Grier M. Orr, a judge of the Second Judicial District, and his wife, Etta Orr (Apartment #C,) Frederick J. Wright (Apartment #D,) William H. Williams (Apartment #E,) and Mrs. Marie O'Connor, the widow of Edward O'Connor (Apartment #F,) with Apartment #A vacant. The 1964 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Thomas J. Stearns, a member of the Class of 1938, resided at this address. Frank Everett Otis (1869- ,) the son of Alvin H. Otis and Mary T. Bell Otis, was born in Beloit, Wisconsin, was educated in the public schools of Hudson, Wisconsin, was educated in the high school of Hudson, Wisconsin, in 1886, was a railroad official, engaged in railroad work with Minnesota & North West Railway in 1887, was a commercial agent for the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad after 1890, married Melvina H. La Furgey in 1898, was a member of the St. Paul Commercial Club, was a member of the St. Paul Transportation Club, and officed at 365 Robert Street in 1907. George Simpson Ring (1865- ,) was son of James Henry Ring and Mary Jane Simpson Ring, was born in Clinton, Dewitt County, Illinois, was educated in public schools of Logan County, Illinois, attended the business college of Danville, Indiana, graduated from the Central Normal School in 1886, was engaged immediately as salesman in firm of Ogden, Merrill & Greer, crockery dealers, from 1886 until 1901, married Mary Hayes Reaney (1879- ) in 1901, was a bond broker, with W. J. Hayes & Sons, bond bankers of Cleveland, Ohio, as the manager of its St Paul office after 1905, was a member of the Minnesota chapter of the National Register of the Sons of the American Revolution, was a member of the St. Paul Commercial Club, was a member of the White Bear Yacht Club, and officed at the Pioneer Press Building in 1907. Hendrik Brusse (1867- ,) the son of Gerritt Brusse and Maria Kempers Brusse, was born at Grand Rapids, Michigan, was educated in the public schools of Grand Rapids, Michigan, married Lamoille Tillinghast at Toledo, Ohio, in 1899, was a newspaper man, was a reporter on various Grand Rapids, Michigan, newspapers until 1894, then was a reporter on the Toledo Blade in 1895, was the managing editor of the Toledo Commercial from 1896 until 1897, joined the Associated Press as an assistant correspondent in the Detroit, Michigan, office in 1900, was promoted to an editorial position in the general office in Chicago, Illinois, in 1902, was appointed the correspondent in charge of the Northwest, headquartered in St. Paul, in 1903, was a Mason, and officed at the Dispatch Building in 1907. Grier M. Orr became a Second Judicial District judge in 1903, was named the first juvenile court judge in Ramsey County in 1905 and lobbied the State Legislature for the creation of separate juvenile detention facilities, resulting in the creation of Ramsey County Boys' Totem Town and juvenile facilities in Hennepin County and in St. Louis County, Minnesota. Grier M. Orr, with Henry Wolfer of Stillwater, Minnesota, Frank L. Randall of St. Cloud, Minnesota, Samuel G. Smith of St. Paul, Edward Foote Waite of Minneapolis, and Albert H. Hall, was a member of a six member subcommittee appointed by the Governor of Minnesota which developed and drafted legislation for indeterminate sentences enacted by the Minnesota Legislature in 1911. The judges of the Second Judicial District (Ramsey County) through 1903 were E. C. Palmer from 1858 until 1864, Westcott Wilkin from 1865 until 1891, Hascal R. Brill from 1876 until 1907, Orlando Simons from 1876 until 1890, Levi M. Vilas in 1889, William L. Kelly from 1887 until 1907, Charles D. Kerr from 1889 until 1896, Charles E. Otis from 1889 until 1903, James Joseph Egan from 1891 until 1897, William D. Cornish from 1890 until 1893, John W. Willis from 1893 until 1899, George L. Bunn from 1897 until 1905, Olin B. Lewis from 1897 until 1909, Edwin A. Jaggard from 1899 until 1905, and Grier M. Orr from 1903 until 1909. St. Paul lawyers who became Minnesota State Supreme Court justices in the 19th Century were Lafayette Emmett, James Gilfillan, S. J. R. McMillan, Charles E. Flandreau, Isaac Atwater, and Greenleaf Clark. The Law Enforcement League, a late 19th Century civil rights organization in which the notable black St. Paul attorney, Fredrick McGhee, was a moving force, sponsored a speech by Booker T. Washington in St. Paul in 1901, attended by Judge Orr, Mayor Andrew Robert Kiefer (1832-1904,) and attorney Thomas P. Kane. Grier Malancthore Orr (1856-1936,) the son of Hunter Orr and Margaret Lawson Orr and the grandson of Samuel C. Orr and Margaret Sloan Orr, was a member of the Minnesota Society of the Sons of the American Revolution by virtue of great grandfathers Robert Orr, a Captain in the Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, Associators and John Sloan, a Private in the Pennsylvania Troops, during the Revolutionary War. Grier M. Orr was born at Pike Furnace, Clarion County, Pennsylvania, resided at Oconto, Wisconsin, in 1870, was a lawyer in Lanier, Preble County, Ohio, in 1880, married Etta White (1866- ) in 1896 and the couple had three children, __?__ Orr ( - ,) __?__ Orr ( - ,) and Helen M. Orr (1897- .) Hunter Orr (1812-1901) was born in Limestone Township, Clarion County, Pennsylvania, moved to Oconto County, Wisconsin, before 1860, was employed as a furnace master in 1860 and a lumberman in 1870, served as a Justice of the Peace, and died in Miamisburg, Montgomery County, Ohio. Margaret Lawson Orr (1812-1903) was born in Kitting, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, and died in Miamisburg, Montgomery County, Ohio. The Northwest Stamp Works in St. Paul was the family business of the Fales family and was located at the corner of Lexington Avenue and Larpenteur Avenue. The company made seals for the state as well as other seals, such as notary public seals. Albert H. "Bert" Hall (1858-1920,) the son of Dr. Levi Hall and Lucinda Mitchel Hall, was born in Alexandria, Licking County, Ohio, attended public schools in Ohio, moved to Austin, Minnesota, in 1872 or 1873, attended high school in Austin, Minnesota, moved to Minneapolis in 1875, attended the University of Minnesota from 1875 until 1880, worked in a sawmill, as a telephone lineman, and a telephone operator as a student, entered the law office of Judge Frederick Hooker as a law student, worked for the U. S. Treasury Department in Washington, D.C., from 1881 until 1883, graduated from the Columbian (George Washington) University Law School in Washington, D.C., in 1883, returned to Minneapolis, was a lawyer, began a solo practice of law in 1884, married Nellie J. Pearson in Hastings, Minnesota, in 1883, was an assistant Minneapolis city attorney from 1889 until 1890, was appointed a special assistant Hennepin County attorney for criminal matters in 1893, was a member of the law firm of Hall & Kolliner after 1900 and in 1907, tried 1,500 contested cases, was an unsuccessful candidate for the Republican nomination for the Fifth congressional district in 1904, was the chair of Committee F of the Institute of Indeterminate Sentence and Release on Parole in 1912, was a member of the American Bar Association, was a member of the Alpha Nu Chi Psi college fraternity, was a member of the Royal League, was a member of the Chi Psi fraternity, was a member of the W. O. W., was a member of the Phi Delta Phi fraternity, was a Republican, was a Methodist, was a Mason, was a member of the Knights of Pythias, was a member of the Knights of Columbus, was a member of the Royal League, was a member of the Woodsmen of the World, was a member of the Ancient Order Of United Workmen, was a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, was a member of the Minneapolis Commercial Club, engaged in the hobbies of driving and general literature, was the chairman of the Bahai Temple Unity Convention in Chicago, Illinois, in 1912, resided at 2030 Queen Avenue South in 1907, and officed at the New York Life Building in 1907. Albert H. Hall and Nellie J. Pearson Hall had one daughter, Mrs. William L. Appleby. Darius Alonzo Cudworth and Cordelia Ann Mills Cudworth were the parents of Frank Barrows Cudworth (1873- ,) an employee of the Passenger Traffic Department of the Great Northern RailRoad at Saint Paul, a resident of Minneapolis, and the husband of Mary Elizabeth Gilmore (1875- .) Roger L. Cudworth was a vice president with Borchert-Ingersoll Inc., a heavy equipment manufacturer, and resided at 709 West Linwood Avenue in 1924, 1930, and 1934. Fredrick McGhee (1861-1912) was born on the John Walker cotton plantation near Aberdeen, Mississippi, the son of slaves Abraham McGhee and Sarah Walker, attended school in Knoxville, Tennessee with help from the Freedmen's bureau and the Presbyterian Church, worked as a waiter while attending law school, graduated from Knoxville College in 1885, moved to Chicago, was the first African-American lawyer in Minnesota in 1889, was the first African American lawyer admitted to the bar in Tennesse and Illinois, married Mattie B. Crane in 1886, initially was a presidential elector for the Minnesota Republican party in 1892 until removed by white Republicans, subsequently became a Democrat, was a Catholic, was a member of St. Peter Claver Church, was involved in the organizing of the Afro-American League, the Minnesota Civil Rights Committee, the St. Peter Claver Union, the Law Enforcement League, and the National AfroAmerican Council, helped formed the Niagara Movement with W. E. B. Du Bois in 1905, was a planner for the creation of the St. Paul branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP,) died of pleurisy in St. Paul, and was eulogized by Du Bois. William Louis Kelly (1837- ,) the great grandson of William Rowan, a Captain in the York County, Pennsylvania, Militia during the American Revolution, was born in Springfield, Kentucky, moved to Minnesota in 1865, settled in St. Paul in 1869, was a member of the Sons of the American Revolution of Minnesota, was admitted to the practice of law in Minnesota in 1871, was a Roman Catholic, addressed the attendees of the corner stone laying ceremony for the St. Paul Cathedral in 1907, and was a judge in the Second Judicial District in 1887, appointed by Governor Andrew R. McGill to a newly created Ramsey County judgeship, and in 1905. Edward Foote Waite (1860-1858) was born in Norwich, New York, graduated from Colgate University in 1880, graduated from the Columbia University Law School in 1883, was a special examiner in the U. S. Pensions Office in 1882, moved to Minnesota in 1888, was held immune from Iowa criminal laws for his official actions as a U. S. pension examiner in In re Waite, 81 F1d 359 (1897,) settled in Minneapolis, was a judge of municipal court in Minneapolis after 1904, was the author of Courts of Domestic Relations in 1922, authored numerous law review articles, including "The Debt of Constitutional Law to Jehovah's Witnesses," 28 Minnesota Law Review 209 (1944,) "The Negro in the Supreme Court," Minnesota Law Review 30 (March, 1946,) 259-260, and "How "Eccentric" Was Mr. Justice Harlan?," 37 Minnesota Law Review 173-187 (1953,) was a judge of the District Court of Hennepin County from 1911 to 1941, and was awarded an honorary Doctor of Science degree by the University of Minnesota in 1949. William Herbert Williams (1857- ,) the son of Hugh W. Williams and Elizabeth Herbert Williams, was born in South Bend, Blue Earth County, Minnesota, was educated in the village school of South Bend, Minnesota, graduated from high school at Mankato, Minnesota, studied law in the office of W. D. Cornish of St. Paul, was a lawyer, was admitted to the practice of law in 1885, remained in law office of W. D. Cornish until 1900, married Catherine D. Walters in 1900, then formed a partnership with Owen Morris under law firm name of Morris & Williams, dissolved the law firm in 1894, practiced law alone after 1894, compiled and published the Minnesota Probate Code, compiled the Laws of Minnesota Relating to the Public School System, Including the State Normal Schools and the University of Minnesota, published in Minneapolis in 1915 by the Syndicate Press, made a specialty of real estate and probate law, was a member of the Citizens League, resided at 233 Nelson Avenue in 1907, and officed at the Pioneer Press Building in 1907. Darius Alonzo Cudworth ( -1924,) Valentine J. Rice ( -1928,) Cordelia A. Cudworth ( -1930,) William L. Kelly ( -1933,) Grier M. Orr ( -1939,) Teresa M. Mullery ( -1946,) Julius Maxman ( -1949,) and Roger Logan Cudworth ( -1954) all died in Ramsey County. Marie E. O'Connor (1903-1991) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Fernis, and died in Ramsey County. Julia M. Donnelly (1871-1968) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Powers, and died in Ramsey County. Etta Orr ( -1944) died in Martin County, Minnesota. Mary Elizabeth Cudworth ( -1946) and Frank B. Cudworth ( -1948) both died in Hennepin County. Roger L. Cudworth (1925-1988) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Hersey, and died in Ramsey County. [See note on the St. Paul Commercial Club for 505 Summit Avenue.] [See note on the White Bear Yacht Club for 18 Kenwood Parkway.] [See note on the Minnesota & North West Railway.] [See note on the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad.] [See note on the Fales family for 11, 19 and 25 Delos Street West.] [See note on Edward Lippett Fales for 19 Delos Street West.] [See note on Willard Allen Fales for 11 Delos Street West.] [See note on the Great Northern RailRoad.] [See note on the Northern Pacific RailRoad.]

