Thursday Night Hikes: Portland East 1 Architecture Notes

Thursday Night Hikes: Portland East 1 Architecture Notes


Observations on Architectural Styles, Part

Portland Avenue East 1

Assembled by

Lawrence A. Martin

Webpage Creation: September 6, 2006

Specific Structures. The following presents available information on the architectural styles of specific structures located along the hike:

614 Portland Avenue: Church Club; Built in 1913. The structure is a three story, 33676 square foot, commercial building. The 1887 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. William Hendricks resided at the corner of Dale Street and Portland Avenue. William F. Clifford, Fletcher Graves, and Otto L. Winter were World War I veterans who all resided at this address in 1919. The records of the 1919-1920 Minnesota World War I Soldier's Bonus Board (#2392) indicate that Bayard F. Taber (1889- ,) a 1917 enlistee and a Sergeant First Class in 101st Aero Squadron A. S. A., who was born in Kendallville, Indiana, moved to Minnesota in 1914, had blue eyes, brown hair, and a medium fair complexion, was 5' 11" tall, was a clerk at induction, was an architectural draughtsman employed by E. H. Lundie after the completion of service, and was unmarried, resided at this address. The records of the 1919-1920 Minnesota World War I Soldier's Bonus Board (#2916) indicate that Edwin F. Noth (1890- ,) a 1917 enlistee and a Sergeant in Battery B, 151st Field Artillery, who was born in Davenport, Iowa, had blue eyes, light hair, and a medium complexion, was 6' tall, was a architect at induction, served in the American Expeditionary Force in France, including the Marne, St. Mihiel, Champagne, Aisne, and Meuse-Argonne, was an architect employed by Toltz, King & Day at the Pioneer Building after the completion of service, and was unmarried, resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Andr D. Berkey, a live stock broker who officed at the Exchange Building, and Lee Donahower, a travel agent employed by the Leslie Donahower Company, both boarded at this address, that Fred M. Clark, a real estate agent officing at the Guardian Life Building, roomed at this address, and that John H. Bogart, a manufacturers agent who officed at the Merchant Bank Building, Daniel D. Clark, the president of the Citizens State Bank, and Fred L. Donahower, a salesman employed by the Leslie Donahower Company, a paper and stationery wholesaler, all resided at this address. The 1920 city directory also indicates that the Church Club was located at this address and that G. O. House was its president and E. B. Bartan was its secretary and treasurer. The 1924 city directory indicates that S. H. Wilson resided at this address. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that the St. John the Evangelist Episcopal Church Parish House was located at this address from 1929 to 1946, that the Minnesota Tuberculosis & Public Health Association and the Ramsey County Tuberculosis and Public Health Association were located at this address beginning in 1948. The 1930 city directory indicates that the St. John's Parish House was located at this address. Alice L. Taber, a resident of Davenport, Iowa in 1919, was the mother of Bayard F. Taber. Bayard Taber was the secretary of the architectural club of the University of Illinois-Champagne-Urbana in 1913. George W. Noth, who resided in Davenport, Iowa, was the father of Edwin F. Noth. The Battle of Saint-Mihiel was a World War I battle fought between September 12-15, 1918, involving the American Expeditionary Force and 48,000 French troops under the command of U.S. general John J. Pershing against German positions. Pershing combined his 16 U.S. divisions into the U. S. First Army, which was supplemented by a French army corps. Col. George C. Marshall helped with planning. Brig. Gen. Douglas MacArthur was a brigade commander in the 42nd (Rainbow) Division. Col. George S. Patton, Jr., commanded the 304th Tank Brigade. The attack at the St. Mihiel salient was part of a plan by Pershing in which he hoped that the United States would break through the German lines and capture the fortified city of Metz. It was one of the first U. S. solo offensives in WWI and the attack of 300,000 troops caught the Germans in the process of retreating. The salient was 25 miles wide at its base and 15 miles deep, extending from about 10 miles southeast of Verdun to the town of St. Mihiel on the Meuse River. The salient angled eastward for 40 miles to Pont-�-Mousson on the Moselle River. The U. S. attack faltered after outdistancing their artillery and food supplies as muddy roads made support difficult. The attack on Metz was not realized as the Germans refortified their positions. Billy Mitchell gathered more than 1,400 American and Allied aircraft for the Battle of St. Mihiel. Pershing believed that control of the air was necessary and he entrusted the job to Mitchell. By the night of Sept. 16, 1918, the Americans had flown a total of 2,469 sorties, engaged in 145 aerial combats, and dropped 44,118 pounds of bombs. Boyd W. Christenson, of Christenson & Associates, Inc., is the Business Development Director-North America for the Adelaide (Australia) Convention Centre, and represents the Tourism Authority of Thailand, and is located at Suite 113. Janet T. Thomas, Psy.D., LP, in private practice, is located at Suite 116 at this address. Shoshana E Englard M.D., an ophthalmologist, is located at this address. Graham C. Clark, Attorney at Law, E. B. Green Editorial, the Tourism Authority of Thailand, and Green Light Video are all located at this address. The current owner of record of the property is N and K Development Company, also located at this address. [See note for Bayard F. Taber.]

609 Portland Avenue: Built in 1915. The structure is a two story, 8250 square foot, multifamily apartment building. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Henry Curtis, Mr. and Mrs. F. J. King, and G. B. Parker all resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. F. J. King and Mr. and Mrs. L. B. Poore all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that the residents of the apartment building located at this address were Frank J. King and his wife, Olive J. King (Apartment #1,) Leon B. Poore, a district passenger agent employed by the Pennsylvania RailRoad, and his wife, Helen M. Poore (Apartment #2,) George B. Parker, a salesman, and his wife, Katherine M. Parker (Apartment #3,) and Charles E. Keller, a deputy State Fire Marshal (Apartment #4.) Olive Julia King (1897-1993) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Scott, and died in St. Louis County, Minnesota. Frank J. King ( -1932,) George Parker ( -1942,) Charles Edward Keller ( -1943,) and Helen M. Poore ( -1943) all died in Ramsey County. Katherine M. Parker (1887-1972) had a mother with a maiden name of Callina and died in Dakota County, Minnesota. The current owner of record of the property is Terry P. McGrath, who resides at 886 Jefferson Avenue. The 1900 city directory indicates that Capt. and Mrs. R. E. Thompson and their daughter resided at the former nearby 606 Portland Avenue. The 1914 city directory indicates that Col. and Mrs. R. E. Thompson, their daughters, and H. R. Thompson all resided at the former nearby 606 Portland Avenue. The 1916 University of Minnesota Alumni Directory indicates that Elaine Elizabeth Levanson, a 1906 graduate of the University of Minnesota, resided at the nearby former 606 Portland Avenue. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. H. S. Crippen and their daughter all resided at the former nearby 606 Portland Avenue. [See note on the Pennsylvania Railroad for 1297 St. Clair Avenue.]

605 Portland Avenue: Built in 1911. The structure is a three story, 8540 square foot, multifamily apartment building. The 1914 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. H. R. Gait, Mrs. B. C. Baldwin and her daughter, W. D. Baldwin, Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Reynoldson, Mr. and Mrs. C. P. Schaub, and Miss B. R. Twigg all resided at this address. The 1915 Woman's Who's who of America indicates that Clara Frances Baldwin resided at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Keller, Morris Lanpher, R. A. Lanpher, E. W. Nystrom, and Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Reynoldson all resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Edgar B. Barton, a purchasing agent for the St. Paul Fire & Marine Insurance Company, resided at this address. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Rollin A. Lanpher, Sr. (1841-1922,) the widower father of R. A. Lanpher, Jr., who was born in Illinois to parents born in the United States and who died of chronic myocardiac insufficiency, resided at this address in 1922. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Whitman, Mrs. Mary Wedge, Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Kelly, Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Keller, and Miss Grace Johnston all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that the residents of the apartment building located at this address were Karl O. Victor, an agent employed by the State Bureau of Criminal Apprehension, his wife, Mabel E. Victor, and Onetah Victor, a typist employed by the State Bureau of Criminal Apprehension (Apartment #1,) Mrs. Dora Christie, the widow of Joseph Christie (Apartment #2,) Hope C. Johnston, the secretary to the president of the North West Fuel Company (Apartment #3,) and Martin E. Old, a salesman employed by the Real Silk Hosiery Mills Inc., his wife, Elizabeth Old, Elsie J. Old, a helper employed by Montgomery Ward & Company, and Helen A. Old, a clerk (Apartment #5,) with Apartments #4 and #6 vacant. Clara Frances Baldwin (1871- ) was born in Lake City, Minnesota, the daughter of Benjamin C. Baldwin and Ann C. Atkinson Baldwin, was a graduate of the St. Paul Public Schools in 1887 and of the University of Minnesota in 1892, was employed as an assistant librarian by the Minneapolis Public Library from 1892 until 1899, was employed as the secretary of the Minnesota Library Commission from 1900, was a member of the Minnesota Alumni Association, was a member of the Association of Collegiate Alumnae, was a member of the American Library Association, Minnesota Library Association, was a member of the State Arts Society, was a member of the Women's Civic League, and was a member of the Twin City Library Club, and was a Presbyterian. Rollin A. Lanpher, Sr., (1841-1922,) was born in Illinois, was appointed as sergeant of Company D, Second Minnesota Infantry Regiment, married Charlotte Lanpher (1848- ,) who was born in Pennsylvania, and the couple had three children, Mabel E. Lanpher (1874- ,) Rollin A. Lanpher, Jr., (1876- ,) and Morris/Maurice Lanpher (1887- .) Rollin Lanpher, Jr., and his wife, Mae/Mary/Marie Murray Lanpher, resided at 35 Irvine Park in 1920. Edgar B. Barton, the son of Thomas D. Barton and Helen L. Barton and grandson of Philip Wilbur and Edna Hilliard Wilbur, was a member of the Minnesota Society of the Sons of the American Revolution by virtue of great grandfather Miner Hilliard, a private in the Seventh Connecticut Continental Regiment during the Revolutionary War. The Real Silk Hosiery Mills Inc. was founded in 1922 by J. A. and L. L. Goodman and ran knitting mills in Linton, Indiana, Georgia, and Mississippi which manufactured hosiery, lingerie, and underwear. The company ran into financial difficulties in the early 1930's as a result of the Great Depression, and control was assumed by a bank committee. In the late 1920's, Real Silk employed 10,000 canvassers operating from 250 branch offices to sell its product. Gustav Efroymson ( -1955,) the former president of H. P. Wasson Company in Indianapolis, Indiana, assumed control of the company in 1932, but a violent 1934 strike and the redirection of silk to parachutte manufacturing during World War II constrained the company. In 1934, Real Silk had its own post office within the mill to handle more than 3 million packages per year and was the largest U.S. shipper of c.o.d. parcel post packages. In the late 1940's, Real Silk employed 4,000 machine operators and produced a half-million pairs of hosiery weekly. After a post-war profit increase, the financial situation of the company again declined in the early 1950's, Robert Efroymson ( -1988) eventually assumed control of the company, and he slowly closed all of its manufacturing operations and converted it to an investment company as Real Silk Inc., although it continued door-to-door sales of hosiery, lingerie, and other clothing products on a national scale. During the 1920's, Gustave Efroymson helped organize a coalition of Jewish and Catholic businessmen in Indianapolis, Indiana, to fight the Ku Klux Klan, a then-pervasive force in state politics. The Second Minnesota Infantry Regiment was organized between June 26, 1861, and August 23, 1861, served in the battle of Mill Springs, Kentucky, the battle of Shiloh/Pittsburg Landing, Tennessee, the siege of Corinth, Mississippi, the battle of Perryville, Kentucky, the battle of Chickamauga, Georgia, the siege of Chattanooga, Tennessee, the battle of Mission Ridge, Tennessee, the battle of Resaca, Georgia, the battle of Kenesaw Mountain, Georgia, the siege of Atlanta, Georgia, the battle of Jonesboro, Georgia, Sherman's March to the sea, the siege of Savannah, Georgia, and the battle of Bentonville, North Carolina, was commanded by Colonels Horatio P. Van Cleve, James George, and Judson W. Bishop, lost a total of 281 men, with two officers and 91 enlisted men killed as a result of battle and two officers and 186 enlisted men dead from disease, and was mustered out of Federal service on July 11, 1865. The Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension (BCA) was created by the Minnesota Legislature in 1927 and was placed under the Office of the Attorney General. The Bureau of Criminal Apprehension was established to assist peace officers throughout the state in solving local crimes and apprehending criminals. The division of statistics, forerunner of the Criminal Justice Information Systems Section (CJIS,) was added in 1935, as were additional personnel and full police power for the Bureau's agents. The addition of personnel made the establishment of field offices throughout Minnesota possible. In 1947, the Bureau of Criminal Apprehension laboratory became operational, making chemical analysis and microscopic study of evidence possible. In 1969, the Bureau of Criminal Apprehension, along with several other state agencies, became a member of the newly created Department of Public Safety. Benjamin Chapman Baldwin ( -1909,) Martin Old ( -1935,) Elizabeth H. Old ( -1936,) Dora Christie ( -1939,) John Reynoldson ( -1941,) Rollin A. Lanpher, Jr. ( -1942,) Karl O. Victor ( -1945,) and Hope C. Johnston ( -1952) all died in Minnesota. Mabel Eloise Victor (1890-1976) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Rosevold, and died in Chisago County, Minnesota. Dora Christie (1877-1969) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Larson, and died in Hennepin County. The current owners of record of the property are Catherine A. Jansen and Jerome R. Jansen, who reside in White Bear Lake, Minnesota. Dan Pelletier, a collegiate football and basketball official, currently resides at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Mary E. Stivers/Stiver, the widow of William J. Stivers, resided at the former nearby 606 Portland Avenue. [See note on the North West Fuel Company and Edward N. Saunders for 323 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Rollin A. Lanpher for 482 Portland Avenue.]

604 Portland Avenue: Built in 1889. The structure is a two story, 5211 square foot, multifamily apartment building. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Brown and Mr. and Mrs. G. L. Peterson all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Clyde J. Wiggin, a machinist employed by the Omaha RailRoad Shops, and his wife, Mary Wiggin, resided at this address. Clyde J. Wiggin (1901-1981) was born in Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. Mary Margaret Wiggin (1905-1995) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Braun, and died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is Gregory J. Mayen. In 1994 and again in 1996, Gregory Mayen unsuccessfully appealed a decision of the Heritage Preservation Commission denying him a building permit for the installation of vinyl siding and aluminum trim to property at this address. Greg Mayen is a member of the Skilaufers Ski and Social Club. The 1918 city directory indicates that George Alveredes resided at the former nearby 601 Portland Avenue. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Wood resided at the former nearby 602 Portland Avenue and that Mrs. Mate Downing and Mr. and Mrs. G. E. Lees all resided at the former nearby 601 Portland Avenue.

600 Portland Avenue: Built in 1889. The structure is a two story, 2824 square foot, seven bedroom, two bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. The 1900 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Lord resided at this address. Little Sketches of Big Folks indicates that Richard Howard Relf resided at this address in 1907. The 1914 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. R. H. Relf and Richard Relf, Jr., all resided at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that James G. Calihan, John G. Calihan, Miss Della Calihan, and Miss Eloise L. Calihan all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Allen W. Scell, a salesman, and his wife, Sadie V. Scell, resided at this address. Richard Howard Relf (1864- ,) the son of Richard Relf and Augusta Jane Clark Relf, was born in Superior, Wisconsin, was educated in the public schools Superior, Wisconsin, until 1879, attended the St. Cloud, Minnesota, Normal School from 1882 until 1883, attended the Curtiss Business College of St. Paul from 1883 until 1884, was employed in the construction of the Northern Pacific RailRoad from 1879 until 1884, was a clerk for Winston Brothers, contractors, in 1884, was a clerk in the accounting department of the Northern Pacific RailRoad in St. Paul from 1885 until 1887, was a stenographer to the chief engineer of the Northern Pacific RailRoad in 1887, was a stenographer in the office of the general manager of the Northern Pacific RailRoad from 1888 until 1889, was the secretary to principal assistant engineer from 1889 until 1892, married Mary Ellen Howes (1869- ,) the daughter of James Howes and Ellen Attwood Howes, in 1891 in St. Paul, was the chief clerk of the engineering department of the Northern Pacific RailRoad in Chicago and St Paul from 1892 until 1900, was the assistant secretary of the Northern Pacific Railway Company, succeeding P. W. Corbett, after 1900, was the secretary of the Northern Express Company, a subsidiary of the Northern Pacific Railway Company, and officed at the Northern Pacific Railway Building. Richard Howard Relf and Mary Ellen Howes Relf were the parents of two children, Richard Relf (1892- ,) and Kenneth Attwood Relf (1895- .) Richard Relf ( -1916) died in Ramsey County. Richard H. Relf ( -1936) died in Olmsted County, Minnesota. Richard Relf (1892-1956) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Howe, and died in Hennepin County. The current owner of record of the property is Kenneth L. Welle. The 1930 city directory indicates that Ann S. Griffith, the widow of Newell Griffith, resided at the former nearby 601 Portland Avenue and that Richard A. Webb, an engineer, and his wife, Katherine Webb, resided at the former nearby 602 Portland Avenue. Richard Webb ( -1942) died in Ramsey County. Katherine C. Webb (1890-1974) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Fischer, and died in Ramsey County. [See note for the Northern Pacific RailRoad.]

599 Portland Avenue: Built in 1915. The structure is a two story, 2832 square foot, six bedroom, two bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. G. H. Smitton resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Thomas Becken, a contractor, resided at this address and that Henry R. Becken, a clerk employed by the U. S. Post Office, Margaret Becken, a pianist employed by the Emporium, and Mollie J. Becken, a clerk employed by Van Dyke & Strang, all boarded at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Becken resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Thomas Becken, a contractor, and his wife, Henrietta Becken, resided at this address. Henrietta P. Becken ( -1944) and Thomas Becken ( -1949) both died in Ramsey County. The property was last sold in 1991 with a sale price of $125,000. The current owner of record of the property is Jane M. McGrath, who resides at 886 Jefferson Avenue.

596 Portland Avenue: Built in 1889. The structure is a two story, 2556 square foot, four bedroom, three bathroom, asbestos-sided house, with a detached garage. In 1897, there was a defective fireplace in a two story frame residence located at this address which was owned by M. Manvell and in which E. Kopper resided. The 1900 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. F. W. Damler resided at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. John Arbore and Miss Ida Goetsch all resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Anna B. Arbore, the widow of John Arbore, resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mrs. Anna B. Arbore, her daughter, and Miss Ida E. Goetsch all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Anne B. Arbore, the widow of John Arbore, Dorothy Arbore, an account executive for the Luther P. Weaver Advertising Agency, Lorna Arbore, a clerk for the Dispatch-Pioneer Press Company, Margaret Arbore, operator employed by the Tri-State Telephone & Telegraph Company, and William Arbore, a laborer, all resided at this address. Frederick W. Damler ( -1924) died in Ramsey County. The Tri-State Telephone & Telegraph Company was a major competitor of Northwestern Bell Telephone in 1908 and each wanted to buy the Zenith Telephone Company, a company established in 1907 in Augusta, Maine, with an exchange in Duluth, Minnesota. In 1910, two wealthy Pittsburgh families, the Lockharts and the Masons, began to loan the Tri-State Telephone & Telegraph Company large sums of money and also bought the Zenith Telephone Company so that Northwestern Bell Telephone, originally the North Western Telephone Exchange Company of Minnesota, would not be able to buy it. In 1912, the two families exchanged their $2.5 million loan to the Tri-State Telephone & Telegraph Company and their $400,000 investment in the controlling interest of Zenith for $2.9 million in Tri-State Telephone & Telegraph Company common stock. Previously, the Tri-State Telephone & Telegraph Company purchased the former Minnesota Valley Telephone Company, renamed the Twin City Telephone Company in 1901, in 1905. In 1916, Tri-State Telephone & Telegraph Company provided dial service in St. Paul, on May 28, and in Minneapolis, on November 19. The Tri-State Telephone & Telegraph Company subsequently went deeper in debt and in 1917, the Tri-State Telephone & Telegraph Company and Northwestern Bell Telephone were ordered by the Minnesota Railroad and Warehouse Commission to connect their networks. In 1918, in order to stop the costly competitive battle, Northwestern Bell Telephone and the Tri-State Telephone & Telegraph Company agreed to divide the state of Minnesota in half and then to stay out of each other's territory. In St. Paul, served by the Tri-State Telephone & Telegraph Company, and in Minneapolis, served by Northwestern Bell Telephone, the two company's manual and automatic systems were interconnected, a project that required vast amounts of wires and cables, switchboard modifications, a completely new combined telephone book, changes in thousands of telephone numbers, and expanded customer education that was not completed until 1920. In 1928, the Tri-State Telephone & Telegraph Company purchased the Dakota Central Telephone Company. In 1929, a syndicate headed by Theodore Gary of Kansas City, Missouri, attempted to purchase control of the Tri-State Telephone & Telegraph Company and Northwestern Bell Telephone then began to help the Gary group to actually buy out the Tri-State Telephone & Telegraph Company. By 1933, the Gary group owned the controlling interest in the Tri-State Telephone & Telegraph Company, using a loan from Northwestern Bell Telephone, after paying $200 a share, and then turned over their shares of the Tri-State Telephone & Telegraph Company to Northwestern Bell Telephone in return for forgiveness of their $19.5 million debt, with the result that Northwestern Bell Telephone then owned the Tri-State, Dakota Central, and Zenith telephone companies. Dorothy Ida Arbore (1904-1987) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Goetsch, and died in Ramsey County. William J. Arbore (1905-1971) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Goetsch, and died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is Matthew J. McEiver. The Giftco Company, a company that provides computer search listings of private aid sources, is located at this address. Christian Worship of the Free is also located at this address. [See note on Northwestern Telephone Exchange Company/Northwestern Bell Telephone Company for 562 Lincoln Avenue.]

