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RailRoads in Minnesota, Part II

RailRoads in Minnesota, Part II

Assembled by

Lawrence A. Martin

Webpage creation: April 28, 2010

Wabasha Street RailRoad was incorporated in 1883 by M. E. Drury, L. M. Gregg, S. S. Kepler, James G. Lawrence, F. N. Milligan, John Schwirtz, and A. D. Southworth to build a street railway in Wabasha, Minnesota. It had initial capital stock of $25,000 and its principal place of business was Wabasha, Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1883. M. E. Drury (1840- ) was born in County Kerry, Ireland, emigrated to the United States in 1853, resided in New York in 1853, came to Wabasha, Minnesota, in 1857, was employed in the lumber trade for 26 years, began lumber contracting in 1867, coupling rafts at this point for the Eau Claire, Wisconsin, Lumber Company, was a lumberman in the lumber raft towing business with Peter Kirns, as Drury & Kirns, was the president of the First National Bank of Wabasha, Minnesota in 1884, was the president of the People’s Bank of Wabasha, Minnesota, in 1903. Lyman M. Gregg prospected for mineral claims in Oakwood Township, Minnesota, in 1855, but did not settle in Oakwood Township, Minnesota, in 1855, was the treasurer of Wabasha County, Minnesota, from 1857 until 1859, was the marshal of Wabasha, Minnesota, in 1858, was the sheriff of Wabasha County, Minnesota, from 1880 until 1882, married Wilhelmina Holzer, and was the proprietor of the Merchant’s Hotel in Wabasha, Minnesota. Sylvester S.? Kepler (1833- ,) the son of William Kepler and Elizabeth Kepler, was born near Meadville, Crawford County, Pennsylvania, was a store clerk, came to LaCrosse, Wisconsin, in 1855, came to Wabasha, Minnesota, in 1856, was a clerk for the mercantile house of H. S. Allen & Company, lumbermen on the Chippewa, selling general merchandise and lumber, became the interim manager of the business upon the death of W. H. Creamer in 1856, entered business on his own in Wabasha, Minnesota, in 1857, was the partner of W. S. Jackson (1832-1882) until 1876, was the secretary and a member of the board of directors of the Zumbro, Minnesota, Lead Mining Company in 1865, was the unsuccessful Democratic candidate for the Minnesota House of Representatives in 1866, married Catherine “Kate” McDougall in 1868, invested in land in Wabasha, Minnesota, moved to Eau Claire, Wisconsin, in 1876, became the co-owner, with G. O. Mills ( -1881,) and editor of the Eau Claire News, later partnered with W. S. Cobban in owning the Eau Claire News, sold the newspaper to Fred W. A. Pauley and M. A. Pauley in 1888, and was the receiver of public monies at the U. S. Land Office at Eau Claire, Wisconsin, in 1885. James Gardner Lawrence (1836-1928) was born in New York, came to Minnesota in 1862, was a farmer, resided in Lake City, Minnesota, in 1873, married Alice Gilman Wyman (1853-1930,) the daughter of Charles Dexter Wyman, was a member of the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Wabasha County, Minnesota (District 15,) from 1873 until 1875, was a member of the board of county commissioners of Wabasha County, Minnesota, in 1874, resided in Wabasha, Minnesota, in 1880, was a member of the Minnesota Senate representing Wabasha County, Minnesota (Districts 15 and 23,) from 1880 until 1887, was an incorporator of and the president of the Wabasha Roller Mill Company, incorporated in 1882, the successor of the Downer & Lowth mill, established in 1872, was an incorporator of the Bank of Wabasha, Minnesota in 1881, was the mayor of Wabasha, Minnesota, was a member of the Minnesota State Board of Equalization, organized the R. E. Jones Company in 1888 with R. E. Jones, which installed the electric light plant and was engaged in the buying of grain and produce and which was incorporated in 1889, was the president of the R. E. Jones Company in 1896, when his interest was sold to H. J. O'Neill, and was a warden of Grace Episcopal Church of Wabasha, Minnesota. Dr. Francis Henry Milligan (1830-1888) was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, moved to St. Louis, Missouri, with his parents in 1835, graduated from the St. Louis, Missouri, high school in 1846, graduated from the Jefferson Medical College of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1851, practiced medicine in St. Louis, Missouri, from 1851 until 1853, moved to Wabasha County, Minnesota, in 1853, married Lucy Ann Bailly (1835-1865,) the daughter of Alexis C. Bailly and Lucy Anne Faribault Bailly, in 1853, was the first regularly graduated physician in Wabasha County, Minnesota, was sheriff of Wabasha County, Minnesota, in 1854, was the Register of Deeds of Wabasha County, Minnesota, in 1855, was the assistant surgeon of the Third Minnesota Infantry from 1861 until 1862, was a Democrat, was the publisher, with John W. Tyson, of the shortlived Federal Constitution in 1864, was the assistant surgeon of the Tenth Minnesota Infantry from 1864 until 1865, married S. D. Abrams in 1866, was the medical partner of Dr. E. A. Tupper, assisted at the organization of the Minnesota State Medical Society in 1868, was the president of the Wabasha County Medical Society in 1869, and was thepresident of the Minnesota State Medical Society from 1876 until 1877. John Schwirtz (1835-1908) was born in Luxembourg, emigrated to America in 1855, moved to Wabasha County, Minnesota, initially farmed outside of Wabasha, Minnesota, married Marie Antonia Tritsch (1839 - 1876) in 1858, engaged in the hardware, general merchandise, farming tools, and machinery business, married Ellsa Hoppe Duke (1833-1887,), the former Mrs. John Duke, married Marie Voightlander (1846-1934,) was one of the incorporators of the Wabasha Building & Loan Association in 1883, and died either in Duluth, Minnesota, or in Wabasha, Minnesota. Ashahel Dimmick Southworth (1829-1904) was born in Oneida county, New York, worked on the farm, attended and taught school until 1853, moved to Illinois in 1853, was employed on the survey and construction of the Illinois Central RailRoad until 1855, moved to Lodi, Illinois, in 1855, was engaged in surveying and real estate until 1862, married Dorcas Hackley (1829-1864) in 1857, then was the deputy collector and inspector of liquors for the seventh Internal Revenue District of Illinois until 1870, married Mary J. Southworth, the daughter of George Addison Southworth and Cornelia Bowen Southworth, in 1865, moved to Wabasha County, Minnesota, in 1870, settled on a thirteen acre parcel, owned several farms in the Redwood Falls, Minnesota, area, partnered with W. F. Florer ( -1881) to establish the exchange bank of A. D. Southworth & Company in 1872, converted that firm into the Bank of Wabasha, Minnesota, in 1881, moved to Northfield, Minnesota, in 1892, and died in Northfield, Minnesota.

Wadena & Park Rapids RailRoad was incorporated in 1883 by William R. Baumbach, E. S. Case, William Crooks, James B. Cutler, Charles A. Gilman, John R. Miller, Frank C. Rice, Gilbert H. Rice, Hermann Trott, and I. A. Wolverton to build a single track or double track railway from Wadena, Hubbard County, Minnesota, to Park Rapids, Hubbard County, Minnesota. It engaged in preliminary surveying of a route in 1884 and proposed completion of the rail line in 1885. It had initial capital stock of $1,000,000 and its principal place of business was Wadena, Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1881, operated in 1891, and was succeeded by the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba RailRoad. William R. Baumbach (1849-1933,) the son of William von Baumbach, a physician, and Augusta Hoffman Baumbach, was born in Racine, Wisconsin, moved with his family to Mendota, Illinois, attended public schools in Mendota, Illinois, served in the 132nd Illinois Regiment in 1864 during the American Civil War, married Jennie R. __?__/Rebecca J. Dawson (1847-1906) in 1870, was a partner of J. J. Meyer in a mercantile business in Illinois from 1876 until 1880, moved to Wadena, Minnesota, in 1880, was a partner in Baumbach & Meyer in Wadena, Minnesota, from 1880 until 1885, left the partnership in 1885 to form the Wadena Exchange Bank, was the president of the Wadena Exchange Bank from 1885 until 1892, became the president of the First National Bank of Wadena, Minnesota, when it merged with the Wadena Exchange Bank in 1892, was a member of the board of directors of the Wadena & Park Rapids RailRoad, married Hannah Swindlehurst (1866–1954,) the daughter of Joseph Swindlehurst and Margaret Maria O’Connor Swindlehurst, was a partner of John Anderson & Company of Sebeka, Minnesota, was a member of the mercantile firm of C. W. Baumbach & Company, filed for a Civil War pension in 1912, was a Republican, was a Mason, was a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, died in Los Angeles County, California, and is buried in the Wadena Cemetery, Wadena, Wadena County, Minnesota. Edgar S. Case, the son of Ephriam Case and Mary E. Adsit Case, was a banker associated with the Bank of Wadena, Minnesota, which failed in 1884, was the register of deeds for Wadena County, Minnesota, in 1880, was the master of the Masonic lodge in Wadena, Minnesota, in 1883, and organized the Wadena County Bank of Verndale, Minnesota. James B. Cutler (1830-1909,) the son of Leonard Cutler, was born in Michigan, married Margaret Beard (1832-1916,) resided in LaPorte, Indiana, moved to Iowa in 1850, was the mayor of Osage, Iowa, in 1882, purchased a half interest in the Park Rapids, Minnesota, town site in 1882, and was buried in the Osage Cemetery, Osage, Mitchell County, Iowa. Charles Andrew “C. A.” Gilman (1833-1927) was born in Gilmanton, New Hampshire, was a lawyer, taught in New Hampshire country and village schools for four years, taught grammar classes in Gilmanton Academy in New Hampshire, was a New Hampshire highway surveyor from 1854 until 1855, came to Minnesota in 1854, moved to Sauk Rapids, Benton County, Minnesota in 1855, married Hester Cronk (1837-1910) in 1857, moved to St. Cloud, Minnesota in 1861, was a Republican, was a register and receiver in the federal land office at St. Cloud, Minnesota, in 1861, was the county auditor of Benton County, Minnesota, was the register of deeds of Benton County, Minnesota, was a stock farmer, was a lumberman, was a saw mill builder, engaged in land purchases and sales, was a member of the Minnesota Senate representing Aitkin County, Minnesota, Andy Johnson County, Minnesota, BeckerCounty, Minnesota, Buchanan County, Minnesota, Carlton County, Minnesota, CassCounty, Minnesota, ClayCounty, Minnesota, Crow WingCounty, Minnesota, DouglasCounty, Minnesota, ItascaCounty, Minnesota, LakeCounty, Minnesota, MorrisonCounty, Minnesota, Otter Tail County, Minnesota, Pembina County, Minnesota, PolkCounty, Minnesota, PopeCounty, Minnesota, St. LouisCounty, Minnesota, Stearns County, Minnesota, ToddCounty, Minnesota, WadenaCounty, Minnesota, and Wilkin County, Minnesota (District 3,) from 1867 until 1870, was a member of the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Stearns County, Minnesota (Districts 31 and 45,) from 1874 until 1880 and from 1914 until 1917, was Speaker of the House of Representatives from 1879 until 1880, was Minnesota Lieutenant Governor under Governor John S. Pillsbury and under Governor Lucius Hubbard from 1880 until 1887, was an unsuccessful candidate for the Republican Party endorsement for Minnesota Governor in the 1886 election and the 1888 election, was the State Law Library librarian from 1894 until 1899, and died in St. Cloud, Minnesota. Frank C./Franklin C. Rice (1834-1910,) the son of Benjamin Rice, Jr. (1795-1851,) and Mary Maltby Rice (1798- ,) was born in Panama, Chautauqua County, New York, moved to Mitchell County, Iowa, in 1855, taught school and built and operated grist and saw mills in Riceville, Mitchell County, Iowa, lived in Minnehaha County, Dakota Territory, from 1867 until 1873, founded Dell Rapids, Dakota Territory, married Frances C. Wells (1838-1921) in 1873, ran a real estate business in Minneapolis from 1878 to 1881, acquired several hundred acres in Todd Township, Minnesota, and moved his family to Park Rapids, Minnesota, in 1881, built a dam on Fish Hook River to power a rolling stone grain mill and a sawmill, was a notary public, was in the conveyancing, real estate, insurance, loans and collections business in 1882, was the first postmaster of Park Rapids, Minnesota, in 1882, was the Hubbard County, Minnesota, register of deeds in 1883, was a founding member of the Wadena & Park Rapids Railway company in 1885, was a charter member of the First Baptist Church of Park Rapids, Minnesota, in 1890, was a judge of probate from 1898 until 1901, received the franchise to supply electricity to Park Rapids, Minnesota, in 1908, died of heart failure in Park Rapids, Minnesota, and was buried in the Greenwood Cemetery, Park Rapids, Hubbard County, Minnesota. Gilbert H. Rice (1838-1908,) the son of Benjamin Rice, Jr. (1795-1851,) a War of 1812 veteran, and Mary Maltby Rice (1798- ,) was born in Harmony, Chautauqua County, New York, had a common school education in New York, moved to Mitchell County, Iowa, in 1855, laid out the town site of Riceville, Iowa, in 1857, attended the Cedar Valley Seminary at Osage, Iowa, in 1861, married Martha E. Pierce (1848-1928) in 1866, bought out his brothers’ interests in the milling business at Riceville, Iowa, in 1866, sold the mill, reentered the milling business near Osage, Iowa, from 1867 until 1881, moved to Park Rapids, Minnesota, built the pioneer flour mill in Park Rapids, Minnesota, in 1883, was a member of the Park Rapids Literary Society in 1883, was a probate court judge from 1883 until 1887, was a charter member of the First Baptist Church of Park Rapids, Minnesota, was a Republican, was a member of the Sound Money Club of Park Rapids, Minnesota, was a member of Shell Prairie Lodge No. 131 of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, died in Medford, Jackson County, Oregon, and was buried in the Greenwood Cemetery, Park Rapids, Hubbard County, Minnesota. Hermann Trott (1830-1903) was the son of C. C. Trott, a German military officer, was born either in Hanover, Germany, or in Austria, received a business education, was an engineer, emigrated to the United States in 1856, moved to Minnesota Territory in 1856, was an agent for the Robertson Company, a group of land speculators led by Daniel A. Robertson, in 1856, was involved in a project to encourage German immigration to Chengwatana, Pine County, Minnesota, in 1856, resided at Chengwatana, Minnesota Territory, from 1856 until 1862, successfully applied to the Minnesota territorial legislature to organize Pine County, Minnesota Territory, in 1856, was a member of the first board of county commissioners of Pine County, Minnesota Territory, in 1856, was a justice of the peace in Pine County, Minnesot Territory, was the enumerator for Pine County, Minnesota, for the 1857 Minnesota census, was a Democrat in 1860, was the unsuccessful Democratic candidate for State Auditor in 1860, moved to St. Paul in 1863, married Ann Eliza Goettel (1837- ) in 1864, was a member of the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Ramsey County (District 21,) fron 1865 until 1867, was a clerk in 1866, was the secretary of the land department of the First Division of the St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad in 1868, resided in St. Paul in 1869, was a member of the St. Paul school board from 1869 until 1871, succeeded George Loomis Becker as land commissioner for the First Division of the St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad in 1869, was in charge of building a portion of the St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad in the 1870’s, was the treasurer and the land commissioner of the First Division of the St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad in 1874, was a member of the board of aldermen of St Paul from 1880 until 1881, was an incorporator of the Duluth, North Shore & Southwestern RailRoad in 1884, was the land commissioner of the Northern Pacific RailRoad in 1882, was the secretary of the Minnesota Guarantee Endowment Association in 1887, moved to the State of Washington in 1890, was the president of the Chehalis & Eastern RailRoad in Washington State in 1890, furnished tidal data for Willapa Bay from Sea Harbor, Washington, to the superintendent of the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey in 1892, was a member of the Minnesota Territorial Pioneers, returned to St. Paul in 1899, and died in St. Paul. [See note for William Crooks for 57 Wilkin Street.]

Wahpeton-Breckenridge Street Railway Company: The railroad was organized in 1907. The McGraw electric railway manual: the red book of American street railway, published in 1914, indicates that the railroad was chartered for 25 years in 1909, was given a governmental franchise in 1909, operated 1.44 miles of rail trackage connecting Wahpeton, North Dakota, and Breckenridge, Minnesota, owned two passenger motor cars, had as its officers Mathew Braun, president, Frank Miksche, vice president, E. H. Elwin, secretary, and R. T. Barber, treasurer, had as its board of directors R. T. Barber, Mathew Braun, H. T. Connolly, E. H. Elwin, and Frank Miksche, and had its general office in Breckenridge, Minnesota. The railroad was the shortest interstate streetcar line in the U.S. In 1915, H. C. Hartung resigned as the general manager of the railroad to become the general manager of the Lewiston-Clarkston Transit Company at Lewiston, Idaho, and H. C. Snyder became the general manager of the railroad. The McGraw transit directory, published in 1918, indicates that the railroad operated 1.144 miles of rail trackage connecting Wahpeton, North Dakota, and Breckenridge, Minnesota, including Island Park, owned two motor cars, had as its officers Mathew Braun, president, Frank Miksche, vice president, E. H. Elwin, secretary, R. T. Barber, treasurer, and H. C. Snyder, general manager, purchased energy from the Otter Tail Power Company in Wahpeton, North Dakota, had its repair shops in Breckenridge, Minnesota, and had its general office in Breckenridge, Minnesota. The street railway reportedly was financed by Breckenridge, Minnesota, liquor interests at a time when North Dakota banned the sale of alcohol and when Breckenridge, Minnesota, had 11 saloons. The Wahpeton-Breckenridge Street Railway Company ceased street car operations in 1922. Frank Miksche (1863-1939,) the son of a mercantile store operator in Breckenridge, Minnesota, married Pauline Marsch (1864-1920,) operated a hotel-café and saloon in Breckenridge, Minnesota, in 1892, purchased the Wilkin Hotel in Breckenridge, Minnesota, in 1896, was a partner with his sons, Anthony David “Tony” Miksche (1886-1949) and Leo Frank Miksche (1890-1960,) in the restaurant, billiard, and hotel business in Breckenridge, Minnesota, in the early 1900’s, actively engaged in trotter racing in Northwest Minnesota, owned the trotter “Princess Oratorio,” foaled in 1902 by “Oratorio” and “Tapestry” in Kentucky, until the horse was sold to James McGann of Wyndmere, North Dakota, started a liquor store in Breckenridge, Minnesota, in 1934, died in in Breckenridge, Minnesota, and was buried in Saint Mary's Cemetery, Breckenridge, Wilkin County, Minnesota. Elmer H. Elwin was a graduate of the University of Minnesota Law School in 1902, was a lawyer in the H. B. Wells Land Office, was the county attorney for Wilkin County, Minnesota, in 1920 and 1922, and was a member of the Commercial Club of Breckenridge, Minnesota. Robert T. Barber (1871-1959) was born in Ohio, married Louisa Bartraw Purdon (1871-1955,) the daughter of Andrew Purdon, in 1897, was the cashier employed by the People’s Bank of Wahpeton, North Dakota, resided in Wahpeton, North Dakota, and is buried in Fairview Memorial Gardens, Wahpeton, Richland County, North Dakota.