66 South St. Albans Street: Julian H. Sleeper House; Built in 1892 (1878 according to a plaque on the house and 1900 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Queen Anne in style; Havelock E. Hand, architect. The structure is a two story, 1932 square foot, four bedroom, one bathroom, frame house. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. The 1930 city directory indicates that Arthur C. O'Brien, a clerk employed by the Minnesota Adjutant General's Office, resided at this address. Julian Holland Sleeper (1854- ) was born in California, moved to Minnesota, initially owned a tobacconist's shop, then purchased and managed the Hotel Sherman, hired architect Havelock E. Hand and builder Gustav Dressel to create his dream home at 574 Holly Avenue in 1884, enlarged and remodeled the house during the 1893 Depression, bought the existing boarding-house complex at 673-679 Lincoln Avenue, moved the house in 1911 to this address, connected the three buildings with underground tunnels, built homes in St. Paul and in Bald Eagle, Minnesota. A daughter of Julian H. Sleeper and Harriet Emma Morton Sleeper, Bertha Elizabeth Sleeper, married William B. Matschke. In 1993, Dr. Seth C. Hawkins purchased the Julian H. Sleeper House to relocate his museum collection of the Gilded Age decorative arts, formerly the Gowie-Nonnand House Museum in New Haven Connecticut. Julian H. Sleeper ( -1948) died in Ramsey County. Arthur C. O'Brien (1878-1974) was born in Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. The property was last sold in 1992 with a sale price of $125,000. The current owner of record of the property is Seth C. Hawkins. Seth Hawkins, a baseball fan and host of Hot Stove League meetings, has turned his home into a museum of Victorian decorative arts and 1880's interior design, the world's second largest collection of President James Garfield memorabilia, and an exhibition of Slovenian history and culture. Seth C. Hawkins has a bachelor's degree from St. John's University and a Ph.D. in rhetoric and public address from Bowling Green University and retired as a professor at Southern Connecticut University in 1993. Joseph J. Sheskerin (1897- ,) a Private, was a World War I veteran who resided at the former 72 South St. Albans Street in 1919. The records of the 1919-1920 Minnesota World War I Soldier's Bonus Board (#15353) indicate that Edward K. Deppe (1890- ,) a 1918 draftee and a Private in Casual Detachment 336, who was born in St. Paul, had gray eyes, brown hair, and a light complexion, was 6' 0" tall, was a salesman at induction, served in the American Expeditionary Force in France, was a salesman employed by A. P. Heuchler after the completion of service, and was married, resided with his wife, Hettie Deppe, at the nearby former 100 1/2 St. Albans Street. The 1920 city directory indicates that William Colburn, a salesman, resided at the former nearby 129 St. Albans Street. Joseph John James Sheskerin (1894-1970) was born in St. Paul, the son of Patrick W. Sheskerin (1852-1916) and Mary Ann McInerney Sheskerin (1857-1926) of 72 North St. Albans Street, was a student at St. Thomas College in 1912, worked at E. J. Willis and at the Freight Receipts department of the Great Northern RailRoad in 1912 and 1913, worked for the Northern Pacific RailRoad in 1918, was 5'7", weighed 135 lbs., had light brown hair and had light blue eyes when he enlisted in the Army, was a corporal in 1918 and a sergeant in 1919 in the transportation corps, where he served as a clerk, returned to employment by the railroad after military service, was unmarried and resided with two of his five sisters in 1920, Agnes C. Sheskerin, a stenographer employed by the American Mortgage & Investment Company, and Anna Sheskerin, married Madeline Kathryn Canan (1896-1948,) a railroad stenographer, in 1930, subsequently married Jessie Lovell Curtis (1901-1990,) was employed by the Northern Pacific RailRoad in 1941, retired from the railroad in 1962 as a night train supervisor, lived at 129 Summit Avenue in 1970, and died of arteriosclerotic heart disease in St. Paul. Joseph John Sheskerin and Jessie Sheskerin are both buried at Fort Snelling Cemetery. Joseph John Sheskerin (1894-1970) was born in Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. Edward K. Deppe (1890-1958) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Paschke, and died in Hennepin County. Agnes Sheskerin ( -1931,) Ann Sheskerin ( -1937,) Madeline Sheskerin ( -1948,) and William W. Colburn ( -1950) all died in Ramsey County. [See note on the Great Northern RailRoad for 280 Maple Street.] [See note on the Northern Pacific RailRoad.]

131 South St. Albans Street: Built in 1890 (1900 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Queen Anne in style. The structure is a two story, 2927 square foot, four bedroom, two bathroom, half-bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that James J. McCafferty resided at this address from 1891 to 1897. The 1891 city directory indicates that James J. McCafferty was a lawyer and a U. S. Commissioner and resided at 237 West Ninth Street. The 1892 and 1894 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. J. J. McCafferty and Mr. and Mrs. R. C. Wiley resided at this address. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Martha Salisbury (1798-1892,) who died of senility, resided at this address in 1892. The 1896 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. J. McCafferty and Miss Mary Dorsey resided at this address. The 1898 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. J. McCafferty resided at this address. The 1900 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. T. L. Wann resided at this address. T. L. Wann was the treasurer of the Minnesota Boat Club in 1892. The 1898 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. T. L. Wann resided at 586 Lincoln Avenue. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mrs. Jacob Marx resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Sargent resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Howard H. Sargent, the treasurer of the Cochran-Sargent Company, and his wife, Mary Sargent, resided at this address. Zoodyssey, Inc. is currently located at this address. The 1939 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Thomas L. Wann, Jr., attended the school from 1905 until 1912, served as a Captain in the 338th Field Artillery as part of the American Expedtionary Force during World War I, and resided at White Bear, Minnesota. Thomas Leslie Wann II (1894-1954) married Elizabeth Bowne Clarkson (1896-1956) in 1917 and the couple had two children, Elizabeth C. Wann (1918- ) and Thomas Wann (1920- .) Mrs. Hiram Stilwell was the daughter of Martha Salisbury. Thomas Leslie Wann II died in Minnesota and Elizabeth Bowne Clarkson Wann died in Washington County, Minnesota. James J. McCafferty ( -1911) died in Aitkin County, Minnesota. Thomas Leslie Wann ( -1925) and Thomas L. Wann ( -1954) both died in Ramsey County. The last sale of this property was in 1996 and the sale price was $275,000. The current owners of record of the property are Paul L. Acito and Margaret M. Clouthier. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Luman A. Gilbert (1847-1892,) who died of stomach cancer, resided at the former nearby 128 South St. Albans Street in 1892. The Gilbert burial plot at Oakland Cemetery includes the graves of Luman A. Gilbert (1837-1892,) his wife, Ellen Gardner Gilbert (1840-1898,) Leslie L. Gilbert (1869-1928,) and Grace A. Swinton (1867-1898.) In 1879, Luman A. Gilbert was the president of the Young Men's Christian Association Free Reading Room, located at the Odd Fellow's Hall. [See note on Thomas Cochran, Jr., Emilie Cochran, Moncrieff Cochran, and Margaret Davis Cochran and on the Cochran-Sargent Company for 79 Western Avenue North.] [See note on Thomas L. Wann for 79 Western Avenue North.]

149 South St. Albans Street: Built in 1904 (1914 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Tudor Revival in style. The structure is a two story, 6161 square foot, eleven bedroom, five bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Alfred C. Whitney resided at this address from 1915 to 1926. The 1918 city directory indicates that the residents at this address were Mr. and Mrs. F. I. Whitney and their daughters, A. C. Whitney, Miss M. E. Whitney, Miss Emily Gilbert, and Miss M. S. Gilbert. The records of the 1919-1920 Minnesota World War I Soldier's Bonus Board (#12361) indicate that Ernest Ambrose Countryman (1882- ,) a 1917 enlistee and a Second Lieutenant in the 13th Provisional Training Regiment, who was born in Appleton, Minnesota, was 5' 10" tall, was a lawyer who officed at the Guardian Life Building after the completion of service, and was married, resided with his wife, Louise W. Countryman, at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Countryman, Miss Emily Gilbert, Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Whitney, and Mrs. F. I. Whitney all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Robert D. Clark, a salesman employed by Northern Malleable Iron Company, his wife, Elizabeth O. Clark, and Robert D. Clark, the recording secretary of the Young Mens Christian Association, all resided at this address. In 1934, Robert D. Clark, Eizabeth Ottis Clark, Robert O. Clark, and Virginia Clark resided at this address. Ernest Ambrose Countryman was the son of A. D. Countryman. Ernest Ambrose Countryman was the treasurer of the Minnesota chapter of the Sons of the American Revolution. Alfred C. Whitney (1881-1961) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Gilbert, and died in Ramsey County. Frank Irving Whitney (1850-1919,) the son of Madison Whitney and Joanna Carpenter Whitney, was born in Calais, Maine, married Louisa Gilbert, was the general passenger and ticket agent for the St. Paul, Minneapolis, & Manitoba RailRoad and for its successor, the Great Northern RailRoad, from 1888 until 1906, acquired the Schurmeier Wagon & Carriage Company in 1902, representing railroad interests who were looking to get into the ground transportation business, was the general manager of the Northern British Development Company, was a member of the Council of the Minnesota branch of the General Society of Colonial Wars, as a descendant of Mayflower passenger John Alden, in 1911, was a Mason, resided in St. Paul, and was the author of Valley, Plain and Peak: Scenes on the Line of the Great Northern Railway. Frank I. Whitney ( -1919) died in Ramsey County. A. D. Countryman ( -1927) died in Swift County, Minnesota. The current owner of record of the property is Christ's Household of Faith, located at 355 Marshall Avenue. [See note on the Northern Malleable Iron Company for 943 Euclid Street.] [See the note for the Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA) for 277 Harrison Avenue.]