592 Portland Avenue: Built in 1885. The structure is a two story, 2324 square foot, four bedroom, two bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage. The 1900 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. T. B. Keim resided at this address. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Elmer E. Wood resided at this address in 1924. The 1930 city directory indicates that Martin Christensen, a carpenter employed by Hans J. Frandsen, and his wife, Martha Christensen, and A. Caryl Hunter, a music teacher, all resided at this address. Elmer E. Wood (1988-1983) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Dissmore, and died in Ramsey County. Hans J. Frandsen ( -1943,) Martin J. Christensen ( -1945,) Alfred Caryl Hunter ( -1949,) and Martin I. Christensen ( -1951) all died in Ramsey County. Martin Christensen (1907-1963) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Allen, and died in Ramsey County. Martha W. Christensen (1897-1965) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Schultz, and died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is Raymond E. Heichel.

591 Portland Avenue: Built in 1883. The structure is a two story, 2208 square foot, four bedroom, one bathroom, one half-bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. The 1887 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. H. B. Constans resided at this address. The 1900 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. M. C. Wright resided at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Becken and their daughters resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Florence Bessell, a student, and Patrick H. Deehan, a manager, both resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. P. H. Deehan resided at this address. The 1914 city directory indicates that Mrs. K. K. Porterfield resided at this address. William J. Coleman (1892- ,) a Sergeant, was a World War I veteran who resided at this address in 1919. The 1930 city directory indicates that Patrick H. Deehan, manager of the Deehan Detective Agency, his wife, Agnes Deehan, and Marjorie Deehan, a student, all resided at this address and the Deehan Detective Agency was located at this address. Patrick H. Deehan ( -1937,) William Joseph Coleman ( -1943,) Agnes H. Deehan ( -1945) all died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is Rebecca A. Carpentier. The 1900 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Popp, Arnold Popp, and E. C. Popp all resided at the former nearby 590 Portland Avenue. The 1914 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Mark McKendrick resided at the former nearby 590 Portland Avenue. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. A. V. Schaller resided at the former nearby 590 Portland Avenue. The 1920 city directory indicates that Howard W. Cress, a camera man employed by Rath Mills & Bell, Inc., boarded at the former nearby 590 Portland Avenue and that Ruth E. Cress, the widow of Joshua Cress and a stenographer employed by Field Schlick & Company, resided at the former nearby 590 Portland Avenue. The 1924 city directory indicates that Miss N. Statelar resided at the former nearby 590 Portland Avenue. Christian E. Popp (1846-1906) was born in Germany and died in Ramsey County. Edward C. Popp ( -1951) died in Stearns County, Minnesota. Arnold Popp ( -1918) died in Ramsey County.

589 Portland Avenue: Built in 1980. The structure is a two story, 1850 square foot, three bedroom, one bathroom, one half-bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage. The 1900 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. L. K. Luse and C. Z. Luse all resided at this address. The 1914 city directory indicates that Dr. and Mrs. J. F. Fulton resided at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that Miss G. L. Backus resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Dorothea Curtis, a teacher at Oak Hall, and Elizabeth N. Deane, a teacher at Oak Hall, both boarded at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that the Oak Hall Dormitory was located at this address. John F. Fulton ( -1932) died in Ramsey County. The property was last sold for $205,000 and that sale occurred in 2001. The current owner of record of the property is Erick M. Holman. Erick Holman is a Major in the 934th Airlift Wing, U.S. Air Force Reserve Command, the Flying Vikings, and was deployed to CENTCOM HQ�s for his Air Expeditionary Force deployment in February, 2007. The 1900 city directory indicates that Dr. and Mrs. Alex Donald resided at the former nearby 588 Portland Avenue. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Hackert resided at the former nearby 588 Portland Avenue. The 1930 city directory indicates that Nannie Statelar, an artist, resided at the former nearby 590 Portland Avenue. Alex Donald ( -1921) and Nancy Statelar ( -1949) both died in Ramsey County.

586 Portland Avenue: Built in 1890. The structure is a two story, 2416 square foot, five bedroom, two bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that John Boon Hartsinck and John Knuppe resided at this address in 1894. The 1900 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Hartsinck and their daughter all resided at this address. Little Sketches of Big Folks indicates that John Boon Hartsinck resided at this address in 1907. The 1914 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Hartsinck and their daughters resided at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. A. M. Calmenson and Mrs. N. L. Beckjord all resided at this address. The records of the 1919-1920 Minnesota World War I Soldier's Bonus Board (#30846) indicate that Stephen T. Kroske (1896- ,) a 1918 draftee and a Private First Class in Company A of the 315th Engineers, who was born in Silver Lake, Minnesota, had blue eyes, brown hair, and a fair complexion, was 5' 8 3/4" tall, was a stationary engineer at induction, served in the American Expeditionary Force in France, including St. Mihiel and the Meuse-Argonne Offensive, was a moulder employed by the Northern Malleable Iron Company after the completion of service, and was unmarried, resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Frank J. Ulwelling, a salesman employed by the J. T. McMillan Company, and his wife, Blanche Ulwelling, resided at this address. John Boon Hartsinck (1851- ,) the son of Martin S. Hartsinck and Marie A. Boon Hartsinck, was born in Amsterdam, Holland, was educated in the high schools of Amsterdam, Holland, and Duisburg, Germany, was employed by the Netherlands American Land Company in 1875, engaged in the brokerage business in Amsterdam, Holland, from 1875 until 1882, married Henrietta Yssel de Schepper in 1876, then was employed by the Canadian Pacific Railway Company and the Qu'Appelle Valley Farming Company in Canada, moved to the United States in 1883, became the general agent for the Netherlands American Land Company in 1889, was a member of the firm of Knuppe & Hartsinck, general agents for the United States and Canada, for the Netherlands American Land Company, was vice consul for the Netherlands in Minnesota in 1888, 1889, and 1900, and officed at the Globe Building. The current owners of record of the property are Christy J. Redalen and Ronald R. Redalen, who reside at 576 Portland Avenue. Redalen's Masonry is located at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Charles H. Eckstrand, a painter, resided at the former nearby 588 Portland Avenue.

585 Portland Avenue: Built in 1885. The structure is a two story, 4709 square foot, seven bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Hiram D. Brown resided at this address from 1891 to 1905. The 1900 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. H. D. Brown and their daughter and E. O. Brown all resided at this address. The 1914 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. F. I. Whitney and their daughters, Alfred C. Whitney, and Miss M. E. Whitney all resided at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Patty, Miss E. B. Bonta, the Misses Kay, and Miss L. E. Trusdell all resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. S. Mackey, Miss Nellie Jones, Mrs. S. M. Officer, and Mrs. J. R. Patty all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Elizabeth M. Forsythe, a clerk employed by the A. H. Wilder Dispensary, resided at this address. Hiram D. Brown (1848-1905) was born in Lorraine, New York, moved to Minnesota, operated the Lake City, Minnesota, Sentinel, moved to St. Paul in 1881, subsequently operated his own printing company, and died in St. Paul. The current owners of record of the property are Lorri Steffen and Paul Zenner.

581 Portland Avenue: Built in 1900. The structure is a two story, 4529 square foot, five bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, brick house, with a detached garage. The 1900 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. W. H. S. Wright and their daughter, W. H. Wright, and Mrs. O. F. Brown resided at this address. The 1914 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Chamberlin resided at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that Rev. and Mrs. E. M. Cross resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Rev. Edward M. Cross, the rector of the Church of St. John the Evangelist, resided at this address and that Roland E. Cross, a student, boarded at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Rev. and Mrs. E. M. Cross resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Rev. Frederick D. Butler, the rector of the Episcopal Church of St. John the Evangelist, and his wife, Marie E. Butler, resided at this address. The last sale of this property was in 2003 and the sale price was $660,000. The current owners of record of the property are James B. Hove, Jr., and Karen J. Kingsley.

580 Portland Avenue: Built in 1889. The structure is a two story, 2248 square foot, three bedroom, two bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided house, with a detached garage. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Charles Leonard resided at this address from 1884 to 1891. The 1885 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Charles Leonard, R. E. Leonard, and Egbert W. Leonard, a clerk with Berkey, Talmadge & Company, a wholesale tea, coffee, and spice dealer, all resided at this address. The 1887 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Charles Leonard and R. E. Leonard all resided at this address. The 1900 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Rogers, James King, his daughter, and J. R. King all resided at this address. The 1914 and 1924 city directory indicates that Dr. and Mrs. D. C. Jones resided at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that Rev. and Mrs. D. C. Jones resided at this address. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that George F. Benz (1858-1925,) the unmarried brother of Eliza Gerber, who was born in Germany to parents who were born in Germany and who died of parenchymatous nephritis, resided at this address in 1925. The 1930 city directory indicates that Dewitt C. Jones, a physician and surgeon who officed at 350 St. Peter Street, Arthur E. Storum, a salesman, and his wife, Mrs. Anna C. Storum, a bookkeeper employed by N. W. Buyers & Jobbers, Inc., all resided at this address. In 1879, Charles Leonard was the Right Illustrious Master of the St. Paul Masonic Council, No. 1, of the of Royal and Select Masters. The current owners of record of the property are Leora A. Clevenger and Raymond L. Clevenger.

576 Portland Avenue: Former William Kingston Residence; Built in 1977. The structure is a split-entry, 1408 square foot, four bedroom, two bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage. The 1885 and 1887 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. William Kingston resided at this address and that William Kingston was a storekeeper employed by the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha RailRoad. The 1900 city directory indicates that Mrs. William Kingston resided at this address. The 1902 University of Minnesota Alumni record indicates that Howard W. Kingston, an 1899 graduate, resided at this address. The 1914, 1918, and 1924 city directories indicate that Mrs. William Kingston and H. W. Kingston resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Jennie B. Kingston, the widow of William Kingston, resided at this address. The current owners of record of the property are Christy J. Redalen and Ronald R. Redalen. [See note on the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha RailRoad.]

575 Portland Avenue: Built in 1879. The structure is a 1 3/4 story, 1747 square foot, three bedroom, three bathroom, asbestos-sided house, with a detached garage. The 1885 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Ezra F. Lambert resided at this address and that Ezra F. Lambert was a cashier employed by Dyer & Howard, music and musical instrument dealers. The 1887 and 1900 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Angell resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Ole C. Lee and his wife, Hannah Lee, resided at this address. The property was last sold in 1998 with a sale price of $110,000. The current owner of record of the property is James A. Winkels, who resides in St. Louis Park, Minnesota.

570 Portland Avenue: Built in 1890. The structure is a two story, 2322 square foot, five bedroom, two bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. The 1887 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. E. P. Wilgus resided at this address. The 1900 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Sylvester Kipp resided at this address. The 1910-1911 Directory of the University of Minnesota indicates that Paul I. Carman, a student, resided at this address. The 1916 University of Minnesota Alumni Directory indicates that Charles Lowry Carman resided at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. N. B. Wheeler and their daughter all resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. G. C. Lambert and R. F. Lambert all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that George C. Lambert, a lawyer who officed in the Minnesota Building, and his wife, Mabel Lambert, resided at this address. Charles Lowry Carman (1859-1929) was an 1897 graduate of the University of Minnesota Medical School, was a member of the Minnesota State Medical Society, was the treasurer of the St. Paul Chapter of the American Guild in 1898, and died of arteriosclerosis and myocarditis at St. Luke's Hospital in St. Paul. George C. Lambert (1867- ) was born in Belgium, came to Minnesota in 1884, initially settled in Ghent, Minnesota, subsequently moved to St. Paul, studied law, was admitted to the practice of law in Minnesota in 1888, was a first lieutenant in the 20th Minnesota Regiment during the Spanish-American War, was the Minnesota Adjutant General from 1899 until 1901, and became the secretary-treasurer and general counsel of the Minnesota Farmers Union in 1932. In 1920, Paul I. Carman was a physician who officed with Dr. Charles L. Carman. The current owner of record of the property is Brian D. Schultz. Brian the Floorman is located at this address. [See note on Farmer's Union Grain Terminal Association for 987 Wakefield Avenue.]

569 Portland Avenue: Former Portland Apartments; Built in 1927. The structure is a three story, 19440 square foot, multi-family apartment building. The 1930 city directory indicates that the residents of the apartment building located at this address were Harry Sievertson, an assembler, and his wife, Alice Sievertson (Apartment #B1,) John Leo Collins, a salesman, and his wife, Frances Collins, (Apartment #B2,) John A. Jewel (Apartment #101,) Herman Nagel, a clerk (Apartment #102,) Jean Kusick, a stenographer (Apartment #103,) Walter A. Williams, a district supervisor employed by the Packers & Stockyards Division of the U. S. Department of Agriculture, and his wife, Kathryn Williams (Apartment #104,) Arthur C. Kirby, a care taker, and his wife, Grace Kirby (Apartment #106,) Lillian L. Simmon , the office manager employed by St. Paul Community Chest, Inc. (Apartment #201,) Melvin F. Krasnow, a dealer in wholesale fruits, and his wife, Eva Krasnow (Apartment #202,) Ingeborg D. Steenerson, a clerk employed by the U. S. Internal Revenue Service (Apartment #203,) Sam/Samuel Ziegler, a dentist with an office at 350 St. Peter Street (Apartment #205,) Julius L. Perit (Apartment #301,) Alphnose F. Kossick, a salesman, and his wife, Ruby Kossick (Apartment #302,) Ralph O. Kilpatrick, a structural engineer, and his wife, Dorothy L. Kilpatrick (Apartment #303,) Mrs. Mabel Comstock, the widow of Chauncey Comstock and a stenographer for the State Department of Commerce (Apartment #304,) and Victor R. Rasmussen, a manager employed by the Wormser Hat Shop, and his wife, Josephine Rasmussen (Apartment #305,) with Apartments #105, #204, #206, and #306 vacant. In 1972-1973, John Jordan, a Junior at Macalester College, resided in Apartment #B1 at this address. The current owners of record of the property are James R. Councilman and Mary H. Councilman, who reside at 8 Crocus Hill. Strong Tool Company, Inc., is also located at this address.