Water Works Filtration Railway/Minneapolis Municipal Waterworks Railway: The McGraw transit directory, published in 1918 by the McGraw-Hill Publishing Company, indicates that the railroad operated 1.583 miles of rail trackage from the corner of Central Avenue and 36th Avenue NE in Minneapolis to the City Water Filtration Plant and thence to a junction with the Soo Line RailRoad outside the city limits. After building a new water filtration plant in Columbia Heights, the City of Minneapolis decided to build an electric railway connecting the plant to an interchange with the Soo Line RailRoad in order to haul chemicals to the plant, replacing the trucks that had previously performed this task. The railway was built by a combination of day labor from the Waterworks Department and Minneapolis Street Railway Company employees, who performed the specialized work of laying track and hanging wire. The route was used mainly to haul chemicals such as coal, powdered alum, chlorine, ammonia, and sand. Originally, passenger service was limited to plant employees, but it was later extended to the general public. The railroad was intended to carry supplies and filtration plant employees to the plant, owned one combination freight and passenger motor car, purchased energy from the Twin City Rapid Transit Company, had a car repair facility at the filtration plant, was managed by Frederick William Cappelen, the city engineer, and had its general office in Minneapolis. In 1867, a small pump and a system of mains and hydrants were installed in Minneapolis for fire protection in the lumber milling district. By 1872, water was being supplied to residences south and west of the Mississippi River by a pumping station at the corner of South First Street and 5th Avenue. In 1881, the city formed the Board of Water Commissioners and hired S. L. Blodgett of Milwaukee to design the water system. Blodgett chose Columbia Heights, Minnesota, as the focal point of the water system because it was the highest point of land, dominating the city, and because water would flow to Minneapolis users via gravity. Blodgett had a disagreement over the compensation for his services in 1881, leading to a claims petition to the Minneapolis City Council in 1883, when the Claims Committee of the city council was unable to determine the exact nature of his services without additional information from the Minneapolis Board of Water Commissioners. Chlorination began in 1910. The water treatment plant was built between 1913 and 1918. After completion of the treatment plant in 1918, Minneapolis residents were provided with filtered and purified water for the first time. A rail line was constructed along Reservoir Boulevard so that workers and treatment chemicals could be transported to the plant by streetcar. It became known as the Minneapolis Municipal Waterworks Railway. The railway’s single car was designed by a Minneapolis city engineer and was built by the McGuire-Cummings Manufacturing Company in 1917. Due to the steep grades, rail car #1 could only take one loaded freight car up the hill at a time. The rail line climbed steep grades, ranging from two percent to five percent, and it gained 123.4 feet in elevation over only 8000 feet of track. The end of passenger service on the line occurred in 1948. Freight service was discontinued in 1953 after the Minneapolis Street Railway decided to abandon its line on Central Avenue, and thus stopped selling electricity to the filtration plant railway. Service to the filtration plant was continued through the use of trucks. Rail car #1 was sent to a scrap yard in 1953. Frederick Wilhelm/William Cappelen (1857–1921,) the son of Diderik Cappelen (1824-1890,) was born in Drammen, Norway, attended school in Fredrikstad, Řstfold County, Norway, was educated at the Technical School in Örebro, Sweden, was educated at the Royal Saxon Polytechnicum in Dresden, Germany, emigrated to the United States in 1880, was initially employed by the Northern Pacific RailRoad from 1880 until 1886, married Augusta Emilie Felicitas Wessel (1860- ) in New York City in 1883, became a City of Minneapolis bridge engineer in 1886, was elected Minneapolis City Engineer in 1893 and was re-elected in 1913, was a member of the Minnesota Board of Health, was a member of the American Society of Municipal Improvements, was a member of the Minneapolis Society of Engineers, was elected a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers in 1895, invented a headlight shade (U. S. patent #1353890) in 1916, and designed many public works buildings in Minneapolis, including the Prospect Park "Witch's Hat" Water Tower, the Kenwood Park Water Tower, and the Franklin Avenue/Cappelen Memorial Bridge.

Watertown, Sioux City & Duluth RailRoad: The railroad was projected to build and operate a 100 mile rail line from Hankinson, North Dakota, to Watertown, South Dakota. Surveys of the rail line route were completed in 1892. The railroad was incorporated in 1891. In 1891, the members of the board of directors of the railroad were J. M. Bailey, Jr., E. H. Barnvard, J. F. Brock, N. T. Burroughs, O. E. Dewey, O. Gesley, A. C. Mellette, J. I. Monks, H. R. Pease, C. W. Sutenroth, W. R. Thomas, H. D. Walrath, and W. M. Wilson. In 1893, the officers of the railroad were H. D. Walroth, president, G. W. Carpenter, chief engineer, and E. H. Banvard, secretary. The railroad was incorporated under South Dakota law in 1901 to build and operate a 125 mile rail line from Watertown, South Dakota, to Wahpeton, North Dakota, had $1,000,000 in capital stock, and had its general office in Watertown, South Dakota. H. D. Walrath (1842- ) was born in Morristown, St. Lawrence County, New York, married to Emma F. Sheldon of New York, moved in 1870 to Omaha, Nebraska, then moved to Indiana, then moved to Cherokee, Iowa, moved to Watertown, Dakota Territory, in 1880, was associated with the Codington County Bank, and was the president of the First National Bank of Watertown, South Dakota, in 1887. George W. Carpenter (1833-1911,) was the son of son of George W. Carpenter (1801- ) and Anne/Annie Foot Carpenter, was born in Marilla, Erie County, New York, married Ermina E. Watson (1840- ,) the daughter of Milton Watson and Marilla Watson, in 1858, served in the 21st New York Regiment and the 116th New York Regiment during the American Civil War, was wounded during the battles of Donaldsonville and Cedar Creek, farmed hops in Fillmore County, Minnesota, from 1865 until 1878, was a justice of the peace for Fillmore County, Minnesota, moved to Codington County, Dakota Territory, in 1878, was the surveyor in Watertown, Dakota Territory, in 1887, also was the surveyor for Hamlin County, Dakota Territory, and Deuel, Dakota Territory, surveyed for the Great Northern RailRoad for three years, was an official of the South Dakota National Guard, was a Mason, and was a land office agent in Watertown, Codington County, South Dakota. Eugene Henry Banvard (1854-1903,) was the son of John Banvard, the artist, was born in New York, married Jessie Ann Fleming (1852-1945) in 1881, was a lawyer, resided in Watertown, South Dakota, was associated with the law firm of Banvard & Wood, and died in Brooklyn, Kings County, New York.

Watertown & Sioux Falls Railway Company: The Watertown & Sioux Falls Railway Company was incorporated in 1916 in South Dakota, succeeded the South Dakota Central Railway Company in a foreclosure sale in 1916, operated a 106.14 mile rail line from Watertown, South Dakota, to Sioux Falls, South Dakota, had as its officers C. O. Kalman, president, R. Budd, vice president, E. C. Lindley, vice president, F. L. Paetzold, secretary-treasurer, Harold E. Judge, attorney, and G. H. Hess, Jr., comptroller, had as its governing board F. R. Aikens, Ralph Budd, F. G. Dorety, C. O. Kalman, E. C. Lindley, G. R. Martin, and F. L. Paetzold, had its entire capital stock of $1,100,000 owned by the Great Northern RailRoad, and had its general offices located at St. Paul. The railroad purchased the South Dakota Central RailRoad in a bankruptcy sale in the 1920’s. In 1919, the railroad owned eight locomotives, including two 2-6-0 "Mogul" type locomotives, and 60 rail cars. In 1921, the officers of the railroad were C. O. Kalman, president, W. P. Kenny, vice president, F. L. Paetzold, secretary-treasurer, and G. H. Hess, Jr., comptoller, and the members of the board of directors of the railroad were B. M. Concklin, F. G. Dorety, H. E. Judge, C. O. Kalman, William P. Kenny, J. T. Maher, and F. L. Paetzold, and the railroad had its general offices in St. Paul. The railroad was suceeded by the Great Northern RailRoad in 1928. Erasmus Christopher Lindley (1870-1957,) the son of Osmond Lindley and Achsa/Achsah Wilson Lindley, was born in Dublin, Wayne County, Indiana, moved with his family to Lyon Township, Cloud County, Kansas, graduated from the University of Michigan in 1895, graduated from the University of Michigan Law School in 1896, was a member of the law firm of Walker & Payne in Chicago, Illinois, was an Assistant State Attorney in Cook County, Illinois, in 1903 and 1904, was a vice president and the general solicitor for the Great Northern Railway Company in 1914 and in 1921, was the president of and a member of the board of directors of the Duluth Terminal Railway Company in 1916, was a member of the board of directors of the Minneapolis Western Railway Company in 1916, married Clara Anne “Anna” Hill (1873-1947) in 1918, resided in St. Paul in 1920, resigned as general solicitor of the Great Northern RailRoad in 1922 after a dispute over the disposition of the James J. Hill estate, resided in Tuxedo Park, Orange County, New York, in 1930, practice law in New York, joined the other four sons-in-law of James J. Hill as a member of the Jeckyll Island Club, located near Savannah, Georgia, and was buried at Resurrection Cemetery, Mendota Heights, Dakota County, Minnesota. Lindley’s estate endowed the Lindley Scholarship at the University of Michigan Law School in 1957. Harold Eugene Judge (1873-1936,) the son of Patrick Henry Judge and Della Cemira Sutton Judge, was born in Floyd, Floyd County, Iowa, was educated in the public schools and an academy at Fort Dodge, Iowa, graduated from the University of Iowa at Iowa City, Iowa, in 1894, was admitted to the practice of law in Iowa in 1894, moved to to Sioux Falls, South Dakota in 1894, was a partner in the law office of Bailey & Voorhees & Judge, married Susan M. “Susie” Hamill (1867-1958,) the daughter of Harriet Hammill, in South Dakota in 1896, then was a partner in the law firm of Aikens & Judge, was a resident of Sioux Falls, South Dakota, represented the Northern States Power Company and the Great Northern Railway Company in Risty v. Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railway Company, 270 U.S. 378 (1926,) and was buried at the Mount Pleasant Cemetery in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. George H. Hess, Jr., entered railroad employment with the St. Paul, Manitoba & Pacific RailRoad in 1892, served in various accounting capacities with the Interstate Commerce Commission from 1911 to 1916, was the assistant comptroller of the Great Northern RailRoad in 1918, was the comptroller of the Great Northern Railway Company from 1920 until 1946, was the comptroller of the Midland Railway of Manitoba, was the comptroller of the Farmers’ Grain & Shipping Company RailRoad in 1922, and assembled a 30,000 volume collection of dime novels that the Great Northern RailRoad considered purchasing and which was acquired by the Minnesota Historical Society. Frank R. Aikens (1850/1855-1920,) the adopted son of Nelson Aikens and Serepta Rosebrook Aikens, was born in New York City, New York, was educated in the public schools of Rome, New York, read the law in a law office in Rome, New York, was admitted to the practice of law in Syracuse, New York, engaged in the practice of law in Rome, New York, until 1880, moved to Canton, Dakota Territory, in 1880, was a lawyer in Canton, Dakota Territory, until 1889, married Margaret B. Bailey (1850-1924,) the widow of Mark W. Bailey and the daughter of Major William H. Miller, in 1883, was a Republican, was a senator from the fifth district of the provisional state of South Dakota legislature in 1885, was a member of the South Dakota territorial legislature from 1887 until 1889, was an associate justice of the supreme court of the Dakota Territory after 1889, then was the judge of the second judicial circuit until 1894, was accused in 1891 by a committee of Sioux Falls, South Dakota, ministers of drunkenness and licentiousness, resumed a law practice in Canton, Dakota Territory, came to Sioux Falls, Dakota Territory, in 1895, was a law partner with Charles O. Bailey, John H. Voorhees, and Harold E. Judge until 1897, was the president of the South Dakota Bar Association in 1918, and was buried in Woodlawn Cemetery, Sioux Falls, Minnehaha County, South Dakota. Frederic/Frederick Gerber Dorety (1878-1961) was the vice president of the Californian Publishing Company in 1899, was the managing editor of the Daily Californian in 1899, was the president of the Associated Students organization of the University of California-Berkeley in 1900, graduated from the University of California-Berkeley in 1900, was a member of the Golden Bear, the senior society of the University of California, in 1900, was a member of the Beta-Xi fraternity, was a member of the editorial board of the Harvard University Law Review in 1902, graduated from the Harvard University Law School in 1903, was an instructor in law at the University of California in 1904, married Mary Frances French ( -1929,) the daughter of Rev. J. M. French, the pastor of the United Presbyterian Church of Oakland, California, and a 1904 graduate of the University of California-Berkeley, in 1904, practiced law in Seattle, Washington, was an assistant U. S. attorney in Seattle, Washington, in 1908, resided in Seattle, Washington, in 1918, was a vice president and general counsel of the Great Northern RailRoad, resided in St. Paul in 1920 (737 Osceola Avenue,) in 1923 and in 1936, and died in Hennepin County. James T. Maher was the real estate and tax agent for the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific RailRoad in 1904, had a permit to operate a forty-foot, twenty-passenger launch on St. Mary Lake, running from St. Mary, Montana, to the camp at the site of the Going-to-the-Sun Chalets near the upper end of the lake in 1911, was the right of way, tax and land commissioner of the Great Northern RailRoad in 1913 and 1920, and was the president of the CottonwoodCoal Company in 1927. William P. Kenny ( -1958) married Margaret Fallon, was a vice president and director of traffic for the Great Northern RailRoad in 1930, allegedly was the source in 1917 for the Rocky Mountain mountain goat logo/trademark used by the Great Northern RailRoad, was a member of the board of directors of the Minneapolis Citizens Alliance, was the president of the Great Northern RailRoad, was a benefactor of the College of St. Catherine in St. Paul, and resided at 533 Summit Avenue in St. Paul in 1930 and 1934. a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/SumEPortTNH.html"> [See note on Charles Oscar “C. O.” “Collie” Kalman for 590 Summit Avenue.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/SumEPortTNH.html"> [See note on Ralph Budd for 475 Portland Avenue.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/SAlbTNH.html" [See note on Frederic L. Paetzold for 825 Fairmount Avenue.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/TNHrail2.html" [See note on George R. Martin for the Willmar & Sioux Falls RailRoad.]

Watonwan Valley RailRoad: The railroad was organized either in 1879 or in 1899 and was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1899 for the purpose of building a railroad from Madelia, Minnesota, Southerly to Fairmont, Minnesota, and to the Southern boundary of the State. The railroad was actually completed only to Fairmont, Minnesota, constructed a 29.38 mile rail line from Madelia, Minnesota, to Fairmont, Minnesota, in 1899, operated until 1899, and was succeeded by the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha RailRoad.

Wells & SouthEastern RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1872 by O. F. Southwick, J. P. West and others in order to construct and operate a railway from Wells, Minnesota, to a point along the Southern border of Minnesota in Faribault County, Minnesota, or Freeborn County, Minnesota, and was organized in 1872. In 1874, the Wells & SouthEastern RailRoad was extended by Colonel Clark Thompson to Mankato, Minnesota. Colonel Clark W. Thompson (1825-1885) was born in Canada, was educated in Illinois, traveled from Rockford, Illinois to Nevada City, California in 1850, was employed as a gold miner in California, married __?__ Wells, the daughter of J.W. Wells, moved to Hokah, Minnesota, in 1853, was active in Minnesota business and politics, resided in Hokah, Minnesota, in 1854, was a miller in 1854, was a member of the Territorial House of Representatives representing Ramsey County, Wabasha County, Minnesota, and Washington County, Minnesota (District 4,) from 1854 to 1856, was a member of the Territorial Council representing Fillmore County, Minnesota, Houston County, Minnesota, and Mower County, Minnesota (District 8,) from 1855 to 1857, was a Republican elector in 1860, was the superintendent of Indian affairs in the Northwest, sponsored by Senator Morton S. Wilkinson, in 1862, reputedly demonstrated only minimal concern for the applicable Indians, was responsible for selecting Crow Creek, Dakota Territory, in 1862-1863, as the reservation for the exiled Santees and Winnebagos following their participation in the 1862 Dakota War, was a founder, with H. W. Holly and M. Conant, of Wells, Minnesota, in 1869, built in Wells, Minnesota, the first mill, a creamery, a cheese factory, a barrel factory, and a vinegar factory, was a member of the board of directors of the Minnesota & NorthWestern RailRoad in 1870, reportedly built, at his own expense, the railroad in 1871 that linked Wells, Minnesota, to LaCrosse, Wisconsin, resided in Wells, Minnesota, in 1870, was a railroad president in 1870, was a member of the Minnesota State Senate representing Cottonwood County, Minnesota, Faribault County, Minnesota, Jackson County, Minnesota, Martin County, Minnesota, Murray County, Minnesota, Pipestone County, Minnesota, and Rock County, Minnesota (District 20,) from 1870 until 1872, after contesting the election of George W. Whallon, was a La Crosse, Wisconsin, resident in 1874, received four U. S. patents in 1877-1878 (#198,825, #202,073, #203,509, and #211,436) relating to hoop making machines, coopering, and veneer machines, was the president of the Minnesota State Agricultural Society from 1880 until 1884, and died on his farm in Wells, Minnesota. Legend in Western North Carolina, published by James H. Cathey in the 1899 book The Genesis of Lincoln, but debunked in William E. Barton's The Paternity of Abraham Lincoln and and Louis A. Warren’s Lincoln’s Parentage and Childhood, suggests that Abraham Lincoln was the illegitimate son of Clark W. Thompson’s maternal grandfather, Abraham Enloe, who allegedly employed Nancy Hanks, Lincoln’s mother, as a house servant on the Oconalufty River in Swain County, North Carolina. Orin Frederick Southwick (1831-1906,) the son of Orin Southwick (1789-1881) and Hannah Stone Southwick (1811-1890,) was born in Mooers, Clinton County, New York, attended the Mooers, New York, common schools, the Champlain Academy, and the Fort Edward Collegiate Institute, taught school at the Mooers Common School and the Champlain Academy, taught at the Burr Oak Institute at Burr Oak, Iowa, began the Southwick Brothers mercantile firm in Freeborn, Minnesota, surveyed and plotted roads in Southern Minnesota, married Mary E. Benson (1845- ) in 1867, moved to Wells, Minnesota, with the Southwick Brothers Mercantile Company, sold out his Freeborn, Minnesota, mercantile company interest to his brothers in 1870, consolidated the Wells, Minnesota, mercantile company operations, was a mayor of Wells, Minnesota, was a member of the Temperance Party, and was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. J. P. West (1839- ) was born in Waterbury, Vermont, was admitted to the practice of law in 1860, moved to Wausau, Marathon County, Wisconsin, in 1861, was the county superintendent of education for Marathon County, Wisconsin, in 1862, was the assistant county assessor for Marathon County, Wisconsin, Wood County, Wisconsin, and Portage County, Wisconsin, in the 1860’s, was the postmaster for Marathon County, Wisconsin, in 1863, was the president of the Marathon County, Wisconsin, chapter of the American Bible Society in 1867, was the district attorney for Marathon County, Wisconsin, in 1871, came to Minnesota in 1871, was a lawyer, resided in Wells, Minnesota, was a Republican, served in the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Faribault County, Minnesota (District 6,) from 1873 until 1876, served in the Minnesota Senate representing Faribault County, Minnesota (District 6,) from 1875 until 1878, served again in the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Faribault County, Minnesota (District 6,) from 1877 until 1881, was the president of the Minnesota State Beekeepers Association in 1891, 1897, and 1899, resided in Hastings, Minnesota, in 1895, and was the superintendent of the Honey, Bees and Aparian Suplies Department of the Minnesota State Agricultural Society in 1895. a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/TNHrail2.html" [See note on Henry W. Holley for the Southwestern Railway Company.]

Wells & SouthWestern RailRoad: The railroad incorporated and was organized in 1872. The railroad became the Minnesota Central RailRoad and later became the Southern Minnesota RailRoad.

West Duluth Street RailRoad Company: The railroad was incorporated in 1889 by C. K. Shannon and others and had capital stock of $100,000. Charles K. Shannon was the second vice president and trust officer of the American Loan & Trust Company of Duluth, Minnesota, in 1890 and was the candidate of the Minnesota Prohibition Party in 1896.