855 West St. Clair Avenue: Hans H. Freng Apartment Building; Built in 1916. The building is a four unit, two story, stucco apartment/condominium building. Each unit has three bedrooms, has one bathroom, and is 1750 square feet in area. Unit 2 was last sold in 2004 with a sale price of $220,000, Unit 104 was last sold in 1994 with a sale price of $117,000, Unit 203 was last sold in 2001 with a sale price of $237,200, and Unit 204 was last sold in 1998 with a sale price of $139,900. The 1910 city directory indicates that Hans H. Freng was a travel agent and resided at 1153 Portland and that Alfred C. Dent was a salesman for Edwin White & Company and resided in Minneapolis. The 1918 city directory indicates that A. C. Dent, H. H. Freng, and Dr. A. H. Goodrich resided at this address. Hans H. Freng died in 1920, at the age of 52 years. Alfred C. Dent, according to the 1920 city directory, was the deputy manager of the Merchants Trust and Savings Bank and resided at 707 Fairmont Avenue. Alfred C. Dent was a student at the University of Notre Dame during the 1904-1905 and 1905-1906 school years. The 1920 city directory also indicates that Gerson M. Altman was a salesman and resided at this address. The 1923 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Altman, Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Belden, Mr. and Mrs. Isidore Cohen, and E. E. Connor resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Henry N. Klein, a physician located at 350 St. Peter Street, and his wife, Josephine Klein, resided at Apartment #1 at this address, that Charles A. Klaus and his wife, Anna B. Klaus, resided at Apartment #2 at this address, that John A. Maher, a manager employed by the Maher Coal Bureau, and his wife, Florence Maher, resided at Apartment #3 at this address, and that William F. Enright, a salesman, and his wife, Frances L. Enright, resided at Apartment #4 at this address. Unit 2 is currently owned by Juleene M. Carroll. Unit 104 is currently owned by Mary H. Adkins and Roger S. Adkins. Unit 203 is currently owned by Frances E. Baillon. Unit 204 is currently owned by Joann M. Stover.

860 West St. Clair Avenue: Linwood Park Center; Built in 1991. The building is a two story, 18305 square foot, municipal tax-exempt building. The current owner of record of the property is the City of St. Paul.

865 West St. Clair Avenue: Built in 1904. The building is a two story, four bedroom, one bathroom, 2016 square foot, frame house, with a detached garage. The 1910 city directory indicates that Coleman J. Conroy was a plumber with a business at 149 West Sixth Street and resided at this address. The 1914, 1916, and 1918 city directories indicate that C. J. Conroy resided at this address. Anthony J. Conroy (1896- ,) a Second Lieutenant, John F. Conroy (1898- ,) a Seaman, and Raymond T. Conroy (1894- ,) a Private, were World War I veterans who resided at this address in 1919. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. J. Conroy resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Coleman J. Conroy, a plumber, and his wife, Ellen Conroy, resided at this address. Ellen T. Donovan Conroy, wife of C. J. Conroy, was born in 1869 in Bellevue, Ohio, was the daughter of John and Catherine Donovan, came to St. Paul in 1888, and was affiliated with the Ladies Auxilliary of the Ancient Order of Hibernians. Mr. and Mrs. Conroy had three sons and one daughter. The current owner of record of the property is Michael C. Arfsten. Michael C. Arfsten was associated with the Neighborhood Healthcare Network in 2005.