565 Portland Avenue: The Kennington Apartments; Built in 1927. The structure is a brick condominium building. Unit G-1 is a 650 square foot, one bedroom, one bathroom, condominium unit, and is currently owned by Jane A. McGrath and Terrence P. McGrath, who reside at 886 Jefferson Avenue. Unit G-2 is a 650 square foot, one bedroom, one bathroom, condominium unit, and is currently owned by Jane A. McGrath and Terrence P. McGrath, who reside at 886 Jefferson Avenue. Unit G-3 is a 1141 square foot condominium unit, and is currently owned by McGrath Properties, which is located at 886 Jefferson Avenue. Unit G-4 is a 1392 square foot condominium unit, and is currently owned by McGrath Properties, which is located at 886 Jefferson Avenue. Unit 101 is a 650 square foot, one bedroom, one bathroom, condominium unit, and is currently owned by Jane A. McGrath and Terrence P. McGrath, who reside at 886 Jefferson Avenue. Unit 102 is a 650 square foot, one bedroom, one bathroom, condominium unit, and is currently owned by Charles Leonard Jackson, who resides at 448 Ashland Avenue. Unit 103 is a 650 square foot, one bedroom, one bathroom, rental condominium unit, and is currently owned by Elizabeth Rocco. Unit 104 is a 650 square foot, one bedroom, one bathroom, condominium unit, with the last sale of the unit occurring in 1992 at a sale price of $16,950, and is currently owned by Jane A. McGrath and Terrence P. McGrath, who reside at 886 Jefferson Avenue. Unit 105 is a 650 square foot, one bedroom, one bathroom, condominium unit, with the last sale of the unit occurring in 1992 at a sale price of $18,200, and is currently owned by Jane A. McGrath and Terry P. McGrath, who reside at 886 Jefferson Avenue. Unit 106 is a 650 square foot, one bedroom, one bathroom, condominium unit, and is currently owned by Jane A. McGrath and Terrence P. McGrath, who reside at 886 Jefferson Avenue. Unit 201 is a 650 square foot, one bedroom, one bathroom, condominium unit, with the last sale of the unit occurring in 2002 at a sale price of $75,000, and is currently owned by Juble L. Blomberg, who resides at 1807 Ford Parkway. Unit 202 is a 650 square foot, one bedroom, one bathroom, condominium unit, and is currently owned by C. Leonard Jackson, who resides at 448 Ashland Avenue. Unit 203 is a 650 square foot, one bedroom, one bathroom, rental condominium unit, and is currently owned by Jennifer Rocco. Unit 204 is a 650 square foot, one bedroom, one bathroom, rental condominium unit, and is currently owned by Nang Tri Tan and Thu Houng Tran. Unit 205 is a 650 square foot, one bedroom, one bathroom, condominium unit, and is currently owned by Jane A. McGrath and Terry P. McGrath, who reside at 886 Jefferson Avenue. Unit 206 is a 650 square foot, one bedroom, one bathroom, condominium unit, with the last sale of the unit occurring in 1998 at a sale price of $50,000, and is currently owned by Mary L. Severson and Ronald J. Severson. Unit 301 is a 650 square foot, one bedroom, one bathroom, condominium unit, with the last sale of the unit occurring in 2003 at a sale price of $117,000, and is currently owned by Amy Schreiner. Unit 302 is a 650 square foot, one bedroom, one bathroom, condominium unit, with the last sale of the unit occurring in 1992 at a sale price of $16,850, and is currently owned by Jane A. McGrath and Terry P. McGrath, who reside at 886 Jefferson Avenue. Unit 303 is a 650 square foot, one bedroom, one bathroom, condominium unit, and is currently owned by Jane A. McGrath and Terry P. McGrath, who reside at 886 Jefferson Avenue. Unit 304 is a 650 square foot, one bedroom, one bathroom, condominium unit, and is currently owned by Jane A. McGrath and Terry P. McGrath, who reside at 886 Jefferson Avenue. Unit 305 is a 650 square foot, one bedroom, one bathroom, condominium unit, and is currently owned by Jane A. McGrath and Terry P. McGrath, who reside at 886 Jefferson Avenue. Unit 306 is a 650 square foot, one bedroom, one bathroom, condominium unit, and is currently owned by Jane A. McGrath and Terry P. McGrath, who reside at 886 Jefferson Avenue. In 2003, Geoffrey Sylvester was a financial supporter of the Randy Kelly for St. Paul Mayor campaign and resided at Unit 204 at this address. The 1885 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. A. V. Teeple resided at this address. The 1887 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Harris Richardson resided at this address. The 1900 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. S. W. Rice resided at this address. In 1907, Jesse E. Greenman resided at this address. The book of Minnesotans: a biographical dictionary of leading living men of Minnesota, edited by Albert Nelson Marquis, indicates that Jesse E. Greenman resided at this address in 1907. The 1914 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. D. O'Brien, Jr., resided at this address. The 1916 University of Minnesota Alumni Directory indicates that Walter Richardson resided at this address. The 1918 and 1924 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. Walter Richardson resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that the residents of the apartment building located at this address were Meyer L. Rosenberg, Annie E. Rosenberg, a nurse, Fannie Rosenberg, a teacher, Jennie J. Rosenberg, a stenographer employed by T. W. Sudheimer Company, and Rose Rosenberg, a teacher (Apartment #B1,) Anna Vandewalker (Apartment #B2,) Morris H. Herschler, an auditor, and his wife, Jennie B. Herschler (Apartment #102,) Alex H. Altschuler, associated with A. H. Altschuler Drug Company, and his wife, Blanche Altschuler, (Apartment #103,) Mrs. Myrtle Eaton, a clerk, (Apartment #104,) Colton A. Emerson, a solicitor for Edward G. Henry, and his wife, Lydia Emerson, (Apartment #105,) Alvin O. Fuhrman, a chemist (Apartment #106,) Simon Tankenoff, a partner with Leslie Hurvitch in the public accounting firm of Tankenhoff & Hurvitch, located at the Pioneer Building, and his wife, Frieda Tankenoff (Apartment #202,) Anthony Faeth, a salesman, and his wife, Jean Faeth (Apartment #204,) Walter M. Browning, a department manager for Husch Brothers, and his wife, Ruth Browning, (Apartment #205,) Leon L. Schall, an accountant employed by D. L. Friedmann & Company, and his wife, Theodora Schall (Apartment #301,) William A. Sirovatka, an installer employed by the Tri-State Telephone & Telegraph Company, and his wife, Helen Sirovatka (Apartment #302,) Mae A. Sherman, a secretary employed by Hon. Samuel B. Wilson, the Minnesota Supreme Court Chief Justice (Apartment #303,) Edwin H. Buntin, department manager of Maurice L. Rothschild & Company, and his wife, Stella Buntin, (Apartment #305,) and Annie J. Russell, the proprietor of Russell-Gowns, located at 334 St. Peter Street (Apartment #306,) with Apartments #101, #201, #203, #206, #and 304 vacant. Shoplifter Myrtle Eaton offered her apartment (#104) as a hideout for the Barker-Karpis gang before the Bremer kidnapping. Jesse E. Greenman (1861- ,) the son of Curtis S. Greenman, a merchant, and Mary/Eucla Gage Greenman (1864- ,) was born in Savannah/Somonauk, De Kalb County, Illinois, was educated in the Tiskilwa, Illinois, and Kearney, Nebraska, public schools, moved to Iowa in 1869, moved to Nebraska in 1871, engaged in lumbering and mining in the Black Hills of South Dakota from 1876 until 1884, moved from South Dakota to Minnesota in 1882, attended Archibald's Business College in Minneapolis, was taught by private tutors from the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, read the law under Judge O. M. Pond at the law offices of Jackson & Pond in Minneapolis in 1882, was employed by Wyman, Mullin & Company, a wholesale dry goods firm in Minneapolis, as assistant credit man from 1885 until 1889, was employed by the Powers Dry Goods Company in St. Paul as an assistant credit man in 1889, was in charge of the law department of R. G. Dun & Company from 1890 until 1896, married Estelle/Estella M. Thompson of Willow Lake, South Dakota, in St. Paul in 1892, was a credit man for Guiterman Brothers from 1895 until 1896, was reemployed by the law department of R. G. Dun & Company from 1896/1898 until 1902, was admitted to the practice of law in Minnesota in 1902, was a lawyer, was a partner with Philip Gilbert in the law firm of Gilbert & Greenman after 1902, was a partner in the law firm of Gilbert, Greenman & Andre in 1912, represented the First National Bank of St. Paul, the Capitol National Bank of St. Paul, the Hackett, Walther, Gates Hardware Company, A. Hirschman & Company, and George Benz & Sons in 1915, was a partner in the law firm of Greenman & Epp in 1920, was a member of the Commercial Law League of America in 1920, was a Republican, was a member of the St. Paul Commercial Club, was a Mason, was a member of the Royal Arcanum, was a member of the Benevolent and Protective order of Elks, was a member of the Dayton Avenue Presbyterian Church, officed at the National German American Bank Building in 1907, and officed at the Pioneer Building in 1911, 1915, and 1920. Jesse E. Greenman and Estella M. Thompson Greenman were the parents of three children, Marion Greenman, Allen Greenman (1896- ,) and Katheryn Greenman. Walter Richardson was a 1911 graduate of the University of Minnesota Law School, was a member of the Psi Upsilon fraternity, was admitted to the practice of law in Minnesota, was a lawyer, represented, with Harris Richardson and C. J. Rockwood, the Minnesota & Ontario Power Company over an assessment for state taxes in State v. Minnesota & Ontario Power Company, 141 N.W. 839 (1913,) officed at the Germania Life Building in 1916, and officed at 1018 Nicollet Avenue in Minneapolis in 1917. R. G. Dun & Company, the predecessor of Dun & Bradstreet, was the oldest and largest mercantile agency in the world and published references books of traders in the United States and Canada. John M. Bradstreet & Company was a Cincinnati, Ohio, credit-rating agency that was founded in 1849 as Bradstreet's Improved Mercantile Agency and moved to New York in 1855. The credit rating company that became R. G. Dun & Company, Tappan & Douglass, was founded by Lewis Tappan in New York in 1841, was taken over by an employee, Robert Graham Dun (1826-1900,) who purchased the successor financial rating service to Tappan & Douglass, B. Douglass & Company, in 1854, and began publishing the Mercantile Agency's Reference Book in 1854 and published Dun's Review since 1893. Robert Graham Dun became the sole proprietor of the Mercantile Agency's Reference Book in 1859. R. G. Dun & Company established branch offices in various major cities over the years. R. G. Dun & Company was one of the first to use office machinery, including the typewriter. Arthur Whiteside was the chief executive officer of R. G. Dun & Company in the 1930's. Dun & Bradstreet, created in a 1933 merger of R. G. Dun & Company and John M. Bradstreet & Company, provided financial data and credit ratings of U.S. business firms and business executives. The Dun & Bradstreet Corporation is one of the world's leading suppliers of business information, services, and research, maintains a database that contains statistics on more than 150 million companies in more than 200 countries, has a risk management segment that sells that information, and also offers marketing information and purchasing-support services. The 1885 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Wilgus, E. P. Wilgus, and Dr. and Mrs. J. M. Welch all resided at the former nearby 560 Portland Avenue. The 1885 city directory also indicates that Augustus B. Wilgus was associated with the real estate firm of A. B. Wilgus & Brother, that Edmund P. Wilgus was also associated with the real estate firm of A. B. Wilgus & Brother, and that James M. Welch was a dentist in partnership with George O. Lawton and officed at the Ingersoll Block. The 1887 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Wilgus and Mr. and Mrs. James Wilgus all resided at this address. Addison Venelle Teeple (1843-1892,) the son of Pellum Cartwright Teeple (1809-1878) and Mary Amelia Gleason Teeple (1816-1901,) was born in Centerville, Oxford, Ontario, Canada, served in the Eighth Illinois Cavalry during the American Civil War, served in Stoneman's cavalry brigade of the Army of the Potomac during the Peninsular Campaign of 1862, fought in the battles of Williamsburg, Mechanicsville, Hanover Court House, the Seven Days' Fight, Haxal's Landing, Chancellorsville, and Gettysburg, was wounded and captured at Boonsboro, Maryland, in 1862, was a member of the detachment sent in pursuit of John Wilkes Booth in 1865, was a regular correspondent with Illinois newspapers during the war, married Catherine M. Eddy Walkup (1844-1932,) the daughter of Josiah Walkup and Margaret St. Clair Walkup, in Chicago, Illinois, in 1867, compiled a system of abstracts of titles for Rockford, Illinois, from 1866 until 1872, moved to Minnesota in 1872, was admitted to the practice of law, resided in Morris, Minnesota, was the county attorney for Stevens County, Minnesota, was the county surveyor for Stevens County, Minnesota, in 1873, moved to St. Paul in 1874, compiled a handbook of Minnesota statute law for 1866, was an officer and director of four cooperative building and loan societies, edited the Building Association News from 1878 until 1880, was a law partner of Thomas E. Knox officing at 43 East Third Street in 1879, resided at 119 Western Avenue in 1879, was the attorney for service of process for the Rochester German Insurance Company of Rochester, New York, in 1884, resided at 84 1/2 Summit Avenue in 1888, and died in St. Paul. Addison Venelle Teeple and Catherine M. Walkup were the parents of two children, Josiah Teeple (1868-1873) and Mary Teeple (Mrs. Henry) Gervais (1872-1956.) The 1900 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. N. H. Clapp, A. H. Clapp, and N. H. Clapp, Jr., all resided at the former nearby 560 Portland Avenue. The 1914 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Kennedy, their daughters, H. B. Kennedy, and S. G. Kennedy all resided at the former nearby 560 Portland Avenue. The Twelfth General Catalogue of the Psi Upsilon Fraternity indicates that Gale Clifford Merrick resided at the nearby former 560 Portland Avenue in 1917. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Kennedy and their daughters and H. B. Kennedy all resided at the former nearby 560 Portland Avenue. Samuel Y. Kennedy was a World War I veteran who resided at this address in 1919. The 1920 city directory indicates that William E. Anderson, a manager employed by the Patterson-Sargent Company, resided at the former nearby 560 Portland Avenue. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Charles W. Borup (1861-1921,) the husband of Jane Borup, who was born in Minnesota to father born in Ireland and a mother born in the United States and who died of cirrhosis of the liver, resided at the nearby former 560 Portland Avenue in 1921. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that C. Frances West (1862-1923,) the unmarried aunt of Jane B. Borup, who was born in New York to parents born in the United States and who died of pernicious anaemia, resided at the nearby former 560 Portland Avenue in 1923. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Jane B. Borup resided at the nearby former 560 Portland Avenue in 1923. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Rossi, Mrs. J. B. Borup, and Miss C. Frances West all resided at the former nearby 560 Portland Avenue. The 1930 city directory indicates that John H. Lienhard, a reporter employed by the St. Paul Dispatch, and his wife, Catherine Lienhard, resided at the former nearby 560 Portland Avenue. Gale Clifford Merrick (1880- ,) the son of William Hathaway Merrick and Carolina E. Gale, was born in St. Paul, married Sadie McLaughlin, the daughter of P. J. McLaughlin, moved to Tacoma, Washington, and was the president of the Kirby Lumber Company. Gale Clifford Merrick and Sadie McLaughlin Merrick were the parents of two children, Margaret Gale (1908- ) and Kathleen Merrick (1911- .)

555-559 Portland Avenue: Church of St. John the Evangelist; Built in 1888 (1903 and 1955 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Gothic Revival in style; Clarence H. Johnston, Sr., architect. The property contains two buildings, one a two story, 27641 square foot, building and the other a two story, 17892 square foot, building, and is tax exempt property. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that St. John the Evangelist Episcopal Church was located at this address beginning in 1896. In 1905, Rev. Theodore Sedgwick was the rector of the church. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Henry A. Kennedy resided at the nearby former 560 Portland Avenue in 1915. [See note on Johnston for 476 Summit Avenue.]

554 Portland Avenue: Bookstaver House; Built in 1885; Romanesque Revival in style; Cass Gilbert, architect. The structure is a two story, 2604 square foot, four bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, brick house. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that the Bookstaver House was located at this address beginning in 1888. The 1900 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. R. F. Ball resided at this address. The 1914 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Victor Robertson and their daughters all resided at this address. In 1916, Victor Robertson was a member of the Minnesota Historical Society and resided at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Victor Robertson and their daughter all resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Victor Robertson resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Victor Robertson and his wife, Alice Robertson, resided at this address. Victor Robertson was the son of Colonel D. A. Robertson and donated papers, notes and other materials of his father to the Minnesota Historical Society in 1915 and succeeded James J. Hill as a member of the Executive Council of the Minnesota Historical Society in 1916. The current owner of record of the property is Donald Z. Woods. [See note on Cass Gilbert.] [See note on Daniel Alexander Robertson for 294-296 Laurel Avenue.] [See note on James Jerome Hill for 240 Summit Avenue.]

552 Portland Avenue: Portland Terrace/Bookstaver House; Built in 1885 (1888 according to the Cass Gilbert Society;) Romanesque Revival in style; Cass Gilbert, architect. The structure is a two story, 2604 square foot, five bedroom, two bathroom, brick house. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. In 1897, a chimney fire occurred at a three story brick tenement building located at this address which was occupied by R. L. Gorman and for which the Taylor Renting Agency was the agent. The 1900 city directory indicates that Dr. and Mrs. T. H. Johnson and Paul Johnson all resided at this address. The 1914 city directory indicates that Dr. and Mrs. T. H. Johnson and C. H. Ware all resided at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that Dr. and Mrs. T. H. Johnson resided at this address. Frederic H. Johnson (1892- ,) a First Lieutenant, was a World War I veteran who resided at this address in 1919. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. R. A. Rice resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that this address was vacant. The 1939 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Oscar M. Rice, who attended the school from 1904 until 1905 and who graduated from Princeton University in 1909, resided at this address. The current owner of record of the property is Nancy G. Peterson. Architect Nicholas Marcucci, a member of the board of the Cass Gilbert Society in 2008, also is listed as residing at this address. [See note on Gilbert for 318 Summit Avenue.]

550 Portland Avenue: Bookstaver House; Built in 1885; Romanesque Revival in style; Cass Gilbert, architect. The structure is a two story, 2604 square foot, five bedroom, two bathroom, brick house. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. The 1900 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. H. Randall and Mrs. A. R. Langworthy all resided at this address. The 1914 and 1918 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. N. P. Rogers resided at this address. The 1964 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that William M. Plowman, a member of the Class of 1960, resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Augustine Fritsche and Mrs. B. W. T. Constans all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that this address was vacant. The current owner of record of the property is the Ila J. Velleu Trust. Jean Loy Velleu, the wife of Jim Law, a member of the Capitol Area Architectural and Planning Board, and a President Emerita of the Cass Gilbert Society, resides at this address. The Capitol Area Architectural and Planning Board is a State agency that exists to preserve and enhance the dignity, beauty and architectural integrity of the capitol, the buildings immediately adjacent to it, the capitol grounds, and the capitol area, to protect, enhance, and increase the open spaces within the capitol area when deemed necessary and desirable for the improvement of the public enjoyment of the area, to develop proper approaches to the capitol area for pedestrian movement, the highway system, and mass transit system so that the area achieves its maximum importance and accessibility, and to establish a flexible framework for growth of the capitol buildings which will be in keeping with the spirit of the original design. [See note on Gilbert for 318 Summit Avenue.]