West Wisconsin RailRoad: The railroad was chartered in 1863, the same year that the Tomah & Lake St. Croix Railroad was organized, was incorporated in 1865 by H. S. Allen, William Carson, Charles H. Cox, Richard Dewhurst, N. S. Dunbar, R. C. Field, A. Gaylord, George M. Gilkey, Andrew S. Greg, H. L. Humphrey, Carl C. Pope, William T. Price, Miles D. Prindle, C. D. Spaulding, Joseph Thorpe, R. F. Wilson, and William Wilson, succeeded the Tomah & Lake St. Croix RailRoad by assuming control of the corporation in 1866, and was organized in 1868/1869/1871. The original charter of the West Wisconsin Railroad gave the company a range of 30 miles or more up and down the St. Croix River to locate its terminus, which ultimately was Hudson, Wisconsin, on Lake St. Croix. The building of the railroad bridge by the West Wisconsin RailRoad over Lake St. Croix prompted the “battle of the pilings” when Stillwater, Minnesota, lumberman, objecting to the planned size of the channel opening, 98 feet, under the bridge, removed 80 pilings and absconded with the pile driver, leading to a negotiated redesign of the bridge and a 136 foot channel opening. The West Wisconsin RailRoad opened a connection to the St. Paul, Stillwater & Taylors Falls RailRoad in 1872, thereby linking Eau Claire, Wisconsin, to St. Paul by rail. The railroad defied an 1873 Wisconsin General Assembly enactment, Laws of Wisconsin 1873, Chapter 31, that required the West Wisconsin Railroad Company to relay, maintain and operate its road from Tomah, Wisconsin, to Warren's Mills, Monroe County, Wisconsin, which led the State Attorney General to seek court dissolution of the corporation, and when the Wisconsin Supreme Court ruled for the state, the railroad sought a financial settlement with the City of Tomah, Wisconsin, the municipality aggrieved by the failure, and the Wisconsin General Assembly repealed the 1873 enactment in 1876. The West Wisconsin RailRoad went into receivership in 1875. The West Wisconsin Railway Company entered bankruptcy during the "Panic of 1873," with the bondholders forming a committee to represent them consisting of Josiah Attwood, William F. Bruff, James Goodson, Frederick Lehman, John Perry, R. U. Potts, Barthold Schlesinger, and Henry Schlesinger. William H. Ferry represented the New York bondholders as trustee until 1876, when control of the railroad was returned to the company. The receiver was then recalled in 1877. The railroad had an agreement, in 1877, with the St. Paul, Stillwater & Taylors Falls RailRoad to allow West Wisconsin RailRoad trains to proceed from Hudson, Wisconsin, on its rail line to St. Paul and had authority under Special Laws of Minnesota 1872, Chapter 117, to operate in Minnesota with the same authority that it possessed in Wisconsin. In 1877, the officers of the railroad were H. H. Porter, president, J. H. Howe, vice president, H. H. Weekley, secretary, John C. Spooner, solicitor, R. P. Flower, treasurer, C. D. W. Young, auditor, and E. W. Winter, general superintendent, the members of the board of directors of the railroad were A. H. Baldwin, D. A. Baldwin, A. Caplin, R. P. Flower, J. H. Howe, J. O. Hoyt, M. Hughitt, J. Humbird, S. M. Nickerson, H. H. Porter, J. B. Redfield, P. Sawyer, H. Selbert, Z. G. Simmons, and F. E. Trowbridge, and the general offices of the railroad were in Hudson, Wisconsin. In 1878, the officers of the railroad were William H. Ferry, receiver, H. H. Porter, president, J. H. Howe, first vice president, H. H. Weakley, secretary, John C. Spooner, solicitor, R. J. Flower, treasurer, E. W. Winter, general superintendent, and C. D. W. Young, auditor, the members of the board of directors of the railroad were David Dows, Thomas Dreier, W. H. Ferry, R. P. Flower, George Caplin, John Comstock, J. H. Howe, M. Hughitt, N. W. Kittson, H. H. Porter, P. Sawyer, H. Seibert, John C. Spooner, Horace Thompson, and E. W. Winter, the railroad operated 201.4 miles of rail line, and the railroad employed 625 employees. The West Wisconsin Railway was reorganized as the Chicago, St. Paul & Minneapolis RailRoad in 1878. The West Wisconsin RailRoad was sold in foreclosure under order of the U. S. District Court in 1878, became the Chicago, Milwaukee & Minneapolis RailRoad in 1878, operated until 1881, and was succeeded by the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha RailRoad in 1880. The railroad was the successor to the original land grant of the never-constructed Tomah & Lake St. Croix RailRoad. The Tomah & Lake St. Croix RailRoad was incorporated in 1863 by D. A. Baldwin of Hudson, Wisconsin, and Jacob Humbird of Baltimore, Maryland. The West Wisconsin RailRoad built 187.90 miles of rail trackage (a 10.00 mile rail line from Tomah, Wisconsin, to Warren, Wisconsin, in 1867 and a 177.90 mile rail line from Hudson, Wisconsin, to Elroy, Wisconsin, from 1868 until 1872,) reached Merrillan, Wisconsin, in 1869, and reached Saint Paul in 1872. In 1870, D. A. Baldwin was the president of the railroad and Jacob Humbird was the superintendent of the railroad. The railroad merged into the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha RailRoad in 1880 and was ultimately succeeded by the Chicago & NorthWestern RailRoad. William H. Ferry, who resided in New York in 1862, was an incorporator of the Transcontinental RailRoad designated in the Pacific Railway Act of July 1, 1862. William Henry Ferry (1819-1880,) the son of Heman Ferry (1786–1856) and Roxanna Burchard Ferry (1796–1842,) was born in Remsen, Oneida County, New York, attended Amherst College, married Mary Ann Williams (1816- ,) was a delegate to the Chicago Republican Party Convention that nominated Lincoln in 1859, was a member of the New York State Senate in 1860 and 1861, was the President pro tempore of the New York State Senate in 1861, moved to Chicago, Illinois, in 1865, was a member of the board of directors of the Galena & Chicago Union RailRoad, was a member of the board of directors of the Winona & St. Peter RailRoad in 1872, was a member of the board of directors of the Elgin & State Line RailRoad in 1872, was a member of the board of directors of the Chicago & Milwaukee RailRoad in 1872, was a member of the board of directors of the State Line & Union RailRoad in 1872, was an incorporator of and the president of the Chicago, St. Paul & Minneapolis RailRoad in 1878, and was buried at the Rosehill Cemetery and Mausoleum in Chicago, Illinois. Barthold Schlesinger (1828-1900) was born in Hamburg, Germany, resided in Brookline, Massachusetts, a subburb of Boston, Massachusetts, was the German consul in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1878, was a partner of Sebastian B. Schlesinger (1837-1917,) a German composer who studied music in Boston, and did business in 1894 under the name of Naylor & Company, the American sales firm of the Sheffield, England, steel manufactory of Naylor, Vickers & Company (G.P. Naylor and Edward Vickers,) was a member of the board of directors of the New York & Oswego Midland RailRoad in 1873, was a member of the board of directors of the Rio Grande Western RailRoad, was a member of the board of directors of the Chicago & Ohio River RailRoad in 1889, was a member of the Union Club of Boston, Massachusetts, married __?__ Colby, the daughter of Alonzo Colby, and, in 1882, with his wife, began hosting, at their Brookline, Massachusetts, residence, a school which had previously been located in Boston, Massachusetts, and was a social friend of Charles Dickens, Charles Eliot Norton, James Russell Lowell, Oliver Wendell Holmes, and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. Barthold Schlesinger was associated with the firm from 1855. In 1873, Barthold Schlesinger’s portrait was painted by William Morris Hunt and is now in the collection of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, Massachusetts. By the 1880s, the two Schlesingers were the only active principals in Naylor & Company and were the plaintiffs in an 1881 lawsuit which attempted to recover damages from an 1880 breach of contract by a railroad construction firm in Kansas. In 1881, Naylor & Company owned two iron smelters in Rutland County, Vermont. In 1887, the Schlesingers were involved in a lawsuit and counter-suit with the collector of customs in Boston, Massachusetts, regarding the amount of import duties on two shipments of wrought scrap iron from England.

Western RailRoad Company of Minnesota was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1874 by George L. Becker, Frederick Billings, F. R. Delano, C. W. Griggs, James J. Hill, P. H. Kelly, N. W. Kittson, Johnston Livingston, P. F. McQuillan, L. E. Reed, George Stark, and Charles B. Wright, to construct and operate a railway from Brainerd, Minnesota, west southwesterly by way of Little Falls, Minnesota, Sauk Center, Minnesota, and Mankato, Minnesota, to the boundary of the State near Big Stone Lake, Minnesota, and Traverse Lake, Minnesota. The railroad had capital stock of $5,000,000 and its principal place of business was St. Paul. The railroad was organized in 1876, was built and began operation in 1877, was operated by the Western Railway Company until 1878, and had initial capital stock of $10,000,000. In 1877, the railroad constructed a 60.50 mile rail line from Sauk Rapids, Minnesota, to Brainerd, Minnesota. In 1878, the railway was leased to the Northern Pacific RailRoad for 99 years. In 1879, the officers of the railroad were George L. Becker, president, S. E. Neiler, vice president, R. M. Newport, secretary-treasurer, and J. B. Power, land commissioner, the members of the board of directors of the railroad were George L. Becker, Frederick Billings, F. R. Delano, S. E. Neiler, R. M. Newport, Alexander Ramsey, L. E. Reed, George Stark, and C. B. Wright, and the railroad had capital stock of $100,100. In 1882, according to the Report of the RailRoad Commissioner, the railroad owned 60.5 miles of rail trackage, was operated by the Northern Pacific RailRoad, had as its officers George L. Becker, president, F. R. Delano, vice president, and E. T. Williams, secretary, treasurer, and land commissioner, had as its board of directors George L. Becker, Frederick Billings, George W. Cass, F. R. Delano, S. E. Neiler, R. M. Newport, T. F. Oakes, Alexander Ramsey, and C. B. Wright, and had its principal place of business in St. Paul. In 1882, the railroad owned 5,751.10 acres of land in Minnesota. The railroad operated until 1883 and was initially succeeded, through a reorganization in 1883, by the St. Paul & Northern Pacific RailRoad. By 1884, a rail line from Sauk Rapids, Minnesota, to Minneapolis was constructed, and then was extended to St. Paul in 1886. The railroad ultimately was succeeded, in 1896, by the Northern Pacific RailRoad. George Washington Cass (1810-1888,) the son of George W. Cass and Sophia Lord Cass, was born near Dresden, Muskingum County, Ohio, attended the Detroit Academy in Detroit, Michigan, from 1824 to 1827, while living with his uncle, Lewis Cass, the governor of the Michigan Territory, graduated from the U. S. Military Academy, West Point, New York, in 1832, married Louisa Dawson in 1842, joined the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers in 1832, worked on the improvements to the Cumberland Road, helped design the first cast iron bridge in the United States at Brownsville, Pennsylvania, left the U. S. Army in 1836, settled into private business in Brownsville, Pennsylvania, was the engineer of the improvement of the Monongahela River, organized a steamboat line and a stagecoach line from 1836 to 1855, was appointed president of Adams & Company, the successor to Adams Express, expanded the Boston, Massachusetts-based shipping company to points as far away as St. Louis, Missouri, and Richmond, Virginia, married Louisa Dawson in Brownsville, Fayette, Pennsylvania, in 1842, married Ellen Dawson (1819-1903) in Brownsville, Fayette, Pennsylvania, in 1843, was a Major General of the Pennsylvania Militia until 1850, was a Member of the Board of Visitors to the United States Military Academy in 1859, went into railroading, was the president of the Ohio & Pennsylvania RailRoad in 1856, was the president of the Pittsburgh, Fort Wayne & Chicago RailRoadfrom 1856 until 1881, was a member of the board of directors of the of the Pittsburg, Ft. Wayne, and Chicago Railroad from 1856 until 1888, was the unsuccessful was the Democratic candidate for Governor of the State of Pennsylvania in 1863 and in 1868, was an Episcopalian, was a member of and a warden in Christ Church in New York City, New York, joined the Northern Pacific Railway as a member of the board of directors in 1867, was the president of the Northern Pacific RailRoad from 1872 until 1875, was the receiver of the Northern Pacific RailRoad from 1875 until 1878, died in New York, New York, and was buried in Allegheny Cemetery, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. Francis Roach “F. R.” Delano (1823- ,) the son of Gideon Delano, was born in New Braintree, Massachusetts/ Worcester, Massachusetts, apprenticed at a machine shop, worked on an engineering crew, was the superintendent of the Boston & Worcester RailRoad, moved to St. Louis, Missouri, in 1844, was a wheel-wright and engine manufacturer, married Calista Ann Cavender/Cavander (1825-1892,) the daughter of Charles Cavender and Hannah Hopkins Cavender, in 1846, moved to St. Anthony, Minnesota, in 1848 and ran the government mill, moved to Stillwater, Minnesota, worked in the lumber and building industry, was a partner, with Jesse Taylor, Martin Mower, J. E. McKusick, and Jacob Fisher, in the firm of Jesse Taylor & Company, which contracted to build the Minnesota Penetentiary in Stillwater, Minnesota Territory, in 1851, was a member of the firm of McKusick, Anderson & Company in the early 1850’s, was the first warden of the Minnesota State Penetentiary at Stillwater, Minnesota Territory, in 1853, when there were no prisoners, was a surveyor in Washington County, Minnesota, in 1859, was a member of the Stillwater, Minnesota, board of health in 1861, was the mayor of Stillwater, Minnesota, in 1862, served in the U. S. Army during the Dakota War in 1862, came to St. Paul in 1862, contributed a melodeon to the Minnesota State Hospital for the Insane in 1865, was the superintendent of the First Division of the St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad, was a civil engineer of the Great Northern Railway Company in 1874, was a member of the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Ramsey County (District 24) from 1874 until 1876, was a member of a special coroner’s panel to examine the wreck of a Northern Pacific RailRoad that destroyed a bridge in Brainerd, Minnesota, was a civil engineer in 1879, was member of the St. Paul board of fire commissioners in 1884, 1885, 1886 and 1887, was a special agent for right of way of the Northern Pacific Railway Company in 1901 over the question of granting a right of way to the Jamestown & Northern Railway through the Devils Lake Indian Reservation in North Dakota, and was a member of the Minnesota Historical Society. Johnston Livingston (1817-1911,) the son of John Swift Livingston (1785-1867) and Anna Maria Martina Thompson Livingston ( -1838) and a cousin of Crawford Livingston, Jr. (1848-1925,) was educated at Union College, married Sylvia Mathilde Livingston, the daughter of Henry W. Livingston and Caroline De Grasse De Pau Livingston, in 1851, had his city residence on Fifth Avenue in New York City, New York, had his country residence at the Livingston Manor House at Tivoli-on-Hudson, New York, was in the express business, was a member of the board of directors of the Wells, Fargo & Company in 1852, was a member of the board of directors of the Cleveland & Toledo RailRoad in 1865, was a member of the board of directors of the St. Vincent Extension of the St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad in 1876, was a member of the board of directors of the Northern Pacific RailRoad in 1878 and 1886, was a member of the board of directors of the American Express Company in 1887, was a member of the board of directors of the National Express Company in 1887, was a member of the Tuxedo Club, was the president of the Knickerbocker Club, was a member of the Union Club, was a member of the Union League, was a member of the St. Nicholas Society, and was a member of the the Union College Alumni Association. George Stark (1823-1893,) the son of Frederick G. Stark, was born at Manchester, New Hampshire, attended the Pembroke Academy, attended the Milford Academy, worked as assistant with the chief engineer and surveyor of the City of Manchester, New Hampshire, Uriah A. Boyden, attended the Bedford Academy, attended the Sanbornton Academy, attended the Lowell, Massachusetts, high school,was employed on the survey staff of the Nashua & Lowell Railroad in 1837, was employed as the assistant engineer on the extension of the Nashua & Lowell Railroad in 1840, was employed by the Land & Water Power Company of Manchester, New Hampshire, then surveyed for the Vermont Central RailRoad, was an engineer employed by the Old Colony RailRoad in 1845, married Elizabeth A. Parker ( -1846,) the daughter of Daniel Parker of Bedford. New Hampshire, in 1845, was a civil engineer, married Mary G. Bowers, the daughter of Col. Joseph Bowers of Chelmsford, Massachusetts, in 1848, was the treasurer and assistant superintendent of the Nashua & Lowell RailRoad in 1849, became the superintendent of the Hudson River RailRoad in 1852, was a member of the New Hampshire Legislature in 1856, became the managing agent of the Boston & Lowell RailRoad in 1857, was brigadier-general of the third brigade of New Hampshire militia in 1857, was the unsuccessful Democratic candidate for governor of New Hampshire in 1860, recruited New Hampshire soldiers during the American Civil War, was a member of the committee selected to re-organize and resuscitate the Northen Pacific RailRoad in 1875, was the vice president and general manager of the Northern Pacific RailRoad from 1875 until 1879, was the author of a report on the Meigs Elevated RailRoad, an experimental monorail at Cambridge, Massachusetts, in 1887, was a resident of Bridgeport, Connecticut, in 1896, was an inventor who received a U. S. patent (#25,397) for a design for fence rail supports, and died at Nashua, New Hampshire. Charles Barstow Wright (1822-1898,) the son of Rufus Wright, was born in Wysox, Bradford County, Pennsylvania, was a successful merchant and banker in Western Pennsylvania in 1842, married Cordelia Williams of Erie, Pennsylvania, was employed by C. L. Ward of Towanda, New York, in 1843 to manage thousands of acres in Illinois, was a member of the board of directors of the Philadelphia & Erie RailRoad, engaged in the development of petroleum in Pennsylvania, in the 1860’s, organized the construction of the Warren & Franklin RailRoad in 1863, was a member of the board of directors of the Northern Pacific RailRoad in 1870, was a president of the Northern Pacific RailRoad from 1874 until 1879, directed the construction of the Western RailRoad of Minnesota from 1877 until 1878, resided in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, organized the Tacoma Light & Water Company in 1884, founded the Annie Wright School in Tacoma, Washington, in 1884, and purchased the Pecos & Rio Grande RailRoad in 1886. Frederick Billings (1823-1890) was born in Royalton, Vermont, grew up in Woodstock, Vermont, attended preparatory school at the Kimball Union Academy in Meriden, New Hampshire, graduated from the University of Vermont in 1844, read the law in the law offices of O. P. Chandler in Woodstock, New York, was admitted to the practice of law in Vermont in 1848, moved to California in 1848, moved to San Francisco, California, served briefly as California’s attorney general, created a legal firm, Halleck, Peachy & Billings, specializing in contested land claims, was a trustee of the College of California/University of California at Berkeley, amassed a fortune from land speculation, married Julia Parmly of New York City, New York, in 1862, returned to Woodstock, Vermont, in 1865, participated in the financial rescue of the Northern Pacific RailRoad after the 1873 Panic, was the president of the Norhtern Pacific RailRoad from 1879 until 1881, when there was a hostile takeover by Henry Villard, was a member of the board of directors of the Northern Pacific RailRoad until 1890, was a member of the board of directors of the Nicaragua Canal Construction Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Delaware & Hudson Canal Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Farmer’s Loan & Trust Company, was a member of the board of directors of the American Exchange Bank, was a member of the board of directors of the Manhatten Life Insurance Company, was a member of the board of trustees of the Brick Church in New York City, New York, was a member of the board of trustees of the Presbyterian Hospital in New York City, New York, , was a member of the board of trustees of the Hospital for the Ruptured and the Crippled in New York City, New York, and died of heart disease in Woodstock, Vermont. Samuel E. Neiler (1828-1911) was the teller of the Erie, Pennsylvania, City Bank in 1857, married Lovinia Jackson (1829–1882,) was a partner of William C. Warren in Erie, Pennsylvania, was the cashier of the Northwestern National Bank of Minneapolis in 1872, was a member of the board of trustees of St. Mark’s Presbyterian Church in Minneapolis, was an incorporator of the Lyndale Railway Company in 1878, was an incorporator of the Minneapolis, St. Cloud & Sauk Rapids RailRoad Company in 1878, was a member of the board of directors of the Minneapolis, Minnehaha & Fort Snelling Railway in 1884, was the treasurer of the Minneapolis, Lyndale & Minnetonka Railway Company in 1884, was employed by the Minnesota Saving Fund & Investment Company in 1892, died in Hendricks, Minnesota, and is buried in Lakewood Cemetery, Minneapolis. [See note on James Jerome Hill for 240 Summit Avenue.] James Buell Power (1833-1912,) the son of William H. Power and Catharine A. Buel Power, was born at Stockport, New York, moved with his family to Pittsfield, Massachusetts, attended Massachusetts schools, was a ticket and freight clerk at Port Jervis, New York, on the New York & Erie Railway, was employed by the Civil Engineering Department of the St. Louis & Pacific RailRoad in 1851, was employed by the St. Louis & Iron Mountain RailRoad in Missouri in 1852, was the civil engineer in charge of work on the Susquehanna Division of the New York & Erie Railway in 1856, married Helen Amelia Buckhout of Newburgh, New York, in 1857, moved to Waseca County, Minnesota, in 1857, worked as an engineer and surveyor, was the Chief of the Land Office in the State Auditor’s Office of Minnesota in 1861, became Deputy Minnesota State Treasurer in 1862, became the Chief Draftsman in the U.S. Surveyor’s Office in St. Paul in 1867, became the first Land Commissioner of the Northern Pacific Railway in 1871, was the General Agent for theMinnesota and Dakota division of the Northern Pacific RailRoad in 1873, again became the Land Commissioner for the Northern Pacific RailRoad in 1875, bought 6,000 acres near Leonard, Dakota Territory, in 1875, was the Land Commissioner of the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba RailRoad from 1881 until 1885, became the Secretary/Treasurer of the South St. Paul Stockyards in 1885, retired to his farm in North Dakota to retire, was appointed the director of the North Dakota Board of Agriculture in 1887, was a member of the board of trustees of the North Dakota Agricultural College at Fargo, North Dakota, in 1890, was appointed by the State Board of Public Lands as special agent to select lands inuring to the state by the Congressional Enabling Act in 1890, was Acting President of the North Dakota Agricultural College from 1893 until 1895, served in the North Dakota House of Representatives in 1897, and was buried at St. Paul. E. T. Williams was the land commissioner for the St. Paul & Northern Pacific RailRoad in 1883. [See 231 Maria Avenue for information about P. H. Kelly.] [See 225 Summit Avenue for information about Norman Kittson.] [See note on Philip Francis McQuillan for 26 Kenwood Parkway.] [See note on Lathrop E. Reed for 650 Summit Avenue.] [See note for George Loomis Becker for 194 McBoal Street.] [See note on Reece Marshall Newport for 696 West Linwood Avenue.] [See note on Alexander Ramsey for 265 South Exchange Street.]