11 Summit Court: Summit Court Apartments; Built in 1888 (1898 according to Ramsey County property tax records; 1899 according to the Minnesota Historical Society;) Renaissance Revival in style. The structure is a brick condominium/rowhouse. The building is on the National Register of Historic Places. Unit 9 is a 1759 square foot, three bedroom, one bathroom condominium unit and was last sold in 1995 with a sale price of $125,000, and which is owned by Karen G. Larson and Robert B. Larson. Unit 10 is a 1330 square foot, three bedroom, one bathroom condominium unit, which is owned by Ray J. McGee. Unit 11 is a 1759 square foot, three bedroom, one bathroom condominium unit and was last sold for $169,900 and that sale occurred in 1999, and which is owned by VF Associates LLC, located at 61 St. Albans South. Unit 12 is a 1438 square foot, three bedroom, one bathroom condominium unit and the last sale of this property was in 1996 and the sale price was $137,000, and which is owned by William E. Towner. Unit 13 is a 1759 square foot, three bedroom, one bathroom condominium unit and was last sold in 1997 with a sale price of $123,000, and which is owned by Diane L. Henze and Richard J. Henze, who reside in Minnetonka, Minnesota. Unit 14 is a 1438 square foot, three bedroom, one bathroom condominium unit, which is owned by Janet M. Williams. Unit 15 is a 1759 square foot, three bedroom, one bathroom condominium unit and was last sold for $155,200 and that sale occurred in 1999, and which is owned by Jennifer A. Windsor. Unit 16 is a 1438 square foot, three bedroom, one bathroom condominium unit, and which is owned by Douglas R. Heidenreich and Mary L. Heidenreich. The 1902 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. L. O'Brien and their daughters, Mr. and Mrs. Rukard Hurd, Dr. Brewer Mattocks, Mrs. Ellen Mattocks Mahon, Mrs. Ellen Regnier, Mrs. H. M. Smyth and her daughter, Miss Katharine Johnson, Mr. and Mrs. William F. Thompson, Dr. and Mrs. G. L. Huntington, A. E. Huntington, Mr. and Mrs. H. P. Boyle, and Mr. and Mrs. Peyton Boyle all resided at this address. In 1907, Benjamin Czapski Bradford and John Bowman Darling both resided at this address. Little Sketches of Big Folks indicates that Henry Burleigh Wenzell resided at this address in 1907. The book of Minnesotans: a biographical dictionary of leading living men of Minnesota, edited by Albert Nelson Marquis, indicates that Paul Harris Gotzian and Charles Lyman Greene both resided at this address in 1907. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Paul Gotzian and Emma Beebe Gotzian, husband and wife, resided at this address in 1909. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Mrs. Dollie Carlton resided at this address in 1913. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Mrs. Clara Beardslee resided at this address in 1915. The 1918 city directory indicates that the residents at this address were Mrs. G. L. Beardslee and her daughter, Mrs. T. A. Bowen, E. U. Bowen, Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Capser, Maj. and Mrs. T. A. Cummings and their daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Harrison Hatton, Andrew Muir and his daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Mark Skinner and their daughter, Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Sonntag and their daughter, E. W. Sonntag, and J. H. Sonntag. Eugene A. Bowen, Leo Conway, and Thomas S. C. Cummings were World War I veterans who resided at this address in 1919. The 1920 city directory indicates that George W. Capser, a manufacturers agent officing at 329 1/2 Jackson Street, resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Col. and Mrs. E. L. Butts, Dr. C. L. Greene, Miss Jane Ffoliott, and Mrs. Ursula Wheaton all resided at this address. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Elizabeth Nugent (1847-1926,) the unmarried sister of William Nugent, who was born in Ireland to parents born in Ireland and who died of edema of the lungs, resided at this address in 1926. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Jessie Rice Greene (1862-1926,) the wife of Charles L. Greene, who was born in Minnesota to parents born in the United States and who died of chronic myocarditis, resided at this address in 1926. The 1930 city directory indicates that the residents of the apartment building located at this address were Albert Baker, a janitor (Basement Apartment,) Abby A. Fuller (Apartment #9,) Mrs. Julia B. Bowen, the widow of Timothy A. Bowen (Apartment #12,) and John F. Fitzpatrick, a lawyer who officed at the Pioneer Building (Apartment #13,) with Apartments #10, #11, #14, #15, and #16 vacant. In 1934, Miss Abbie Fuller, Caroline Beals Jilson, and Eleanor B. Jilson resided at this address. The 1939 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that James C. Lawrence (1921- ,) who attended the school from 1931 until 1933 and again from 1934 until 1938 and who attended the University of Rochester, resided at this address. Former State Representative Donald M. Moe resided at this address in 1979. In 1879, Dr. Brewer Mattocks was the St. Paul city physician. Henry Burleigh Wenzell (1853- ,) the son of Henry Wenzell and Martha A. Smart Wenzell, was born in Newton, Massachusetts, was educated at the Cambridge, Massachusetts, High School, graduated from Harvard College in 1875, attended Leipzig University, attended Gottingen University, graduated from the Harvard University Law School in 1882, was a lawyer, practiced law in St. Paul from 1883 until 1896, was a member of the law firm Wenzell & Tiffany from 1889 until 1894, was the Minnesota State Supreme Court reporter after 1895, compiled the General Statutes of Minnesota of 1894, was the reporter for Minnesota Reports from 1895 until 1905, was a member of the board of trustees and the treasurer of the Roselawn Cemetery, was a member of the Minnesota Historical Society, was a member of the Minnesota Bar Association, was a member of the Ramsey County Bar Association, was a member of the American Bar Association, was a member of the Harvard Club of Minnesota, was the secretary of the Harvard Club of Minnesota after 1887, was a member of the Society of Colonial Wars, was a member of the Sons of the Revolution, was a member of the Minnesota Club, and officed at the State Capitol in 1907. Paul Gotzian was the president of the St. Paul Automobile Club, with 50 members, in 1903. Rukard Hurd (1858-1922) was born in Cinncinati, Ohio, was a descendent of a veteran of the War of 1812 and a member of the Pennsylvania Society of the War of 1812, was an 1878 graduate in civil engineering of the Pennsylvania Military College, renamed in 1972 as the Widener University, in Chester, Pennsylvania, moved to Minnesota in 1889, settled in St. Paul, engaged in the life insurance business with The Washington Life Insurance Company of New York, resided at 32 East Fourth Street in 1894, was a Republican, was aide de camp to Governor David Marston Clough from 1895 until 1899 and to Governor John Lind from 1899 until 1901, was a member of the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Ramsey County (District 36) from 1901 until 1903, became a Trustee of the Pennsylvania Military College in 1890, and was buried in Oakland Cemetery. Rukard Hurd was a founder and the secretary-treasurer of the Minnesota branch of the Sons of the American Revolution in 1883, was a Major during World War I, was an insurance agent, was the secretary-treasurer and the governor of the Sons of the Revolution in Minnesota, was a member of the Minnesota Tax Commission, was the author of Hurd's Iron Ore Manual, published by F. M. Catlin in 1911 as director of mines and minerals, was involved with the Merchandise Bank/Merchants' Trading Check Company, was a partner in the Lewis-Hurd Manufacturing Company with Henry J. Lewis, which made the Lewis Patent Cellular Cigar Box Filler, was a member of the Aztec Club of 1847, was a member of the Military Order of Loyal Legion, was a member of the Society of Colonial Wars, was a member of the St. Paul Chamber of Commerce, was a member of the Saint Paul Choral Club, and was a member of the Knights of Pythias. In 1919, Major Rukard Hurd, a World War I veteran, resided at the Angus Hotel. Rukard Hurd is credited with writing the words to "Taps" and Widener University retained the copyright on them. The melody of "Taps" was is believed to have been composed in 1862 by Union Major General Daniel Butterfield. In 1893, Rukard Hurd was employed by the Washington Life Insurance Company of New York. In 1933, Mrs. Rukard Hurd resided at the Commodore Hotel. Hurd had a sister, Anna "Nannie" Hurd Hayward (Mrs. William Whipple) Symmes, who married a lawyer in Cincinnati, Ohio. The original Hurd family homestead was located near Cincinnati, Ohio. Rukard Hurd, the son of Edward Hurd and Harriet Duncan Hurd and the grandson of Rukard Hurd and Mary Osborn Hurd, was a member of the Minnesota Society of the Sons of the American Revolution by virtue of great grandfathers Nathan Hurd, a Captain in the Eighth Battalion of the Wadsworth Connecticut Brigade, and Ethan Osborn, a Private in the Connecticut Troops, and great great grandfather John Osborn, a Lieutenant in Baldwin's Regiment of Artificiers, during the Revolutionary War. William Whipple Symmes (1849- ,) was born in Hamilton, Butler County, Ohio, a son of Americus Symmes, graduated from Louisville University in 1869, read the law in the office of Colonel John Mason Brown in Frankfort, Kentucky, and in the office of Pirtle & Caruth in Louisville, Kentucky, was admitted to the practice of law in Louisville, Kentucky, in 1871, moved to Ohio in 1871, was an attorney at law with his brother, C. Scott Symmes, in Cincinnati, Ohio, was a Democrat, and served on the commission in 1921 which designed the permanent tomb of William Henry Harrison (1773-1841) and his wife, Anna Tuthill Symmes Harrison (1775-1864.) Benjamin Czapski Bradford (1873- ,) the son of Louis Bradford and Nora Czapski Bradford, was born in Memphis, Tennessee, was educated in the Des Moines, Iowa, public schools, was educated in the public and private schools of Columbia, Tennessee, was a clerk employed by an insurance company in Louisville, Kentucky, in 1889, was employed in the auditor's office of the Ohio Valley Railway, was the general office manager of the Royal Insurance Company of Louisville, Kentucky, until 1901, served for three years in the Tennessee National Guard, moved to St. Paul in 1901, was the purchasing agent employed by the American Grass Twine Company and the Minnie Harvester Company from 1901 until 1903, was employed in the railway and mill supplies broker after 1903, married Martha (Mrs. Trevor) McClurg in 1913, was a member of the Minnesota Club, was a member of the St. Paul Town & Country Club, was a member of the Minnesota Boat Club, was a member of the St. Paul North West Railway Club, was a member of the Duluth North West Railway Club, resided at 719 Goodrich Avenue in 1923, and was the sales manager of the St. Paul Town & Country Club in 1927. John Bowman Darling (1859- ,) was the son of Keyes A. Darling and Ann M. Bowman Darling, was born in Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, graduated from the Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, high school, attended the University of Wisconsin, attended the Rush Medical College at Chicago, Illinois, spent two years in post graduate training in European hospitals from 1883 until 1885, was a surgeon employed by the Wisconsin Central RailRoad, was a member of the medical staff of St. Joseph's Hospital, was a member of the medical staff of the City and County Hospital, was a surgeon for the Third U. S. Infantry at Fort Snelling and during its deployment to Manilla, the Phillipines, was a member of the Minnesota State Medical Society, was a member of the Ramsey County Medical Society, was a member of the St. Paul Commercial Club, was a member of the Independent Order of Foresters in 1894, and officed at Fourth Street and Wabasha Street. Widener University was originally founded as the Bullock School in Wilmington, Delaware, in 1821 and incorporated the former Alsop School (1846-1853,) the former Hyatt's Select School for Boys (1853-1859,) and the former Delaware Military Academy. In 1862, the institution was moved to Pennsylvania and was chartered as the Pennsylvania Military Academy and then, in 1892, assumed the name of the Pennsylvania Military College. In 1946, it expanded again to include the former Penn Morton College, and then, in 1972, became a totally civilian institution, as the Widener University, named for Philadelphia's Widener family. George Dunton Widener (1862-1912,) the son of P. A. B. Widener, a member of the board of the Fidelity Trust Company of Philadelphia, the bank that controlled International Mercantile Marine, and his son, Harry Elkins Widener (1885-1912), died in the Titanic sinking, while his wife, Eleanor Elkins Widener (1861-1937), survived the sinking. The Widener family patriarch, Peter Arrell Brown Widener, was part-owner of the Titanic through the International Mercantile Marine Company, along with J. Bruce Ismay, Charles Steele, William J. Pirrie, and J. P. Morgan. George Widener made his huge fortune building streetcars, primarily through the Philadelphia Traction Company. Harry Widener was a noted collector of rare books, and his collection included a Shakespeare Folio and a Gutenberg Bible, and after his death, his mother donated $2 million for the construction, in 1912-1914, of the Harry Elkins Widener Memorial Library at Harvard, Harry Widener's alma mater. Brewer Mattocks (1841- ,) the son of John Mattocks (1814- ) and Mary Elizabeth Brewer Mattocks ( -1851,) was born in Keeseville, New York, came to St. Paul in 1856 with his father, graduated from the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy in 1861, graduated from a medical college in St. Louis in 1864, was a physician, served in the American Civil War from 1861 until 1865 as hospital steward and assistant surgeon with the Second and Seventh Minnesota Regiments, practiced medicine in St. Paul from 1865 until 1881, was the president of the St. Paul City Board of Health, was a the Ramsey County physician, moved to Faribault, Minnesota, in 1881, later moved to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, donated a collection of swords, badges, and medals from the American Civil War to the Minnesota Historical Society in 1916, and was the author of several published poems. In 1872, Dr. Brewer Mattocks was the author of the article "Children, Their Diseases and Treatment" in the journal Transactions of the Minnesota State Medical Society, which was essay that opposed considering the treatment of children as a special branch of practice and offered advice on treating infants' ailments. In 1900, Dr. Brewer Mattocks authored the motto for the seal of the Ramsey County Medical Society "To dissect, to observe and to write," with the seal's graphic representation of a microscope, scalpel and pen designed by Pharmacist R. O. Sweeney of Sweeney's Drug Store at Kellogg Boulevard and Wabasha Street. Brewer Mattocks, an assistant surgeon with the Seventh Minnesota Regiment in the American Civil War and the physician and health officer for the City of St. Paul from 1867 until 1871 and from 1874 until 1876, was the author of the promotion book Minnesota as a home for invalids, Philadelphia, J. B. Lippincott & Co. and St. Paul, D. D. Merrill, Randall & Co., 1871, of Songs of Help and Inspiration, published by the American News Company, and of Ad Tiberim Or The Fall Of The Gracchi: An Epic Ballad Of The Roman Empire, Brewer Mattocks, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 1911. In 1900, Brewer Mattocks (1841- ) was a doctor born in New York to parents both born in Vermont and resided in St. Paul with his daughter, Ellen M. Mabone (1873- ,) a school teacher born in Minnesota, and his nephew, Sidney Hughes (1884- ,) a commercial clerk born in Georgia, resided in Minnesota. Brewer Mattocks, Jr. (1867- ,) the son of Dr. Brewer Mattocks and a clerk, resided with his wife, Delia Mattocks (1868- ,) and his son, Brewer Mattocks III (1901- ,) in Duluth, Minnesota. Dr. Brewer Mattocks is believed to be the collector of mid-19th Century human remains representing a minimum of five individuals (likely Assiniboine or Sioux) from a burial ground at Wolf Point on the Fort Peck Indian Reservation, Montana, in 1898 and was the donor of the human remains to the Carnegie Museum of Natural History in 1913. Ellen R. Mattocks, the daughter of Brewer Mattocks, married Lester M. Mabon of St. Paul in Faribault, Minnesota, in 1896. John Mattocks (1814- ) was born in Peacham, Vermont, graduated from Middlebury College in 1832, graduated from the theological department of Yale College in 1838, was a Presbyterian clergyman, settled in St. Paul in 1856, was the pastor of the First Presbyterian Church for 19 years, was the superintendent of the city schools for ten years, and died at St. Paul. Peyton Boyle, John B. West, Horatio West, and Charles W. Ames incorporated West Publishing Company in 1882. Charles Ames was the general manager of West Publishing Company. Jesse Peyton Boyle was the editor-in-chief of the fledgling West Publishing Company, but he left West Publishing and moved his family to Philadelphia and later to Cincinnati, after quarreling with his partners at West Publishing. Jesse Peyton Boyle was the grandfather of poet and novelist Kay Boyle (1902-1992,) one of the so-called "Lost Generation" of expatriate writers in Europe between the World Wars that included Gertrude Stein, James Joyce, Djuna Barnes, Ernest Hemingway, Ezra Pound, and Robert McAlmon, who wrote Short Stories (1929,) Wedding Day and Other Stories (1930,) Plagued by the Nightingale (1931,) Year Before Last (1932,) My Next Bride (1934,) Primer for Combat (1942,) Avalanche (1944,) A Frenchman Must Die (1946,) The Smokinq Mountain: Stories of Germany During the Occupation (1951,) Being Geniuses Together (1966,) Nothing Ever Breaks Except the Heart (1966,) and The Underground Woman (1975.) Kay Boyle was the daughter of Howard Peterson Boyle, a lawyer, and Katherine Evans, a literary and social activist. Caroline Beals Jilson (1858- ) was the widow of Frank B. Jilson. Charles Lyman Greene, M. D., a clinical professor of medicine and physical diagnosis at the University of Minnesota, was the author of Medical Examination For Life Insurance, P. Blakiston's Sons & Company, Philadelphia, 1900. Charles Lyman Greene, M. D., also authored Medical Diagnosis: A Manual For Students And Practitioners, published by Blakiston in Philadelphia in 1917, and Medical Diagnosis and the Student Practitioner, published by P. Blakiston’s Son & Company in Philadelphia in 1926. Charles Lyman Greene (1862- ,) was the son of Dr. William Warren Greene (1831-1881) and Elizabeth Lawrence Greene ( -1876,) was born in Gray, Maine, was educated in the schools of Portland, Maine, was educated at University of Michigan, married Jessie Rice at St. Paul in 1886, graduated from the University of Minnesota Medical School in 1890, after an interruption caused by his father's death and his employment by the Northern Pacific RailRoad, studied at the Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children in London, England, from 1890 until 1891, interned at St. Joseph's Hospital, interned at the City and County Hospital, was a physician, did post graduate work at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, in 1893, did post graduate work at Harvard University in 1894, 1895, and 1897, did post graduate work at London, England, in 1902, did post graduate work in Paris, France, in 1902, did post graduate work in Heidelberg, Germany, and in Berne, Switzerland, in 1906, practiced medicine in St Paul, was a member of the Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity, was a member of the Nu Sigma Nu fraternity, was the house physician at the City and County Hospital in St. Paul from 1889 until 1890, was the first assistant city physician of St. Paul from 1891 until 1892, was an instructor of applied anatomy at the University of Minnesota in 1891, was the medical director of the Minnesota Life Insurance Company from 1892 until 1904, was a clinical professor of medicine and physical diagnosis at the University of Minnesota from 1897 until 1903, was a professor of theory and medical practice at the University of Minnesota in 1903, was the medical director of the Minnesota Mutual Life Insurance Company from 1892 until 1904, was a president of the Minnesota Medical Association, was a member of the American Medical Association, was a member of the Minnesota State Board of Health, was a member of the Ramsey County Medical Society, was a president of the National Association of Life Insurance Examiners, was an attending physician at St. Luke's Hospital, was an attending physician at the City and County Hospital, was an attending physician at the St. Paul Free Dispensary, was the author of the Medical Examination of Life Insurance and its Associated Clinical Methods; A Manual of Medical Diagnosis, was a member of the board of trustees of St. Luke's Hospital, was member of the American Association of Physicians, was member of the National Association of the Study and Prevention of Tuberculosis, was member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, was a member of the board of trustees at St. Luke's Hospital, was member of the Minnesota Academy of Medicine, was member of the Ramsey County Medical Association, was member of the Minnesota Club, was a member of the Minneapolis Club, was a Mason, was member of the St. Paul Town & Country Club, was a member of the University Club, was a member of the White Bear Yacht Club, was a member of the Lafayette Club, was a member of the Royal Societies Club of London, England, was a member of the Author's Club of London, England, was a member of the American University Club of London, England, engaged in the hobbies of foreign travel, hunting, golf and curling, resided at 324 Summit Avenue in 1916, resided at 415 Summit Avenue, officed at the Lowry Arcade in 1907, and officed at the Lowry Building in 1916. Charles Lyman Greene had two daughters, Dorothy Lawrence Greene, who married Alfred J. Schweppe and lived in Seattle, Washington, and Jessie Greene, who married Dr. Frederick Ramsay Ritzinger and lived in St. Paul. Frederick Ritzinger (1885- ,) a First Lieutenant, was a World War I veteran who resided at the former 45 South St. Albans Street in 1919. Donald M. Moe is a financial consultant who previously worked in the field of real estate investment and development, served as a Minnesota state representative from 1971 to 1980, served as a Minnesota state senator from 1981 to 1990, and was a member of the Task Force on Agency Management and Personnel of the Minnesota Policy Blueprint sponsored by the Minneapolis-based Center of the American Experiment. Donald M. Moe, the older brother of former Minnesota Senate majority leader Roger Moe, and a former State Representative and a former State Senator, currently resides at 110 Virginia Street. Douglas R. Heidenreich, with a B.A. from the University of Minnesota in 1953 and a J.D. from the William Mitchell College of Law in 1961, has been a professor of law at the William Mitchell College of Law from 1965 to the present, teaching Commercial Transactions, Contracts, and Professional Responsibility, and is the undisputed faculty curmudgeon. Douglas R. Heidenreich was a contributor to the Howard Dean for President campaign and to the Democratic National Committee in 2004. Karen J. Lawson, a retiree, resided at this address in 2004 and was a contributor to the Howard Dean for President campaign in 2004. Leo J. Conway ( -1931) and Brewer E. Mattocks ( -1934) both died in Hennepin County. Ellen Irene Mahon (1881-1986) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of English, and died in Olmsted County, Minnesota. Timothy A. Bowen ( -1911,) George L. Beardslee ( -1915,) Jessie Rice Greene ( -1926,) Charles Lyman Greene ( -1929,) Harrison Hatton ( -1929,) Abby Abbe Fuller ( -1939,) John F. Fitzpatrick ( -1944,) Clara Adelaide Beardslee ( -1946,) and Caroline Beals Jilson ( -1947) all died in Ramsey County. Harrison Hatton (1919-1962) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Parsons, and died in Ramsey County. Andrew Muir ( -1919) died in Rice County, Minnesota. Mark G. Skinner (1892-1969) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Welch, and died in Hennepin County. Eugene Bowen ( -1922) died in Koochiching County, Minnesota. William H. Nugent (1907-1959) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Ryerson, and died in Ramsey County. William H. Nugent (1904-1978) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Van Hook, and died in Ramsey County. Jessie G. Ritzinger (1887-1970) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Rice, and died in Ramsey County. Eleanor Burrill Jilson (1883-1974) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Beals, and died in Ramsey County. [See note on Henry Burleigh Wenzell for 543 Lincoln Avenue.] [See note for Francis B. Tiffany for 682 Fairmount Avenue.] [See note on the West Publishing Company for 415 Summit Avenue.] [See note for Paul Harris Gotzian for 542 Lincoln Avenue.] [See note for the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States (MOLLUS) for 30 Irvine Park.] [See note on Knights of Pythias for 2225 East Lake of the Isles Parkway.] [See note on Town & Country Club for 952 Wakefield Avenue.]