549 Portland Avenue: Charles W. Bunn House; Built in 1905 (1886 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Queen Anne in style. The structure is a two story, 4552 square foot, four bedroom, three bathroom, one half-bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Charles W. Bunn resided at this address from 1886 to 1940. The 1887 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Bunn resided at this address. The 1900 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Bunn and their daughter all resided at this address. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Charles Wilson Bunn resided at this address in 1909. The 1909 University of Minnesota Bulletin indicates that Charles W. Bunn, a lecturer of federal jurisdiction, resided at this address. The 1914 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Bunn and their daughter all resided at this address. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Mary A. Bunn (1855-1916,) the wife of Charles W. Bunn, who was born in the United States to parents born in the United States and who died of chronic myocardititis, resided in White Bear, Minnesota, in 1916. In 1916, Charles W. Bunn was a member of the Minnesota Historical Society and resided at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that C. W. Bunn and his daughter both resided at this address. Charles W. Bunn, Jr., was a World War I veteran who resided at this address in 1919. The records of the 1919-1920 Minnesota World War I Soldier�s Bonus Board (#11630) indicate that Charles Bunn (1893- ,) a 1917 enlistee and a First Lieutenant in the Field Artillery/Air Service/School for Aerial Observers, who was born in St. Paul, was a law student at induction, was employed by the Butler, Mitchell & Doherty law firm after the completion of service, and was unmarried, resided with his father, C. W. Bunn, at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Charles W. Bunn, the vice president and general counsel of the Northern Pacific RailRoad, resided at this address and that Charles W. Bunn, a partner with Pierce Butler, William D. Mitchell, Michael J. Doherty, Wlfred E. Rumble, and Pierce Butler, Jr., in the law firm Butler, Mitchell & Doherty located at the Merchant Bank Building, boarded at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that C. W. Bunn and his daughter both resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Charles W. Bunn, vice president and special counsel for the Northern Pacific RailRoad, and Helen Bunn both resided at this address. Charles Wilson Bunn (1855-1941,) the son of the Honorable Romanzo Bunn and Sarah Purdy Bunn, was born in Galesville, Wisconsin, was educated in the Sparta, Wisconsin, public schools, graduated (Ph.B) from the University of Wisconsin in 1874 and from the University of Wisconsin Law School in 1875, initially was a clerk employed by the law firm of Cameron & Losey in La Crosse, Wisconsin, in 1875, became a partner in Cameron, Losey & Bunn, married Mary Anderson of La Crosse, Wisconsin, in 1877, moved to Minnesota in 1885 and resided in St. Paul, was a partner with J. W. Lusk in Lusk & Bunn, then with Emerson Hadley in Lusk, Bunn, & Hadley, then was a partner in Bunn & Hadley, became general counsel of the Northern Pacific RailRoad in 1896, then became the vice-president and special counsel of the Northern Pacific RailRoad, was a Republican, was a member of the Minnesota Club, was a member of the University Club of New York, was member of the Chicago Club, and officed at the Northern Pacific RailRoad Building in 1907. Charles Wilson Bunn and Mary Anderson Bunn were the parents of three children, Helen Bunn, Donald Charles Bunn, and Charles Bunn. In 1910, Charles Bunn was a member of the executive board of the initial Boy Scouts of America troop founded in Ramsey County. Charles W. Bunn was the general counsel for the Northern Pacific RailRoad in 1905. W. J. Curtis and C. W. Bunn successfully represented the railroad in Northern Pacific Railway Company v. Peterson, 162 U.S. 346, in 1896, a negligence action arising from a railroad worker injury involving a hand car that was barred by the fellow servant defense to a negligence action. C. W. Bunn successfully represented the railroad in a fellow servant defense to a negligence action in Northern Pacific Railway Company v. Charless, 162 U.S. 359, in 1896, in a case arising out of the crippling of a railroad day laborer due to a defective hand car. C. W. Bunn unsuccessfully represented the railroad in Northern Pacific Railway Company v. Egeland, 163 U.S. 93, in 1896, in a case over the liability of a rail gang member who jumped from a moving train upon direction from the conductor that was not barred by contributory negligence. C. W. Bunn successfully represented the railroad in a Gallatin, Montana, land title case, Northern Pacific Railway Company v. Colburn, 164 U.S. 383, in 1896. C. W. Bunn successfully represented the Northern Pacific RailRoad in Oakes v. Mase, 165 U.S. 363, in 1897, a wrongful death action arising from the negligence of a conductor of one train mishandling a switch and causing the death of an engineer of another train, where liability was inapplicable because of the fellow servant/servant and master common law rule. C. W. Bunn successfully represented the railroad in Northern Pacific Railway Company v. Poirier, 167 U.S. 48, in 1897, a negligence case involving a brakeman who was severely injured from a train collision at Clyde Spur, Montana, and an allegation that the conductor of the first train should have dispatched a flagman to warn the second train that was barred by the fellow servant defense to a negligence action. J. R. McBride and C. W. Bunn unsuccessfully represented a supplier of ties and lumber to the Northern Pacific RailRoad in an action to recover the reasonable value of certain timber and railroad ties manufactured from trees in Idaho that were alleged to have been unlawfully cut in Stone v. United States, 167 U.S. 178, in 1897. James W. McCreery and C. W. Bunn unsuccessfully represented in an action to compel the removal and abatement of a fence erected and maintained by purchasers of land from the Union Pacific Railroad Company in Camfield v. United States, 167 U.S. 518, in 1897. C. W. Bunn unsuccessfully represented the railroad in Northern Pacific Railway Company v. Musser-Sauntry Land, Logging & Manufacturing Company, 168 U.S. 604, in 1897, a land title case from Wisconsin. C. W. Bunn successfully represented receivers of property of the Northern Pacific Railroad Company in McHenry v. Alford, 168 U.S. 651, in 1898, a case dealing with allegedly unpaid gross earnings taxes that caused clouds upon the title of property in Richland County, North Dakota. C. W. Bunn successfully represented the railroad in Northern Pacific Railway Company v. Smith, 171 U.S. 260, in 1898, a land title case from Bismarck, Burleigh County, Dakota Territory. C. W. Bunn and A. B. Browne unsuccessfully represented the railroad in Northern Pacific Railway Company v. Myers, 172 U.S. 589, in 1899, a controversey over the classification of certain lands as mineral or nonmineral for purposes of taxation. C. W. Bunn successfully represented the railroad in Northern Pacific Railway Company v. Freeman, 174 U.S. 379, in 1899, overturning a wrongful death judgment for the estate of a man in a farm wagon drawn by two horses at a slow trot who was killed by a train at a railroad crossing at Elma, Chehalis County, Washington, because of contributory negligence by the decedent. C. W. Bunn successfully represented the railroad in Northern Pacific Railway Company v. De Lacey, 174 U.S. 622, in 1899, in a land title case against an alleged homesteader in Tacoma, Washington. James B. Kerr and C. W. Bunn successfully represented the railroad in Northern Pacific Railway Company v. Amacker, 175 U.S. 564, in 1900, a land title case between an alleged homesteader and the land grant railroad. A. B. Browne, C. W. Bunn, and James B. Kerr successfully represented the railroad in Jamestown & Northern Railway Company v. Jones, 177 U.S. 125, in 1900, a land title case between an alleged homesteader and a land grant railroad from Stutsman County, North Dakota. C. W. Bunn and Emerson Hadley successfully represented the estate of Sophia M. Bristol of New York in a case over probate taxes despite the domicile of the decedent and the administrator of her estate in another state in Bristol v. Washington County, 177 U.S. 133, in 1900. James B. Kerr and C. W. Bunn successfully represented the railroad in a railroad grant/land title case in Donerty v. Northern Pacific Railway Company, 177 U.S. 421, in 1900. C. W. Bunn, with J. B. Kerr, unsuccessfully represented the railroad in United States v. Northern Pacific Railway Company, 177 U.S. 435, in 1900, a case relating to the the cancelation and annulment of a certain patent granted in 1895 to the Northern Pacific RailRoad Company by the United States. C. W. Bunn, Julien T. Davies, Wm. B. Hornblower, and Emerson Hadley successfully represented the County Auditor of Aitkin County, Minnesota, and the Northern Pacific RailRoad in Stearns v. State of Minnesota, 179 U.S. 223, in 1900, in a challenge to state legislation representing an agreement replacing taxation on the basis of a per cent of the gross earnings rather than taxation upon the railroad property to induce a predecessor railroad company to build a railroad. C. W. Bunn and James B. Kerr unsuccessfully represented the purchaser of land obtained from the Northern Pacific RailRoad in Moore v. Cormode, 180 U.S. 167, in 1901, a land title case from Garfield County, Territory of Washington. C. W. Bunn and James B. Kerr unsuccessfully represented several parties, including the Spokane & Palouse Railway Company, who purchased land from the Northern Pacific Railway Company in Powers v. Slaght, 180 U.S. 173, in 1901, a case between a lessee who subsequently claimed title to land under the Homestead Act and the various purchasers of the land from the railroad. C. W. Bunn and James B. Kerr unsuccessfully represented the purchaser of land obtained from the Northern Pacific RailRoad in Moore v. Stone, 180 U.S. 180, in 1901, a land title case involving the Northern Pacific RailRoad from Garfield County, Washington. C. W. Bunn successfully represented a railroad agent and the Northern Pacific RailRoad in Fairbank v. United States, 181 U.S. 283, in 1901, a case challenging a conviction of a railroad agent for failing to afix an internal revenue stamp required by federal law on foreign bills of lading under Article 1, Section 9, of the Constitution of the United States. John W. Griggs, C. W. Bunn, George B. Young, and M. D. Grover successfully represented the Northern Securities Company, the Great Northern Railway Company, and the Northern Pacific Railway Company in delaying original Supreme Court jurisdiction in the case of State of Washington v. Northern Securities Company, 185 U.S. 254, in 1902. James B. Kerr and C. W. Bunn unsuccessfully represented the railroad in Nelson v. Northern Pacific Railway Company, 188 U.S. 108, in 1903, a land title case from Kittitas county, Washington. C. W. Bunn and James B. Kerr unsuccessfully represented the railroad in an action to enjoin the taking, removing, or disposing of granite from a quarter section of land taken possession under a mineral location in Northern Pacific Railway Company v. Soderberg, 188 U.S. 526, in 1903, which turned on the question of the definition of the word "mineral." C. W. Bunn and James B. Kerr successfully represented the railroad in overturning a ruling of the Minnesota Supreme Court in Northern Pacific Railway Company v. Townsend, 190 U.S. 267, in 1903, in a land title case from Wadena County, Minnesota. C. W. Bunn and James B. Kerr successfully represented the railroad in an Oregon and Washington State land title case in United States v. Northern Pacific Railway Company, 193 U.S. 1, in 1904. C. W. Bunn successfully represented the railroad in Northern Pacific Railway Company v. Adams, 192 U.S. 440, in 1904, in a wrongful death action on behalf of the estate of a passenger riding from Washington state to Idaho who was a lawyer and the attorney of several railway companies, though not in the employ of the Northern Pacific RailRoad, who was riding on a free rail pass that included a liability waiver, and who was found dead, apparently thrown from the train. C. W. Bunn unsuccessfully represented the railroad in Northern Pacific Railway Company v. American Trading Company, 195 U.S. 439, in 1904, a case enforcing damages on a special contract for the transportation of goods from Newark, New Jersey, to Yokohama, in Japan, an obligation the railroad gained by purchasing foreclused mortgages taken by its predecessor. Charles W. Bunn unsuccessfully represented the Northern Pacific RailRoad Company and George B. Young unsuccessfully represented the Northern Securities Company in Northern Securities Company v. United States, 193 U.S. 197, in 1904 in an antitrust/restraint of trade case. George B. Young, John G. Johnson, M. D. Grover, C. W. Bunn, and W. P. Clough unsuccessfully represented the Northern Securities Company in State of Minnesota v. Northern Securities Company, 194 U.S. 48, in 1904 in an antitrust anti-restraint of trade case. C. W. Bunn, Emerson Hadley, and James B. Kerr successfully represented the Northern Pacific Railway Company in Northern Pacific Railway Company v. Dixon, 194 U.S. 338, in 1904, a wrongful death negligence case involving a railroad fireman who was killed in a head-on collision of two trains arising from false information transmitted by a railroad telegraph operator that was barred by the fellow servant/servant and master common law rule. William W. Billson, C. W. Bunn, Chester A. Congdon, H. Oldenburg, and James B. Kerr unsuccessfully represented John Humbird and Frederick Weyerhaeuser as purchasers of more than 10,000 acres of land from the Northern Pacific Railway Company, in Humbird v. Avery, 195 U.S. 480, in 1904, in a land title challenge relating to whether the federal land grants to the railroad started from Ashland, Wisconsin, or Duluth, Minnesota. C. W. Bunn and James B. Kerr successfully gained a reversal of a lower court judgment against the railroad in a dispute over title to land claimed by a homesteader in Washington State through adverse possession in Northern Pacific Railway Company v. Hasse, 197 U.S. 9, in 1905. C. W. Bunn and James B. Kerr successfully represented the railroad in a Spokane, Washington, land title case, Northern Pacific Railway Company v. Ely, 197 U.S. 1, in 1905. Charles W. Bunn and James B. Kerr represented the lumber company in a railroad land grant and land title case, Northern Lumber Co. v. O'Brien, 204 U.S. 190, in 1907. Charles W. Bunn and James B. Kerr unsuccessfully represented the railroad in Northern Pacific RailRoad Company v. Slaght, 205 U.S. 122 and 205 U.S. 134, in 1907, two cases involving title to a right of way sought by the railroad in Washington State. Charles W. Bunn unsuccessfully represented the railroad in a question of the responsibiity of a railroad to build and maintain public road crossings and the power of a city to modify the state railroad charter in exempting the railroad from those obligations in Northern Pacific RailRoad Company v. State of Minnesota ex rel. City of Duluth, 208 U.S. 583, in 1908. Charles W. Bunn, Jared How, J. F. McGee, Pierce Butler, William D. Mitchell, William A. Lancaster, Frank B. Kellogg, Cordenio A. Severance, Robert E. Olds, Stiles W. Burr, and Walker D. Hines successfully represented the Northern Pacific Railway Company in Ex Parte Young, 209 U.S. 123, a case overturning a Federal court demand that the Minnesota Attorney General show cause not to be held in contempt over a dispute with railroad shareholders over state rate regulation in 1908, where the railroad also was a defendant. Charles W. Bunn and Samuel A. Putman unsuccessfully represented the railroad in Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railway Company v. United States, 217 U.S. 180, in 1910, in an appeal of an insufficient claims award of deductions by the U. S. Postmaster General from railroad postal payments. Charles W. Bunn successfully represented the railroad in a challenge to an Interstate Commerce Commission order that required the establishment of through routes and joint rates for passengers and their baggage, east and west, from and to points on the Chicago & Northwestern Railway between Chicago and Council Bluffs, Iowa, from and to points on the Union Pacific Railroad between Colorado common points and Omaha, Nebraska, and Kansas City, Missouri, via Portland, Oregon, and to and from points on the Northern Pacific Railway between Portland, Oregon, and Seattle, Washington, in Interstate Commerce Commission v. Northern Pacific RailRoad Company, 216 U.S. 538, in 1910. Charles W. Bunn and F. B. Kellogg unsuccessfully represented Frederick Weyerhauser and John Humbird in a railroad grant land title case involving land between Thomson Junction and Duluth, Minnesota, in Weyerhauser v. Hoyt, 219 U.S. 380, in 1911. Charles W. Bunn, Frank B. Kellogg, and Stiles W. Burr successfully represented Frederick Weyerhauser and John Humbird in a railroad grant land title case, Campbell v. Weyerhauser, 219 U.S. 424, in 1911. Charles W. Bunn successfully represented the railroad in a dispute with a homesteader about title to land located in Todd County, Minnesota, Northern Pacific Railway Company v. Wass, 219 U.S. 426, in 1911. Charles W. Bunn and Charles Donnelly unsuccessfully represented the railroad in a land title dispute between a homesteader with a federal land patent and a railroad with a land grant in Northern Pacific Railway Company v. Trodick, 221 U.S. 208, in 1911. Charles W. Bunn was a legal counsel who participated in The Minnesota Rate Cases, 230 U.S. 352, in 1913, challenging a 1907 act of the Minnesota Legislature that set a maximum rate for railroad freight. Charles W. Bunn unsuccessfully represented the railroad in an appeal of its challenge to the constitutionality of a intrastate North Dakota coal carriage rate in Northern Pacific Railway Company v. State of North Dakota ex rel McCue, 216 U.S. 579, in 1910. Charles W. Bunn successfully represented the railroad in a challenge to liabilities imposed for a violation of the "hours of service" law for an intrastate train crew in Northern Pacific Railway Company v. State of Washington ex rel. Atkinson, 222 U.S. 370, in 1912. Charles W. Bunn successfully represented the Northern Pacific Railway Company in one of four consolidated wrongful death/negligence cases of railroad workers, with three of four found to be barred by state worker's compensation laws, in Mondou v. New York, New Haven & Hartford Railway Company, 223 U.S. 1, in 1912. Charles W. Bunn successfully represented the railroad in Winfree v. Northern Pacific Railway Company, 227 U.S. 296, in 1913, in a wrongful death/negligence case of a railroad fireman, a minor, that was found to be barred by the Washington State worker's compensation law. Charles Donnelly and Charles W. Bunn unsuccessfully represented the railroad in Northern Pacific Railway Company v. U.S., 227 U.S. 355, in 1913, involving a dispute over land titles on the Yakima River Indian Reservation. Charles Donnelly, Francis Lynde Stetson, and Charles W. Bunn unsuccessfully represented the railroad in Northern Pacific Railway Company v. Boyd, 228 U.S. 482, in 1913, a collection action against the Northern Pacific Railway Company of an 1896 judgment against the Coeur D'Alene Railway & Navigation Company, whose property was acquired in foreclosure by the Northern Pacific Railway Company. Charles W. Bunn filed an amicus curiae brief in The Minnesota Rate Cases, 230 U.S. 352, in 1913, suits brought by stockholders of the Northern Pacific Railway Company, the Great Northern Railway Company, and the Minneapolis & St. Louis Railroad Company, to restrain the enforcement of two orders of the Railroad & Warehouse Commission of the state of Minnesota, and two acts of the Minnesota Legislature, prescribing maximum charges for transportation of freight and passengers. Charles W. Bunn successfully represented the railroad in a dispute with a homesteader about title to land in Northern Pacific Railway Company v. Houston, 231 U.S. 181, in 1913. Charles W. Bunn, F. C. Dillard, Robert Dunlap, E. C. Lindley, Maxwell Evarts, Gardiner Lathrop, and Charles Donnelly unsuccessfully represented the railway against the Interstate Commerce Commission over the long and short haul clause of the Interstate Commerce Act in U. S. v. Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway Company, 234 U.S. 476, in 1914. Charles W. Bunn, F. C. Dillard, Robert Dunlap, E. C. Lindley, Maxwell Evarts, Gardiner Lathrop, and Charles Donnelly unsuccessfully represented the railway against the Interstate Commerce Commission over the long and short haul clause of the Interstate Commerce Act in U. S. v. Union Pacific Railway Company, 234 U.S. 495, in 1914. Charles W. Bunn and Charles Donnelly represented the interests of the Northern Pacific Railroad Company in Burke v. Southern Pacific Railway Company, 234 U.S. 669, in 1914, a land title case involving mineral deposits. Charles W. Bunn, John I. Dille, Charles Donnelly, John L. Erdall, and A. H. Bright successfully represented the railroad in Northern Pacific Railway Company v. North Dakota ex rel. McCue, 236 U.S. 585, in 1915, in a challenge to a North Dakota statute setting maximum intrastate rates, graduated according to distance, for the transportation of coal in carload lots. Charles W. Bunn successfully represented the railroad in Northern Pacific Railway Company v. Concannon, 239 U.S. 382, in 1915, a case over an attempt to recover a portion of a former right of way strip granted by Congress in 1864. Charles W. Bunn successfully represented the railroad in Northern Pacific Railway Company v. Meese, 239 U.S. 614, in 1916, in a wrongful death/negligence case of a railroad worker that was found to be barred by the Washington State worker's compensation law. Charles W. Bunn, Charles Donnelly, and Emerson Hadley successfully represented the railroad in a land title case, Barlow v. Northern Pacific Railway Company, 240 U.S. 484, in 1916. Emerson Hadley and Charles W. Bunn unsuccessfully represented the railroad in United States v. Northern Pacific Railway Company, 242 U.S. 190, in 1916, in a challenge to a failure to report excessive duty hours by a train crew under the Interstate Commerce Act of February 4, 1887. Charles W. Bunn, Charles Donnelly, Stiles W. Burr, and James B. Kerr unsuccessfully represented the timber company and the Northern Pacific Railway Company in West v. Edward Rutledge Timber Company, 244 U.S. 90, in 1917, involving the title to land in Idaho traded with the Northern Pacific Railway Company for grant land in what became Mount Ranier National Park. C. W. Bunn, with Charles Donnelly, successfully represented the railroad in another freight rate case, regarding the duty of the railroad to direct freight when two parallel, but different length, rail lines are involved, in Northern Pacific Railway Company v. Solum, 247 U.S. 477, in 1918. Lorenzo B. Da Ponte, C. W. Bunn, and Charles Donnelly unsuccessfully represented the Northern Pacific RailRoad in a case over the party to bear the cost of installing railroad track crossing interlocking devices in Northern Pacific Railway Company v. Puget Sound & Willapa Harbor Railway Company, 250 U.S. 332, in 1919. Charles Donnelly, Charles H. Carey, James B. Kerr, Charles A. Hart, and C. W. Bunn successfully represented the railroad in an action to quiet title to five small tracts of land in Umatilla county, Oregon, against a claim of adverse possession under color of title in Northern Pacific Railway Company v. McComas, 250 U.S. 387, in 1919. Charles W. Bunn successfully represented the railway companies in Wallace v. Hines, 253 U.S. 66, in 1920, in a case challenging extraterritorial property taxes by the state of North Dakota. D. F. Lyons and Charles W. Bunn unsuccessfully represented the railroad in United States v. Northern Pacific Railway Company, 254 U.S. 251, addressing an alleged violation of the Safety Appliance Act relating to railroad brake connections, in 1920. Alexander Britton, C. W. Bunn, and Evans Browne unsuccessfully represented the Northern Pacific RailRoad in a claim for compensation for carrying the mails above the amounts paid by the U. S. Postmaster General in Northern Pacific Railway Company v. United States, 251 U.S. 326, in 1920. Stiles W. Burr and C. W. Bunn successfully the timber company represented in Rutledge Timber Company v. Farrell, 255 U.S. 268, in 1921, an Idaho land title case. Charles W. Bunn successfully represented the railroad in State of North Dakota ex rel Lemke v. Chicago & North Western Railway Company, 257 U.S. 485, in 1922, in an attempt by several railroads to prevent their applying an order of the Interstate Commerce Commission to increase intrastate rates that were found to be unjust discrimination against interstate commerce. C. W. Bunn, D. F. Lyons, and M. L. Countryman successfully represented the Director General of Railroads and five railroad companies to enjoin the collection of a special excise tax assessed against each of the companies for the years 1918 and 1919 under a North Dakota statute in Davis v. Wallace, 257 U.S. 478, in 1922. C. W. Bunn unsuccessfully represented the receiver of the Missouri, Kansas & Texas Railway Company in Schaff v. J. C. Famechon Company, 258 U.S. 76 in 1922, a case to recover the charges for rental of refrigerator cars used in shipping potatoes in 1914 and 1915 from various points in Minnesota for which the United States Supreme Court decided it lacked jurisdiction to review a decision of the Minnesota Supreme Court. Charles W. Bunn successfully represented the railroad in Fullerton-Krueger Lumber Company v. Northern Pacific Railway Company, 266 U.S. 435, in 1925, a case concerning the Minnesota statute of limitations on an action to recover excess freight charges in Hennepin County under a Minnesota state railroad rate law. C. W. Bunn, F. M. Dudley, and John H. Carroll successfully represented the railroad in a challenge that Federal and state railroad rate increases were excessive and discriminatory and the resulting rate structure lacked uniformity in Northern Pacific Railway Company v. Department of Public Works of Washington, 268 U.S. 39, in 1925. Charles Bunn unsuccessfully represented himself in a challenge to the federal excise tax on income from the sale of municipal bonds in Willcuts v. Bunn, 282 U.S. 216, in 1931. Charles Bunn and Pierce Butler, Jr., unsuccessfully represented a military officer stationed at Fort Snelling who challenged a state tax on his automobile in Storaasli v. Minnesota, 283 U.S. 57, in 1931, with Justice Pierce Butler recusing himself from participation in deliberations on the case. Charles W. Bunn was a special master in the dispute over the amount of the waters of the Ware River and of the Swift River in State of Connecticut v. Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 282 U.S. 660 and 283 U.S. 789, in 1931. Charles Bunn, then of Washington, D.C., successfully represented the United States in Olson v. United States, 292 U.S. 246, in 1934, a case over the compensation due when private property on Lake of the Woods was flooded in establishing Canadian power plants. In 1895, William Nelson Cromwell, general counsel of the Northern Pacific Receivers, announced yesterday that he had appointed Charles W. Bunn of St. Paul assistant general counsel of the Northern Pacific Receivers, according to the New York Times. In 1903, Charles W. Bunn, then general counsel of the Northern Pacific RailRoad, was considered a likely replacement for president of the Soo Line RailRoad if Charles S. Mellen resigned to accept the president's job at the New York, New Haven & Hartford RailRoad, according to the New York Times. Charles W. Bunn (1855- ) was born in Trempealeau, Wisconsin, the son of Judge Romanzo Bunn and Sarah Purdy Bunn, graduated from the University of Wisconsin in 1874 and from the University of Wisconsin Law School in 1875, joined the law firm of Cameron & Losey, formed the partnership of Cameron, Losey & Bunn in 1876, moved to St. Paul in 1885, formed the law firm of Lusk & Bunn, which became Lusk, Bunn & Hadley in 1890 and Bunn & Hadley in 1892, became the lawyer for the reorganization of the Northern Pacific RailRoad in 1895, and then became the General Counsel for the reorganized Northern Pacific RailRoad. In 1877, Charles W. Bunn married Mary Anderson of La Crosse, Wisconsin, the daughter of Mons Anderson. Charles Wilson Bunn (1855- ) was the author of A Brief Survey of the Jurisdiction and Practice of the Courts of the United States, a 1939 publication of West Publishing. In 1952, Charles Bunn was a professor at the University of Wisconsin Law School and was a final editor on the 1952 edition of the Uniform Commercial Code. The Charles Bunn Reading Room at the University of Wisconsin Law Library was named for Charles W. Bunn. Charles Sanger Mellen (1851/1852-1927,) the son of George Kingsbury Mellen and Hannah Maria Sanger Mellen, was born in Lowell, Massachussetts, graduated from the Concord, New Hampshire, High School in 1867, began his railroad career as a clerk at the Northern New Hampshire RailRoad in Concord, New Hampshire, in 1870, then worked for the Central Vermont RailRoad, was the superintendent of the Boston and Lowell RailRoad, married Marion Beardsley Foster (1892- ) in St. Albans, Vermont, in 1875, was purchasing agent and then general traffic manager of the Union Pacific RailRoad from 1888 to 1892, became the general manager of the New York and New England RailRoad in 1892, married Katherine Lloyd Livingston in Brooklyn, New York, in 1893, became a protege of financier John P. Morgan, was the president of the Northern Pacific Railway Company from 1896 until 1903, resided in St. Paul, was the president of the Washington & Columbia River Railway Company in 1898, was the president of the Portage & North Western Railway Company of Manitoba, Canada, in 1899, was the president of the Taylors Falls & Lake Superior RailRoad Company in 1900, was the president of the Stillwater & St. Paul RailRoad Company in 1900, was the president of the Northern Pacific Steamship Company in 1901, was an investor of the Bozeman Coal Company in 1902, was the president of the New York, New Haven & Hartford RailRoad from 1903 until 1913, was an investor in the Ellenville & Kingston RailRoad Company in 1905, resided in New Haven, Connecticut, ended his railroad career as president of the President of Maine Central RailRoad in 1914, was a Mason, and died in Concord, New Hampshire. Cass Gilbert designed the Charles W. Bunn Summer House, a combination of Shingle style and Queen Anne elements, built in 1895, at 2550 Manitou Island, in White Bear Lake, Minnesota. Alfred Horace Anderson, who moved from Wisconsin, started logging operations in Mason County, Washington, and introduced logging railroads to the West in the form of the Satsop Railroad Company, was Charles W. Bunn's brother-in-law. In 1905, James B. Kerr came west to Oregon from St. Paul, to represent the Northern Pacific RailRoad when it joined with the Great Northern RailRoad to construct the Spokane, Portland & Seattle RailRoad (SP&S) line along the north bank of the Columbia River, providing both railroads access from Spokane to Portland. Kerr formed a law partnership in 1907 with Charles H. Carey and went on to become one of the great land lawyers in the region and continued to handle the Northern Pacific RailRoad's tangled land and grant problems. The partnership became Davies, Biggs, Strayer, Stoel & Boley, then merged with Rives, Bonyhadi & Smith and is now Stoel Rives. John Williams Griggs (1816-1891,) the son of Joshua Griggs and Lydia Fuller Griggs, was born in Brookline, Massachusetts, moved to Minnesota in 1862, initially settled in Faribault, Minnesota, moved to Chicago, Illinois, in 1870, married Ruth Beardsley, then moved to St. Paul in 1878, was employed by the land department of the St. Paul & Sioux City RailRoad, and died in St. Paul. John Williams Griggs and Ruth Beardsley Griggs had two daughters, Pauline Griggs (Mrs. Vernon Nelson) Robbins and Harriet Barnes Griggs (Mrs. Elmer John) Barker. Marcus D. Grover (1842-1904) was born in Wells, Rutland County, Vermont, was educated at the Troy Conference Academy, read the law at the office of K. Nicholson in Wallingford, Vermont, and the office of Tremain & Peckham at Albany, New York, was admitted to the practice of law at Schenectady, New York, in 1868, first practiced with M. P. Morton in Troy, New York, became the partner of Hon. R. C. Betts at Granville, Washington County, New York, was a member of the Vermont Legislature for four years, married Virginia A. Townsend of Cayuga County, New York, became a partner in the law firm of Waldo, Tobey & Grover at Fort Henry, Essex County, New York, which became Waldo & Grover, moved to St. Paul in 1887 to be an assistant solicitor of the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba RailRoad, became the solicitor general for the Great Northern RailRoad in 1888, and died in St. Paul. Marcus D. Grover and Virginia A. Townsend Grover had two daughters, Virginia L. Grover and Myra E. Grover. Emerson Hadley (1857-1916,) the son of Andrew J. Hadley and Louisa Brett Hadley, was born in Marion, Massachusetts, graduated from Phillips Academy in Andover, Massachusetts, in 1876, was tutored at Wareham, Massachusetts, graduated from Harvard University in 1881, graduated from the Columbia University Law School in 1884, was admitted to the practice of law in New York State in 1884, moved to Minnesota in 1884, settled in St. Paul, became the law partner of Edward Gordon Rogers in 1884, with Tilden R. Selmes joining the Rogers & Hadley partnership in 1887, married Mary Miller Luce, the daughter of Henry Clark Luce and Bessie Delano Luce of Marion, Massachusetts, in 1887, resided at 123 Farrington Street from 1895 until 1916, when the Cass Gilbert-designed house was sold to Mary Saunders Gribben and Perry Dean Gribben, was a member with James W. Lusk of the law firm of Lusk, Bunn & Hadley from 1890 until 1893, was a member of the law firm of Bunn & Hadley from 1893 until 1895, was a member with James D. Armstrong of the law firm of Hadley & Armstrong from 1895 until 1900, was the assistant general counsel for the Northern Pacific RailRoad since 1900, represented the Chicago & Northwestern RailRoad and seven other railroads before the Minnesota RailRoad & Warehouse Commission in 1905, officed at the Northern Pacific RailRoad Building in 1907, was a member of and the secretary of the board of trustees of the House of Hope Presbyterian Church, was a member of the Minnesota Club, was a member of the Town & Country Club, was a member of the White Bear Yacht Club, was a member of the Nushka Curling Club, was a member of the Harvard Club of Minnesota, was a member of the University Club of Saint Paul, and became a member of the Minnesota Historical Society in 1916. Emerson Hadley and Mary Luce Hadley had one child, Louise Hadley (Mrs. Carl B.) Drake, whose son, Carl B. Drake, Jr., was the Chief Executive Officer of the St. Paul Companies from 1977-1984. James W. Lusk (1841- ,) the son of Rev. William Lusk and Jane Adelaide Morris Lusk, was born in Cherry Valley, New York, was educated in the public schools of Reedsburg, Wisconsin, and Batavia, New York, served two years in the American Civil War as a Second Lieutenant in Company "B" of the 12th Wisconsin Infantry and a First Lieutenant in Company "A" of the 12th Wisconsin Infantry, was admitted to the practice of law in Sauk County, Wisconsin, in 1866, was a county judge for Sauk County, Wisconsin, for four years, moved to St. Paul in 1884, was admitted to the practice of law before the Supreme Court of Minnesota and before the U. S. Supreme Court, was engaged in the active practice of law in St. Paul, was the general attorney for the Chicago Great Western RailRoad, was a banker, became the president of the National German American Bank in 1893, was a member of the board of directors of the St. Paul Fire & Marine Insurance Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Chicago Great Western RailRoad, was a member of the board of directors of the Northwestern Trust Company, was a member of the Minnesota Club, was a member of the St. Paul Town & Country Club, resided at 557 Dayton Avenue in 1907, and officed at the National German American Bank Building in 1907. Charles W. Bunn ( -1941) and Helen Bunn ( -1951) both died in Ramsey County. The last sale of this property was in 1994 and the sale price was $257,500. The current owners of record of the property are John McCarty and Linda McCarty. John McCarty and Linda McCarty are political activists who held a reception honoring former Governor Howard Dean, M.D., of Vermont, a 2004 Democratic Candidate for President of the United States, in 2003. John McCarty was a financial supporter in 2003 of Eco Education, a non-profit environmental education organization, and John McCarty and Linda McCarty were financial supporters of Children's Defense Fund-Minnesota in 2000. [See note on the Northern Pacific RailRoad.] [See note on the Chicago Great Western RailRoad.] [See note on the Chicago & Northwestern RailRoad.] [See note on the Great Northern RailRoad.] [See note on the Taylors Falls & Lake Superior RailRoad.] [See note on the Soo Line RailRoad.] [See note on the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railway.] [See note for Wallingford for 5 Crocus Place.] [See note on Percy Dean Gribben for 555 Grand Hill.]