Western Tramway Company: The company was organized in Fergus Falls, Minnesota. The company was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1881.

White Bear & East Minneapolis RailRoad: The railroad was initially chartered in 1857 as the Minnesota Western RailRoad. An 1870 Minnesota law allowed the railroad to divide into separate railroads, including the Minneapolis & St. Louis RailRoad. The rail line was constructed in 1871, was leased to the Lake Superior & Mississippi RailRoad upon the completion of the rail line, reverted to the control of its stockholders upon the bankruptcy of the Lake Superior & Mississippi RailRoad, then was leased to the Minneapolis & St. Louis RailRoad, merged with the Minneapolis & St. Louis RailRoad in 1881, and the became controlled under lease by the St. Paul & Duluth RailRoad shortly after 1881. The railroad had 13 miles of rail trackage and was operated by the St. Paul & Duluth RailRoad in 1883.

White Cedar Timber Company: The railroad owned two rod engines and one gasoline engine in the 1920's. The company railroad operated a 33 mile rail line near Big Falls, Minnesota, in 1938. The railroad was associated with the Itasca Paper Company. The Itasca Paper Company paper mill in Grand Rapids, Minnesota, which had been purchased by Charles Blandin, then owner of the St. Paul Pioneer. Press and Dispatch Printing Company, was built in1902. In 1933, the company became the Blandin Paper Company and, in 1997, the plant was purchased by the UPM Kymmene Group. a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/SumEPortTNH.html"> [See note on Charles K. Blandin for 340 Summit Avenue.]

Willmar & Sioux Falls RailRoad was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1886 by Henry T. Corson, Charles E. Goodnow, George H. Perkins, Gorham Powers, John G. Schutz, Edwin A. Sherman, John M. Spicer, Daniel E. Sweet, and Charles B. Tyler to build a railway from Willmar, Minnesota, through Granite Falls, Minnesota, Marshall, Minnesota, and Pipestone, Minnesota, to Sioux Falls, Dakota Territory as an extension of the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba RailRoad. It had initial capital stock of $2,000,000 and its principal place of business was Pipestone, Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1886. The rail line was graded in 1887, track was laid in 1888, and trains operated between Marshall, Minnesota, and Pipestone, Minnesota, later in 1888. In 1890, the officers of the railroad were W. P. Clough, president, E. Sawyer, secretary-treasurer, M. D. Grover, attorney and counsel, C. H. Warren, auditor, and A. L. Mohler, general superintendent, and the members of the board of directors were W. P. Clough, M. D. Grover, James J. Hill, Edward Sawyer, and E. T. Stephenson. In 1893, the railroad had 165 total employees (133 employees in Minnesota,) had 158.18 miles of rail trackage (122.60 miles in Minnesota,) owned 15 bridges, and owned 184 trestles. In 1893, the officers of the railroad were W. P. Clough, president, E. Sawyer, secretary-treasurer, M. D. Grover, general counsel, C. H. Warren, comptroller, and A. L. Mohler, general manager, and the members of the board of directors of the railroad were W. P. Clough, M. D. Grover, J. J. Hill, E. Sawyer, and E. T. Stevenson. According to Poor's Manual of the RailRoads of the United States, Volume 33 by Henry Varnum Poor in 1901, as of 1899, the railroad was organized in 1866, opened in 1893, acquired the Sioux City & Northern RailRoad and the Sioux City & Western RailRoad, was controlled by the Great Northern RailRoad, operated 222.23 miles of rail trackage from Willmar, Minnesota, to Yankton, South Dakota, had capital stock of $1,500,000, had as its officers W. P. Clough, president, James N. Hill, vice president, E. Sawyer, secretary and treasurer, and R. I. Farrington, comptroller, and had its general office at St. Paul. In 1904, the officers of the railroad were Louis W. Hill, president, Robert I. Farrington, vice president, E. Sawyer, secretary-treasurer, R. A. Wilkinson, general solicitor, M. D. Grover, general counsel, John G. Drew, comptroller, George R. Martin, auditor, and F. E. Ward, general manager, and the members of the board of directors were J. W. Blabon, R. I. Farrington, M. D. Grover, Louis W. Hill, and E. Sawyer. In 1904, the railroad had capital stock of $7,000,000, had 446 employees in Minnesota, owned 16 locomotives, owned 15 passenger cars, owned 1,071 freight cars, owned 13 company service cars, owned 14 bridges, owned 107 trestles, and operated 433.41 total miles of railway trackage (133.91 miles in Minnesota.) The railroad had a line from Willmar, Minnesota by way of Yankton, South Dakota, and Sioux City, Iowa, to Sioux Falls, South Dakota. The railroad operated until 1907, when it merged into the Great Northern RailRoad and was succeeded by the Great Northern RailRoad. Henry Tabor Corson (1837-1914) was born in Maine, attended school during his youth, went to California in 1856, worked in the mines and in a store house at San Francisco, California, went to Chicago in 1861, married Virginia __?__ (1845-1917,) was employed as a traveling salesman until 1878, moved to Sioux Falls, Dakota Territory, in 1878, with his family, resided at the Cataract, Dakota Territory, managing a hotel with his brother, William Henry Corson, until it was leased in 1894, was a member of the board of directors of the Dakota penitentiary ifrom 1885 until 1886, was a member of the board of directors of the Willmar & Sioux Falls RailRoad, was a Mason, was a member of the board of directors of the Yankton, Sioux Falls & Nebraska RailRoad in 1887, and was buried in Woodlawn Cemetery, Sioux Falls, Minnehaha County, South Dakota. Gorham Powers (1840-1915,) the son of Arba Powers and Naomi Mathews Powers, was born in Pittsfield, Somerset County, Maine, was educated at the Heartland Academy in Maine, served in the Fourth Maine Artillery during the American Civil War, subsequently served as a Second Lieutenant in the 13th U.S. Heavy Artillery, Company F, a “colored” regiment, during the American Civil War, was wounded at the Battle of Cedar Mountain during the American Civil War, married Addie M. Farrell Ireland (1843-1881,) the daughter of Dea Farrell and Almira L. Ireland Farrell, in 1866, graduated from the Albany, New York, law school in 1866, moved to Minnesota, was admitted to the practice of law in Minnesota in 1866, practiced law in Minneapolis with Alonzo Plummer from 1866 until 1868, moved to Renville County, Minnesota, in 1868, was a county commissioner of Renville County, Minnesota, in 1870, was the county attorney of Yellow Medicine County, Minnesota, from 1872 until 1876, after Yellow Medicine County, Minnesota, was detached from Renville County, Minnesota, practiced law as a member of the law firm of Powers & Rathbone in Granite Falls, Minnesota, from 1876 until 1890, was a member of the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Lac Qui Parle County, Minnesota, Lyon County, Minnesota, Redwood County, Minnesota, and Yellow Medicine County, Minnesota (District 37,) from 1878 until 1881, was a Minnesota district court judge of the 12th Judicial District in Yellow Medicine County, Minnesota, from 1890 until 1915, was a member of the Minnesota Historical Society, and is buried in the Granite Falls City Cemetery, Chippewa County, Minnesota. Judge Gorham Powers initially favorably ruled on a review of the successful application of Jacob F. Jacobson to the Minnesota RailRoad & Warehouse Commission to compel the Wisconsin, Minnesota & Pacific RailRoad to make a connection with the Willmar & Sioux Falls RailRoad at a crossing of their rail lines near Hanley Falls, Minnesota, which was unsuccessfully appealed to the Minnesota Supreme Court in Jacobson v. Wisconsin, Minnesota & Pacific Railway Company, 71 Minn. 519 (1898,) and was subsequently unsuccessfully appealed to the U. S. Supreme Court in Jacobson v. Wisconsin, Minnesota & Pacific Railroad, 179 U. S. 287 (1900.) John G. Schutz (1854-1925) was born in Switzerland, emigrated to the United States with his family, came to Minnesota with his family in 1855, resided in Marshall, Minnesota, was a merchant, was a Republican, was a member of the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Lincoln County, Minnesota, Lyon County, Minnesota, and Yellow Medicine County, Minnesota (District 17,) from 1898 until 1903, was a member of the Minnesota Senate representing Lincoln County, Minnesota, Lyon County, Minnesota, and Yellow Medicine County, Minnesota (District 17,) from 1902 until 1907, was a delegate from the Lyon County, Minnesota, agricultural society to the Minnesota State Agricultural Society, in 1912, and was a Mason. Edwin Alonzo Sherman (1844-1916,) the son of Calvin Sherman (1812-1875) and Lucy P. Parmenter Sherman, was born in Wayland, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, graduated from high school at Wayland, Massachusetts in 1860, was engaged in agricultural pursuits until 1864, moved to Boston, Massachusetts, in 1865 and worked as a clerk in an oil commission house, became a partner in Capen, Sherman & Company in 1867, retired from the firm in 1871, came West in 1872,. During the first winter taught school near Sioux City, Iowa, in 1872, married Florence Louise Cowdrey (1846-1890) of Melrose, Massachusetts, in 1873, came to Sioux Falls, Dakota Territory, in 1873, then purchased a half interest in the Sioux Falls Independent, a newspaper published by C. W. McDonald, actively engaged in the publication of the newspaper for 18 months, sold his interest in the newspaper to T. J. White in 1874, was the superintendent of schools of Minnehaha County, Dakota Territory, from 1874 to 1876, purchased the Cascade Mill property with Isaac Emerson and J. G. Botsford in 1877, was the Dakota Territory territorial treasurer in 1877 and 1878, was the Dakota Territory territorial auditor in 1879 and 1880, built a stone dam and the Cascade Mill, added the electric light works and incorporated the Cascade Milling Company in 1887, built several business and residential buildings, was one of the first trustees and the president of the board of the newly established state school for deaf mutes, organized and was first president of the Minnehaha National Bank in 1886, was admitted to the practice of law in South Dakota in 1886, organized the Union Trust Company in 1887, became associated with John M. Spicer, of Willmar, under the direction of James J. Hill of the Great Northern Railroad Company, and undertook the project of building the 149 mile Willmar & Sioux Falls RailRoad in 1887, resigned the presidency of the Minnehaha National Bank in 1888, became the president of the Union National Bank, was a Republican, was elected as one of the first trustees of the village of Sioux Falls, Dakota Territory, was a member of the Sioux Falls, Dakota Territory board of education, married Katharine Emma Elwell (1862-1938) of London, England, in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, in 1892, donated a 53 acre park to the City of Sioux Falls, Dakota Territory in 1910, was a member and president of the Sioux Falls, Dakota Territory, Commercial Club, was a member of the Congregational Church, was a member of the South Dakota House of Representatives (District 10) from 1910 until 1912, supported a prohibition on the sale of alcohol, and is buried in the Mount Pleasant Cemetery, Sioux Falls, South Dakota. John Mason Spicer (1841-1928) was born in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, then resided with his family in Guilford, Franklin County, Pennsylvania, moved with his family to Polo, Illinois, in 1852, received a limited formal education, began working as a clerk in a grocery store, then took a job as a clerk in a general merchandising firm, moved to St. Paul in 1860, was employed by the general merchandising firm of Ingersoll & Company, became a partner in Ingersoll & Company and was the manager of a new store in Belle Plaine, Minnesota, married Eliza Frances Deming Spicer (1851-1909,) the daughter of George Loomis Deming (1823-1894) and Isabella Moffat Deming (1823- ,) moved to Willmar, Minnesota, in 1871, established a general merchandise-farm implement partnership with Andrew Larson under the name of Spicer & Larson, was the president of the Willmar, Minnesota, Board of Education in 1878, organized, with Larson and three other investors, the Kandiyohi County Bank in 1879, was the president of the Kandiyohi County Bank from 1879 until 1884, was a Willmar, Minnesota, alderman in 1880, formed, with Larson and three other investors, the Central Land Company in 1882 for the purpose of buying, owning, improving, selling, and dealing in lands in Kandiyohi County, Minnesota, was the mayor of Willmar, Minnesota, in 1881 and 1893, was the president of the Lake Superior, Willmar and Dakota RailRoad Company in 1883, was a Democrat, was one of the organizers of the St. Cloud & Willmar RailRoad, was the founder of Spicer, Minnesota, was a delegate to the Democratic national convention in 1884 and in 1888, was the president of the Willmar & Sioux Falls Railway Company in 1886, was president and principal owner of the Willmar & Sioux Falls Townsite Company, which platted and developed townsites along the Willmar & Sioux Falls rail line, was the president of the Spicer Land Company, incorporated in 1899, held the controlling interest in the Meadow Land Company, held the controlling interest in the Spicer Land Company, and was buried in Spicer, Minnesota. Charles B. Tyler (1834- ) moved to Minnesota in 1858, was a printer, and was appointed the federal land register at New Ulm, Minnesota, from 1873 until 1877. Daniel Elijah Sweet (1838-1902,)the son of Lorenzo Luman Sweet, was born in Pennsylvania, moved to Wisconsin with his parents when a child, moved to Iowa in 1860, married Amarancy Hatch (1835-1870,) the daughter of Reuben Hatch (1790- ) and Betsey Shephard Hatch (1790- ,) enlisted in the 11th Iowa Infantry during the American Civil War, moved to Cedar County, Iowa, and resided there until 1872, moved to Lyon County, Iowa, in 1872, married Mary Olive Votra (1841- ) in Lyon County, Iowa, was instrumental, with fellow surveyor Charles H. Bennett, in the founding of Pipestone, Minnesota, was the first settler in Pipestone County, Minnesota, in 1874, was the first postmaster of Pipestone, Minnesota, was a delegate to a Republican Party Congressional Convention in 1876, was a Pipestone County, Minnesota, supervisor in 1877, was a justice of the peace in Pipestone County, Minnesota, was a probate judge for Pipestone County, Minnesota, served as the county surveyor for Pipestone County, Minnesota, in 1879, was a Mason, moved to Jennings, Louisiana, managed a steamboat, and died at Siloam Springs, Arkansas. Marcus Delett Grover (1841-1904,) the son of Allen Grover (1802-1865) and Rachel Crain/Crane Harnden Grover ( -1887,) was born in Wells, Rutland County, Vermont, was educated in the Wells, Vermont, public schools, attended the Troy Conference Academy, Poultney, Vermont, read the law in the law offices of D. E. Nicholson in Wallingford, Vermont, was a law student with the law firm of Tremian & Peckham in Albany, New York, was admitted to the practice of law in Rutland County, Vermont, and in Schenectady County, New York, in 1868, practiced in the law office of M. P. Norton, Troy, New York, then was a law partner of R. C. Betts in Granville, New York, until 1874, was a member of the Vermont House of Representatives in 1869, married Virginia A. Townsend of Jordan, Onondaga County/Cayuga County, New York, was a partner in the law firm of Waldo & Grover in Port Henry, New York from 1874 until 1887, moved to St. Paul to assist W. E. Smith, counsel of the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba RailRoad, in 1887, succeeded W. E. Smith as general counsel of the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba RailRoad in 1888, became the general counsel of the Great Northern RailRoad in 1890, was the general counsel and a member of the board of directors of the Great Northern RailRoad in 1890, was the attorney and counsel and a member of the board of directors of the Willmar & Sioux Falls RailRoad in 1890, was the attorney and counsel and a member of the board of directors of the Duluth, Watertown & Pacific RailRoad in 1890, was an incorporator in 1892 of the Great Northern Express Company, was the draftsman of the articles of incorporation of the Northern Securities Company, resided at 225 Summit Avenue in 1904, and died of a malarial fever and pneumonia in St. Paul. Charles Howard Warren (1856- ) was born in Orleans County, New York, was a clerk in the freight auditor’s office of the Chaicago & NorthWestern RailRoad in 1876, was a clerk in the superintendent’s office of the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific RailRoad from 1876 until 1881, was a stenographer and clerk to General Manager Manvel at the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba RailRoad from 1881 until 1884, became general passenger agent of the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba RailRoad in 1884, then became the Comptroller of the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba RailRoad at the direction of James J. Hill in 1888, became the General Manager of the Great Northern Railway at the direction of James J. Hill in 1894, also was the general manager of the Central Montana RailRoad in 1896, married Lilian Baker, a stockholder's daughter, got chesty aspiring to be president of the Great Northern Railway, disagreed with J. J. Hill, refused to resign, was fired in 1897, became the first assistant to the president of the Central Railroad of New Jersey in 1897, and was the First Vice President of the Central RailRoad of New Jersey from 1899 until 1902, resigning when the railroad was purchased by the Reading Company and its general offices shifted to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The Lewis Baker Warren Scholarship at the Sheffield Scientific School at Yale University was established in 1914 by a gift of $5,000 from Mr. and Mrs. Charles Howard Warren and augmented in 1936 by a $1,000,000 gift from the estate of C. H. Warren. Adam Leonides Mohler (1849/1850-1930,) the son of George Mohler (1815- ) and Elmira Rebecca Ruth Mohler (1815- ,) was born in Ephrata, Pennsylvania, moved to Illinois, was a warehouse and office clerk employed by the Chicago & North Western RailRoad in Gait, Illinois, in 1868, was a station agent employed by the Rockford, Rock Island & St. Louis RailRoad in Erie, Illinois, in 1871, married Jennie Malissa Smith (1850- ,) was a clerk in the auditor’s office of the Rockford, Rock Island & St. Louis RailRoad from 1871 until 1882, was a clerk employed by the Burlington, Cedar Rapids & Northern Railway from 1882 until 1886, was the land commissioner employed by the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba RailRoad from 1886 until 1887, was the general freight agent employed by the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba RailRoad from 1887 until 1889, was the assistant general manager of the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba RailRoad in 1889, was the general manager of the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba RailRoadfrom 1889 until 1890, was the general manager of the Great Northern RailRoad from 1890 until 1893, was the general manager of the Montana Central RailRoad after 1893, was the general manager of the Minneapolis & St. Louis RailRoad after 1894, resided in 1897, was an inventer who filed for a U. S. patent (#592,119) in 1897, was the general manager of the Oregon Railroad and Navigation Company, was an executive with the Portland & Asiatic Steamship Company, was an executive of the Ilwaco Railway & Navigation Company, was an executive with the Oregon Short Line RailRoad, was the president of the Union Pacific RailRoad from 1911 until 1914, and was a member of the board of directors of the Harriman National Bank in 1918. E. T. Stephenson was a member of the board of directors of the Willmar & Sioux Falls RailRoad in 1893, was a member of the board of directors of the Duluth, Watertown & Pacific RailRoad in 1893, and was the assistant secretary and stock transfer agent for the Ogdensburg Terminal RailRoad in 1920. E. T. Stevenson was a notary public in Ramsey County, Minnesota, in 1888. Randolphe A. “R. W.” Wilkinson (1843/1847-1932/1942,) the son of Samuel Wilkinson and Martha Mitchell/Martha Pearson Wilkinson, was born in England, emigrated to the United States in 1854/1857, resided in Sauk County, Wisconsin, served in a Wisconsin Regiment during the American Civil War, was a Colonel, married Mary Jane Lycan (1847-1902) in 1867, was employed as a clerk in the Internal Revenue Office at Prairie du Sac, Wisconsin, in 1868, was admitted to the practice of law in Wisconsin in 1868, resided in Mauston, Wisconsin, was a member of the Wisconsin General Assembly, practiced law until 1877, moved from Mauston, Wisconsin, to Wonewoc , Wisconsin, in 1877, was a dealer in general produce and agricultural implements, was the proprieter of the Juneau House, was a District Attorney of Juneau County for two terms, was the chairman of the Juneau County board for one term,was a member of the Juneau County board for two terms, was the chairman of the town board of Wonewoc , Wisconsin, in 1881, and was the president of the Village of Wonewoc , Wisconsin, moved to Minnesota in 1880, farmed in the Red River Valley of Minnesota, was a Democrat, was a right of way agent for the Great Northern RailRoad in 1890, resided in Crookston, Minnesota, in 1900, became a Republican, moved to St. Paul, was the general solicitor of the Great Northern RailRoad in 1903, married Mathilda Achilles (1868- ) in 1906 in St. Paul, was the right of way and tax commissioner of the Great Northern RailRoad in 1908, was the tax commissioner of the Iowa & Great Northern RailRoad in 1909, was the president of the Review Publishing Company in 1910, resided in Lake Elmo, Minnesota, in 1910, was a member of the Minnesota House of Representative representing Washington County, Minnesota (District 43,) from 1918 until 1927, was a Mason, died in St. Paul, and was buried in Oakland Cemetery. John Graham Drew (1864- ) was born in Hammondsport, New York, was a station clerk for the St. Joseph & Western RailRoad in 1881, continued in the employ of the railroad in various capacities when it became the St. Joseph & Grand Island RailRoad, was the auditor of the St. Joseph & Grand Island RailRoad in 1896, was the comptroller of the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba RailRoad in 1902, was the comptroller of the Park Rapids & Leech Lake RailRoad in 1906, was the comptroller of the Great Northern RailRoad in 1908, was the comptroller of the Montana Central RailRoad in 1908, and was the president of the Railway Accounting Officers Association in 1921. George R. Martin (1864- ,) the son of James B. Martin and Amelia M. Walrath Martin, was born in Evans Mill, New York, was a telegraph operator with the Chicago & NorthWestern RailRoad from 1885 until 1887, was a station agent, train dispatcher and chief clerk for the Minneapolis, St.Paul & Sault Ste. Marie RailRoad 1887 until 1890, was employed in the accounting department of the Great Northern RailRoad from 1890 until 1894, was an assistant auditor for the Great Northern RailRoad from 1894 until 1897, was a special superintendent for the Great Northern RailRoad in 1897, was the general superintendent of the Montana Central RailRoad from 1897 until 1898, was the general superintendent for the Central Division of the Great Northern RailRoad from 1898 until 1899, was an auditor for the Great Northern RailRoad from 1899 until 1902, was the general auditor of the Great Northern RailRoad from 1902 until 1905, was an incorporator of the Whitney Electrical & Development Company in Pierre, South Dakota, in 1902, was the auditor of the Willmar & Sioux Falls RailRoad in 1905, was assistant comptroller or comptroller for the Great Northern RailRoad from 1906 until 1916, resided at 3305 East Calhoun Parkway in Minneapolis, after 1907, was the comptroller of the Glacier Park Company in 1913, was a vice president of the Great Northern RailRoad in 1916 and 1919, was vice president of the Great Northern Steamship Company after 1916, was the vice president of the Northern Steamship Company after 1916, was comptroller of the Great Northern Express Company after 1916, was a member of the board of directors of the Great Northern RailRoad in 1919, and was the executive vice president of the Great Northern Railway in 1922. [See note on William Pitt Clough for 500 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Edward Sawyer for 461 Holly Avenue.] [See note on James Jerome Hill for 240 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Louis Warren Hill for 260 Summit Avenue.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/SumEPortTNH.html"> [See note on James Norman Hill for 240 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Robert I. Farrington, Thayer B. Farrington, and John D. Farrington for 457-459 Portland Avenue.] [See note on John Graham Drew for 720 Goodrich Avenue.] [For more information on Frank Earl Ward, see 1522 Portland Avenue.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/TNHrail2.html" [See note on Joseph Ward Blabon for the Wisconsin, Minnesota & Pacific RailRoad.]