12 Summit Court: Wilbur H. Howard residence; Built in 1890; Queen Anne in style. The structure is a two story, 4308 square foot, eight bedroom, five bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Wilbur H. Howard resided at this address from 1890 to 1896. The 1891 city directory indicates that Wilbur H. Howard was in the real estate business and resided at this address. The 1892, 1894, 1896, and 1898 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. Wilbur H. Howard and daughter all resided at this address. The 1902 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. E. H. McHenry resided at this address. The 1902 University of Minnesota Alumni record indicates that Clara N. Kellogg and Lee Olds Kellogg, a 1902 graduate and valedictorian, resided at this address. Little Sketches of Big Folks indicates that Ether Leonard Shepley resided at this address in 1907. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Ether Leonard Shepley (1862-1916,) the husband of Sophia Perin Shepley, who was born in Maine and who died of chronic Bright's disease, resided at this address in 1916. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Mrs. Sophia P. Shepley resided at this address in 1917. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Shepley and L. E. Shepley all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that George S. Hardenbergh, the president of P. R. L. Hardenbergh, a wholesale furniture, upholsterers' materials, and automobile top and trimmer supplies dealer, and his wife, Janthe Hardenbergh, resided at this address. In 1934, George S. Hardenbergh and Ianthe Bronson Hardenbergh resided at this address. The 1939 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that George A. Hardenbergh (1918- ,) who attended the school from 1931 until 1936 and who attended the California Institute of Technology, resided at this address and that George S. Hardenbergh, who attended the school from 1900 until 1906, who attended Yale University, who served during World War I as Captain in the Ordnance Department in the American Expeditionary Force, also resided at this address with his second wife, Iantha Bronson Hardenbergh. In 1879, Wilbur H. Howard was a partner with William J. Dyer in Dyer & Howard, a music and musical instrument store located at 69 East Third Street, and resided at 37 Iglehart Street. In 1908-1909, Wilbur H. Howard was a member of the credentials committee of the annual meeting of the General Congregational Association of Minnesota at Faribault, Minnesota. Edwin H. McHenry (1859-1931) was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, attended the Pennsylvania Military College, Chester, Pennsylvania, entered railway service in 1883 as a rodman on the Black Hills branch of the Northern Pacific RailRoad, progressed from rodman to chainman, draftsman, leveler, transitman, assistant engineer, division engineer, principal assistant engineer, for the Northern Pacific RailRoad, and was the chief engineer for the Northern Pacific RailRoad over the period 1895-1901. Edwin H. McHenry was one of the original engineers for the Stampede Tunnel for the Northern Pacific RailRoad in the 1880's. The Stampede Pass in the State of Washington was the site chosen to be the Northern Pacific RailRoad's crossing of the Cascade Range. Discovered by Virgil G. Bogue in the 1880's, it was originally named the Garfield Pass in honor of President James A. Garfield. Popular rumor indicates that the pass received the name "Stampede" when Northern Pacific RailRoad construction gangs, fearing a ruthless trail boss sent to speed their progress, bolted from the site. In 1893, Northern Pacific RailRoad chief engineer Edwin McHenry became intrigued by the Korean symbol called a monad, said to represent nature's duality. He convinced the Northern Pacific RailRoad to adopt the symbol for their logo shortly after. In 1896, Edwin Harrison McHenry was one of the receivers for the Northern Pacific RailRoad. Edwin McHenry was the chief engineer of the Canadian Pacific Railway in 1901 and 1902, and eventually joined the New York, New Haven & Hartford RailRoad, in charge of its electrification, along with several other Northern Pacific RailRoad executives between 1900 and 1915, including John W. Kendrick, Northern Pacific RailRoad chief engineer and later first vice president, and namesake of Kendrick, Idaho, and Howard Elliott, Northern Pacific RailRoad president and New York, New Haven & Hartford RailRoad president. Ether Leonard Shepley (1862- ,) the son of Leonard Downs Shepley and Frances Ellen Chase Shepley, was born in Portland, Maine, was educated in public schools of Portland, Maine, attended St. Augustine Academy until 1879, was employed by E. D. Bangs & Company, brokers in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1879, moved to St. Paul in 1886, married Sophia Periu in 1889, was a bookkeeper at the German American Bank Building in 1891, was in the coal business, was the assistant treasurer of the North West Fuel Company from 1891 until 1896, was the treasurer and a member of the board of directors of the North West Fuel Company in 1896, was a member of the executive committee of the North West Fuel Company in 1901, was the assistant to president of the North West Fuel Company in 1903, was the first vice president of the North West Fuel Company in 1905, also was the secretary, treasurer and a member of the board of directors of the North West Coal Railway Company from 1893 until 1901, and officed at the Pioneer Press Building in 1907. George Hardenbergh was a former Ramsey County commissioner who bought the Mounds Theatre building in 1967 and donated the Mounds Theatre in 2001 to the Portage for Youth as a new grassroots theater and community center for St. Paul's Dayton's Bluff neighborhood. Louis E. Shepley (1858- ) was born in Syracuse, New York, moved to St. Paul in 1885, was a street paving and sewer construction contractor, was the partner of Michael F. Fielding in Fielding & Shepley, a street paving company, in 1896, was a Democrat, was a supporter of the Palmer-Buckner presidential ticket in 1896, and was engaged in the fuel business. Lee Olds Kellogg received a masters degree from Columbia University in 1906, was a member of the Papers and Publications Committee of the American Institute of Mining and Metallurgical Engineers, was a member of the editorial staff of the Engineering and Mining Journal, edited Details of Practical Mining, published in New York by McGraw-Hill in 1916, and was a mining engineer in Ecuador before 1918, when he moved to New York. Ethen Leonard Shepley ( -1917) and Louis E. Shepley ( -1938) both died in Ramsey County. Ianthe Hardenbergh (1896-1983) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Swain, and died in Ramsey County. The property was last sold for $355,000 and that sale occurred in 1994. The current owners of record of the property are Allan J. Campbell and Sue E. Campbell. [See note on the NorthWestern Fuel Company for 1322 West Osceola Avenue.] [See note on the Northern Pacific RailRoad.] [See note on the Canadian Pacific RailRoad.]