548-554 Portland Avenue: Portland Terrace/Bookstaver House/The Portland; Built in 1890 (1885 according to Ramsey County property tax records and 1888 according to the Cass Gilbert Society;) Italian Renaissance/Romanesque Revival in style; Cass Gilbert, architect. The structure is a two story, 3584 square foot, four bedroom, two bathroom, building. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. Portland Terrace reportedly was built for attorney Leidum Sharpe, who apparently lived with his family at 548 Portland and rented out the other four units. The 1900 city directory indicates that S. Appleton and daughters and F. W. Appleton all resided at 548 Portland Avenue. Little Sketches of Big Folks indicates that Edward J. Schurmeier resided at The Portland in 1907. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. John Farrington and their daughter all resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Bertha V. J. Constans, the widow of William Constans, resided at 550 Portland Avenue, that Kathryne Farrington boarded at 548 Portland Avenue, that Mary L. Farrington, the widow of John Farrington, resided at 548 Portland Avenue, and that William C. Farrington, an inspector, boarded at 548 Portland Avenue. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Flandreau resided at 548 Portland Avenue, that Mr. and Mrs. R. A. Rice resided at 552 Portland Avenue, and that Mr. and Mrs. Victor Robertson resided at 554 Portland Avenue. William Blair Flandrau and Grace Corrin Hodgson Flandrau both resided at 548 Portland Avenue when F. Scott Fitzgerald and Zelda Fitzgerald resided in St. Paul and the Fitzgeralds socialized with the Flandraus. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Mary G. Barbey resided at 548 Portland Avenue. The 1964 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Robert B. Farnham, a member of the Class of 1958, resided at this address. Mary S. Griggs Barbey (1893-1945,) the daughter of Mary Chafee Wells Griggs (1863-1944) and Chauncey Milton Griggs (1860-1931,) was born in Minnesota, married John Edward Barbey (1891- ,) the son of John Barbey and Mary E. Barbey in 1916 in Saint Paul, and married William Homer Sweney (1894- ,) a Yale University graduate, playing hockey from 1914 until 1915, in 1932. The Minnesota Historical Society photographic archive indicates that Louis W. Hill, Jr., and Mary Griggs Barbey were in a Junior League Play Night Club production in 1925. Pierre Griggs Barbey (1917-1943) was the son of John Edward Barbey and Mary S. Griggs Barbey and was buried in Oakland Cemetery. Pierre Barbey was a member of the Class of 1936 at St. Paul Academy and attended the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. W. Homer Sweney attended St. Paul Academy in 1908, graduated from Yale University in 1915, was stationed at the Great Lakes Training Station during World War I, married Mary Griggs Barbey, and was employed by the St. Paul White Lead & Oil Company. William Blair McClure Flandrau (1875-1938,) the son of Charles E. Flandrau, was a Harvard-educated member of St. Paul's elite, was a tall charmer with playboy tendencies, was a published writer, married Grace Corrin Hodgson in 1909, lived on a coffee plantation near Vera Cruz, Mexico, from 1909 until 1912, then resided at 385 Pleasant Avenue in St. Paul, volunteered for army service in World War I, then resided at 548 Portland Avenue, inherited a modest fortune, was an alcoholic, and retired in 1922. Edward J. Schurmeier (1857-1935,) the son of John H. Schurmeier and Caroline Wenzel Schurmeier, was born in St. Paul, was educated in St. Paul public schools, graduated from the German Wallace College/Berea College, Berea, Ohio, in 1879, served as a clerk to Judge Galusha Aaron Grow, attended law school at Columbia College, attended law school at the University of Michigan, married Adele B. Blackford in St. Paul in 1883, was a farm lands investor and broker, was a member of Kiefer & Schurmeier, a farm lands dealer, until 1883, was the manager of the Schurmeier Wagon & Carriage Company from 1883 until 1902, when the Schurmeier family sold their wagon-building operations to Frank Irving Whitney, then was the manager of the Schurmeier estate, was the secretary and treasurer of the J. H. Schurmeier Realty Company, was the president of Edward J. Schurmeier & Company, a real estate investment and brokerage house headquartered at the Endicott Building, was a member of the Minnesota House of Representatives, representing Ramsey County (District 25,) from 1895 until 1897, was a Democrat, was a member of the board of directors of the St. Paul Chamber of Commerce, was a member of the Junior Pioneers, was a member of the Knights of Pythias, resided at the corner of East Seventh Street and Rosabel Street in 1906, officed at the Schurmeier Block in 1906, and officed at 247 East Seventh Street in 1907. Samuel Appleton ( -1925) died in Ramsey County. The property was last sold in 1993, with a sale price of $170,000. The current owners of record of the property are William Hargens and Mary Staples Thompson. In 2003, Mary Staples Thompson was a financial supporter of the Randy Kelly for St. Paul Mayor campaign and resided at this address. Architect Gar Hargens is listed as residing at 548 Portland Avenue. Mary Staples Thompson, a finance employee with Fannie Mae, was a contributor to the John Kerry for President campaign in 2004. Artful Flowers is located at 552 Portland Avenue, Apartment #C. [See note on Robert I. Farrington, Thayer B. Farrington, and John D. Farrington for 460 Portland Avenue.] [See note on F. Scott Fitzgerald for 599 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Grace Corrin Hodgson Flandrau for 19 Summit Court.] [See note on William Constans and Bertha Constans for 465 Summit Avenue] [See note on Gilbert for 318 Summit Avenue.] [See note on the St. Paul White Lead & Oil Company for 859 West Linwood Avenue.] [See note on Knights of Pythias for 2225 East Lake of the Isles Parkway.]

546 Portland Avenue: Built in 1888. The structure is a brick condominium building. Unit 5 is a 950 square foot, one bedroom, one bathroom, condominium unit, with the last sale of the unit occurring in 1994 at a sale price of $44,700, and is currently owned by James A. Winkels, who resides in St. Louis Park, Minnesota. Unit 6 is a 950 square foot, two bedroom, one bathroom, condominium unit, and is also currently owned by James A. Winkels, who resides in St. Louis Park, Minnesota. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Frederick E. Rice resided at this address from 1891 to 1893. The 1900 city directory indicates that Miss Mary Bunn, Judge G. L. Bunn, and Hon. E. W. Durant all resided at this address. The 1910-1911 Directory of the University of Minnesota indicates that David Saul Barron, a student, resided at this address. The 1914, 1918, and 1924 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. M. F. Kennedy and their daughters all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Mathilda Auerbach, the widow of Maurice Auerbach, resided at this address. The 1930 city directory also indicates that Lily McClellan and Mrs. May G. McMasters both resided at this address. Edward White Durant, Jr., was a member of the Semi-Annual Association/Club, an informal men�s dinner club which was started by Henry Hamilton Robinson in 1884 as a gathering of unmarried Twin Cities scions who were home from prep school and college breaks and which met twice each year for 30 years. In 1888, Edward White Durant of the Stillwater Shipping Company, was Borealis Rex 3 of the St. Paul Winter Carnival. Edward W. Durant (1829-1918) was born in Roxbury, Massachusetts, of Huguenot ancestry, moved with his parents to Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1838, moved to Whiteside County, Illinois, in 1840, moved to Stillwater, Minnesota, in 1848, was employed by John McKusick for a short time, was engaged in log rafting on the St. Croix and Mississippi Rivers, became a pilot, formed a steamboat towing company, married Henrietta Pease in 1853, was an alderman and mayor of Stillwater, Minnesota, was a member of the Minnesota House of Representatives from 1873 to 1876 and from 1885 to 1886 and of the Minnesota Senate from 1887 to 1890 and from 1903 to 1906, was the Democratic Party candidate for lieutenant governor and for U. S. Senator, was a Grand Master of Masons for the jurisdiction of Minnesota, and was Grand Chancellor of the Knights of Pythias. Edward W. Durant, Jr., a resident of Stillwater, Minnesota, also was engaged in lumbering and mining. John McKusick is credited with naming Stillwater because of fond memories of Stillwater, Maine, near his hometown, and because of the stillness of Lake St. Croix, Minnesota. McKusick, Elam Greeley, Elias McKean, and Calvin Leach, partners in the the Stillwater Lumber Company, built the first lumber mill in Stillwater, Wisconsin Territory, in 1844. McKusick then built a boarding house and a company store and eventually became the sole owner of the lumber mill. The John Allen family was the first to settle in the new village, followed by the family of Ansun/Anson Northrup, who operated the Northrup House hotel, built in 1844. After Wisconsin became a state in 1848, all the ceded lands west of the St. Croix and Mississippi Rivers were left without government. Joseph R. Brown convened a meeting of the settlers in this unorganized territory to meet on August 26, 1848, in what has become known as the "Stillwater Convention," held in John McKusick�s store, and the meeting drafted a Memorial to Congress that a new territory be created and that the territory be named "Minnesota" and elected Henry Sibley to deliver the petition to the U.S. Congress. Mary A. Bunn ( -1916) and Matilda Rice Auerbach ( -1945) both died in Ramsey County. Edward White Durant ( -1918) died in Washington County, Minnesota. Interlingual Solutions, a cross-cultural, bilingual company with business services designed to help small- and medium-sized companies achieve success in the Japanese marketplace, and Akikaze Media Services, a translation service, are currently located at this address.

544 Portland Avenue: Oscar L. Taylor Double Residence/John E. Sawyer and Frederick E. Rice Duplex; Built in 1888; Richardsonian Romanesque in style; C. H. Johnston, architect. The structure is a brick condominium building. The house is on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the Summit Hill Historic District. Unit 1 is a 955 square foot, one bedroom, one bathroom, condominium unit, and is currently owned by June B. Nelson. Unit 2 is a 950 square foot, one bedroom, one bathroom, condominium unit, with the last sale of the unit occurring in 2002 at a sale price of $175,800, and is currently owned by Kari J. Mohr. Unit 3 is a 800 square foot, one bedroom, one bathroom, condominium unit, with the last sale of the unit occurring in 2002 at a sale price of $154,900, and is currently owned by Kimberly A. Lowe. Unit 4 is a 950 square foot, two bedroom, one bathroom, condominium unit, with the last sale of the unit occurring in 1999 at a sale price of $107,000, and is currently owned by Daniel M. Roth. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that the house was built by Oscar L. Taylor and that Dr. John E. Sawyer resided at this address from 1891 to 1893. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Reinhart and Vernon Reinhart all resided at this address. Hugh J. Johnson (1880- ,) a Private, was a World War I veteran who resided at this address in 1919. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Elmer, Mrs. G. S. Moore, and Gardner Moore all resided at this address. Oscar Livingston Taylor (1858-1917) was born at Freeport, Illinois, the son of Oscar Taylor and Martha Malvina Snow Taylor, studied at the Freeport High School, entered Cornell University in 1877, graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree from Cornell University in 1881, settled in St. Paul in 1882, was engaged in the real estate business until his death, was involved in the St. Paul Associated Charities and with a state anti-tuberculosis campaign, led in the organization of the St. Paul Athletic Club, was elected to be the club's first president, was chairman of the club's building committee, and was in charge of the erection of a new St. Paul Athletic Club clubhouse. Oscar Livingston Taylor married Nora Tilghman West of Edwardsville, Illinois, in 1885 and the couple had two sons, Donald West Taylor, a 1908 Cornell University graduate who served in the Army Aviation Service during World War I, and Gilbert Morris Taylor, a 1916 Cornell University graduate who served as a second lieutenant in the Army Engineer Reserve Corps during World War I. Oscar Livingston Taylor ( -1917) died in Ramsey County. John Evans Sawyer ( -1944) died in Hennepin County.