Wilton & Northern RailRoad/Crookston Lumber Company RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1905 and operated until 1912 or 1914. The Wilton & Northern Railroad was built in 1905 by the Crookston Lumber Company as part of its efforts to block the expansion of the Minneapolis, Red Lake & Manitoba RailRoad into logging on the Red Lake Indian Reservation. The railroad owned one rod locomotive and three general locomotives. The Wilton & Northern Railroad owned three Lima-Shay geared locomotives, which were able to travel on ten percent to 12 percent grades and were excellent logging steam engines. Rather than compete with the St. Hilaire Lumber Company on the Minneapolis, Red Lake & Manitoba Railway, the Crookston Lumber Company built a railroad to haul logs from the Red Lake Reservation to its sawmill in Bemidji, Minnesota, by way of the Great Northern RailRoad. The Wilton & Northern Railroad ran North 24 miles to Island Lake, Minnesota, on the Southern edge of the Red Lake Reservation. Dempsey & Dougherty had the contract for the construction of the Wilton & Northern rail line. The towns of Spaulding, Minnesota, Lynx, Minnesota, Newhaven, Minnesota, and Fowlds, Minnesota, were created on the Wilton & Northern RailRoad line. The headquarters and enginehouse of the railroad were at Fowlds, Minnesota. As a result of the efforts of Alfred L. Molander, an employee of C. A. Smith & Company before 1908 and the general manager and treasurer of the Minneapolis, Red Lake & Manitoba RailRoad from 1908 until 1938, succeeding Walter G. Marson, the Wilton & Northern RailRoad and the Minneapolis, Red Lake & Manitoba RailRoad reconciled, resulting in the construction of a connection at the Nebish, Minnesota, gravel pits and Island Lake, Minnesota. The railroad eventually became a private railroad owned and operated by the Crookston Lumber Company. Hovey C. Clark (1859- ) was the secretary-treasurer of the Crookston Lumber Company.

Winnebago & St. Paul RailRoad/Winnebago City & St. Paul Railway Company: The railroad was incorporated in 1877 by Charles Albee, William Allen, J. A. Armstrong, A. Bartlett, Frank Deudon, Andrew C. Dunn, M. J. Fellows, A. L. Fox, F. A. Gale, E. J. Hendricks, H. W. Holley, C. S. Kimball, George D. McArthur, Henry McKinstry, Paul McKinstry, J. C. Paschke, C. H. Payne, J. S. Robertson, N. W. Sargent, Robert P. Sargent, R. Sheren, C. G. Stagle, Lester C. Turner, Levis N. Turner, Charles Wallace, J. S. Wallace, D. N. Ware, J. H. Welch, and Josiah F. Winship, to build and operate a Winnebago City, Minnesota, Northwardly to Mankato, Minnesota, or to some point along an existing railroad to Mankato, Minnesota, and also from Winnebago City, Minnesota, Southwardly to the Iowa state line, with a principal place of business in Winnebago City, Minnesota, with capital stock of $500,000, and was organized in 1877. William Allen was the editor and publisher of the Winnebago City, Faribault County, Minnesota, Press & Times in 1882. John A. Armstrong (1833-1919) was educated at Argyle Academy in New York, was a banker in Winnebago City, Minnesota, married Caroline __?__ ( -1874,) was an incorporator of the Winnebago City Brick & Tile Company in 1893, was an incorporator and member of the initial board of directors of the Winnebago Manufacturing Company in 1894, resided in Winnebago City, Faribault County, Minnesota, in 1900, was a Republican, and was a member of the Minnesota Senate representing Faribault County, Minnesota (District 12,) from 1900 until 1903, and died in Ramsey County, Minnesota. Andrew Clarkson “A. C.” Dunn (1834-1918,) the son of Nathaniel Dunn and Charlotte Tillinghast Dunn, was born in New York City, New York, read the law under the direction of Edward Standford of New York City, New York, came to Minnesota in 1854, was admitted to the practice of law by the Minnesota Territorial Supreme Court, practiced law for a short time at Sauk Rapids, Minnesota, then relocated at St. Paul, was an early settler in and founder of Winnebago City, Minnesota, in 1856, was the Secretary of the Minnesota Senate from 1857 until 1858, was one of the special Commissioners, appointed by the governor, to divide Faribault County, Minnesota, into towns and name them in 1858, married Diana Jane Smith (1836-1913,) the daughter of Colonel Benjamin F. Smith, of Blue Earth County, Minnesota, in 1859, was the Faribault County, Minnesota, county attorney after 1862, was one of the commissioners appointed to take the vote of the soldiers then in active service in the South in 1863, was the Chief Clerk of the Minnesota House of Representatives from 1864 until 1866, was a Democrat, and was a member of the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Faribault County, Minnesota (District 6,) from 1880 until 1883, was one of the legal counsels on the part of the House of Representatives in the impeachment proceedings against Judge E. St. J. Cox in 1881, was the author of Leaves from the tablets of my memory concerning early days of Minnesota, 1916, was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, was a member of the Minnesota Historical Society, and died in Winnebago, Minnesota. George D. “G. D.” McArthur (1834-1914) was born in New York, attended Cornell College, came to Minnesota in 1855,.moved to Faribault County, Minnesota, in 1856, was a road supervisor for Faribault County, Minnesota, in 1863, was engaged in farming, banking, and dealing in agricultural implements, owned the George D. McArthur Implement Company, was a Mason, resided in Blue Earth, Minnesota in 1894, was a Republican, was a member of the Minnesota State Senate representing Faribault County, Minnesota (Districts 5 and 12,) from 1894 until 1903, and was a member of the Minnesota State Agricultural Society in 1896. Henry McKinstry (1842-1914,) the son of Paul McKinstry (1807-1890) and Harriet Lilly McKinstry (1810-1897,) was born in Bethel, Windsor County, Vermont, resided between 1842 and 1868 in Bethel, Vermont, was educated at the Newbury Seminary in Orange County, Vermont, taught school between 1859 and 1862, was mustered into Company G of the 12th Vermont Volunteer Infantry Regiment during the American Civil War in 1862, was a Confederate prisoner of war, married Alice D. Packer, the daughter of David Packer, in Lowell, Massachusetts, in 1868, resided between 1868 and 1872 in Syracuse, New York, learned telegraphy, was an operator for the United States Telegraph Company along the Central RailRoad, was a bookkeeper in a wholesale and retail millinery store in Syracuse, New York, until 1871, was a bookkeeper in a wholesale and retail millinery store in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1872, resided between 1872 and 1896 in Winnebago City, Minnesota, clerked in a general store owned by J. F. Winship, his brother-in-law, until 1874, then entered the dry goods merchandising business, also invested in farm land and city property, was a Republican, was the chairman of the Republican county central committee, was a member of the Winnebago, Minnesota, school board, was a member of the Winnebago, Minnesota, city council, was a member of the Odd Fellows, was a member of the Grand Army of the Republic, was a Mason, was a Methodist Episcopalian, was a lay delegate from Minnesota Methodism to the General Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church in 1884, resided after 1896 in Worcester, Massachusetts, and died in Worcester, Massachusetts. Paul McKinstry (1807-1890) was born in Bethel, Windsor County, Vermont, married Harriet Lilly, the daughter of Samuel Lilly (1777- ) and Clara Eddy (1784-1867,) moved to Newbury, Vermont, in 1854, opened and ran a hardware and stove store in Newbury, Vermont, moved to Northfield, Minnesota, in 1866, to Winnebago City, Minnesota, in 1869, and died in Winnebago City, Minnesota. Josiah F. Winship (1839-1899) was born in Ipswich, New Hampshire, moved to Southern Illinois in 1853, returned to Vermont, moved to Platteville, Wisconsin, returned to Vermont, was exempted from military service during the American Civil War on account of disability, was a clerk in a large store in New Ipswich, Vermont, until 1865, moved to Winnebago City, Minnesota, in 1865 or 1866, married Alice H. McKinstry ( -1870,) the daughter of Paul McKinstry (1807-1890) and Harriet Lilly McKinstry (1810-1897,) in 1866, was the postmaster of Winnebago City, Minnesota, then married Ellen McKinstry (1846-1934,) the daughter of Paul McKinstry (1807-1890) and Harriet Lilly McKinstry (1810-1897,) in 1872, was engaged in the mercantile business, was the Winnebago, Minnesota, township treasurer, was a probate court judge of Faribault County, Minnesota, from 1892 until 1899, was a Mason, was a Methodist Episcopalian, died Hudson, Wisconsin, and was buried in Hillside Cemetery, Winnebago City, Minnesota. Frank Deudon of in Blue Earth, Minnesota, was the local agent for the Moline Plow Company of Moline, Illinois, and was a partner with G. K. Moulton in Moulton & Deudon, a retailer of shawls and cloaks in 1863 and 1868. John S. Robertson resided in Winnebago City, Minnesota, in 1889. Levi N. Turner (1838- ,) the son of Lyman Turner (1805-1893) and Miriam Flanders Turner (1814- ,) was born in Milo, Piscataquis County, Maine, moved with his family to Wisconsin in 1845, apprenticed as a carpenter and millwright, was a logger in 1861, served in Company F of the 12th Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry from 1861 until 1865, was severely wounded in the Battle of Atlanta, Georgia, moved to Blue Earth County, Minnesota, in 1865, was a carpenter in Winnebago City, Minnesota from 1865 until 1870, married Mary Eliza Weaver (1851- ) of New York in 1870, engaged in a general merchandise business in Winnebago City, Minnesota from 1870 until 1874, operated the Cable flour mill with Walter Redfearn at Lyra, Blue Earth County, Minnesota, from 1882 until 1892, moved to California in 1892, engaged in the hardware and implement business in Delano, California, and was a member of the Ancient Order of United Workmen since 1876.

Winona Bridge RailRoad: The railroad was organized as a Minnesota corporation in 1890 to build and operate a bridge over the Mississippi River from East Winona, Wisconsin, to Winona, Minnesota, and began operation upon completion of its building in 1891, having been the recipient of the transfer by deed of the rights granted by an act of Congress in 1888 and by acts of the Legislatures of Minnesota and Wisconsinto build the bridge from the Winona & Southwestern RailRoad. Construction of the bridge was by the Union Bridge Company. The bridge consisted of four spans and was a modification of the Pratt truss. The track of the Winona Bridge Railway Company started on this side of the river at a connection with the Chicago, Burlington, and Northern, then extended almost due east for 854 feet, and then in a 1 degree and 30 minute curve 1,089 feet, turned to the north to the bridge. The bridge was 1,260 feet long, and on the Wisconsin side a length trestle of 1,100 feet. Part of the trestle was in the 6 degree curve with which the road turns slightly to the East. The bridge consisted of a 420 foot swing span on the Minnesota side and three trusses spanning 360, 240, and 240 feet towards Wisconsin. The approach trestles were 270 feet long on the Minnesota side and 1,100 feet long through the marsh land on the Wisconsin side. The Green Bay, Winona, & Saint Paul RailRoad owned one-third of the Winona Bridge RailRoad in 1890. According to the Manual of the RailRoads of the United States, Volume 27 by Henry Varnum Poor in 1895, the railroad operated 1.03 miles of rail trackage from Winona, Minnesota, to Buffalo, Wisconsin, was incorporated in 1890, opened operations in 1891, connected the Winona & Southwestern RailRoad, the Green Bay, Winona & St. Paul RailRoad, and the Chicago, Burlington & Northern RailRoad, is leased by those three railroads, had $400,000 in capital stock, had as its officers M. G. Norton, president, Joseph Walker, Jr., vice president, H. W. Lamberton, treasurer, and H. W. Weiss, secretary, had as its board of directors S. W. Champion, George B. Harris, J. R. Hastings, E. F. Hatfield, H. W. Lamberton, M. G. Norton, J. C. Peasley, V. Simpson, and Joseph Walker, Jr., and had its general office in Winona, Minnesota. According to Poor's Manual of the RailRoads of the United States, Volume 33 by Henry Varnum Poor in 1901, as of 1899, the railroad operated 1.03 miles of rail trackage between Winona, Minnesota, and Buffalo, Wisconsin, had $400,000 in capital stock, had as its officers M. G. Norton, president, J. A. Jordan, vice president, H. W. Lamberton, treasurer, M. G. Norton, V. Simpson, and H. W. Weiss, secretary, had as its board of directors Mark T. Cox, Daniel Cunningham, George B. Harris, J. A. Jordan, H. W. Lamberton, S. T. Palmer, and J. C. Peasley, and had its general office in Winona, Minnesota. In 1904, the officers of the railroad were W. W. Baldwin, president, J. A. Jordan, first vice president, H. W. Weiss, secretary, T. S. Howland, treasurer, and D. Cunningham, superintendent, and the members of the board of directors were W. W. Baldwin, M. T. Cox, T. S. Howland, J. A. Jordan, and C. I. Sturges. In 1904, the railroad had capital stock of $400,000, owned one bridge, and operated 1.03 miles of railway trackage between Winona, Minnesota, and Buffalo, Wisconsin (0.49 miles in Minnesota.) In 1913, the railroad had as its officers W. W. Baldwin, president, J. A. Jordan, vice president, H. W. Weiss, secretary, T. S. Howland, treasurer, and D. Cunningham, general superintendent, had as its board of directors W. W. Baldwin, Charles W. Cox, T. S. Howland, J. A. Jordan, and C. I. Sturgis, had total capital stock of $400,000, had as its principal place of business Chicago, Illinois, had eight employees in Minnesota, had 1.03 miles of railway trackage (0.49 miles of track in Minnesota,) and had ten total employees. The railroad operated until 1938 and was succeeded by the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy RailRoad and by the Green Bay & Western RailRoad. Reportedly, in 1983, the Winona Bridge was taken out of regular service for operational reasons because the locomotives available for local service at La Crosse, Wisconsin, were getting too heavy for the bridge. The bridge was closed to traffic in 1985 when heavy repairs were needed to be made on the trestle approach and the bridge was unable to handle 100-ton cars. The Burlington Northern RailRoad bought the Green Bay & Western RailRoad's share of the Winona Bridge RailRoad in 1985 or 1987 to use the railroad as a shell company to create a competitive route to move intermodal trains between Chicago, Illinois, and Seattle, Washington, and to circumvent some work rules, but the venture failed before it started. The bridge partially burned in 1989, with the fire confined to the short stretch on the Minnesota side and to the swing span, and was dismantled in 1990 as a threat to river traffic. Joseph Walker, Jr., was a member of Joseph Walker & Sons, a New York Stock Exchange firm that was founded in 1855. Henry W. Weiss was the secretary and a member of the board of directors of the Chicago & Iowa RailRoad in 1898, was the the secretary and a member of the board of directors of the Chicago, Burlington & Northern RailRoad in 1899, was the the secretary-treasurer and a member of the board of directors of the Galesburg & Rio RailRoad in 1899, was the the secretary-treasurer and a member of the board of directors of the Illinois Valley & Northern RailRoad in 1899, was the the secretary-treasurer and a member of the board of directors of the St. Louis, Rock Island & Chicago RailRoad in 1899, and was the the secretary-treasurer and a member of the board of directors of the Quincy, Alton & St. Loius RailRoad in 1899. Mark T. Cox (1853-1909) of New York, New York/East Orange, New Jersey, was a senior partner of the Wall Street investment and banking firm of Robert Winthrop & Company, was a member of the committee to merge and readjust the capitalization of the Flint & Pere Marquette RailRoad, the Detroit, Grand Rapids & Western RailRoad, and the Chicago & West Michigan RailRoad in 1899, was a member of the board of directors of the Lackawanna Steel Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Wisconsin Central RailRoad, was a member of the board of directors of the Chicago Junction RailRoad, was a member of the board of directors of the Union Stock Yard Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Public Service Corporation of New Jersey, was a member of the board of directors of the Colonial Assurance Company in 1900, and was a member of the board of directors of the Allis-Chalmers Company in 1901, was the president and member of the board of directors of the Massena Terminal Company in 1901, was the vice president and a member of the board of directors of the St. Lawrence River Power Company in 1902, and was the vice president and a member of the board of directors of the Pere Marquette RailRoad in 1904. Seth W. Champion (1844-1910) was born in Princeton, Kentucky, was employed by the Chicago & Alton RailRoad from 1867 until 1881, married Lucinda A. __?__, was an agent for the Green Bay & Minnesota RailRoad from 1881 until 1885, was the chief passenger and freight clerk with the Green Bay, Winona & St. Paul RailRoad from 1885 until 1889, was the general freight and passenger agent for the Green Bay, Winona & St. Paul RailRoad from 1889 until 1891, was the superintendent for the Green Bay, Winona & St. Paul RailRoad after 1891, was the vice president and general manager of the Iola & Northern RailRoad, was the general manager and a member of the board of directors of the Kewaunee, Green Bay & Western RailRoad in 1895, and was buried in the San Gabriel Cemetery, San Gabriel, Los Angeles County, California. James C. Peasley (1840-1920,) the son of Francis J. C. Peasley ( -1852,) a banker, attended Illinois College, in Jacksonville, Illinois, and Mary E. Grannis Peasley, was born in Henderson County, Illinois, was employed by the Des Moines County Savings Bank, was the assistant treasurer of the Burlington & Missouri River RailRoad Company from 1864 until 1866, married Louisa S. Green of Lawrenceville, New Jersey, in 1866, was the cahsier of the Burlington, Iowa, National State Bank before 1871, was the president of the Burlington, Iowa, National State Bank after 1871, was a Republican, was a member of the board of directors of the Burlington, Cedar Rapids & Northern RailRoad in 1888, was the vice president and treasurer of the Chicago, Burlington & Kansas City RailRoadin 1892, was the treasurer of the Chicago, Burlington & Northern RailRoad in 1892, was the first vice president and treasurer of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy RailRoad in 1892, was the treasurer of the Kansas City, St. Joseph & Council Bluffs RailRoad in 1892, was the treasurer of the St. Louis, Keokuk & NorthWestern RailRoad in 1892, was a member of the Chicago Club, and died in Chicago, Illinois. Daniel Cunningham married Laura B. Smith of La Crosse, Wisconsin, and was the superintendent of the Burlington & Northern RailRoad in 1892. W. W. Baldwin was the vice-president of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company in 1913. [See note for Verrazano Simpson for the Winona & Western RailRoad.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/TNHrail2.html" [See note on Charles Harkness Lamberton for the Winona City RailRoad.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/TNHrail2.html" [See note on Matthew George Norton for the Winona & Western RailRoad.]