18 Summit Court: Built in 1900. The structure is a two story, 3088 square foot, three bedroom, two bathroom, two half-bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Mahlon N. Gilbert resided at this address from 1890 to 1900. The 1891 city directory indicates that the Right Reverend Mahlon N. Gilbert was an assistant bishop of the Episcopal Churches of Minnesota and resided at this address. The 1892, 1894, 1896, and 1898 city directories indicate that Bishop and Mrs. M. N. Gilbert resided at this address. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Mahlon N. Gilbert (1848-1900,) who died of pneumonia, and Frances "Fanny" P. Carvill Gilbert (1855-1900,) who died of a carcinoma, husband and wife, resided at this address in 1900. The 1902 city directory indicates that Rev. and Mrs. James D. Paxton resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mrs. Emma Pilkington resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that this address was vacant. In 1934, Nick Frederick Helmers, Rose Thurston Helmers, Joan Carolyn Helmers, and Mary Kathryn Helmers all resided at this address. The Helmers family were members of the Minikahda Country Club, the Womens Club of St. Paul, and the Schubert Club in 1934. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Alice Borup resided at this address from 1941 to 1973. Mahlon N. Gilbert was born in Laurens, Otsego County, New York, the son of Norris Gilbert (1811-1877) and Lucy Todd Gilbert (1813-1891,) graduated from Fairfield Academy and from Hobart College, taught at an Episcopal church school in Ogden, Utah, in 1870, graduated from Seabury Divinity School at Faribault, Minnesota, in 1875, was ordained by Bishop Henry B. Whipple in 1875, and worked as Protestant Episcopal rector of churches in Montana and of Christ Episcopal Church in St. Paul, and as Bishop Coadjutor of the Episcopal Diocese of Minnesota from 1886 to 1900. Gilbert married Fanny Pierpont Carvill of Faribault, Minnesota, the daughter of George G. Carvill and Ann Augusta Brown Carvill, in 1880 in Philadelphia. In 1883, Gilbert was a member of the House of Deputies of the General Convention which met in Philadelphia and he also attended the Pan-Anglican Lambeth Conference, a congress of the Anglican Communion, in London in 1897. Mahlon Norris Gilbert and Fanny Pierpoint Carvill Gilbert had two daughters, Lucy Gilbert (Mrs. William) Nalle and Frances Gilbert Cheney. Gilbert an active member of the Society of Colonial Wars and of the Sons of the Revolution and was chaplain of the First Regiment of the Minnesota National Guards in 1883. Samuel Cook Edsall was elected in 1901 to suceed Mahlon Gilbert as Bishop Coadjutor of the Episcopal Diocese of Minnesota. There is a Mahlon Norris Gilbert Book Award at the Seabury-Western Theological Seminary of Evanston, Illinois. The Seabury-Western Theological Seminary is the result of a 1933 merger of the Seabury Divinity School (founded in 1858 at Faribault, Minnesota) and Western Theological Seminary (founded in 1883 at Chicago, Illinois.) The Gilbert burial plot at Oakland Cemetery includes Mahlon Norris Gilbert (1848-1900,) and Fanny Pierpoint Carvill Gilbert (1854-1900.) Nick Frederick Helmers was the president of the Associated General Contractors of America and of the Engineers Club. Nils Hjelmerus/Nick Helmers (1881- ) was born in Vaxjo, Kronoberg, Smaland, Sweden, emigrated to the United States with his family in 1887, and became a citizen in 1892. Rose Thurston Helmers was a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution. James Dunlop Paxton, the son of William Miller Paxton and Caroline Sophia Denny Paxton and the grandson of Harmar Denny and Elizabeth Febiger O'Hara Denny and of James Dunlop Paxton and Jane Maria Miller Paxton, was a member of the Minnesota Society of the Sons of the American Revolution by virtue of great grandfathers James O'Hara, a Quartermaster and Assistant Commissary, William Paxton, a Private in the Pennsylvania Associators, William Miller, a Captain in the Seventh Pennsylvania Line, and Ebenezer Denny, a Lieutenant in the Fourth Pennsylvania Line, and great great grandfathers John Paxton, Jr., a Captain in the Second Battalion of the Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, Militia, William Denny, Commissary of Issues at Carlisle, Pennsylvania, James Dunlop, a Colonel in the First Battalion of the Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, Associators, and John Wilkins, a Captain in the Pennsylvania Continental Infantry, during the Revolutionary War. Emma Nicols Pilkington ( -1927) died in Ramsey county. Mary Helmers (1910-1975) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Carpenter, and died in Hennepin County. The current owners of record of the property are David M. Lilly and Perrin B. Lilly. In 2003, David Lilly and Perrin Lilly and Martha Kaemmer were contributors to the Randy Kelly for St. Paul Mayor campaign and resided at this address. David M. Lilly, a retiree, and Perrin B. Lilly, a retiree, were contributors to the Howard Dean for President campaign in 2004. [See note for the Minikahda Club for 702 Fairmount Avenue.] [See note on the Schubert Club for 374-376-378 Maria Avenue.]

19 Summit Court: George C. Squires Residence; Built in 1900; Georgian Revival in style; Cass Gilbert and John Knox Taylor, architects. The structure is a brick condominium. Unit 101 is a 2650 square foot, three bedroom, two bathroom condominium unit, the last sale of this unit was in 2003 and the sale price was $650,000, and the unit is owned by Marilyn E. Hanson and Robert A. Hanson. Unit 201 is a 2550 square foot, two bedroom, two bathroom condominium unit and the unit is owned by Patricia A. Hvidston and Roger A. Opp. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. In 1889, George C. Squires resided at this address. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that George C. Squires resided at this address from 1890 to 1903. The 1891 city directory indicates that George C. Squires, who partnered with Charles E. Flandrau, Horace Ransom Bigelow, and W. M. Cutcheon in the law firm of Flandrau, Squires & Cutcheon, resided at this address and that Mary E. Squires, the widow of Selah Squires, boarded at this address. The 1892 and 1894 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. George C. Squires, Mrs. Mary Squires, Miss Adeline Squires, and J. McK. Burns all resided at this address. The 1898 and 1902 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. George C. Squires resided at this address. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Charles Ffolliott resided at this address in 1913. The 1918 city directory indicates that Charles Ffolliott, the Misses Ffolliott, and Miss K. M. Thompson all resided at this address. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that William J. Engman resided at this address in 1920. The 1920 city directory indicates that Charles Ffolliott, the president of A. Guthrie & Company, resided at this address and that Eliza Ffolliott, Millicent Ffolliott, and Nancy Ffolliott all boarded at this address. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Millicent Ffolliott (1852-1923,) the unmarried sister of C. Ffolliott, who was born in Ireland to parents born in Ireland and who died of cerebral hemorrhage, resided at this address in 1923. The 1924 city directory indicates that Miss Eliza Ffolliott, Charles Ffolliott, Miss Millicent Ffolliott, J. W. Thompson, and W. H. F. Thompson all resided at this address. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Eliza Ffolliott (1856-1926,) the unmarried sister of Charles Ffolliott, who was born in Ireland to parents born in Ireland and who died of apoplexy, resided at this address in 1926. The 1930 city directory indicates that Stanley Gates, a partner with Lawrence E. Shaughnessy in Stanley Gates & Company, an investment securities dealer located at the Merchants Bank, and his wife, Kathleen Gates, resided at this address. In 1934, Stanley Gates and Kathleen Thompson Gates resided at this address. George C. Squires was an attorney who, with F. W. M. Cutcheon, represented the insurance company in the U. S. Supreme Court case Louisa Banholzer v. New York Life Insurance Company 178 U.S. 402 (1900.) Mrs. George Squires was a member of the Women's Committee of the Minnesota Division of the Council of National Defense in 1917, with Mrs. Thomas G. Winter of Minneapolis, Mrs. Cordenio Severance of Cottage Grove, Minnesota, Mrs. W. T. Coe of Wayzata, Minnesota, Miss Josephine T. Berry of St. Paul, Miss Agnes Peterson of St. Paul, Mrs. Edwin Stuhr of Minneapolis, Miss Annie Shelland of St. Paul, Mrs. Frances Buell Olson of St. Paul, Mrs. Francis A. Chamberlain of Minneapolis, Mrs. Elbert Carpenter of Minneapolis, Mrs. Walter Thorp of Minneapolis, Mrs. W. R. Mandigo of St. Paul, Mrs. Bertha Dahl Laws of Appleton, Minnesota, Mrs. Charles P. Noyes of St. Paul, Mrs. J. L. Washburn of Duluth, Minnesota, Mrs. Harold Weld of Boulevard, Minnesota, and Dr. Auten Pine of St. Paul. Charles Eugene Flandrau (1828-1903,) was born in New York, New York, the son of Thomas Hunt Flandrau (1826-and Elizabeth Macomb Flandrau, sailed in the U. S. Revenue-Cutter Service before 1853, moved to Minnesota with Horace Bigelow in 1853, was admitted to the practice of law and formed the firm of Bigelow & Flandrau in St. Paul, replaced J. K. Markland as Nicollet County, Minnesota, Attorney in 1853, was a member of the Minnesota territorial council for the tenth District in 1856, was Indian agent for the Mdewakanton and Wahpekute Dakota from 1856 to 1858, was the commander of the defense of New Ulm, Minnesota, during the 1862 Dakota War, was a justice of the Minnesota Territorial Supreme Court from 1857 to 1858 and of the Minnesota Supreme Court from 1858 to 1864, was an unsuccessful candidate for Minnesota governor as a Democrat in 1867 and was an unsuccessful candidate for Minnesoat Supreme Court Chief Justice in 1869, also practiced law in New York, Illinois, Missouri, and Nevada, represented the Dakota bands in support of an 1897 Congressional bill to restore rights forfeited in 1863, and died in St. Paul. Charles E. Flandrau was one of the first settlers of St. Peter, Minnesota, in 1854. In 1867, he was elected president of the first board of trade of Minneapolis and he was chairman of the Democratic state central committee in 1868-1869. Flandrau was an incorporator of the Dakota Land Company and Flandreau County, North Dakota, was named for him. Flandrau State Park at New Ulm, Minnesota, was named for him in honor of his 1862 service in the defense of the city of New Ulm, Minnesota, a largely German settlement, during the Dakota Uprising. Flandrau was put in charge of the defense of the southwestern frontier of the State while he also served on the Minnesota Supreme Court, then moved to Nevada to practice law in 1864, but returned to Minneapolis in 1865. In 1867, he was the Democratic candidate for governor but was defeated by William Rainey Marshall. In 1869, he unsuccessfully ran for chief justice of the Minnesota Supreme Court. Judge Flandrau was married twice, first in 1859 to Isabella Dinsmore of Kentucky, and the couple had two daughters, Martha Macomb Flandrau and Sarah Gibson Flandrau. After Isabella Flandrau died in 1867, Flandrau married a widow, Rebecca B. Riddle, the daughter of Judge William McClure of Pittsburgh, and the couple had two sons, Charles Macomb Flandrau, a noted author, and William Blair McClure Flandrau, whose wife, Grace Hodgson Flandrau (1889-1971,) was also a popular author. Charles Macomb Flandrau (1871-1938) was the oldest son of Charles Eugene Flandrau and Rebecca Flandrau, graduated from Harvard University in 1895, published Harvard Episodes, a satirical collection of Ivy League short stories, in 1897, Viva Mexico!, an idiosyncratic travel memoir drawn from the time the author spent on his younger brother's coffee plantation, in 1908, and Prejudices, lived in France for much of the 1920's, and was the local theater critic for the Pioneer Press, the Dispatch, and theDaily News, but often came to shows drunk. Martha Macomb Flandrau married Tilden Russell Selmes, and their daughter, Isabella Selmes, was the first female congresswoman from Arizona, under her married name of Isabella Greenway. Thomas Hunt Flandrau was a law partner of Aaron Burr, a former vice-president of the United States, and Elizabeth Macomb Flandrau was a half sister of Alexander Macomb, the commanding general of the United States Army from 1828 to 1841. Charles Flandrau's brother, Thomas Macomb Flandrau (1826- ) was a physician and was the U. S. Civil War veterans' pension examining surgeon from 1866 to 1887. Charles E. Flandrau was the father-in-law of Grace Hodgson Flandrau (1889-1971.) Stanley Gates was a graduate of Dartmouth University. The Gates family were members of the University Club, the Minikahda Country Club, and the St. Paul Athletic Club in 1934. Grace Corrin Hodgson Flandrau (1886-1971) was born in St. Paul, the illegitimate daughter of a businessman in mortgage banking, was a contemporary of F. Scott Fitzgerald, married W. Blair Flandrau ( -1938,) an alcoholic, in 1909, moved to Mexico where the couple ran a coffee plantation until the Mexican Revolution, was a friend of Brenda Ueland, wrote novels that all take place in St. Paul and that are all satires of high class society, moved to Paris after the stock market crash of 1929, returned to Minnesota and did a radio show on KSTP, and left a $1 million bequest to the University of Arizona in Tuscon with which the university built the Grace Hodgson Flandrau Planetarium. Grace Corrin Hodgson Flandrau wrote Cousin Julia (1917,) Being Respectable (1923,) Entranced (1924,) Story of Marias Pass (1925,) Glance at the Lewis and Clark Expedition (1925,) Then I Saw the Congo (1929,) Indeed This Flesh (1934,) and Under the Sun; tales of love and death (1936.) Eliza Ffolliott ( -1926,) Charles Ffolliott ( -1930,) William R. Mandigo ( -1935,) Charles M. Flandrau ( -1938,) W. Blair Flandrau ( -1938,) William J. Engman ( -1942,) and Kathleen Thompson Gates ( -1953) all died in Ramsey County. Mary Elizabeth Clark Squires (1825-1903,) the wife of Selah Squires, a lawyer, died in Dansville, New York. Stanley Gates (1885-1971) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Smith, and died in Ramsey County. Francis A. Chamberlain ( -1940) and Elbert L. Carpenter ( -1945) both died in Hennepin County. [See note for Horace Bigelow for 30 Irvine Park.] [See note on Frank W. M. Cutcheon for 670 Oakland Avenue.] [See note on Cordenio A. Severance for 710 West Linwood Avenue.] [See note for Francis A. Chamberlain and Cyrus Foss Chamberlain for 2312 Blaisdell Avenue South.] [See note on Charles Phelps Noyes for 335 Bates Avenue.] [See note on Alcinda Auten-Pine for 873 Lincoln Avenue.]