542 Portland Avenue: Built in 1910 (1908 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Colonial Revival in style. The structure is a two story, 4980 square foot, ten bedroom, three bathroom, half-bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided house. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Mrs. Minnie Stanton resided at this address in 1898. The 1914 city directory indicates that Mrs. M. A. Gilbert and her daughter, Miss Mary S. Gilbert, Mrs. G. W. Fairbrother, Mrs. H. I. Stanton, and R. J. McGuckin all resided at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Skinner and Mrs. B. I. Stanton all resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. H. M. Pearce and Mrs. B. J. Stanton all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Minnie Stanton, the widow of Benjamin D. Stanton, Harry G. Allen, and his wife, Ruth Allen, all resided at this address. In 1934, Frederick G. Ingersoll resided at this address. Frederick G. Ingersoll (1855-1941,) the son of Daniel Wesley Ingersoll and Harriet Smith Ingersoll, was born in Irvington, New York, moved to St. Paul with his parents in 1858, was educated in the public schools of St. Paul, graduated from the University of Michigan in 1878, was admitted to the practice of law in 1879, was a lawyer in St. Paul, was a notary public in 1880, married Mary Katinka Phelps (1859- ,) the daughter of daughter of John Phelps and Clara Clark Phelps in St. Paul in 1887, was a second vice president of the Minnesota Historical Society, was a federal court commissioner in the the Northern Securities Case in 1902, was the president of the St. Paul Title & Trust Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Second National Bank, was a member of the board of directors of the Pioneer Press Company, was the president of the city council of St. Paul from 1891 until 1893, was a member of the Republican State Central Committee for three terms, was a member of the Minnesota Club, was a member of the St. Paul Town & Country Club, was a member of the Zeta Psi college fraternity, and officed at the New York Life Building. Frederick Gerald Ingersoll and Mary Katinka Phelps Ingersoll were the parents of Geraldine Ingersoll (Mrs. Horace) Thompson (1888- ) and John Phelps Ingersoll (1891- .) In 1920, Leon A. Makielski painted a portrait of Mrs. Frederick Ingersoll which currently is in the collection of the Detroit Institute of Art. With Charles Hart, Frederick Ingersoll was a lawyer for the St. Paul Pioneer Press and represented the newspaper in an appeal to the Minnesota Supreme Court challenging the John Day Smith "Midnight Execution" Act in 1906, arising in connection with the botched hanging of William Williams (1879-1906), a steamfitter who was convicted of killing a 16-year old friend with whom he was suspected of having an "unnatural relationship," John Keller, and of killing Keller's mother, after Williams failed to convince the jury that he was insane, and after Williams lost every court appeal. It would be the last time an execution was carried out in Minnesota. The executioners did not take into account the stretch of the hanging rope and after Williams' feet hit the floor, Ramsey County sheriff's deputies scrambled to hoist up the rope and the police surgeon counted the minutes on his watch, waiting for Williams' pulse to stop and a small crowd of spectators watched as it took Williams 14 1/2 minutes to die by strangulation. The miscalculated hanging began a six-year successful movement to abolish the death penalty in the Minnesota Legislature. In 1902, Frederick G. Ingersoll was appointed a special Federal court examiner for the Northern Securities Company merger litigation under the Sherman antitrust law brought by the State of of Minnesota through its Attorney General, represented by W. D. Munn. The Northern Securities Company merger litigation was intended to prevent the absorption by the Northern Securities Company of the Northern Pacific RailRoad, the Great Northern RailRoad, and the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy RailRoad. John Day Smith (1845- ,) the son of Edward Gower Smith and Elizabeth Brown Lord Smith, was born in Litchfield, Kennebec County, Maine, prepared for college at Litchfield Academy and at the Waterville Classical School, enlisted in Company "F" of the 19th Maine Regiment in 1862, served in the Corps of General Hancock in the Army of the Potomac during the American Civil War, saw action at Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Bristol Station, Mine Row, the Battle of the Wilderness, Spottsylvania, Bethesda Church, North Anna, Cold Harbor, the Siege of Petersburg, Gettysburg, and Jerusalem Road, was wounded at the Battle of Gettysburg, was severely wounded at Jerusalem Road, was severely wounded at the Siege of Petersburg, Virginia, in 1864, graduated from Brown University in 1872, married Mary Hardy Chadbourn ( -1874) in 1872, received a master's degree from Brown University in 1875, graduated from the Columbian University Law School in 1878, married Laura Bean in 1879, was an academy principal in Worcester, Massachusetts, received a LL M from the Columbian University Law School in 1891, was a lawyer, was a lecturer on the law of torts and the law of evidence at Howard University from 1880 until 1885, moved to Minnesota in 1885, was a lecturer on constitutional law at the University of Minnesota Law School from 1890 until 1905, was the Department Commander of the Grand Army of the Republic, was a Republican, was a partner in the Smith & Parsons Law Firm, was a member of the Minnesota House of Representatives, representing Hennepin County (District 29,) from 1889 until 1891, was a member of the Minnesota Senate, representing Hennepin County (District 34) from 1891-95, was elected a judge of the Hennepin County district court in 1904, was President of the Sons of the American Revolution in 1906, was a Baptist, was a member of the Ark Chapter of the Darios Commandery of the Knights Templar, was the president of the Minneapolis Humane Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children and Animals, resided at 2720 Pillsbury Avenue in Minneapolis in 1907, and officed at the Minneapolis Court House in 1907. John Day Smith was the father of five children, Mary Smith, Edward Day Smith, Elizabeth Smith, Mabel Edna Smith, and Emma Smith. Frederick G. Ingersoll ( -1941) was an original member of the Junior Pioneer Association of St. Paul in 1934 and died in Ramsey County. The St. Paul Title and Trust Company was incorporated in 1886 and began operations in 1887. Maurice Auerbach was the president and Robert R. Dunn was the vice president of the St. Paul Title and Trust Company in 1902. George Edmund Ingersoll (1856- ,) the son of D. W. Ingersoll and Harriet Smith Ingersoll, was born in Irvington, New York, was educated in St. Paul public schools, graduated from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York, as a civil engineer in 1877, was employed as an assistant engineer by the Hastings & Dakota Railway from 1878 until 1879, was employed as an assistant engineer by the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers in 1880, engaged in sheep raising from 1881 until 1882, was employed as an assistant engineer by the Northern Pacific Railway from 1882 until 1883, practiced as a civil engineer in Fort Benton, Montana from 1883 until 1886, practiced as a civil engineer in railroad construction from 1886 until 1893, married Jean F. MacLaren in 1892, was employed as the general manager of the Superior Rapid Transit Railway Company from 1894 until 1900, was the resident manager of the Montana & Oregon Gold Mining Company of Ashland, Oregon, from 1900 until 1903, was the chief engineer employed by the Los Angeles, Tropico & Glendale Railway Company in 1904, was a broker and selling agent of railway supplies after 1904, resided at 81 Western Avenue in 1907, and officed at the German American Bank Building. Mary S. Gilbert ( -1919) and Minnie E. Stanton ( -1938) both died in Ramsey County. George W. Fairbrother (1837-1905) was born in the United States and died in Ramsey County. Harry G. Allen ( -1933) died in Hennepin County. The property was last sold in 1993 with a sale price of $180,000. The current owner of record of the property is William P. Rolf. William P. Rolf was a financial supporter of the Friends of the St. Paul Public Library in 2006. In 2004, William Rolf applied for four variances to convert the existing 16-unit apartment building at 501 Ashland Avenue to its original configuration of 24 one-bedroom units and the granting of that application was successfully appealed by opponents of the variances. William Rolf was a professional realtor in 1993. [See note on the Northern Pacific RailRoad.] [See note on Horace E. Thompson for 808 Summit Avenue.] [See note on the Great Northern RailRoad.] [See note on the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy RailRoad.] [See note on the Hastings & Dakota RailRoad.]

541 Portland Avenue: Charles J. Berryhill House; Built in 1896 (1890 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Queen Anne in style; George Wirth, architect. The structure is a two story, 3384 square foot, three bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Charles J. Berryhill resided at this address from 1886 to 1903. The 1887 and 1900 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. C. J. Berryhill resided at this address. The 1914 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Albert Wilkinson resided at this address. In 1916, Homer P. Clark was a member of the Minnesota Historical Society and resided at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. H. P. Clark resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Homer P. Clark, the treasurer of West Publishing Company, resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Smith resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that this address was vacant. Charles J. Berryhill ( -1919) died in Washington County, Minnesota. The current owner of record of the property is Ragnhild A. Westby. [See note on George Wirth for 400 Summit Avenue.]

536 Portland Avenue: Charles E. Clarke Residence; Built in 1904; Georgian Revival in style. The structure is a two story, 2488 square foot, four bedroom, one bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Charles E. Clarke resided at this address from 1904 to 1909. The book of Minnesotans: a biographical dictionary of leading living men of Minnesota, edited by Albert Nelson Marquis, indicates that Charles Elihu Clarke resided at this address in 1907. The 1914 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. D. S. Elliott and their daughter resided at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. H. M. Pearce resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Schmahl resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Julius A. Schmahl, the Minnesota State Treasurer, and his wife, Minerva Schmahl, resided at this address. Charles Elihu Clarke (1856- ,) the son of Hon. Charles Ezra, a member of Congress, and Hannah Tuttle Clarke, was born at Great Bend, Jefferson County, New York, was educated in the Watertown, New York, public schools, was educated at the Hungerford Collegiate Institute, was educated at the Kelsey's Preparatory School in Clinton, New York, studied for three years in a law office at Watertown, New York, married Charlotte M. Rogers at Watertown, New York, in 1881, moved to St. Paul in 1882, was in estate management, has been senior member of the firm of Clarke & Fletcher, real estate, fire insurance and loans, since 1887, was the executor of the Henry Hale estate after 1890, was a member of the St. Paul Commercial Club, had the hobbies of fishing, driving and outdoor sports, and officed at 303 Jackson Street. Julius August Schmahl (1867-1955) was born in Traverse des Sioux, Nicollet County, Minnesota, the second youngest of the ten children of Jacob Schmahl and Roset Apfel Schmahl, who were both born in Germany, resided in Redwood Falls, Redwood County, Minnesota, was an apprentice in the printing office of the Redwood Gazette from 1881 to 1883, worked for the Fargo Argus in 1884, was a reporter for Minneapolis and St. Paul daily newspapers from 1885 to 1892, purchased an interest in and became the editor and publisher of the Redwood Gazette, was a Republican, married Minerva "Lizzia" Fowlds (1867- ,) was the chief clerk of the Minnesota House of Representatives during the 1901, 1903, and 1905 legislative sessions while remaining the editor of the Redwood Gazette, was Minnesota Secretary of State from 1907 to 1921, was Minnesota State Treasurer from 1927 to 1937 and from 1939 to 1951, and was interred at Redwood Falls Cemetery, Redwood Falls, Minnesota. Julius A. Schmahl reviewed The History of Redwood County, Minnesota, compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge and published in Chicago by H. C. Cooper, Jr., & Company in 1916. In 1919, Julius A. Schmal made addresses at New Ulm, Minnesota, August 20, 1919, and Kimball, Minnesota, Sept. 27, 1919, on the occasion of a home-coming of soldiers of World War I, and of the 57th anniversary of the repulse of the Sioux Indians that were published in Minneapolis by the Syndicate Printing Company and that decried the evils of Socialism, including the Nonpartisan League. In 1932, Julius A. Schmahl made an address "One hundredth anniversary of the discovery of the source of the Mississippi River" at Lake Itasca, Minnesota, which was published in Saint Paul by the Modern Life Insurance Company of Minnesota. Schmahl was the longest serving Minnesota treasurer, a post that was abolished in the 1990's, exceeding the tenure of Val Bjornson by one day. Jacob Schmahl ( -1906) settled at Traverse des Sioux, Nicollet County, Minnesota, after moving to Minnesota from Galena, Illinois, moved to the vicinity of Fort Ridgely, Minnesota, in 1856, after the collapse of the St. Peter Townsite Company when it did not become the territorial capitol, was a Democrat, was injured during the 1862 Battle of Fort Ridgely, moved to Redwood Falls, Minnesota, and operated a largely unsuccessful brewery and saloon, was employed at various occupations at Fargo and Casselton, North Dakota, and died in New Ulm, Minnesota. Roset Apfel (1828-1914) was born in Mainz, Germany, emigrated to the United States with her family in 1839, moved to to Galena, Illinois, then moved to Caledonia, Houston county, Minnesota, was employed in the home of Col. Robertson, then editor of the St. Paul Pioneer, married Jacob Schmahl, and died in Duluth, Minnesota. The Modern Life Insurance Company was located in Winona, Minnesota, and in St. Paul and was in business from 1921 to 1967. Charles E. Clarke ( -1908) and Charles E. Clarke ( -1923) both died in Ramsey County. Julius A. Schmahl (1867-1955) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Oppel, and died in Ramsey County. Minerva Dowlds Schmahl (1878-1973) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Morrison, and died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Elizabeth A. Currie and Gary R. Currie. Gary R. Currie was formerly a legislative analyst for the Minnesota House of Representatives Research Department dealing with local government topics.

533 Portland Avenue: Built in 1884; Queen Anne in style. The structure is a two story, 5041 square foot, eight bedroom, three bathroom, one half-bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. The 1887 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Skinner resided at this address. The 1900 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. M. F. Patterson, W. O. Patterson, and Mrs. W. F. Alexander all resided at this address. The 1914 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. H. F. Warner resided at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. H. F. Warner and their daughter all resided at this address. The records of the 1919-1920 Minnesota World War I Soldier's Bonus Board (#4909) indicate that Harry D. Warner (1899- ,) a 1918 enlistee and a Private First Class in the Motor Transport Corps, who was born in St. Paul, had blue eyes, brown hair, and a medium fair complexion, was 5' 5" tall, was a clerk at induction, was a merchant employed by Lindeke, Warner & Sons after the completion of service, and was unmarried, resided with his father, Harry F. Warner, at this address. Harry D. Warner was a World War I veteran who resided at this address in 1919. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Harry Warner resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Harry F. Warner, his wife, Mary Warner, and William Warner all resided at this address. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Harry F. Warner resided at this address in 1930. Lindeke, Warner & Sons was a wholesale dry goods house in St. Paul. Harry Dave Warner ( -1930,) William Howard Warner ( -1938,) Harry F. Warner ( -1942,) Myron F. Patterson ( -1943,) Mary Warner ( -1949,) William Warner ( -1953) all died in Ramsey County. Mary Lou Warner ( -1956) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Anderson, and died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Charles Stander and Theresa F. Stander. The book of Minnesotans: a biographical dictionary of leading living men of Minnesota, edited by Albert Nelson Marquis, indicates that Frederick Newberry Dickson resided at this address in 1907. The 1914 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. F. N. Dickson resided at the former nearby 530 Portland Avenue. The 1918 city directory indicates that Hon. and Mrs. F. N. Dickson resided at the former nearby 530 Portland Avenue. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. F. N. Dickson and their daughter all resided at the former nearby 530 Portland Avenue. Frederick N. Dickson ( -1941) died in Ramsey County. Frederick N. Dickson, a judge of the Ramsey County District Court, resigned from the bench and joined the predecessor to the Oppenheimer Law Firm in 1921. The 1930 city directory indicates that Frederick N. Dickson was a lawyer and was a partner with William H. Oppenheimer, Frank C. Hodgson, Montreville J. Brown, Stan D. Donnelly, and Edwin B. Baer in the law firm of Oppenheimer, Dickson, Hodgson, Brown & Donnelly, with offices at the Merchants Bank Building. [See note on William H. Oppenheimer for 766 West Linwood Avenue.] [See note on Frederick Newberry Dickson for 766 Linwood Avenue.]

529-531 Portland Avenue: O. L. Taylor House; Built in 1901 (1884 according to Ramsey County property tax records); Queen Anne in style; __?__ Mould, architect. The structure is a two story, 3280 square foot, 14 room, three bathroom, asbestos-sided triplex, with a detached garage. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Oscar L. Taylor resided at this address from 1886 to 1918. In 1888, Oscar L. Taylor resided at this address. The 1887 and 1900 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. O. L. Taylor resided at 529 Portland Avenue. Little Sketches of Big Folks indicates that Oscar Livingston Taylor resided at 529 Portland Avenue in 1907. The 1914 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. O. L. Taylor and Morris Taylor all resided at this address. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Oscar Livingston Taylor (1858-1917,) the husband of Nora W. Taylor, who was born in Illinois to parents born in the United States and who died of an acute dilatation of the heart, resided at this address in 1917. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. O. L. Taylor and Morris Taylor all resided at 529 Portland Avenue. Fred C. Rogers and Thos. J. Rogers were World War I veterans who both resided at this address in 1919. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. M. Brown resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Charles M. Brown, associated with the Aetna Life Insurance Company of Hartford, Connecticut, his wife, Netta C. Brown, Edith Brill, and Alice Brill all resided at this address. The 1939 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Donald W. Taylor (1887- ,) who was born in St. Paul, who attended the school from 1900 until 1904, who attended Cornell University, who graduated from the University of Minnesota, who was self employed in real estate and insurance, who was a member of the White Bear Yacht Club and the University Club, and who pursued the hobbies of yachting, fly fishing, billards, banjo playing, carpentry, and drafting resided at this address. Donald W. Taylor married Anne Puffer in Minneapolis in 1909 and the couple had two daughters. The 1964 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Donald W. Taylor, a member of the Class of 1904, resided at 529 Portland Avenue. Oscar Livingston Taylor (1858-1917,) the son of Oscar Taylor and Martha Malvina Snow Taylor, was born at Freeport, Illinois, studied at the Freeport, Illinois, High School, graduated from Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, in 1881, was a member of the Alpha Delta Phi fraternity, was a member of the Christian Association at Cornell University, was a member of the Tom Hughes Boat Club at Cornell University, was a member of the Glee Club at Cornell University, moved to St. Paul in 1881, married Nora Tilghman West of Edwardsville, Illinois, in Madison County, Illinois, in 1885, resided in St. Paul, was in real estate business as a member of the firm J. C. Stout & Company until 1885, when the firm dissolved, was in the insurance business, organized the real estate firm of Smith & Taylor, was the president of the Urban Investment Company, was the president of the Manhattan Company, was associated with the Associated Charities of St. Paul, was involved in the state anti-tuberculosis campaign, relinquished the management of the Manhattan Building in St. Paul in 1899, invested in a 5,000 acre wheat farm in northern Minnesota in 1899, was the president of the Northwestern Cornell Club in 1906 and 1907, was a member of the Cornell University Class of 1881 reunion committee in 1906, was a member of the Minnesota Club, was a member of the St. Paul Town & Country Club, was a member of the White Bear Yacht Club, was a member of the Oshkosh Yacht Club, was a member of the Duluth Yacht Club, was a member of the Canadian Camp Club, was a member of the Informal Club, was a founder of the University Club in 1907, was the president of the Minnesota Cornell Alumni Association in 1916, and was the chairman of the construction committee of the St. Paul Athletic Building in 1916, officed at 48 East Fourth Street in 1907, and died of a heart ailment in St. Paul. Oscar Livingston Taylor and Nora Tilghman West Taylor were the parents of Donald West Taylor, who was a 1908 graduate of Cornell University and served in the Army Aviation Service during World War I, and Gilbert Morris Taylor, who was a 1916 graduate of Cornell University and was a second lieutenant in the Engineer Reserve Corps during World War I. In 1850, Aetna Insurance Company organizes an Annuity Fund to sell life insurance. In 1853, the Annuity department separates from Aetna Insurance and is incorporated as Aetna Life Insurance Company under Eliphalet A. Bulkeley. The name "Aetna" was retained to take advantage of the good reputation of the original Aetna and was inspired by the strength of the 11,000-foot volcano on the eastern shores of Sicily, Mt. Etna, then the most active volcano in Europe. The Aetna Life Insurance Company survived the Panic of 1857 and, in 1861, began offering participating life insurance policies which paid dividends to policyholders and provided higher commission rates for agents. In 1867, Aetna issued its first farm mortgage loan, and, by 1872, Aetna had 27 percent of its assets in farm mortgages. Aetna President Morgan G. Bulkeley, son of Eliphalet A. Bulkeley, was elected governor of Connecticut in 1888 after having served several terms as mayor of Hartford, Connecticut. Aetna issued its first accident policy in 1891, entered the field of health insurance in 1899, began offering automobile coverages in 1907, formed a bond department to sell fidelity and surety coverages in 1911, formed a Group department to sell group life insurance in 1913, and began offering group disability policies in 1919. Because of efforts to revamp its farm mortgage portfolio in the late 1920's and because it had small investments in outside corporate stock, the company survived the Great Depression. Aetna entered the international insurance arena by acquiring a Canadian life insurer, Excelsior Life Insurance Company, in 1960, and partnered with Italy's Assicurazioni Generali to form an international insurance network that would market insurance products in over 70 countries in 1966. In 1998, Aetna acquired NYLCare Health Plans for $1.05 billion, adding 2.2 million members to Aetna U.S. Healthcare�s membership base, and in 1999, acquired Prudential HealthCare for $1 billion, making Aetna the country�s largest provider of health benefits with more than 21 million members. In 2000, Aetna sold its financial services and international businesses to ING for $7.7 billion, a sale that helps Aetna redefine itself as an independent health and group benefits company, and spun off the health business to its shareholders. In 2005, Aetna acquired Strategic Resource Company (SRC), an administrator of group benefit products for part-time and hourly workers, ActiveHealth Management, a clinically focused, technology-driven health management and health care data analytics company, and HMS Healthcare, a regional health care network operating in Michigan, Colorado and other states. Oscar Livingston Taylor ( -1917) and Fred Rogers ( -1941) died in Ramsey County. Nora Frances Taylor (1892-1971) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Pyle, and died in Beltrami County, Minnesota. Alice C. Brill (1889-1968) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Gray, and died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is William Uhlenkott. According to the Twin Cities GLBT Life website, the International Gay/Lesbian Archives are located at this address. William Uhlenkott and Peter Jirak were financial supporters of the Jean-Nickolaus Tretter GLBT Archive at the University of Minnesota in 2006. The 1920 city directory indicates that Hon. Frederick N. Dickson, a judge in th Second Judicial District, resided at the former nearby 530 Portland Avenue. The 1921 Carlton College Alumni directory indicates that Frederick N. Dickson resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Nathaniel P. Langford, Jr., resided at the former nearby 530 Portland Avenue. Nathaniel P. Langford ( -1940) died in Ramsey County. Nathaniel Pitt Langford (1901-1988) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Cary, and died in Ramsey County. [See note on Oscar Livingston Taylor for 544 Portland Avenue.] [See the note on Nathaniel Pitt Langford for 306 South Exchange Street.] [See note on Town & Country Club for 952 Wakefield Avenue.] [See note on the White Bear Yacht Club for 18 Kenwood Parkway.] [See note on the University Club for 420 Summit Avenue.] [See note on the Informal Club for 761 Goodrich Avenue.]