The Winona City RailRoad was incorporated in 1883 under a Winona, Minnesota, city ordinance by Royal D. Cone, Thomas Taylor "T.T." Hayden, Charles Horton, John A. Mathews, and C. H. Porter to build a street railway in the City of Winona, Minnesota, and its suburbs in Winona County, Minnesota. It had initial capital stock of $50,000 and its principal place of business was Winona, Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1883. In 1887, the Winona General Electric Company was the assignee of the rights and franchises of the street railway company. In 1889, the railroad operated four miles of rail track, owned 37 horses, had ten cars, had as its board of directors Charles Horton, C. H. Lamberton, B. H. Langely, John A. Mathews, C. H. Porter, and E. S. Youmans, and had as its officers B. H. Langley, president, Charles Horton, vice president, C. H. Porter, secretary-treasurer, and L. Marion, superintendent. In 1890, there was an internal fight among the investors in the railroad over the question of electrification of the rail line, with the faction favoring electrification, holding 49 percent of the shares of capital stock, consisting of Edward R. Gilman, H. W. Turner, H. S. Cole, W. G. De Celle, H. K. Gilman, C. B. Boothe, B. H. Langley, and Mary A. C. Langley and with the faction opposing electrification, holding 45 percent of the shares of capital stock consisting of H. W. Lamberton, J. A. Mathews, F. A. Johnston, and M. G. Norton, and with ownership of six percent of the shares of capital stock in litigation before the Minnesota Supreme Court between Mary A. C. Langley and F. A. Johnston. An interim set of officers of the railroad in 1890 were B. H. Langley, president, W. G. De Celle, vice president, B. D. Hatcher, secretary, and H. W. Turner, treasurer. Later in 1890, the railroad was owned by the Thomson-Houston Electric Company, which also owned street railroads in 81 other cities (Albany, New York; Alliance, Ohio; Ansonia, Connecticut; Americus, Georgia; Atlanta, Georgia; Attleboro, Massachusetts; Auburn, New York; Augusta, Maine; Bangor, Maine; Boston, Massachusetts; Bremen, Germany; Brooklyn, New York; Chattanooga, Tennessee; Cincinnati, Ohio; Cleveland, Ohio; Council Bluffs, Iowa; Crescent Beach, Massachusetts; Dallas, Texas; Danville, Virginia; Decatur, Illinois; Denver, Colorado; Des Moines, Iowa; Fort Worth, Texas; Gloucester, Massachusetts; Harrisburg, Pennsylvania; Indianapolis, Indiana; Joliet, Illinois; Kansas City, Missouri; Kearney, Nebraska; Knoxville, Tennessee; Louisville, Kentucky; Lynn, Massachusetts; Macon, Georgia; Milwaukee, Wisconsin; Minneapolis; Nashville, Tennessee; New Bedford, Massachusetts; Newburyport, Massachusetts; Newport, Rhode Island; Newton, Massachusetts; North Adams, Massachusetts; Omaha, Nebraska; Ottawa, Illinois; Ottumwa, Iowa; Passaic, New Jersey; Peoria, Illinois; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; Plymouth, Massachusetts; Port Townsend, Washington; Portland, Oregon; Pueblo, Colorado; Quincy, Massachusetts; Red Bank, New Jersey; Revere, Massachusetts; Richmond, Indiana; Rochester, New York; Rockford, Illinois; St. Louis, Missouri; St. Paul; Salem, Massachusetts; Salem, Ohio; San Jose, California; Saratoga Springs, New York; Scranton, Pennsylvania; Seattle, Washington; Shreveport, Louisiana; South Bend, Indiana; Southington, Connecticut; Spokane Falls, Washington; Springfield, Illinois; Springfield, Massachusetts; Syracuse, New York; Toledo, Ohio; Topeka, Kansas; Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Utica, New York; Victoria, Australia; Victoria, British Columbia, Canada; West Superior, Wisconsin; Wheeling, West Virginia; Wichita, Kansas; and Washington, D.C.) In 1893, the railroad operated four miles of track, was an electrified system, had seven rail cars, had as its officers G. C. Duffle, president, H. B. Levis, vice president, B. F. Meek, secretary, and W. H. Moore, treasurer, and had its main office at St. Paul. In 1894, the railroad had four miles of track, the railroad had seven rail cars, and its superintendent was G. C. Duffle. The Poor's Directory of RailRoad Officials, published by the Poor's RailRoad Manual Company in 1898, indicates that the officials of the railroad were B. H. Langley, president, F. A. Johnston, vice president, C. H. Porter, secretary and treasurer, and L. Marion, superintendent, that the members of the board of directors of the railroad were Charles Horton, F. A. Johnston, C. H. Lamberton, B. H. Langley, John A. Mathews, C. H. Porter, and E. S. Youmans, that the general office of the railroad was in Winona, Minnesota, and that the railroad operated 3.82 miles of rail trackage and owned 37 horses and ten rail cars. Thomas Taylor "T.T." Hayden (1831-1906) was born in Elgin County, New York, came to Minnesota in 1873 or 1880, engaged in the farm machinery business, invested in the Winona Harvester Company in 1883, was a Democrat, was a member of the Minnesota Senate representing Winona County, Minnesota (District 15,) from 1887 until 1891, and was a proprietor, with C. L. Bonner, of the Winona Electric Light Company in 1890. Charles Horton (1836-1913) was born in Niles, New York, came to Minnesota in 1858, settled in Winona, Minnesota, founded the Empire Lumber Company in 1858 initially with his partner, Lemuel C. Porter, and with his partner, Alexander Hamilton, from 1860 until 1880, established a limestone quarry in Winona, Minnesota, in 1870, was the treasurer of the Winona Carriage Company in 1883, was granted individual authority by city ordinance to lay a rail line across a highway on the South shore of Lake Winona in 1887, was the president of the Winona, Minnesota, Bicycle Club in 1887, was the general manager of the Winona Harvester Company, donated the parsonage of the St. Paul’s Protestant Episcopal Church, where he was a warden in 1910, was the president of the Woodlawn Cemetery Association of Winona, Minnesota, was a Mason, and operated the Charles Horton Lumber Company of Winona, Minnesota. Joseph Mathews resided in Cascade Township, Minnesota, in 1855. Charles Henry Porter, the son of Judge John Porter and Mary Ellen Porter, was a wholesale and retail postage stamp dealer in Winona, Minnesota, in 1880 and was the vice president of the First National Bank of Winona, Minnesota, in 1881. George C. Duffle graduated from Ripon College of Ripon, Wisconsin, in 1868, was a resident of Ripon, Wisconsin, taught at Ripon College in 1879 and 1880, was the president of the Winona General Electric Company in 1894, was a member of the board of directors of the Owatonna, Minnesota, Electric Company in 1890, purchased the electric plant of the Owatonna, Minnesota, Electric Company in 1895, and purchased, with W. S. Pierce, the Austin, Minnesota, Electric Light Company in 1898. Benjamin Franklin Meek, Jr. (1850-1928,) the son of Benjamin Franklin Meek, Sr., married Harriet __?__, was an incorporator of the Mitchell Electric Company in 1892, was the secretary of the Northwest General Electric Company of St. Paul before 1893, became a vice president of the Northwest General Electric Company of St. Paul after 1893, resided at 876 West Osceola Avenue in St. Paul in 1893, and died in Minneapolis. B. H. Langley owned B. H. Langley & Company of Winona, Minnesota, which functioned as a collection agent for the Minnesota Sanitary Commission during the American Civil War, married Mary A. __?__, was a generalissimo of the Winona, Minnesota, Coeur de Lion Commandery of the Knights Templar in 1868 and 1869, adopted as his daughter Mary Elizabeth Payne, whose name was changed to Mary Elizabeth Langley by Special Laws of Minnesota 1871, Chapter 141, was the eminent commander of the Winona, Minnesota, Coeur de Lion Commandery of the Knights Templar from 1870 until 1875, was a Mason in 1876, was the secretary of the Vienna Mining Company of Winona, Minnesota, with mining operations in Idaho, in 1882, was a division freight agent for the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad in 1882, was the general freight and ticket agent of the Montana Central RailRoad in 1890, resigned his position with the Montana Central RailRoad in 1894, resided in Helena, Montana, in 1890, resided in Portland, Oregon, in 1900, and was an agent in San Francisco, California, of the Panama RailRoad Steamship Line in 1905. Charles Harkness Lamberton (1855- ,) the son of Henry Wilson Lamberton, a member of the state capitol commission, and Margaret J. Plumer Lamberton (1833-1902,) and the brother of Henry McClelland Lamberton (1861-1945,) was born in Carlisle, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, married Imogene Maude Smith, the daughter of Sylvester J. Smith and Frances Merritt Smith, in Winona, Minnesota, in 1878, was the cashier of the Winona Deposit Bank of Winona, Minnesota, in 1881, and eventually resided in Aiken, South Carolina. John Arnot Mathews (1824-1907) was born in Elmira, New York, learned the mercantile business from his father, moved to Tioga, Pennsylvania, to become a merchant in 1845, came to Winona, Minnesota, in 1855, married Ellen B. Bush, the daughter of A. C. Bush, of Tioga, Pennsylvania, in 1855, established a real estate and loan business, was elected mayor of Winona, Minnesota, for four terms (1868-1869, 1869-1870, 1873-1874, and 1887-1888,) was a stockholder and director of the Winona & Southwestern Railroad, although he opposed the use of public funds to support the railroads, joined the Winona County Old Settlers Association in 1889, and was buried in the Woodland Cemetery in Winona, Winona County, Minnesota. Wilford G. De Celle resided at 466 Iglehart Avenue in St. Paul in 1887, was an incorporator of the Faribault Consolidated Gas and Electric Company in 1895, and was an executive of the Northwest General Electric Company. Edward R. Gilman was an incorporator of the Faribault Consolidated Gas and Electric Company in 1895. Charles A. Coffin was the president of Thomson-Houston Electric Company in 1891. Thomson-Houston merged with Thomas A. Edison's General Electric Company in 1895. a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/TNHrail2.html" [See note on Royal Day Cone for the Winona & Western RailRoad.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/TNHrail2.html" [See note on Henry Wilson “Harry” Lamberton for the Winona & Western RailRoad.]

Winona, Homer, Dresbach & La Crescent RailRoad: The railroad was authorized by the Minnesota Legislature shortly after statehood in 1857. The railroad was incorporated in 1871 by Norman Bush, Z. H. Lake, Verrazano Simpson, and others to construct and operate a railway from Winona, Minnesota, to La Crescent, Minnesota. The railroad had capital stock of $200,000. The railroad was organized in 1871. Zaphna Henry Lake, Jr. (1827-1876,) the son of Zaphna Henry Lake, Sr. was born in Conneaut, Ashtabula County, Ohio, was educated in Ashtabula, Ohio, public schools, attended the Ashtabula College, moved to California in 1849, operated a hotel for four or five years, moved to Chicago, Illinois, then moved to La Crosse, Wisconsin, then moved to Winona, Minnesota, initially was a Republican, partnered with A. W. Webster in banking in Winona, Minnesota, as early as 1856, owned the Winona Deposit Bank, married Fannie E. Ehle in 1862, withdrew from banking in 1865 and entered the loan and insurance business with R. B. Basford, subsequently was a follower of Horace Greeley, moved to California in 1871 to regain his health, returned to Minnesota, and died in Minnesota. [See note for Verrazano Simpson for the Winona & SouthWestern RailRoad Company.]

Winona & La Crosse RailRoad: The railroad was chartered by Territorial Laws of Minnesota 1856, Chapter 159, to build, maintain, and operate a railroad from Winona, Minnesota, to a point in Minnesota opposite from La Crosse, Wisconsin. The incorporators of the railroad were J. A. Balcomb, T. F. Bennett, C. H. Berry, G. F. Child, G. W. Curtis, M. K. Drew, K. J. Hilbert, H. D. Huff, Harvey H. Johnson, William A. Jones, E. L. King, David Olmsted, L. D. Smith, and D. Upman. The 1856 legislation also authorized the railroad to construct and operate a ferry across the Mississippi River. The railroad initially had $500,000 in capital stock. The Winona & LaCrosse RailRoad Company was incorporated under a special act of the territory of Minnesota in 1856, but, due to financial difficulties caused by the Panic of 1857, it was impossible to raise money for the construction of the line and it was not able to develop beyond a paper railroad. The railroad was not ultimately built under the 1856 law. Special Laws 1872, Chapter 51, revived the old charter and amended it to incorporate the Winona & Southwestern Railroad Company. The new railroad apparently was organized in 1871. The board of the Winona & Southwestern Railroad Company in 1871 consisted of Thomas Abbott, R. D. Cone, M. K. Drew, J. C. Easton, H. W. Lamberton, William Mitchell, M. G. Norton, Ignatius O'Ferral, John Robson, Thomas Simpson, E. D. Williams, Thomas Wilson, William Windom, William H. Yale, E. S. Youmans, and George P. Wilson. The railroad was authorized to build, equip and operate a railroad from Winona, Minnesota, to the Iowa state line east of range 14 and west of the 5th principal meridian, and also granting the right to extend the line, by the most feasible route, from Winona, Minnesota, to St. Paul and Minneapolis, with the railroad to be completed and equipped by 1876. The name of the company was changed in 1872 to the Winona & Southwestern Railway. In 1872, the city of Winona, Minnesota, held a special election and voted $150,000 in bonds to aid the construction of the railroad. Chatfield, Minnesota, and other towns in Winona County, Minnesota, and Fillmore County, Minnesota, also voted liberal bonuses to the railroad. Later in 1872, $100,000 of the bonds was re-directed to the aide of the Green Bay, Winona, and St. Paul RailRoad. In 1872, at a incorporators meeting, officers of the railroad were elected and the purchase of maps and surveys was commissioned. In 1872, William Mitchell was the president of the railroad, E. D. Williams was the vice president of the railroad, Thomas Simpson was the secretary of the railroad, and M. G. Norton was the treasurer of the railroad. In 1873, the directors of the railroad issued stock in the amount of $67,500. At least two surveys were made, but the Panic of 1873 prevented the start of construction. The Winona & Southwestern RailRoad charter was extended by the Minnesota legislature in part due to the surveys done by 1873. David Olmsted (1822–1861,) the son of Timothy Olmsted, was born in Fairfax, Vermont, moved to Chicago, Illinois, in 1838, then moved to Wisconsin in 1838, moved to Monona, Iowa, in 1840, spent many years as a trader with the Winnebago Indians near Fort Atkinson, Iowa, and at Long Prairie, Minnesota, was a clerk for W. G. Ewing & G. W. Ewing, was a member of the Iowa Constitutional Convention in 1846, entered into partnership with Henry Rhodes to purchase the business of the Ewings in 1847, moved to Long Prairie, Minnesota, in 1848, settled in St. Paul in 1853, was a Democrat, was a member of the Minnesota Territorial Council representing Benton County, Minnesota, Mahkahto County, Minnesota, Pembina County, Minnesota, and Wahnahta County, Minnesota (District 6,) from 1849 until 1852, was the president of the Minnesota Territorial Council in 1849, was a charter member of the Minnesota Historical Society, owned and edited the Minnesota Democrat, a frontier newspaper previously owned by Daniel Robertson, in 1853, was elected the first mayor of St. Paul in 1854 and served one term, married __?__ Stevens, the daughter of Judge Stevens of St. Albans, Vermont, was an unsuccessful Democratic candidate for Minnesota Territorial delegate to the U. S. Congress, subsequently became a conservative Republican, went to Winona, Minnesota in 1855, moved to Cuba in 1856, returned to Vermont in 1857, left Minnesota because of failing health, and died at his mother's house in Franklin County, Vermont. Thomas Simpson (1831-1905) was born in Yorkshire, England, emigrated to the United States with his parents while young, studied surveying, took the government contract for running the meridian and parallel lines in the SouthEast part of Minnesota Territory in 1853, settled in Winona, Minnesota, in 1856; was admitted to the practice of law in Minnesota in 1858, practiced law, engaged in many important business enterprises, was the secretary of the Winona & Southwestern Railroad Company, was the president of the Minnesota State Normal School board of trustees, and died in Winona, Minnesota.Ignatius Francis Falkner “I. F.” “Frank” O'Ferral/O’Ferrall (1825-1883,) the son of John O’Ferral and Eliza/Elizabeth Mary Frances Humrichhouse/Humrickhouse O’Ferral (1798-1835,) was born in Virginia, moved to California in 1849, married Amelia Medora Harris (1837/1839-1912) in Jo Daviess County, Illinois, in 1857, moved toMinnesota, was a member of the Minnesota Senate representing Fillmore County, Minnesota (District 9,) from 1858 until 1860, based on certificates of election that were the result of a Minnesota Supreme Court order in O’Ferrall v. Colby, 2 Minn. 180 (1859,) was unseated when the Minnesota Senate determined that the Minnesota Supreme Court didn't have the authority to determine the membership of the Minnesota Senate under the Minnesota Constitution and decided that Reuben Wells was entitled to the seat, resided in California in 1866, was an incorporator of the Winona & La Crosse RailRoad Company, was a Mason in Fillmore County, Minnesota, from 1877 until 1879, participated in the building of the Chatfield Railroad in 1878, died in Chatfield, Fillmore County, Minnesota, and was buried in the Chatfield Cemetery, Chatfield, Fillmore County, Minnesota.

Winona, Mankato & New Ulm RailRoad: The railroad was authorized by the Minnesota Legislature shortly after statehood in 1857. The railroad was incorporated in 1870 by George L. Dunlap, J. H. Stewart, John F. Tracy and others to construct and operate a rail line from a point along the line of the Winona & St. Peter RailRoad in Lina, Blue Earth County, Minnesota, by way of Mankato, Minnesota, to New Ulm, Minnesota, had capital stock of $1,000,000, and was organized in 1871. In 1870, the railroad had constructed a 3.75 mile rail line from Mankato Junction, Minnesota, to Mankato, Minnesota. In 1874, the railroad operated 31 miles of rail line, had four wooden bridges, had capital stock of $100,000, was owned and operated by the Chicago & NorthWestern RailRoad, was operated directly by the Winona & St. Peter RailRoad, has as its officers John F. Tracy, president, M. L. Sykes, Jr., vice president and treasurer, J. B. Redfield, secretary, J. H. Howe, general manager, and J. W. Stewart, general superintendent, and had as its board of directors James H. Howe, H. H. Porter, J. H. Stewart, M. L. , Jr., and John F. Tracy. In 1877, the board of directors of the railroad was Albert Keep, H. H. Porter, J. B. Redfield, M. L. Sykes, and John P. Tracy, had 3.75 miles of railway trackage from Mankato, Minnesota, to Mankato Junction, Minnesota, and had no rolling stock. In 1879, the officers of the railroad were M. L. Sykes, Jr., vice president, secretary and treasurer, and John E. Blunt, chief engineer, the board of directors of the railroad were Albert Keep, H. H. Porter, J. B. Redfield, and M. L. Sykes, Jr., the capital stock of the railroad was $100,000, and the general offices of the railroad were at Chicago, Illinois. The railroad operated until 1880 and was purchased by the Winona & St. Peter RailRoad in 1880. George L. Dunlap was a resident of Chicago, Illinois, was the superintendent of the Galena & Chicago Union RailRoad in 1864, was the general superintendent of the Chicago & North Western Railway in 1867, married Emma Rice, was a major landowner in Appleton, Wisconsin, in 1867, was a partner of Perry H. Smith in the Chicago Contracting Company in 1875, was one of the members of the first board of trustees of the Lake Geneva Yacht Club, was a builder of the North Shore RailRoad of Canada in 1875, was a member of the Chicago Historical Society in 1877, was a member of the board of directors of the Chicago Belt Line RailRoad in 1884, was a member of the board of directors of the Wabash, St. Louis & Pacific RailRoad in 1884, resided at the Hotel de Mentone in Paris, France, in 1902, and wintered in the South in 1902. John F. Tracy (1827-1878,) the son of John A. Tracy, was born in Erie, Pennsylvania, engaged in railroad construction carrying on in the tradition of his father, John A. Tracy, became the superintendent of railroads for the Erie & North East RailRoad, served simultaneously as the president of the Chicago & Rock Island RailRoad and the Chicago & NorthWestern RailRoad, built the first railroad bridge across the Mississippi River, and was considered one of the fathers of the American railway system. Milton Luther Sykes, Jr. (1826-1907,) was born in Springfield, Massachusetts, attended the Old High School on School Street, Springfield, Massachusetts, was a clerk for Jonathan Bangs in Springfield, Massachusetts, for two years, was a clerk for one year with F. M. Carew & Company, was a clerk for one year with D. & J. Ames at a paper mill at Chicopee Falls, Massachusetts, was an employee of the engineering corps of the New Haven, Hartford & Springfield RailRoad in 1844, was subsequently the superintendent of the Connecticut Valley RailRoad, was subsequently the superintendent of the Morris & Essex RailRoad, in 1853 or 1854, was employed by D. L. Harris and A. D. Briggs, the bridge builders, in 1853, was the superintendent of the Hudson River RailRoad in 1857, was subsequently the vice president and superintendent of the Chicago & Milwaukee RailRoad, was the vice president of the Michigan Southern & Northern Indiana RailRoad in 1860, resided in Chicago, Illinois, in 1860, was the vice president of the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western RailRoad in 1865, was the vice president of the Cleveland, Painesville & Ashabula RailRoad in 1867, resided in New York City, New York, in 1867, was the second vice president of the Chicago & NorthWestern RailRoad in 1867, was a member of the board of directors of the Chicago & NorthWestern RailRoad in 1882, was a member of the board of directors of the Elgin & State Line RailRoad in 1882, was a member of the board of directors of the Chaicago, Milwaukee & NorthWestern RailRoad in 1882, was a member of the board of directors of the Dakota Central RailRoad in 1882, was a member of the board of directors of the Escanaba & Lake Superior RailRoad in 1882, was a member of the board of directors of the Menominee River RailRoad in 1882, was a member of the board of directors of the Rock River RailRoad in 1882, was a member of the board of directors of the Winona & St. Peter RailRoad in 1882, was a member of the board of directors of the Chicago, St. Paul & Omaha RailRoad in 1882, was a member of the board of directors of the Sioux City & Pacific RailRoad in 1884, was a member of the board of directors of the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha RailRoad in 1890, was a member of the board of directors of the St. Paul & Sioux City RailRoad in 1892, resigned from the Chicago & NorthWestern RailRoad in 1901, and died at Fair Hills, Mount Vernon, New York. [See note for Jacob Henry Stewart for 50 Irvine Park.]