27 Summit Court: Built in 1890 (1889 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Queen Anne in style; Cass Gilbert & John Knox Taylor, archtects. The structure is a two story, 5181 square foot, six bedroom, four bathroom, one half-bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Robert B. C. Bement resided at this address from 1889 to 1967. The 1891 city directory indicates that Tracy Lyon was associated with Robert Bement & Company, an engineering and contracting company, and resided at the Dakota Hotel. The 1892 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Tracy Lyon and William Bement all resided at this address. The 1894 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. R. B. C. Bement and their daughter all resided at this address. The 1896 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. R. B. C. Bement, their daughter, and William Bement all resided at this address. The 1898 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. R. B. C. Bement, Mr. and Mrs. F. E. Bird, Lansing T. Bement, and William Bement all resided at this address. The 1902 city directory indicates that Col. and Mrs. R. B. C. Bement and Lansing T. Bement all resided at this address. The book of Minnesotans: a biographical dictionary of leading living men of Minnesota, edited by Albert Nelson Marquis, indicates that Robert B. C. Bement resided at this address in 1907. In 1916, Robert Bunker Coleman Bement was a member of the Minnesota Historical Society and resided at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that Col. and Mrs. R. B. C. Bement and Lansing Bement all resided at this address. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Lansing T. Bement resided at this address in 1923. The 1924 city directory indicates that L. T. Bement and R. B. C. Bement both resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Lansing T. Bement, the production manager employed by the West Publishing Company, and his wife, Frances Bement, resided at this address. In 1934, Lansing T. Bement, Francis Flynn Bement, Robert Bement, and Herbert Bement all resided at this address. The 1939 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Herbert O. Bement, a member of the Class of 1930 or 1933, and Robert L. Bement, a member of the Class of 1930 or 1932, both resided at this address. The 1950 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Herbert O. Bement, who attended the school from 1925 until 1930, resided at this address. Lansing Tracy Bement was the son of Robert Bunker Coleman Bement (1848-1920) and Mary Elizabeth Tracy Bement (1850-1923.) The 1964 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Herbert O. Bement, a member of the Class of 1933, resided at this address. The Bement burial plot at Oakland Cemetery includes the graves of Lansing Tracy Bement (1874-1946,) Rosilla Day Bement (1889-1923,) and Frances Flynn Bement (1882-1945.) Colonel Robert Bunker Coleman Bement (1847/1848-1920,) the son of William Bement (1816-1882) and Katherine/Catherine Bacon Lewis Bement (1815-1876) and grandson of Caleb Nichols Bement (1791-1868) and Harriet Hobbie Holmes Bement (1791-1823), was born in Northumberland/Bacon Hill, Saratoga County, New York, grew up on Staten Island, New York, attended the University of New York City, New York, for two years, graduated in 1868/1869 with a civil engineering degree from the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute at Troy, New York, was the resident engineer with the the Burlington & Missouri River RailRoad in Nebraska, worked as chief engineer for the Dubuque & Minnesota RailRoad, the Chicago, Clinton & Dubuque RailRoad, the Iowa Pacific RailRoad, and the Chicago, Dubuque & Minnesota RailRoad from 1870 until 1874, married Mary E. Tracy (1850-1923,) the daughter of Cornelius L. Tracy, in Troy, New York, in 1872, was the chief engineer for the Troy & Boston RailRoad from 1875 until 1879, was a manufacturer of hammers and forgings in Buffalo, New York, from 1879 until 1882, was a member of A. Storrs & Bement, wholesale paper and mill agents in Boston, Massachusetts, from 1882 until 1886, moved to Minnesota in 1886, resided in St. Paul, was a civil, contracting, and hydraulic engineer for Charleston, West Virginia, for Duluth, Minnesota, for West Superior, Wisconsin, and for Bozeman, Montana, was a St. Paul water commissioner from 1891 until 1901, was president of the St. Paul Board of Water Commissioners from 1892 until 1898, was promoted a Major in the Engineering Corp of the U. S. Volunteers in Manila, Philippine Islands, in 1898, served in the Spanish-American War as Colonel of Engineers from 1898 until 1899, was the United States Internal Revenue Collector (Administrator de Hacienda) in Manila in 1899, was the president of the Robinson Cary Company, mill and railway supply, steam engine, pump, and boiler dealers and manufacturing agents, from 1905 until at least 1913, was the president of the Southern States Pine Products Company of Savannah, Georgia, was the secretary and treasurer of the Mercantile Warehousing Company, was treasurer of the Duluth Gas & Water Company, was an Episcopalian, was a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers, was a member of the Boston Society of Civil Engineers, was a Republican, was a member of the Psi Upsilon Fraternity, was a Mason, was a member of the Minnesota State Society of Colonial Wars, was a member of the Minnesota Historical Society, was a member of the Sons of the American Revolution, was a member of the Minnesota Club, was a member of the University Club of New York City, was a member of the St. Paul Town & Country Club, was a member of the Informal Club, officed at the corner of Fourth Street and Wacouta Street in 1907, died in Ramsey County, and was buried at Oakwood Cemetery in Troy, New York. Robert Bement married Mary Elizabeth Tracy (1850-1923,) the daughter of Cornelius Lansing Tracy, (1825- ) and Mary Olmsted Tracy (1825- ,) in 1872 in Troy, New York, and the couple had two children, Lansing Tracy Bement (1874- ,) employed by West Publishing, and Bertha Tracy Bement (Mrs. S. D.) Sturgis (1875- .) William Bement was superintendent of the Victory Cotton Mills at Victory, New York, for a short period of time, was associated with an importing house in New York City in 1847, was treasurer of the New York & New Haven RailRoad from 1849 to 1870, and engaged in mining at Colorado, where he owned and operated an ore sampling mill at Georgetown, Colorado, until he retired in 1877. Bertha Tracy Bement married Samuel Davis Sturgis, Jr. (1861- ) in 1896 in St. Paul and the couple had three children, Samuel Davis Sturgis (1897-1964,) Elizabeth Tracy Sturgis (1900- ,) and Robert Bement Sturgis (1902-1980.) Robert Bunker Coleman Bement had a cottage on Manitou Island in White Bear Lake in White Bear, Minnesota. Robert Bement made drawings of water tanks in Glenwood, Minnesota (1892-1893) and in St. Paul (1894) and drawings of a bridge for the Manitou Island Land and Improvement Company, White Bear Lake, Minnesota (1893.) Bertha Bement Sturgis, who reportedly resided in the Panama Canal Zone for three years, was the author of Field book of birds of the Panama Canal Zone, New York and London, Putnam's Sons: The Knickerbocker Press, 1928. Captain Samuel Davis Sturgis, Jr., was born in St. Louis, Missouri, the son of General Samuel Davis Sturgis (1830- ,) United States Army, and Jerusha Wilcox Sturgis (1830- ,) served with the 12th Battery Field Artillery, United States Army, and was stationed at Fort Douglass, Utah, in 1903, and married Bertha Tracy Bement in St. Paul in 1896. Herbert D. Bement (1914-1972) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Day, and died in Dakota County, Minnesota. The property was last sold for $960,000 and that sale occurred in 2001. The current owners of record of the property are Gary J. Balas and Stephanie L. Steele. [See note on General Samuel Davis Sturgis and Samuel D. Sturgis III for 427 Portland Avenue.] [See note on the West Publishing Company for 415 Summit Avenue.] [See note for the Dubuque & Minnesota RailRoad.] [See note for the Chicago, Dubuque & Minnesota RailRoad.] [See the note for the St. Paul Academy.]