528 Portland Avenue: Built in 1904; Georgian Revival in style. The structure is a two story, 4100 square foot, eight bedroom, two bathroom, asbestos-sided house, with a detached garage. The house is on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the Summit Hill Historic District. The 1914 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Sheean and Miss Jane Sheean all resided at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. E. P. Winter and their daughter all resided at this address. Everett P. Winter was a World War I veteran who resided at this address in 1919. The 1924 city directory indicates that Dr. and Mrs. H. B. Zimmerman resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Anna M. Peitsch, the widow of Frederick Peitsch, Lyle Jennings, a laborer, and his wife, Freida Jennings, all resided at this address. Fred A. Peitsch ( -1926) died in Ramsey County. Anna Matilda Peitsch (1885-1967) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Hummel, and died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is Scott J. Adams. The Carlton College Bulletin of 1921 indicates that Frederick N. Dickson, a lawyer with the law firm of Moore, Oppenheimer, Peterson & Dickson, resided at the former nearby 530 Portland Avenue. [See note for Frederick Newberry Dickson for 766 Linwood Avenue]

524-526 Portland Avenue: J. R. Hudson House; Built in 1907 (1900 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Queen Anne in style; J. Walter Stevens, architect. The structure is a two story, 4569 square foot, five bedroom, three bathroom, asbestos-sided house, with a detached garage. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. The 1900 city directory indicates that Mrs. J. R. Hutson, Frank A. Hutson, and J. M. Hutson all resided at 524 Portland Avenue. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Newel H. Clapp resided at this address in 1902. The 1914 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. N. H. Clapp resided at 524 Portland Avenue and that Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Glasspoole resided at 526 Portland Avenue. In 1916, Newel H. Clapp was a member of the Minnesota Historical Society and resided at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. N. H. Clapp resided at 524 Portland Avenue. The 1920 city directory indicates that Charles E. Clapp, a student, boarded at 526 Portland Avenue, that Luella E. Clapp, the widow of Newel H. Clapp, resided at 526 Portland Avenue, and that Newell H. Clapp, a partner with Augustus W. Clapp, Charles E. Elmquist, Grant S. Macartney, and Charles W. Briggs in the law firm of Clapp & McCartney, which officed at the Merchants Bank Building, resided at 524 Portland Avenue. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mrs. Sarah E. Clapp resided at 524 Portland Avenue and that A. W. Clapp resided at 526 Portland Avenue. The 1930 city directory indicates that 524 Portland Avenue was vacant and that Theo G. Ames and his wife, Barbara Ames, resided at 526 Portland Avenue. Newel/Newell H. Clapp was a lawyer and, with Moses E. Clapp, unsuccessfully represented the Lindsay & Phelps Company in Lindsay & Phelps Company v. Mullen, 176 U.S. 126 (1900,) a 5-4 U. S. Supreme Court decision which started as a replevin action to recover logs and became a constitutional issue when the State of Minnesota became the successor to Mullen's interest in the logs seized to pay scaling and surveying fees. Newell H. Clapp, with Harry S. McCartney, successfully represented intervening shareholders of Guardian Trust Company in Kansas City Southern Railway Company v. Guardian Trust Company, 240 U.S. 166 (1916) challenging a bankruptcy reorganization scheme that favored some equity holders and left unsecured creditors inadequately provided for. Newell Clapp, with A. W. Clapp, unsuccessfully represented a stockholder of the of the Cloquet Lumber Company against the Collector of Internal Revenue on a disputed tax payment in Lynch v. Hornby, 247 U.S. 339 (1918,) where the U.S. Supreme Court on a 7-2 vote upheld taxation of a distribution that occurred after the enactment of the income tax law of an asset value increase that preceded its passage. In 1930, Mrs. Lulu E. Clapp was the widow of Newell H. Clapp and resided at 614 Grand Avenue. Newell/Newel Harvey Clapp (1850- ,) the son of Rufus H. Clapp and Maria S. Woodruff Clapp, was born in Waitsfield/Waitesfield, Vermont, was educated in the common schools of Wisconsin, read the law with H. A. Wilson of Hudson, Wisconsin, was admitted to the practice of law in Wisconsin in 1871, was a lawyer, practiced law in Hudson, Wisconsin, from 1871 until 1881, was a law partner of Augustus Wilson, married Sarah Elizabeth Jones (1855- ,) the daughter of Sterling Jones and Elizabeth Jones, in Hudson, Wisconsin, in 1872, moved to Stillwater, Minnesota, in 1881, was a partner with Alvin E. MaCartney in the law firm of Clapp & MaCartney, moved the law firm to St. Paul in 1893, later added Moses E. Clapp as a law firm partner, resided at this address in 1907, officed at the National German American Bank Building in 1907, was a member of the American Bar Association, was a member of the Minnesota State Bar Association, was a member of the Minnesota Club, was a Mason, was a Knight Templar, was a member of the Minnesota Historical Society, was a member of the St. Paul Commercial Club, and officed at the National German American Bank Building. Newel Harvey Clapp and Sarah Elizabeth Jones Clapp were the parents of Mattie A. Clapp (1874-1892,) Augustus W. Clapp (1877- ,) Newel H. Clapp, Jr. (1878- ,) Edwin J. Clapp (1881- ,) Arthur A. Clapp (1886- ,) Dorothy A. Clapp (1892-1902,) and Rufus H. Clapp (1895- .) Clapp & MaCartney remains in the form of its successor, Briggs & Morgan. Barbara A. Ames ( -1940) died in Mower County, Minnesota. The property was last sold for $315,000 and that sale occurred in 1998. The current owners of record of the property are Raymond N. Meyer and Sheila A. Meyer. [See note on Stevens for 335 Summit Avenue.]

523 Portland Avenue: Howard/Ordway House; Built in 1913 (1889 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Queen Anne in style; Mould & McNicol, architects. The structure is a two story, 5636 square foot, six bedroom, five bathroom, one half-bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. The 1900 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. L. P. Ordway resided at this address. The 1914 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. L. P. Ordway, S. G. Ordway, and L. P. Ordway, Jr., all resided at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. L. P. Ordway and L. P. Ordway, Jr., all resided at this address. The records of the 1919-1920 Minnesota World War I Soldier's Bonus Board (#15665) indicate that Samuel Gilman Ordway (1887- ,) a 1918 enlistee and a First Lieutenant in 34th Field Artillery, who was born in St. Paul, was a lawyer at induction, was a self-employed lawyer after the completion of service, and was married, resided with his wife, Mildred W. Ordway, at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. S. G. Ordway resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Richard Ordway, an employee of the Crane Company, and his wife, Gladys Ordway, resided at this address. Richard Ordway attended St. Paul Academy and then Yale University, was a major stockholder in his father's, Lucius Pond Ordway's, Minnesota Mining & Manufacturing (3M) corporation, was a prominent member of countless organizations and committees in the Twin Cities, served as a trustee of Macalester College, and was elected Chair of Macalester's Development Council in 1961. Richard Ordway's daughter, Pondie Nicholson, followed her father on Macalester College's Board of Trustees, along with her husband, and they were followed by their son, Ford Nicholson. Richard None Ordway (1903-1976) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Gilman, and died in Ramsey County. Gladys Watson Ordway (1903-1989) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Watson, and died in Washington County, Minnesota. The current owner of record of the property is Linda K. Pollari. The 1887 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. A. L. Mohler resided at the former nearby 516 Portland Avenue. The 1900 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. John J. Rhodes and their daughter resided at the former nearby 516 Portland Avenue. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Lucie J. Heath resided at the nearby former 516 Portland Avenue in 1900. The 1909 University of Minnesota Catalogue indicates that A. C. Heath, M.D., a clinical instructor of the nose and throat, resided at the former nearby 516 Portland Avenue. The 1914 city directory indicates that Dr. and Mrs. A. C. Heath and Mrs. L. J. Heath resided at the former nearby 516 Portland Avenue. The 1918 city directory indicates that Dr. and Mrs. A. C. Heath and Mrs. L. J. Heath all resided at the former nearby 516 Portland Avenue. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Lucie J. Heath (1842-1925,) the widowed mother of Dr. A. C. Heath, who was born in Massachusetts to parents born in the United States and who died of cerebral thrombosis, resided at the nearby former 516 Portland Avenue in 1925. The 1924 city directory indicates that Dr. and Mrs. A. C. Heath and Mrs. L. J. Heath all resided at the former nearby 516 Portland Avenue. Adam Leonides Mohler (1849- ) was born in Ephrata, Pennsylvania, was a telegrapher in 1865, became connected with the railroad business in 1868, was rapidly promoted, married Jennie Malissa Smith (1857- ,) was the general manager of the Saint Paul & Manitoba RailRoad in the mid 1880's, was the assistant general manager of the Great Northern RailRoad between 1888 and 1889, was the general manager of the Montana Central RailRoad, became the general manager of the Minneapolis & St. Louis railway in 1894, was the general manager of the Oregon Railroad and Navigation Company, served in an executive position with the Portland and Asiatic Steamship Company, served in an executive position with the Ilwaco Railway and Navigation Company, served in an executive position with Oregon Short Line RailRoad, retired as the president of the Union Pacific Railroad in 1918, and died in Chicago, Illinois. Adam Leonides Mohler and Jennie Malissa Smith Mohler were the parents of Anna Marie Mohler and Ruth Malissa Mohler. A. C. Heath was an assistant in diseases of the nose and throat at the University of Minnesota Medical School in 1898, was the author of the article "A Simple Contrivance For The Relief Of Hay Fever" in the Journal of the American Medical Association in 1906, was promoted from clinical instructor in diseases of the nose and throat to clinical professor of the diseases of the nose and throat at the University of Minnesota Medical School in 1909, authored the article "A New Modification of an Old Adenotome" in The Laryngoscope in 1914, officed at the Lowry Building in 1914, and also was a member of the first medical staff at the Charles T. Miller Hospital in 1920. Mrs. A. C. Heath and Miss Amelia Ames assisted in the donation of a portrait of James M. Goodhue to the Minnesota Historical Society by his daughter, Mrs. Eve Goodhue Tarbox, in 1920. The Minneapolis & St. Louis RailRoad, organized by Henry Titus Welles and William Drew Washburn, was a small railroad that ran between the Twin Cities and Peoria, Illinois, used the official slogan "Peoria Gateway," and gained the unofficial nickname when it still had a passenger service "Midnight and Still Later." The railroad initially had branch lines in Iowa and South Dakota. The Minneapolis & St. Louis RailRoad was incorporated in Minneapolis in 1870, merged operations with the Iowa Central RailRoad, incorporated in 1866, in 1901, absorbed the Wisconsin, Minnesota & Pacific Railroad in 1899, formally purchased the Iowa Central RailRoad in 1912, absorbed some other small rail lines in 1916, went into receivership in 1923, abandoned several branch lines in the 1930's, began the conversion to diesel engines in 1938, reorganized in 1942 after the longest receivership in Class I railroad history, purchased the Minnesota Western RailRoad in 1956, renamed the Minnesota Western RailRoad as the Minneapolis Industrial Railroad in 1959, and was absorbed into the Chicago & North Western RailRoad in 1960. Lucie J. Heath ( -1925) died in Ramsey County. Arthur C. Heath ( -1930 died in Wright County, Minnesota. [See note on Lucius Pond Ordway for 400 Summit Avenue.] [See note on the Great Northern RailRoad.]

513-515 Portland Avenue: Edward Duffield Neill House; Built in 1890 (1881 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Classical Revival in style. The structure is a two story, 5717 square foot, ten bedroom, three bathroom, asbestos-sided duplex. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. The 1887 city directory indicates that Rev. and Mrs. Norman Seaver resided at 513 Portland Avenue and Rev. and Mrs. Edward D. Neill and their daughter all resided at 515 Portland Avenue. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Russell W. Berthel resided at 515 Portland Avenue from 1899 to 1922. The 1900 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Wilbur H. Howard and their daughter, Wilbur K. Howard, and Mrs. Helen B. Schenck all resided at 513 Portland Avenue. Little Sketches of Big Folks indicates that Wilbur H. Howard resided at 513 Portland Avenue in 1907. The 1910-1911 Directory of the University of Minnesota indicates that Marion Hastings Brown, a student, resided at this address. The 1914 city directory indicates that Dr. and Mrs. R. W. Berthel resided at 515 Portland Avenue. The 1918 city directory indicates that Dr. and Mrs. R. W. Berthel resided at 515 Portland Avenue. The 1920 city directory indicates that Russell W. Berthel, a partner with Joseph F. Shellman in the dental practice of Berthel & Shellman, located at the Lowry Building, resided 515 Portland Avenue. The 1930 city directory indicates that Grenville W. Baker, an agent for the Aetna Life Insurance Company, and his wife, Annie Baker, resided at 513 Portland Avenue and that Edmund S. Foley resided at 515 Portland Avenue. Edward Duffield Neill (1823-1893) was born at Philadelphia, was a student at Amherst and Andover from 1842 to 1844, was a Presbyterian home missionary in Illinois from 1847 to 1848, was a Presbyterian minister in St. Paul from 1849 to 1860, was the founder of churches in Minnesota, the state superintendent of education and the chancellor of the University of Minnesota from 1858 to 1861, was the chaplain of the First Minnesota Volunteer Infantry and of the Philadelphia hospitals from 1861 to 1864, was the private secretary to Presidents Abraham Lincoln and Andrew Johnson from 1864 to 1866, was the American consul at Dublin, Ireland from 1869 to 1871, was the president of and a professor of history and literature at Macalester College from 1873 to 1893, and was the author ofRailways in their higher aspects/a discourse delivered by Edward D. Neill, June 11, 1854, The history of Minnesota, published in Philadelphia by J. B. Lippincott & Co. in 1858, Dahkotah land and Dahkotah life: with the history of the fur traders of the extreme Northwest during the French and British dominions, published in Philadelphia by J. B. Lippincott & Company in 1859, Terra Mari�, or, Threads of Maryland colonial history, published in Philadelphia by J. B. Lippincott & Co. in 1867, The Fairfaxes of England and America in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries: including letters from and to Hon. William Fairfax, president of Council of Virginia, and his sons Col. George William Fairfax and Rev. Bryan, eighth Lord Fairfax, the neighbors and friends of George Washington, published in Albany, New York by J. Munsell in 1868, Early days of the Presbyterian branch of the Holy Catholic Church in the state of Minnesota, published in Minneapolis by Johnson & Smith in 1873, John Neill of Lewes, Delaware, 1739, and his descendants, published in Philadelphia in a private printing for the family in 1875, Notes on American history, published in Boston by D. Clapp in 1876, History of Dakota County and the city of Hastings: including the Explorers and pioneers of Minnesota, published in Minneapolis by the North Star Publishing Company in 1881, The history of Minnesota: from the earliest French explorations to the present time, published in Minneapolis by the Minnesota Historical Company in 1883, Virginia vetusta, during the reign of James the First. Containing letters and documents never before printed. A supplement to the History of the Virginia Company, published in Albany, New York, by J. Munsell's Sons in 1885, Matthew Wilson, D.D., of Lewis, Delaware, published in Philadelphia in 1888, The development of trade on Lake Superior and its tributaries during the French regime, published in Saint Paul by The Pioneer Press Company in 1890, and The ideal versus the real Benjamin Franklin published in St. Paul by the Department of History, Literature and Political Science of Macalester College in 1892. Neill also was the editor of Glimpses of the nation's struggle: a series of papers read before the Minnesota Commandery of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States, published in St. Paul by the St. Paul Book and Stationery Company, H. L. Collins Co., Review Pub. Co., and Aug. Davis from 1887 to 1909. Neill was the founder of Macalester College, was chaplain of the First Minnesota Regiment during the Civil War (mustered in on April 29, 1861, and mustered out on July 13, 1862,) and served in a diplomatic post in Dublin, Ireland, from 1869 to 1870. Russell W. Berthel (1867-1958) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Rasel, and died in Ramsey County. Wilbur H. Howard (1847- ,) the son of John F. Howard and Jane L. Spaulding Howard, was born in Benson, Vermont, was educated in Brandon, Vermont, from 1861 until 1862, was educated in Castleton, Vermont, from 1863 until 1864, was engaged in the retail dry goods business in Faribault, Minnesota, for three years, married Ada A. Kimball in 1869, was associated with Dyer & Howard from 1871 until 1885, moved to St. Paul in 1872, was associated with Howard, Farwell & Company from 1890 until 1895, resided in Minneapolis in 1896, was associated with Watson & Howard from 1897 until 1905, was associated with Ware, Hospes & Company after 1905, was a member of the board of directors of the St. Paul Chamber of Commerce for 20 years, resided at 12 Summit Court in 1891, and officed at the Germania Life Building in the real estate and loan businesses. Wilbur Howard (1924-1980) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Howard, and died in Ramsey County. Grenville W. Baker ( -1954) died in Ramsey County. Annie MacMillan Baker (1884-1967) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Todd, and died in Ramsey County. Edmund S. Foley (1896-1977) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Rogers, and died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are David C. Coen and Joann K. Coen, who reside in Mendota Heights, Minnesota. Peterka House is located at this address. Little Sketches of Big Folks indicates that Albert Cheney Heath resided at the nearby former 516 Portland Avenue. The 1930 city directory indicates that Albert C. Heath, Sr., a physician who officed at 350 St. Peter Street, his wife, Ray Heath, Albert C. Heath, Jr., a supervisor at the Pioneer Building, and Eve Heath, a student, all resided at the former nearby 516 Portland Avenue. Albert Cheney Heath (1868- ,) the son of Albert Hayford Heath and Lucy Jane Simonds Heath, was born in Auburn, Maine, graduated from the Friends Academy, New Bedford, Massachusetts, in 1887, graduated from Dartmouth College in 1891, graduated from the Medical School of the University of Minnesota in 1894, was a physician and surgeon, was the house surgeon at the St. Paul City Hospital in 1895, engaged in post-graduate study in Heidelberg, Germany, Freiburg, Germany, London, England, Paris, France, and Edinburgh, Scotland, from 1904 until 1905, was a member of the Ramsey County medical society, was a member of the Minnesota State medical society, was a member of the American Medical Association, was a member of the Minnesota Academy of Medicine, was the laryngologist and otologist of the Northern Pacific Railway Company, was a member of the Minnesota Club, was a member of the Town & Country Clubs, and officed at the Lowry Arcade in 1907. Albert Heath ( -1942) died in Hennepin County.

512 Portland Avenue: Built in 1900; Queen Anne in style. The structure is a two story, 2842 square foot, four bedroom, two bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage. The house is on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the Summit Hill Historic District. The 1920 city directory indicates that Martin S. Chandler, an editor employed by West Publishing Company, resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that this address was vacant. The 1939 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Samuel H. Morgan (1911- ,) who was born in Duluth, Minnesota, who attended the school from 1922 until 1929, who was a 1933 graduate of Harvard University, who was a 1936 graduate of the Harvard University Law School, who was a Choate Law Club, and who was a lawyer with the law firm of Kellogg, Morgan, Chase, Carter, & Headley, resided at this address. Samuel H. Morgan married Natalie Peterson in Hingham, Massachusetts, in 1935 and the couple had one child, Jonathan Morgan (1938- .) The current owners of record of the property are Darlene M. McCain and Donovan L. McCain, Jr., who reside at 2156 Goodrich Avenue. Donovan L. McCain, LLC, is located at 801 Nicollet Mall #1900, Minneapolis. Donovan L. McCain, Jr., also owns 838 West Lincoln Avenue, the Kresko Apartments. Donovan L. McCain, Jr., was a financial supporter of the Minnesota Medical Foundation in 2004.