Winona, Marshalltown & Southern RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in 1893 to build a 156 mile rail line extension of the Winona & Southwestern RailRoad from Osage, Iowa, to Chariton, Iowa, by way of Marshalltown, Iowa, to connect to the coal fields of Southern Iowa, and was organized in 1893. In 1893, the officers of the railroad were N. S. Ketchum, president, G. F. Kirby, vice president, A. G. Glick, secretary, and C. C. Gilman, chief engineer, and had as its board of directors E. S. Fonda, C. C. Gilman, A. G. Glick, N. S. Ketchum, G. F. Kirby, Christopher C. Schuler, and E. B. Woodruff. The general offices of the railroad were in Marshalltown, Iowa. In 1895, the officers of the railroad were N. S. Ketcham, president, G. F. Kirby, vice president and treasurer, A. G. Glick, secretary, and C. G. Gilman, chief engineer. In 1901, the railroad operated a 170 mile rail line from Osage, Iowa, to Chariton, Iowa, had as its president N. S. Ketchum of Marshalltown, Iowa, and had as its chief engineer C. C. Gilman C.E., of Marshalltown, Iowa. Nathaniel S. Ketchum (1835/1839-1915,) the son of William Ketchum and Sarah Johnson Ketchum, was born In Hacketstown, Warren County, New Jersey, attended school in Hoboken, New Jersey, attended school in Hopewell, New Jersey, moved with his parents to Rock Island, Illinois, in 1854, attended Princeton University until 1857, studying mechanical and civil engineering, moved to Iowa in 1857, was employed by the Chicago, Iowa & Nebraska RailRoad, building the rail line from Clinton, Iowa, and Marshalltown, Iowa, married Helen Peoples in Princeton, Scott County, Illinois, in 1861, entered the grain, stock and implement business in 1862, was an inventor with three U. S. patents (#101,273) for improvements in harvest droppers in 1870, (#127,610) for improvements in corn shellers in 1872, and (#397,131) for improvements in wagon axles in 1889, built the Eureka implement works at Sterling, Illinois, in 1872, was a member of the board of directors of the Iowa State Agricultural Society in 1877, built the Moline wagon works at Moline, Illinois, in 1879, built the Ketchum wagon works at Marshalltown, Iowa, in 1880, was a wagonmaker, producing the Ketchum wagon, reputedly the first wagon made West of the Mississippi, incorporated the Ketchum & Johnson Company, wholesale and retail dealers in wagons and implements in 1890, was a wagon fixture maker who built wagon spring seats and top boxes for the U. S. Indian Service for delivery in Chicago, Illinois, Kansas City, Missouri, and Sioux City, Iowa, was a Republican, was a member of the Iowa RailRoad Commission in 1905 and 1912, was a Mason, and died at Marshalltown, Iowa. Albert George Glick (1860-1917,) the son of George Glick (1827-1867,) the president of the First National Bank of Marshalltown, Iowa, and Jane Ziegenfelder Glick (1835-1911,) married Helen E. Abbott (1864-1938,) the daughter of Albert Cutler Abbott and Mary Watson Abbott, organized, with Benjamin Britton, Richard Reed, John Ireland Bell, and Albert G. Glick, Brittain & Company, a pork producer, in 1893, and was a member of the executive committee of St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church in Marshalltown, Iowa. Edmund Stephen Fonda (1839-1919,) the son of Stephen H. Fonda and Julia Harwood Fonda, was born in Rupert, Vermont, was educated in the common schools of New York, attended the Fort Edward Institute in New York, moved to St. Joseph County, Michigan, in 1860, married Loretta E. Crego, moved to Osage, Mitchell County, Iowa, in 1869, initially engaged in the real estate business, established an implement business in 1875, was a member of board of directors of the Iowa State Agricultural Society, was the president of the Mitchell County, Iowa, Agricultural Society, was an organizer and the secretary of the Mitchell County Fire Insurance Company, was the chairman of the railway committee of the Osage, Iowa, Board of Trade for five years during the prospecting and building of the Winona & Southwestern Railway, was the mayor of the city of Osage, Iowa, in 1889 and 1891, organized the Farmers National Bank of Osage, Iowa, in 1893, was the vice president of the Cedar Valley Seminary, was president of the Osage, Iowa, city school board, died in Osage, Mitchell County, Iowa, and was buried in Rupert, Vermont. Charles Carroll Gilman was born in Brooks, Waldo County, Maine, attended an academy at Winterport, Maine, attended Waterville College/Colby University, studied medicine with his father, who was a physician, dropped his medical studies due to failing health, entered the lumber business, resided in Michigan from 1853 until 1856, came to Iowa in 1857, initially resided at Dubuque, Iowa, was engaged in the wholesale lumber trade, established the town of Earlville, Iowa, along the rail line of Dubuque & Sioux City Railroad, married Abbie Williams, of Saginaw, Michigan, in 1858, built elevators at Monticello, Iowa, Marion, Iowa, and Cedar Falls, Iowa, in 1860 and 1861, raised, with Francis J. Herron, four companies for the service during the American Civil War, urged the improvement of the rapids in the Mississippi River at Davenport, Iowa, and Keokuk, Iowa, in 1864, secured the incorporation of the Dubuque Produce Exchange in 1865, made the first soundings of the Mississippi River at Dubuque, Iowa, for the railroad bridge in 1866, organized a company for the construction of a railroad from Ackley, Iowa, to Marshalltown, Iowa, by way of Eldora, Iowa, in 1867, which finally resulted in the building of the Central Railroad of Iowa, purchased the Eldora Railroad & Coal Company in 1868, was the president and the superintendent of the New York construction company he organized from 1867 to 1872, was the president of the Central Railroad of Iowa until 1873, organized with H. W. McNeill the Consolidation Company to engage in mining coal in Mahaska County, Iowa, in 1873, sold the company to Ezekiel Clark in 1875, established the Gilman Terra Cotta and Fire Clay Company in 1875, and was the president of the Eldora, Iowa, telegraph company. George Frederick Kirby (1836- ,) the son of Philo Kirby (1805-1878) and Clarissa Bennett Kirby, was born in Bainbridge, New York, graduated from the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute of Troy, New York, as a civil engineer in 1857, was employed in construction by the Mobile & Ohio RailRoad, moved to Iowa in 1861, was in charge of building the Chicago & NorthWestern RailRoad in Iowa, initially resided at Clinton, Iowa, married Jennie Reed (1845- ,) the daughter of Christopher Reed (1793-1864) and Mary Jane Ward Reed, in 1868, subsequently moved to Marshalltown, Iowa, was an organizer, with A. C. Abbott, George Glick, and S. P. Kniseley, of the Marshall Sugar Refining Company/Glucose Company, owned the LeGrand limestone quarry in Marshall County, Iowa, was the president of the Fidelity Savings Bank of Marshalltown, Iowa, and was in charge of construction of the railroad proceeding West from Cedar Rapids, Iowa, that connected Marshalltown, Iowa. E. B. Woodruff, father of F. W. Woodruff, was born in Trumbull county, Ohio, came to Iowa in 1854, resided in Monroe County, Iowa, opened a farm, married Elizabeth Parker, the daughter of Keilly Parker, of Licking County, Ohio, moved to Ottumwa, Iowa, and ran a livery stable, moved to Eddyville, Iowa, and ran a business, was a lieutenant of the Fourth Iowa Cavalry during the American Civil War, and subsequently engaged in the hardware business at Knoxville, Iowa.

Winona Railway, Dock & Transfer Company was incorporated in 1883 by O. B. Gould, Andrew Hamilton, Charles F. Scott, W. A. Scott, and Verrazano Simpson to build railways in the City of Winona, Minnesota. It had initial capital stock of $300,000 and its principal place of business was Winona, Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1883. Ozro B. Gould (1841-1907,) the son of Ozro A. Gould ( -1845) and Mary A. Barnes Gould ( -1848,) was born at Brantford, Ontario, Canada, emigrated to the United States with his mother, moved to Sandusky County, Ohio, with an uncle following his mother’s death, grew up in Ohio, served in the 55th Ohio Volunteer Regiment during the American Civil War, was wounded and taken prisoner at the Battle of Chancellorsville, was paroled, participated in the Battle of Lookout Mountain, participated in the Battle of Missionary Ridge, read the law in the law office of Lee & Brewer at Tiffin, Ohio, took the law course at the University of Michigan, moved to Winona, Minnesota, in 1867, was admitted to the practice of law in Minnesota in 1867, was the superintendent of the Minnesota Soldiers’ Orphans Home in 1872, was a law partner of Arthur H. Snow, was the president of the Winona Guards, a Minnesota National Guard unit, in 1879, was unmarried in 1880, engaged in real estate development in Winona, Minnesota, was an incorporator of the Winona Building & Loan Association, was the president of the Winona Wagon Company, was a Republican, was a member of the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Winona County,Minnesota (District 8,) from 1880 until 1883, married Mary Couse ( -1892,) the daughter of Andrew Couse, in Chicago, Illinois, in 1885, was a judge of the Third Judicial District of Minnesota in 1895, was defeated by Arthur H. Snow in the judicial election of 1896, was a member of the staff of Minnesota Governor Lucius F. Hubbard, married Etta Thompson in 1899, and was a member of the State Board of Control from 1901 until 1907. [See note for Verrazano Simpson for the Winona & SouthWestern RailRoad Company.]

Winona Railway & Light Company/Winona Railway, Light and Power Company: The railroad was incorporated in 1896. According to Poor's Manual of the RailRoads of the United States, Volume 33 by Henry Varnum Poor in 1901, as of 1899, the railroad operated four miles of rail trackage, was the successor to the Winona General Electric Company, had $20,000 in capital stock, had as its officers Walter Abbott, president, R. T. Paine II, vice president, Ernest L. Carr, secretary and treasurer, S. B. Livermore, general manager, had as its board of directors Walter Abbott, John S. Bartlett, A. K. Bonta, Ernest L. Carr, and R. T. Paine II, and had its general office in Winona, Minnesota. In 1901, the Winona General Electric Company consolidated into the Winona Railway & Light Company. The Poor's Directory of RailRoad Officials, published by the Poor's RailRoad Manual Company in 1905, indicates that the officers of the railroad were C. N. Mason, president, John S. Bartlett, vice president, Ernest L. Carr, secretary and treasurer, J. H. White, general manager & purchasing agent, and Robert Paton, chief engineer, and that the general office of the railroad was in Winona, Minnesota. The railroad was entirely rebuilt before 1906, had capital stock of $400,000, had five miles of rail trackage in 1906, had two motor cars in 1906, had as its general office Winona, Minnesota, and operated the Bluffside Amusement Park in 1906. In 1906, the officers of the railroad were C. N. Mason, president, Gordon Abbott, vice president, E. L. Carr, secretary & treasurer, J. H. White, general manager & purchasing agent, and Robert Paton, chief engineer. In 1912, the receiver of the company was Howard Morris, its general manager was R. M. Howard, and its superintendent was J. B. Rogers. The railroad owned four cars (Numbers 9 to 12) built by the St. Louis Car Company in 1913 and 1914. The streetcar service was abandoned in 1938. In 1881, A. K. Bonta was the secretary of The Black Sulphuret Silver Mining Company of Leadville, Colorado. In 1891, Arthur Knox Bonta, a resident of Hoboken, New Jersey, was an inventor and received a U. S. patent (#459,572) for improvements in a commutator turning device. In 1896, A. K. Bonta was the electrical engineer of the Weehawken & Fort Lee Electric Railway, a line of the North Hudson County Railway Company, of Hoboken, New Jersey. In 1897, A. K. Bonta was the superintendent of the North Hudson Railway Company in Hoboken, New Jersey. In 1902, A. K. Bonta was the manager of the Dallas Electric Company in Dallas, Texas. In 1902, A. K. Bonta was the owner of and the chief promotor of the Metropolitan Street Railway Company in Dallas, Texas. In 1903, A. K. Bonta, a temporary resident of Texas, was the general manager of the Standard Light & Power Company of Dallas, Texas. In 1909, A. K. Bonta was the proprietor of the Hotel Bonta at Broadway and 94th Street in New York City, New York. Arthur Knox Bonta (1860-1919,) the son of James William Bonta (1828-1905) and Emiline K. Shaw (1833-1883,) was born in Kansas City, Missouri, married Mary Wilson ( -1931) in 1882, and died in New York City, New York.

Winona & St. Peter RailRoad was chartered in 1855 as the Transit RailRoad Company, was sold to the State of Minnesota in 1860 in a foreclosure sale, was re-organized and transferred to a new operating company in 1862 as the Winona & St. Peter RailRoad, was incorporated under Wisconsin law in 1862, was incorporated in 1866 by an enactment of the Minnesota Legislature, and operated until at least 1882. In 1862, the Winona & St. Peter RailRoad was constructed west from Winona, Minnesota. The railroad developed a 322.98 mile rail line from Winona, Minnesota, to Watertown, South Dakota, from 1864 until 1873. The Winona & St. Peter RailRoad Company owned and operated as branch railroads the Winona, Mankato & New Ulm Railroad, completed in 1870, the Minnesota Valley RailRoad, completed in 1878, the Rochester & Northern Minnesota RailRoad, completed in 1878, the Plainview RailRoad, completed in 1878, and the Chatfield RailRoad, completed in 1878. In 1874, the Minnesota Attorney General commenced suit against the railroad to recover unpaid taxes. In 1880, the railroad was operated by the Chicago & NorthWestern RailRoad. In 1880, the railroad had 367.6 miles of track in Minnesota, had $400,000 of capital stock, and its officers were Albert Keep, president, S. O. Howe, secretary, B. C. Cook, solicitor, M. Hughitt, general manager and superintendent, J. B. Redfield, auditor, and members of the board of directors David Dows, A. G. Dulman, James H. Howe, M. Hughitt, Albert Keep, J. B. Redfield, Aug. Schell, William L. Scott, and M. L. Sykes, Jr. By 1882, it ran across the State of Minnesota and to the James River in the Dakota Territory. The railroad acquired the Winona, Mankato & New Ulm Railway in 1880, the Dakota Central Railway in 1881, the Chicago & Dakota Railway in 1881, the Chatfield RailRoad in 1881, the Plainview RailRoad in 1881, the Rochester & Northern Minnesota Railway in 1881, and the Minnesota Valley Railway in 1881. In 1882, the railroad owned 27,558.67 acres of land in Minnesota. The railroad acquired the Minnesota & South Dakota Railway in 1900 and the Mankato & New Ulm Railway in 1900. The railroad also completed a 32.20 mile rail line from Tyler, Minnesota, to Astoria, South Dakota, in 1900. The railroad became part of the Chicago & NorthWestern RailRoad in 1867, was acquired by the Chicago & NorthWestern RailRoad in 1900, and became the 183 mile Minnesota Division of the Chicago & NorthWestern RailRoad between St. Peter, Minnesota, and Watertown, South Dakota, after 1900. Albert Keep (1826–1907,) the son of Chauncey Keep and Prudence Keep, was born in Homer, Cortland County, New York, attended Cortland Academy in Homer, Cortland County, New York, was a clerk in a country store in 1841, moved to Whitewater, Wisconsin, in 1846, was a leading merchant at Whitewater, Wisconsin, working along with his brother, Henry Keep, and Philander Peck, married Susan Rice ( -1859) of Homer, New York, in 1851, relocated to Chicago, Illinois, in 1851, operated a dry-goods business from 1851 until 1857, was active in Chicago real estate developments after 1857, married Harriet S. Gunn of East Bloomfield, New York, in 1861, was a railroad official and financier, was the president and a member of the board of directors of the Chicago & North Western RailRoad, was a member of the board of directors of the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern RailRoad, controlled the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha RailRoad in 1882, was a member of the board of directors of the Commercial National Bank, was a member of the board of directors of the Merchants' Loan & Trust Company, was a member of the board of trustees of the Chicago Home for Incurables, was a member of the board of directors of the John Crerar Library, was a member of the Chicago Club, was a member of the Calumet Club, and was a Presbyterian. David Dows (1814-1890) was born in Saratoga County, New York, attended school in Amsterdam, New York, became a clerk at a mercantile firm owned by John Dow, his brother, became a partner in his brother’s firm, Dows & Cary, married Margaret E. Worcester (1831-1908,) the daughter of Horatio Worcester (1804-1870) and Susan Vincent Worcester (1807- ,) in New York City, New York, in 1852, headed the New York firm of David Dows & Company, was one of the largest grain dealers in the country, arranged for the purchase of bulk supplies for the Union Army during the American Civil War, was a member of member of the New York City, New York, Chamber of Commerce from 1875 until 1890, was one of the one of the organizers of the New York Corn Exchange, was an organizer of the Produce Exchange & Corn Exchange Bank, was a vice president and a member of the board of directors of the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railway Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Chicago & Northwestern RailRoad, was a member of the board of directors of the Chicago, Minneapolis & Omaha RailRoad, was a member of the board of directors of the Union Pacific RailRoad, was a member of the board of directors of the Delaware & Hudson RailRoad, owned warehouse property in Brooklyn, New York, was a member of the St. George’s Protestant Episcopal Church, was a member of the Union League Club, and died in New York City, New York. Joseph Barlow Redfield (1825-1915,) the son of James Grinnell Redfield and Susan Barlow Redfield, was born in Delhi, Delaware County, New York, was educated at the Delhi Academy, graduated from Union College in 1852, read the law for three years at Deposit, New York, was admitted to the practice of law in New York, was a lawyer, joined the Chicago & NorthWestern RailRoad in 1856, was the assistant treasurer of Chicago, St. Paul & Fond du Lac RailRroad in 1860, married Sara M. Whitlock in 1860, was the assistant secretary and auditor of the Chicago & North Western RailRoad in 1877, was secretary of the Chicago & North Western RailRoad in 1886, was the secretary and auditor of the Fremont, Elkhorn & Missouri Valley RailRoad in 1886, was a vice president of the Chicago & North Western RailRoad after 1889, was a member of the board of directors of the Fremont, Elkhorn & Missouri Valley RailRoad in 1892, was the secretary and auditor of the Sioux City & Pacific RailRoad in 1898, was the secretary and auditor of the Boyer Valley RailRoad in 1900, and was buried in the Woodland Cemetery, Delhi, New York. Anthony G. Dulman ( -1891) of Dutch extraction, was a partner in the mercantile and financial house of Dulman & Scharff of New York City, New York, was a banker, represented Dutch shareholders who invested in American railroads, was a member of the board of directors of the Winona & St. Peter RailRoad in 1872, was a member of the board of directors of the Elgin & State Line RailRoad in 1872, was a member of the board of directors of the Chicago & Milwaukee RailRoad in 1872, was a member of the board of directors of the Chicago & NorthWestern RailRoad in 1872, was a member of the board of directors of the Illinois Central RailRoad in 1877, was a member of the board of directors of the Toledo, Peoria & Western RailRoad in 1879, was a member of the board of directors of the State Line & Union RailRoad in 1880, was a member of the board of directors of the Missouri, Kansas & Texas RailRoad in 1880, was a member of the board of directors of the Canada Southern RailRoad in 1881, and was a member of the board of directors of the Cleveland, Columbus, Cincinnati & Indianapolis RailRoad in 1883. James Henry Howe (1827–1893,) the son of Addison Goodale Howe and Mary Turner Torrey Howe, was born in Turner, Androscoggin County, Maine, studied law in 1848 with his uncle, Timothy Otis Howe (1816-1883,) a justice of the Wisconsin state Supreme Court from 1851 until 1853, operated a private law firm, worked at private law firms in Green Bay, Wisconsin and Kenosha, Wisconsin from 1848 to 1860, married Mary Gordon Cotton (1836-1893,) the daughter of John Winslow Cotton (1800- ) and Elizabeth “Mary” B. Arndt Cotton (1805-1896,) in 1857, served in the U. S. Army as a Colonel, was the Attorney General of Wisconsin from 1860 to 1862, served in the United States Army in the 32nd Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry Regiment from 1862 to 1864, was vice president and general solicitor of the Chicago Northwestern Railroad Company in 1873, was a Republican, was appointed as a United States federal judge for the Eastern District of Wisconsin in 1873, resigned from the bench in 1875, operated private law firms in St. Paul, Minneapolis, North Dakota, and Chicago, Illinois, from 1875 to 1892, and died in Boston, Massachusetts. [See note for Marvin Hughitt for Chatfield RailRoad.]