29 Summit Court: Former Sylvester M. Cary residence; Built in 1956 (1900 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Georgian Revival in style. The structure is a two story, 5355 square foot, ten bedroom, six bathroom, one half-bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Sylvester M. Cary resided at this address from 1889 to 1908. The 1891 city directory indicates that Sylvester M. Cary was the president of Robinson & Cary Company, a railroad and machine supplies company, and resided at this address. The 1892, 1894, and 1896 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. S. M. Cary resided at this address. The 1898 and 1902 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. S. M. Cary and Mrs. C. E. Hunt all resided at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. S. M. Shepard resided at this address. The records of the 1919-1920 Minnesota World War I Soldier's Bonus Board (#2406) indicate that Sidney Butler Dean (1879- ,) a 1918 enlistee and a Captain in the Aviation Section, Quartermaster Corps, who was born in St. Paul, was a merchant employed by Nicols, Dean & Gregg after the completion of service, and was married, resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Thomas McDermott resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Charles G. Rank and his wife, Elizabeth Rank, resided at this address. In 1934, Charles G. Rank, Elizabeth Rank, Sawyer Rank, and Eunice Rank resided at this address. Sylvester M. Cary summered at White Bear Lake, Minnesota, in 1890. The Robinson & Cary Company, established before 1883, became the Robinson, Cary & Sands Company by 1910. The Rank family were members of the White Bear Yacht Club, the Minikahda Country Club, the University Club, and the Women's City Club of St. Paul in 1934. Sidney Butler Dean (1879- ) was born in St. Paul, the son of William Blake Dean, prepared for college at the Hill School, Pottstown, Pennsylvania, was a member of the Yale University Class of 1900, was the business agent for The Courant at Yale University in 1900 (with Frost M. Wheeler as the assistant business manager,) was in business with Nicols, Dean & Gregg, iron merchants, and resided at 353 Summit Avenue in 1905. Sidney B. Dean and Nicols, Dean & Gregg were indicted in 1917 with 37 other manufacturers and jobbers of automobile supplies by a federal grand jury under the Sherman Anti-Trust Act for restraining trade. Nicols, Dean & Gregg was established in 1855 by Joseph M. Marshall and William R. Marshall, initially was an iron merchant and a blacksmith and garage tools and equipment dealer, was sold to John Nicols and Peter Berkey, became a wholesale hardware and implement specialties company, and supplied auto parts, air meters, and gas pumps in 1919. Nicols, Dean & Gregg was later purchased by the General Trading Company. Joseph M. Marshall ( -1897) was born in Missouri, came to Minnesota in 1847, resided successively in the St. Croix valley, at St. Anthony Falls, and, after 1851, in St. Paul, engaged in banking in St. Paul until 1860, moved to Colorado in 1860, and died in Denver, Colorado. John Nicols (1811/1817-1873) was born in Talbot County, Maryland, was educated at the Hillsboro Academy in Maryland, initially was a farmer, was a state legislator in Maryland for three terms, resided in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in 1843, moved to St. Paul in 1851, was engaged in the iron trade, was a Republican, was a member of the Minnesota Senate representing Ramsey County (District 21) in 1864 and representing Ramsey County (District 24) from 1871 until 1873, was a member of the St. Paul Board of Education, was a Ramsey County Commissioner, was a regent of the University of Minnesota, resided at 42 Summit Avenue in 1873, and died in St. Paul. Mary Katherine Nicols (Mrs. William Blake) Dean was the daughter of John Nicols. Charles Grant Rank married the former Mrs. Elizabeth Pearce in 1912 in Rhode Island. The 1917 Catalogue of the Beta Theta Pi Fraternity, published by James T. Brown of New York, indicated that Charles Grant Rank was an 1888 graduate of Denison University, Granville, Ohio, and was railway supplies dealer in St. Paul who officed at the Merchants Bank Building. Mary Charlotte Hardenbergh (1887- ) married Samuel McMillan Shepard. Samuel McMillan Shepard (1883-1945,) the son of Frank Parsons Shepard (1853-1912) and Anna Walter Shepard (1856- ,) and a life member of the Massachusetts Society of Mayflower Descendants after 1923 as a descendant of William Brewster, was a member of the Class of 1906 of Yale University and graduated with a bachelor's degree in Philosophy. Thomas McDermott (1876- ,) the son of Philip McDermott and Elizabeth McGrath McDermott, was born in Stillwater, Minnesota, graduated from the Stillwater, Minnesota, High School in 1892, graduated from the University of Minnesota in 1896, graduated from the University of Minnesota Law School in 1900, read the law with How & Butler and with How & Taylor from 1897 until 1900, was the assistant corporation attorney for St. Paul from 1901 until 1903, was a special attorney for the Water Board of St. Paul in litigation against the St. Paul City Railway Company from 1903 until 1906, engaged in the general practice of law in St. Paul after 1903, was a member of the Theta Delta Chi college fraternity, was a member of the Minnesota Club, was a member of the St. Paul Town & Country Club, resided at 296 Dayton Avenue in 1907, and officed at the Gilfillan Block in 1907. Thomas M. McDermott ( -1926,) Thomas L. McDermott ( -1935,) Elizabeth Sawyer Rank ( -1935,) Charles G. Rank ( -1938,) and Samuel McMillan Shepard ( -1945) all died in Ramsey County. Elizabeth T. Rank (1895-1960) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Wachtler, and died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is Sarah Maud W. Sivertsen. [See note for William Blake Dean for 353 Summit Avenue.] [See note on the White Bear Yacht Club for 767 Goodrich Avenue.] [See note on the University Club for 420 Summit Avenue.] [See note for the St. Paul City Railway Company.] [See note for the Minikahda Club for 702 Fairmount Avenue.] [See note on Town & Country Club for 952 Wakefield Avenue.]

32 Summit Court: The property is tax-exempt property which is owned by the City of St. Paul.

33 Summit Court: Built in 1890 (1889 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Colonial Revival in style. The structure is a stone condominium/rowhouse. Unit 1 is a 3824 square foot, four bedroom, three bathroom condominium unit, which was last sold in 1991 with a sale price of $155,000, and which is owned by Patrick C. Diamond and Elizabeth A. Peterson. Unit 2 is a 2834 square foot, three bedroom, one bathroom, one half-bathroom condominium unit, which was last sold in 1991 with a sale price of $130,000, and which is owned by Dana L. Garvey and Edward A. Garvey, who reside at 32 Lawton Street. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Paul H. Gotzian resided at this address from 1903 to 1905. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Boalt resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that John J. Lynerd, a chauffeur, his wife, Otilda Lynerd, Charles A. Boalt, and his wife, Margaret Boalt, all resided at this address. In 1934, Charles A. Boalt and Margaret Lamberton Boalt resided at this address. In 2005, Edward Garvey, for owner Patrick C. Diamond, appealed a side yard setback variance to the St. Paul Board of Zoning Appeals in order to construct a deck with a circular staircase at this address. Patrick C. Diamond was an Assistant Hennepin County Attorney in 2000 and in 2002, was a Special Assistant Stearns County Attorney in 2007, and was an Assistant Hennepin County Attorney in 2007. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Boalt and their daughter resided at the former nearby 63 Summit Court. Margaret Lamberton Boalt ( -1946) and Charles Arthur Boalt ( -1953) both died in Ramsey County. [See note for Paul Harris Gotzian for 542 Lincoln Avenue.]

170 Victoria Street South: Built in 1890. The structure is a two story, 1532 square foot, three bedroom, one bathroom, one half-bathroom, frame house. The last sale of this property was in 1994 and the sale price was $125,550. The current owner of record of the property is Katharine S. Patterson.

208 Victoria Street South: Built in 1914. The structure is a 1 3/4 story, 1461 square foot, three bedroom, one bathroom, one half-bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. The 1924 city directory indicates that Dr. and Mrs. S. N. Mogilner resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Frank Warren, a hair dealer, and his wife, Ethel Warren, resided at this address. Frank Warren ( -1938) died in Ramsey County. The property was last sold in 1992 with a sale price of $120,000. The current owners of record of the property are Kate E. Depaolis and Mark N. Langseth. Kate DePaolis taught Social Studies at the Broadway Arts and Technology High School, Minneapolis, in 2002 and participated in the Teacher Institute Professional Development seminars for K-12 educators offered by the Minnesota Humanities Commission. Mark N. Langseth is the Executive Director of the Minnesota Campus Compact in St. Paul, a coalition of 48 college and university presidents committed to strengthening communities through developing campus-community partnerships and educating students for informed and active citizenship that recently received a grant from the St. Paul Foundation. Langseth previously was the founding director of the Minnesota Campus Service Initiative, was Chief Operating Officer at the National Youth Leadership Council, and was the recipient of the three-year Kellogg National Fellowship Program (1997-2000.)

210 Victoria Street South: Built in 1909. The structure is a one story, 1632 square foot, four bedroom, one bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. R. M. Pease resided at this address. The records of the 1919-1920 Minnesota World War I Soldier's Bonus Board (#45067) indicate that Stanley I. Rypkins (1891- ,) a 1918 draftee and a Sergeant in Headquarters Detachment of the Prov. Depot for Corps & Army Troops at Camp Wadsworth, South Carolina, who was born in Evansville, Indiana, moved to Minnesota in 1899, had brown eyes, black hair, and a dark complexion, was 5' 4 3/4" tall, was unemployed at induction, was a teacher employed by the University of Minnesota after the completion of service, and was unmarried, resided with his parents, Isaac L. Rypkins and Esther F. Rypkins, at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Julian B. Baird, a salesman employed by the Merchants Trust & Savings Bank, resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Bard resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that A. Wesley Schuneman, the assistant treasurer of Schunemans & Mannheimers, and his wife, Leslie Schuneman, resided at this address. Julian B. Baird (1892-1977) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Redington, and died in Ramsey County. Albert Wesley Schuneman ( -1946) died in Ramsey County. The last sale of this property was in 1994 and the sale price was $104,000. The current owners of record of the property are Paul A. Claesgens and Martha E. Paulsen. Paul Claesgens is the son of Roger Claesgens and Joan Claesgens and the grandson of James Carroll Braheny ( -1991) and Mary Jane Watts Braheny (1912-1995), of Clear Lake, Iowa. Paul Claesgens is a runner who has competed in many races, including the Grand Tour 5K, the Grand Old Day 8K, and the Apple Blossum Special Race. Martha Paulsen is associated with Abbott Northwestern Hospital and is a member of the Minnesota Association of Resources for Recovery and Chemical Health. [See note on Rabbi Isaac L. Rypins for 165 Western Avenue North.] [See note for the Mannheimer Brothers for 270 West Seventh Street.]

Architectural Style Notes

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Information from the University of Minnesota, Northwest Architectural Archives, was used in this webpage.

This webpage was last modified on July 22, 2011.