506 Portland Avenue: Christopher D. O'Brien House; Built in 1887 (1893 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Colonial Revival in style. The structure is a two story, 4079 square foot, six bedroom, four bathroom, frame house. The house is on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the Summit Hill Historic District. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Christopher D. O'Brien resided at this address from 1896 to 1951. In 1896, a wooden fence and rubbish fire occurred at this address on property owned by C. D. O'Brien. The 1900 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. D. O'Brien, their daughter, and R. D. O'Brien all resided at this address. The 1902 University of Minnesota Alumni Record indicates that Richard D. O'Brien, a 1900 graduate and an attorney at law, resided at this address. The 1909 University of Minnesota Catalogue indicates that Christopher D. O'Brien, a lecturer on criminal procedure, resided at this address. The 1910-1911 Directory of the University of Minnesota indicates that Gerald R. O'Brien, a student, resided at this address. The 1914 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. D. O'Brien, A. C. O'Brien, C. S. O'Brien, G. R. O'Brien, and C. S. O'Brien all resided at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. D. O'Brien, A. C. O'Brien, and G. R. O'Brien all resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mrs. C. D. O'Brien and A. C. O'Brien both resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Christopher D. O'Brien, Jr., the Ramsey County attorney, and his wife, Mary O'Brien, resided at this address. Christopher D. O'Brien, who was born in Ireland, was the mayor of St. Paul from 1883 to 1885. In 1909, Christopher D. O�Brien was the president of Governor John Albert Johnson Memorial Commission, established by executive order by Governor Adolph O. Eberhart to administer and direct the funding and the construction of a memorial honoring the late Governor John Johnson and resulting in the erection of a statue at the capitol building in 1912 and a replica statue in St. Peter, Minnesota, in 1913. The 1891, 1893, and 1895 city directories indicate that Hon. and Mrs. C. D. O'Brien and their daughter all resided at 212 McBoal Street. Christopher D. O'Brien was the son of Dillon O'Brien, was one of three brothers in the family who were lawyers trained in the English-controlled courts in Ireland, was the second of St. Paul's Irish-born mayors, and actually used the police to enforce vice and other city ordinances rather than attempting to control. The 1930 city directory indicates that Gerald R. O'Brien, a partner with Ellsworth Bushnell in O'Brien & Bushnell, a manufacturer's agent, and his wife, Helen P. O'Brien, resided at 865 Fairmount Avenue. Gerald R. O'Brien ( -1949,) the son of Christopher Dillon O'Brien and Susan E. Slater O'Brien, married Helen Perkins (1895-1980,) who was a member of the St. Paul Women's Institute, a member of the St. Paul Junior League, and an employee of the Shuneman-Dayton-Hudson Department Store, and the couple had five children, Sarah O'Brien Driscoll, Susan O'Brien Soucheray, Geraldine O'Brien Finneren, Gerald R. O'Brien, Jr., and William P. O'Brien. Richard D. O'Brien (1874- ,) the son of Christopher D. O'Brien and Susan E. Slater O'Brien, was born in St. Paul, was educated in St. Paul public schools, graduated from the University of Minnesota Law School, enlisted in the 14th Minnesota Regiment in 1898 during the Spanish-American War, was a second lieutenant, was a member of the Minnesota National Guard for 13 years, was admitted to the practice of law in Minnesota in 1900, married Edith L. Clements in 1906, was engaged in gen practice of law, was a member of the law firm of C. D. O'Brien & Thomas D. O' Brien, was a member of the St. Paul city council for two terms, was elected the Ramsey County Attorney in 1906, and officed at the Globe Building in 1907. Christopher D. O'Brien ( -1922) died in Ramsey County. Arnold C. O'Brien (1908-1972) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Derry, and died in Ramsey County. Arthur C. O'Brien (1878-1974) was born in Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is Jason T. Patalonis. Jason Patalonis, with Jill Bernett, authored "Japanese Gardening Minnesota-Style" in Minnesota Horticulturist in 1996. In 1996, Jason Patalonis appealled a decision of the St. Paul Heritage Preservation Commission denying approval of the installation of sliding glass doors at the rear of the building at this address. Paul Kranz and Jason Patalonis were financial supporters of One Voice Mixed Chorus in 2006 and Clare Housing in 2007. Jason Patalonis was a financial supporter of Theatre de la Jeune Lune in 2003 and of Cretin Derham Hall High School in 2006.

502 Portland Avenue: Peter Baldy House; Built in 1892; Georgian Revival in style. The structure is a two story, 4150 square foot, five bedroom, one bathroom, one half-bathroom, asbestos-sided house. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Peter Baldy resided at this address from 1893 to 1944. The 1900 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. P. Baldy and their daughters and Fred C. Baldy all resided at this address. The 1914 city directory indicates that Mrs. Peter Baldy and her daughters and F. C. Baldy all resided at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that the Misses Baldy resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Mary K. Baldy and Sarah E. Baldy both resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that the Misses Baldy resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mary Baldy resided at this address. Peter Baldy (1830- ,) the son of Peter Baldy and Sarah Hurley Baldy, was born in Danville, Pennsylvania, was educated at the Danville, Pennsylvania, Academy, was a merchant in Danville, Pennsylvania, from 1852 until 1884, serve briefly in the American Civil War during an emergency call-up to repulse a Confederate Army raid, was the president of the Co-operative Iron & Steel Company of Danville, Pennsylvania, for several years, moved to St. Paul in 1884, was state agent of the Pennsylvania Mutual Life Insurance Company from 1884 until 1892, and was district agent for the National Life Insurance Company of Vermont from 1892 until 1907. Peter Baldy was one of a number of St. Paul residents who were members of the Protestant Episcopalian Church Club and attended the general convention of the church held at Gethsemane Church in Minneapolis in 1893, along with John Q. Adams, J. H. Ames, S. C. M. Appleby, R. B. C. Bement, George B. Edgerton, Major John Espy, John Farrington, H. H. Galusha, Charles J. Ingles, Thomas Irvine, James I. Jellett, W. H. Lightner, Hon. W. R. Merriam, Harvey Officer, Frank O. Osborne, E, W. Peet, T. L. Schurmeier, H. F. Steves, W. S. Timberlake, Harry Warner, Melva J. Wilgus, and W. H. Yardley. Mary Pauline Baldy (1888-1975) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Fautsch, and died in Wright County, Minnesota. The current owners of record of the property are Sona T. Plummer and William H. Plummer, Jr.

501 Portland Avenue: A. Messer House; Built in 1880 (1895 according to the National Register of Historic Places;) Georgian Revival in style. The structure is a two story, 3351 square foot, six bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided house, with a detached garage. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Russell M. Berthel resided at this address from 1923 to 1958. The 1924 city directory indicates that Dr. and Mrs. R. W. Berthel and Mrs. A. C. Messer all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Russell W. Berthel, a salesman, resided at this address. Russell W. Berthel (1867-1958) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Rasel, and died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are James H. Nicklas and Janet L. Nicklas. J. H. Nicklas Company and Sun Stop are located at this address.

496 Portland Avenue: Caroline Gotzian House; Built in 1884 (1900 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Georgian Revival in style. The structure is a two story, 7003 square foot, seven bedroom, three bathroom, one half-bathroom, brick house, with a detached garage. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that James B. Beals resided at this address from 1878 to 1901. The 1885 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Beals resided at this address and that James B. Beals was associated with Hon. Samuel J. McMillan, U. S. Senator, in the law firm of McMillan & Beals, located in the Gilfillan Block. The 1887 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Beals resided at this address. The 1897 Catalogue of the Legal Fraternity of Phi Delta Phi, edited by George Anthony Katzenberger and published by the Inland Press of Ann Arbor, Michigan, indicates that Frederick Carroll Baldy, an 1895 graduate of the University of Minnesota, resided at this address. The 1900 city directory indicates that Mrs. S. J. R. McMillan and Mrs. J. B. Beals both resided at this address. In 1916, Cyrus P. Brown was a member of the Minnesota Historical Society and resided at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. P. Brown, their daughter, and C. P. Brown, Jr., all resided at this address. Cyrus P. Brown, Jr., and Edward C. Brown were World War I veterans who resided at this address in 1919. The 1919 History of the Field Artillery Central Officers Training School indicates that Edward C. Brown resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. P. Brown and C. P. Brown, Jr., all resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Cyrus P. Brown, the president of the First National Bank, and Cyrus P. Brown, Jr., a vice president of the Northwestern Trust Company, both resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Cyrus P. Brown and his wife, Fannie E. Brown, resided at this address. The 1939 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Philip Wright Fitzpatrick (1895- ,) who was born in St. Paul, who attended the school from 1908 until 1912, who graduated from Cornell University, who was a pilot in the Aviation Corps in France during World War I as well as serving as a First Lieutenant in the Aviation Section of the Signal Corps, 89th Aero Squadron and was gassed, married Kathleen Skinner of Boston, was the vice president of Chemical Plastics, Inc. at the Pioneer Building, and had carpentry and carping as hobbies, resided at this address. The 1950 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Philip W. Fitzpatrick (1895- ,) who was born in St. Paul, who attended the school from 1908 until 1912, who graduated from Cornell University in 1917, who was a pilot and First Lieutenant in the 89th Aero Squadron of the American Expeditionary Force and was gassed during World War I, who was the president of the West Virginia Coal & Transportation Company, who was the president of the St. Paul Science Museum, and who engaged in the hobbies of carpentry and carping, resided at this address. Cyrus P. Brown was the president of First National Bank of St. Paul, was a member of the board of the Citizen's Alliance of Ramsey & Dakota Counties, and was a member in 1919 of the board of trustees of the Automobile Mutual Insurance Company of America, located in Providence, Rhode Island. In 1915, Cyrus P. Brown was an investor, with Ralph C. Emery, Ralph C. Watrous, and Melville Eastham and O. Kerro Luscomb, in the General Radio Company in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Philip W. Fitzpatrick married Kathleen Skinner in Boston in 1920 and the couple had four children, Joseph Taylor Fitzpatrick (1924- ,) Charlotte Kathleen Fitzpatrick (1927- ,) Sara Ann Fitzpatrick (1930- ,) and Phyllis Ingoldsby Fitzpatrick (1933- ,) and two grandsons. Samuel J. R. McMillan was a Republican and was a U. S. Senator from Minnesota from 1875 to 1887. Samuel James Renwick McMillan (1826-1897) was born in Brownsville, Fayette County, Pennsylvania, graduated from Duquesne College/Western University of Pennsylvania, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in 1846, studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1849 and commenced the practice of law in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, moved to St. Paul in 1852, then moved to Stillwater, Minnesota, in 1854, returned to St. Paul in 1856, was judge of the first judicial district from 1858 to 1864, was a second lieutenant in the Stillwater Frontier Guards during the Dakota Conflict of 1862, was an associate justice of the Minnesota Supreme Court from 1864 until his resignation in 1874, was chief justice of the Minnesota Supreme Court from 1874 until 1875, was elected by the Minnesota Legislature, as a compromise candidate after a long and bitter fight between Alexander Ramsey, the incumbent, and Democrat-People's AntiMonopolist Party candidate Ignatius Donnelly (1831�1901,) as a Republican to the United States Senate in 1875 and served until 1887, was a member of the Committee of Revision of the Confession of Faith of the Presbyterian Church, was a trustee of the State Reform School, was subsequently a lawyer until his death in St. Paul, and was buried in Oakland Cemetery. After national scandals involving Credit Mobilier of America/Union Pacific RailRoad and William M. "Boss" Tweed and local financial related scandals involving the State Treasurer, William Seeger, and the State Auditor, Charles McIlrath, Republican office holders, the Minnesota Republican Party was beginning to lose its hold on Minnesota government in 1873, reflected in the re-election failure of Alexander Ramsey, who subsequently was appointed Secretary of War by President Rutherford B. Hayes in 1879. In 1880, McMillan sponsored, with Senator John A. Logan of Illinois, a Senate Resolution that permitted the Secretary of the Navy to designate a ship free of charge to transport charitable contributions to Ireland. Philip Wright Fitzpatrick and Kathleen Skinner Fitzpatrick had four children, Joseph Taylor Fitzpatrick (1924- ,) Charlotte Kathleen Fitzpatrick (1927- ,) Sara Ann Fitzpatrick (1930- ,) and Phyllis Ingoldsby Fitzpatrick (1933- .) Caroline Gotzian ( -1913) died in Ramsey County. Cyrus Perrin Brown (1892-1960) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Chadsey, and died in Ramsey County. James B. Beals ( -1932) and Fannie Brown ( -1945) both died in Hennepin County. Edward Clevland Brown ( -1973) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Chadsey, and died in Ramsey County. The last sale of this property was in 1996 and the sale price was $455,000. The current owners of record of the property are James G. Keane and David T. Pizzuto. James G. Keane is a realtor with Edina Realty. David T. Pizzuto, M.D., is an anesthesiologist and was a member of the faculty of the Anesthesiology Department of the Medical School at the University of Minnesota in 1999.

493-495 Portland Avenue: John W. Cunningham House/Fred R. Bigelow House; Built in 1904 (1909 according to Ramsey County property tax records, 1910 according to Larry Millett;) Tudor Revival in style; Thomas Holyoke, architect. The structure is a two story, 5525 square foot, nine bedroom, five bathroom, one half-bathroom, brick house, with a detached garage. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. The 1885 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Cunningham resided at 495 Portland Avenue and that John W. Cunningham was associated with J. W. Cunningham & Company, a printing company. The 1887 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Cunningham and their daughter all resided at 495 Portland Avenue. The 1900 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Cunningham and their daughters all resided at 495 Portland Avenue. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that John W. Cunningham and Walter C. Cunningham both resided at this address in 1906. In 1907, John W. Cunningham resided at this address. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Fred R. Bigelow resided at this address from 1909 to 1953 and that the building was divided into two addresses in the mid-1950's, with the former building at 495 Portland Avenue, built in the 1870's, having been razed in the late 1920's. The 1914 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. F. R. Bigelow resided at 493 Portland Avenue and that Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Cunningham and their daughters and Dr. and Mrs. E. C. Eshelby all resided at 495 Portland Avenue. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Lillian Agnes Cunningham (1850-1918,) the wife of John W. Cunningham, who was born in New York to parents born in the United States and who died of a cerebral hemorrhage, resided at 495 Portland Avenue in 1918. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. F. R. Bigelow resided at 493 Portland Avenue and that Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Cunningham and his daughters all resided at 495 Portland Avenue. The 1920 city directory indicates that Fred R. Bigelow, the president of the St. Paul Fire & Marine Insurance Company, resided at 493 Portland Avenue and that John W. Cunningham resided at 495 Portland Avenue. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that John W. Cunningham (1839-1924,) the widower father of Edith Cunningham, who was born in Ohio to parents born in the United States and who died of c. myocarditis, resided at this address in 1924. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. F. R. Bigelow resided at 493 Portland Avenue and that J. W. Cunningham and his daughter both resided at 495 Portland Avenue. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Alice Fraser Bigelow (1876-1926,) the wife of Fred R. Bigelow, who was born in Canada to parents born in Canada and who died of a cerebral hemorrhage, resided at 493 Portland Avenue in 1926. The 1930 city directory indicates that Frederic R. Bigelow, president of the St. Paul Fire & Marine Insurance Company, and Eileen Bigelow resided at 493 Portland Avenue. John Wesley Cunningham (1838-1924,) the son of Dr. William Cunningham and Nancy Cummings Cunningham, was born in Harrison County, Ohio, graduated from the Ohio Wesleyan University in 1861, was a member of the Sigma Chi fraternity, graduated from the Ohio State and Union Law College, Cleveland, Ohio, in 1862, was admitted to the practice of law in Ohio in 1862, practiced law in Steubenville, Ohio, from 1862 until 1863, moved to St. Paul in 1863, was employed as a cashier by D. W. Ingersoll & Company from 1863 until 1865, was the city editor of the St. Paul Press from 1865 until 1867, founded and operated the Cunningham Brothers Stationery Company from 1867 until 1873, married Lillian Agnes Smith (1850-1918) of Buffalo, New York, in 1869, was a partner in Ramaley & Cunningham, a printing company, from 1873 until 1882, was the head of J. W. Cunningham & Company from 1882 until 1900, operated a real estate and loan company after 1900, resided at this address in 1907, officed at the Manhattan Building in 1907, married Mary Virginia Hart in 1921, and resided in Coalinga, California, in 1921. Mary Virginia Hart, a nurse, was a member of the Class of 1911 of the Illinois Training School for Nurses in Chicago. Frederic Russell Bigelow (1870- ,) the son of Charles Henry Bigelow and Alida Wood Lyman Bigelow, was born in St. Paul, was educated in the St. Paul public schools, graduated from Williams College, Williams, Massachusetts, in 1891, was first employed in the insurance business in 1891 as a clerk with the St. Paul Fire and Marine Insurance Company, moved up the ranks with the St. Paul Fire and Marine Insurance Company to bookkeeper, marine secretary, and assistance secretary, married Harriet Alice Fraser in Richmond, Quebec, Canada, in 1903, and subsequently married Virginia Dousman, was the vice president of the St. Paul Fire & Marine Insurance Company in 1907, was the fourth president of St. Paul Fire & Marine Company, an insurance company subsequently known as The St. Paul Companies, Inc., and now The Travelers Insurance Company, resided at 416 Laurel Avenue in 1907, was a member of the Minnesota Club, was a member of the University Club of New York, was one of the organizers of the St. Paul Community Chest in 1920, and served on the board of the National Citizen's Committee for Welfare and Relief Mobilization during the Great Depression, was a member of the Minnesota Historical Society, was a member of the Chi Psi fraternity, was a member of the St. Paul Town & Country Club, was a member of the White Bear Yacht Club, officed at Third Street and Jackson Street in 1907, and resided at 416 Laurel Avenue in 1907. Frederic Russell Bigelow and Harriet Alice Fraser Bigelow were the parents of Eileen Bigelow (1905-1982,) Hortense Bigelow (Mrs. Henry Orin) Ingram (1906-1928,) and Frederic Russell Bigelow, Jr. (1910-1927.) Frederick R. Bigelow was a member of the board of directors of the Citizen's Alliance in 1920, a panel that included such leading businessmen as Charles W. Ames of the Public Safety Commission, E. S. Warner, one of the founders of the Minnesota Employer's Association, M. W. Waldorf of Waldorf Paper Products Company, W. O. Washburn of American Hoist & Derrick Company, C. G. Roth of the St. Paul Hotel, J. G. Ordway of Crane Company of Minnesota, and Leslie Gedney of Gedney Pickles. Hortense Bigelow (Mrs. Hank) Ingram was the daughter of Frederic Bigelow. The F. R. Bigelow Foundation was formed in 1946 as a way to channel the philanthropy of Frederic Russell Bigelow and his family. Bigelow shared his time and money with the community in both good times in bad and served on boards and committees of many other charitable organizations until his death. The Bigelow Foundation, a precursor to the current F. R. Bigelow Foundation, was incorporated in 1938, the year Frederic stepped down as St. Paul Fire & Marine Insurance Company's president. The Foundation was formed to "promote the well-being of mankind" and was chaired by C. F. Codere, Bigelow's friend and successor at St. Paul Fire & Marine. As Bigelow intended, the Foundation was created to improve the local community through organizations such as the Community Chest, Macalester College, the YMCA and YWCA, and the St. Paul Academy. With tax reform in the 1960's, outside administrators were brought in, and the F. R. Bigelow Foundation eventually became a client of Minnesota Foundation, the Minnesota Foundation eventually became affiliated with The Saint Paul Foundation, and now, the F. R. Bigelow Foundation is a client of The Saint Paul Foundation. During the early 1970's, F. R. Bigelow Foundation board members also decided to spread investments beyond the stock of The St. Paul Companies, Inc., to secure the Foundation's future. O. H. "Orrin" Ingram (1830-1918) founded Dole, Ingram, & Kennedy, a lumber business in the Chippewa Valley, in 1857, began business dealings with Frederick Weyerhaeuser in 1881, and organized the O. H. Ingram Company in 1906. O. H. "Hank" Ingram ( -1963) formed the Wood River Oil and Refining Company in 1938, established the Wood River Oil Barge Company in 1942, and established the Ingram Barge Company in 1954. Ingram Barge Company is the leading carrier on America's inland waterways with nearly 4,000 barges and over 100 linehaul vessels and operates on the Mississippi, Ohio, Cumberland, Tennessee, Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, Kanawha, Illinois, and Monongahela rivers. John Wesley Cunningham ( -1924,) Alice Fraser Bigelow ( -1927,) and Frederic Russell Bigelow ( -1946) all died in Ramsey County. Dr. Ezra C. Eshelby (1864-1961) was born outside of Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. Eileen Bigelow (1905-1982) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Fraser, and died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Katherine L. O'Reilly and Jack Dickson Stewart, Jr. Historic Hill Homes is located at this address. Northland Organic Foods Corporation, a broker of organic and non-GMO grains, soybeans, flour meals, oils, and exports to Japan and Europe and a supplier of organic soybean seed, is located at this address. Peter Shortridge, CEO of Northland Organic, was a financial contributor to the Barack Obama for President campaign in 2008. [See note on Holyoke for 500 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Charles Bigelow, Frederic Bigelow, and the St. Paul Fire & Marine Insurance Company for 530 Grand Hill.] [See note for the Citizens Alliance for 216 Ann Street.]


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This webpage was last updated on August 9, 2011.