Winona & SouthWestern RailRoad Company: The railroad was authorized by the Minnesota Territorial Legislature in 1856 as the Winona & LaCrosse RailRoad Company. The railroad was incorporated in 1870 by William Mitchell, John Robson, William Windom, and others to construct and operate a rail line from Winona, Minnesota, Southwardly to the Minnesota-Iowa border, was revived and reorganized in 1872, had capital stock of $5,000,000, and was chartered in 1887. The railroad was intended by local entrepreneurs to link Winona, Minnesota, with Omaha, Nebraska, and Kansas City, Missouri. Special Laws of Minnesota 1871, Chapter 51, authorized the building, equipment and operation of a railroad by Thomas Abbott, Royal D. Cone,Myron K. Drew, J. C. Easton,Henry W. Lamberton, William Mitchell, Mathew G. Norton, Igantius F. O’Fenall, John Robson, Thomas Simpson, E. D. Williams, George P. Wilson, Thomas Wilson, William Windom, William H. Yale, and Earl S. Youmans, from Winona, Minnesota, to the Iowa line East of Range 14 and West of the 5th principal meridian, and was granted the right to extend the line, by the most feasible route, from Winona, Minnesota, to St. Paul and Minneapolis, by 1876. In 1872, William Mitchell was elected president, E. D. Williams was elected vice president, Thomas Simpson was elected secretary, and M. G. Norton was elected treasurer, and capital stock of $67,500 was subscribed. The 1872 legislation authorized the City of Winona, Minnesota, and the towns and villages on the proposed line of the road to vote a five per cent tax in aid of the railroad and the City of Winona, Minnesota, in 1872, approved bonds to aid in the construction of the road to the amount of $150,000. Several of the towns in Winona County, Minnesota, and in Fillmore County, Minnesota, and the village of Chatfield, Minnesota, voted bonuses to the road. The 1871 law was repealed in 1872 by Special Laws of Minnesota 1872, Chapter 57. Two or more surveys were made under the direction of N. F. Hilbert, one by way of Saratoga, Minnesota, and of Fremont, Minnesota, the other by way of the Money Creek Valley, Minnesota. The rail line was actually surveyed and located from Winona, Minnesota, to Lime Springs, Iowa, by way of Chatfield, Minnesota, and Fillmore, Minnesota. In 1874, the railroad had as its officers William Mitchell, president, Thomas Simpson, secretary, and M. J. Norton, treasurer. In 1875, the company accepted the proposition of certain Iowa parties to build a narrow-gauge road from Hesper, Iowa, to Houston, Minnesota, if the Winona & Southwestern Railroad would build a similar road from Winona, Minnesota, to Houston, Minnesota, but nothing further came of the project. The charter was extended by the 1873 Minnesota Legislature. Only surveys of the Winona & Southwestern Railroad were completed by the original company. In 1887, the railroad was re-organized, the city of Winona, Minnesota, granted another $100,000 bonus, an engineer was hired, another survey was made, and the money to build the rail line was borrowed from the Farmers Loan & Trust Company of New York. In 1888, the company acquired the right of way, built the rail line from Winona, Minnesota, around the South and West sides of Lake Winona and up the valley of Rollingstone Creek, a distance of 21 miles, to a point located in Bear Creek Valley, Minnesota, a depot was constructed in Minnesota City, Minnesota, and a grain elevator was constructed one half mile from Rolling Stone, Minnesota. In 1888, the railroad completed 20 miles of rail trackage, celebrated by an excursion train. In 1888, the construction company that was building the railroad was reorganized with R. D. Cone, Andrew Hamilton, Charles Horton, H. W. Lamberton, William McIntyre, M. G. Norton, John Robson, V. Simpson, and E. S. Youmans. In 1889, the Winona & Southwestern Railway Company extended the rail line through a pair of large wooden trestles over the Bear Creek Valley, on through Altura, Minnesota, and Bethany, Minnesota, and on to East Utica, Minnesota, and depots were built in Altura, Minnesota, and Bethany, Minnesota, and a large trestle was built just South of Bethany, Minnesota. The costs of building the rail line were much higher than anticipated, with the estimates revised to $35,000 per mile. The initially retained Minneapolis construction firm was unable to complete its contract and the Winona South Western Improvement Company was formed to take its place. In 1890, Winona & Southwestern Railroad tracks were laid from Winona, Minnesota, through St. Charles, Minnesota, Dover, Minnesota, Eyota, Minnesota, Simpson, Minnesota, and Stewartville, Minnesota, to Spring Valley, Minnesota, and Osage, Iowa. The Winona & Southwestern Railway Company reached Utica, Minnesota, from Winona, Minnesota, in 1889, was continued to Spring Valley, Minnesota, in 1890, and was at once pushed Southward to the Iowa line near Le Roy, Mower County, Minnesota. Before the end of construction in 1890, an interchange with the Winona & St. Peter RailRoad was installed at Utica, Minnesota. In 1890, the directors considered an extension of the rail line by one of two possible routes, the Southern route proceeding through Saratoga, Minnesota, Chatfield, Minnesota, and Spring Valley, Minnesota, and the selected Northern route. In 1890, construction resumed from East Utica, Minnesota, to St. Charles, Minnesota, where it crossed the Winona & St. Peter RailRoad. Depots were built a Utica, Minnesota, and St. Charles, Minnesota, and the line then continued west to Dover, Minnesota, where a depot was built and to Laird, Minnesota, Planks's Crossing, Minnesota, and a crossing of the Eyota Junction, Minnesota, and Chatfield, Minnesota, branch of the Chicago & NorthWestern RailRoad, through Horton, Minnesota, Predmore, Minnesota, and to Simpson, Minnesota, where a depot was built. In 1890, the track laying had progressed to Judge, Minnesota, and then, with a slight delay for grading, to Stewartville, Minnesota, where a boxcar depot was installed, and continued South through Racine, Minnesota, and Spring Valley, Minnesota, where a depot was constructed. During 1891, the rail line was laid South South Westerly to Ostrander, Minnesota, LeRoy, Minnesota, McIntire, Minnesota, David, Minnesota, Little Cedar, Minnesota, Bucknam's Crossing, Minnesota, and Osage, Iowa, where there was a connection with the Illinois Central RailRoad. The Winona & Southwestern Railway Company acquired the property of the Winona, Osage & Southwestern RailRoad Company in 1891. The Winona, Osage & Southwestern RailRoad Company had attempted the construction of a line from Osage, Iowa, in a SouthWesterly direction, 1.37 miles long, but never operated and since abandoned. The railroad fell into receivership during the Panic of 1893 and was sold to the Winona & Western RailRoad. In 1893, the railroad was controlled by the Winona & SouthWestern Improvement Company, a railroad building contractor, operated 114.41 total miles of railroad trackage (91 miles in Minnesota,) from Winona, Winona County, Minnesota, by way of Mower County, Minnesota, to Osage, Osage County, Iowa, had 146 total employees, all in Minnesota, owned five locomotives, owned six passenger cars, owned 294 freight cars, owned four company cars, owned two bridges and owned 90 trestles. In 1893, the railroad projected the construction of a 200 mile rail line from Osage, Iowa, and Sioux city, Iowa, and expected to immediately construct a 26 mile rail line from Osage, Iowa, to Mason City, Iowa. In 1893, the officers of the railroad were H. W. Lamberton, president, Verrazzano Simpson, vice president and secretary, Matthew G. Norton, treasurer, Henry M. Lamberton, general counsel, E. G. Hornbrooke, auditor, and John J. Mahoney, general superintendent, and the members of the board of directors were S. W. Champion, Royal D. Cone, Andrew Hamilton, William Hayes, Charles Horton, William H. Laird, H. W. Lamberton, Matthew G. Norton, Thomas Simpson, Verrazzano Simpson, Joseph Waller, Jr., and Earl S. Youmans. With the Winona & Southwestern Railway Company in receivers’ hands, the Winona & Western Railway Company was incorporated in 1894 and purchased the 114 miles of main line and the seven mile branch to Rochester, Minnesota. The railroad operated until 1894, was initially succeeded by the Winona & Western RailRoad, and was ultimately succeeded by the Chicago Great Western RailRoad. According to the Manual of the RailRoads of the United States, Volume 27 by Henry Varnum Poor in 1895, the railroad operated 114.41 miles of rail trackage from Winona, Minnesota, to Osage, Iowa, was chartered in 1856, open operations in 1891, shared track in Winona, Minnesota, with the Chicago, Burlington & Northern RailRoad, had a traffic agreement with the Green Bay, Winona & St. Paul RailRoad, went into receivership in 1893, owned three locomotives, owned four passenger cars, owned two baggage cars, owned 104 box cars, owned 53 flat freight cars, owned 10 coal cars, owned one caboose, had $20,000,000 in capital stock, had as its officers Tilden R. Selmes, receiver, H. W. Lamberton, president, Thomas Simpson, secretary, and Matthew G. Norton, treasurer, had as its board of directors S. W. Champion, R. D. Cone, Andrew Hamilton, William Hayes, Charles Horton, William H. Laird, H. W. Lamberton, M. G. Norton, Thomas Simpson, V. Simpson, Joseph Walker, Jr., and E. S. Youmans, and had its general office in Winona, Minnesota. In 1901, the 130 mile long Winona & Western RailRoad Company was acquired by the Chicago Great Western Railroad Company and the Winona & Western Railroad Company ceased to exist, replaced by the Wisconsin, Minnesota & Pacific Railroad Company, a Chicago Great Western RailRoad subsidiary. The Wisconsin, Minnesota & Pacific Railroad Company was controlled by the Chicago Great Western in 1901 and was subsequently absorbed in 1920. John J. Mahoney (1849-1905) was formerly the general superintendent of the Winona & Western RailRoad in Wisconsin and subsequently was the general manager of the Fort Smith & Western Railway, and died in Fort Smith, Arkansas. Myron K. Drew was engaged in the dry goods business in Meadville, Pennsylvania, before 1854, moved to Minnesota in 1854, married M. A. Lombard of Boston, Massachusetts, in 1856, was an incorporator of the La Crosse, Trempealeau, Lake Pepin, & Prescott RailRoad in 1857, engaged in the land speculation business and farming, managed various farms in Western Minnesota, including Redwood County, Minnesota, was the mayor of Winona, Minnesota, from 1859 until 1861, was a Winona, Minnesota alderman, raised apples in Winona, Minnesota, resided at 1020 Knox Avenue North in Minneapolis ijn 1906, and, in 1916, resided at Kintire, Redwood County, Minnesota. Mrs. M. K. Drew was the secretary of the Winona, Minnesota, Women’s Temperance Union in 1875. Elizabeth "Lizzie" Hogg Sherman Norton (1837-1867,) the wife of Daniel Sheldon Norton (1829-1870,) a U. S. Senator from Minnesota who voted to acquit President Andrew Johnson during his impeachment, was first buried in the yard of Myron K. Drew. William B. Mitchell (1832-1900,) the son of John Mitchell and Mary Henderson Mitchell, was born in Stamford, Ontario, Canada, was educated in private secondary schools in Canada, emigrated to the United States in 1848, graduated from Jefferson College, Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, in 1853, read the law in the office of Edgar C. Wilson in Virginia, was admitted to the practice of law in Virginia in 1857, taught school in Morgantown, West Virginia, moved to Minnesota in 1857, resided in Winona, Minnesota, was a member of the Winona, Minnesota, city council, married E. Jane Hanway ( -1867) of Morgantown, West Virginia, in 1857, was a Presbyterian, initially was a Republican, was a member of the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Winona County, Minnesota (District 11,) from 1859 until 1861, was the county attorney for Winona County, Minnesota, for one term, married Mrs. Francis N. Smith, a widow from Chicago, Illinois, in 1872, became dissatisfied with some of the reconstruction measures of the Republican Party during the administration of President Andrew Johnson and subsequently aligned himself largely with Democrats, was a judge in the Third Judicial District from 1874 until 1881, was the president of the Winona & Southwestern RailRoad, was the president of the Winona Savings Bank, was a justice on the Minnesota Supreme Court from 1881 until 1899, losing the Republican nomination in 1898, was the dean of the St. Paul College of Law, wrote more than 1,500 opinions, and died of a stroke at home in Winona, Minnesota. E. G. Hornbrooke, who was the president of the Epworth League of Minnesota in 1893, was the general freight agent of the Winona & SouthWestern RailRoad in 1889 and held the office of auditor of the Winona & Southwestern Railway company from 1890 until 1894, when he was discharged from the position for being short $1900 in his accounts. Earl S. Youmans (1825-1909) was born in New York, came to Minnesota in 1857, resided in Winona, Minnesota, was a lumber dealer as a partner with Addison Youmans and Abner B. Hodgins in Youmans Brothers & Hodgins, was a member of the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Winona County, Minnesota (District 11,) from 1862 until 1867, was the president of the First National Bank of Winona, Minnesota, in 1893, was a member of the board of directors of the Winona & SouthWestern RailRoad in 1895, and was a member of the board of directors of the Winona & Western RailRoad in 1902. Igantius F. O’Fenall was an incorporator of the Winona & LaCrosse RailRoad in 1872. William Windom (1827-1891,) the son of Hezekiah Windom and Mary Spencer Windom, born in Belmont County, Ohio, was educated at Martinsburg, Ohio, studied law at the Martinsburg Academy, Mount Vernon, Ohio, was admitted to the practice of law in 1850, practiced law in Mount Vernon, Ohio, was the prosecuting attorney of Knox County, Ohio, in 1852, moved to Winona, Winona County, Minnesota Territory, in 1855, married Ellen Towne Hatch (1831-1914) in 1856, was a Quaker, was a Republican, was a member of the U. S. Congress from SouthEast Minnesota from 1859 until 1869, was a member of the Republican National Committee from 1866 until 1868, was appointed to the United States Senate to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Daniel S. Norton and served from 1870 until 1881, resigned to become the Secretary of the Treasury by President James Garfield in 1881, resigned his Cabinet post later in 1881, returned to the U. S. Senate from 1881 until 1883, was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection to the U. S. Senate in 1883, moved to New York City, New York, in 1883, practiced law in New York City, New York, was the Secretary of the Treasury in the Cabinet of President Benjamin Harrison from 1889 until 1891, died of a heart attack in New York City, New York, and was interred in Rock Creek Cemetery, Washington, D.C. William Hall Yale (1831–1917,) the son of Wooster Yale (1797-1842,) a shoe manufacturer and Connecticut county sheriff, and Lucy Hall Yale and a lineal descendant of Elihu Yale, the namesake of Yale University, was born in New Haven, Connecticut, was educated in the Wallingford, Connecticut, public schools and at the Connecticut Literary Institute in Suffield, Connecticut, taught school in Norwalk, Connecticut, read the law in the law offices of G. R. Cowles in Norwalk, Connecticut, became a bookkeeper at Sharp’s Rifle Manufacturing Company in 1854, moved to Minnesota in 1857, resided in Winona, Minnesota, was admitted to the practice of law in Minnesota, was a lawyer, was a city judge at Winona, Minnesota, from 1857 until 1859, then was a probate court judge in Winona, Minnesota, was a law partner of William B. Mitchell, later was the law partner of M. B. Webber, was the Winona, Minnesota, municipal attorney, married Sarah Elizabeth Banks ( -1871,) the daughter of Bradly O. Banks, of Norwalk, Connecticut, in 1851, was an Episcopalian, was a Republican, was a member of the Minnesota Senate representing Winona County (Districts 8, 11 and 15) from 1866 until 1868, from 1875 until 1878, and from1894 until 1899, was Lieutenant Governor under Governor Horace Austin from 1870 until 1874, married Mary Louisa Hoyt of Norwalk, Connecticut, in 1872, was the presiding officer over the 1872, 1873 and 1880 Republican Party State Conventions, was a delegate to the 1892 Republican Party National Convention in Minneapolis, was a member of the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Winona County (District 2) from 1898 until 1901, and died in Saint Paul. [See 875 Summit Avenue for a note about William B. Mitchell.] [See note on Thomas Wilson for 761 Goodrich Avenue.] [See note for Verrazano Simpson for the Winona & SouthWestern RailRoad Company.] [See note for E. S. Yeomans for the Winona & SouthWestern RailRoad Company.]

Winona Terminal RailRoad: The railroad was granted a charter by the City of Winona, Minnesota, in 1891. The railroad was incorporated under Iowa law in 1891 by R. D. Cone, Andrew Hamilton, Charles Horton, James L. Horton, William H. Laird, H. M. Lamberton, Thomas Simpson, Verranzano Simpson, and E. S. Yeomans to construct a system of railway terminals at Winona, Minnesota. In 1893, the rights of way for the railroad had been secured. In 1893, the officers of the railroad were William H. Laird, president, R. D. Cone, vice president, and Henry M. Lamberton, secretary and treasurer. William Harris Laird (1833-1910,) the son of Robert Hayes Laird and Maria Nevius Laird, was born in East Buffalo, Union County, Pennsylvania, attended school at Lewisburg, Pennsylvania, was initially employed as a clerk in 1850, moved West in 1855, moved to Winona, Minnesota, in 1855, started in the lumber business in 1856 as a member of the retail lumber firm of Laird Brothers, with brothers John C. Laird and M. J. Laird, and expanded later in 1856 with the addition of James L. Norton and Matthew G. Norton as partners in the business, with the name changed to Laird, Norton & Company, married Mary Jane Watson ( -1889) in 1856, was a member of the First Congregational Church of Winona, Minnesota, was the president of the Deposit Bank of Winona, Minnesota, built the Winona, Minnesota, Public Library, was a member of the board of trustees of Carlton College from 1883 to 1910, became the secretary-treasurer of Laird Norton & Company in 1883, was president of the Second Nationasl Bank of Winona, Minnesota, married Mrs. Della Shawhan of Tiffin, Ohio, in 1895, and died at Johns Hopkins University Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland, after surgery. . [See note for Royal Day Cone for the Winona & Western RailRoad.] [See note for Verrazano Simpson for the Winona & SouthWestern RailRoad Company.] [See note for H. M. Lamberton for the Winona & SouthWestern RailRoad Company.] [See note for E. S. Yeomans for the Winona & SouthWestern RailRoad Company.]

Winona & Western RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1894, was associated with the lumber company of Laird, Norton Company of Winona, Minnesota, purchased the property of the Winona & Southwestern Railroad, operated until 1901, and was succeeded by the Wisconsin, Minnesota & New Ulm RailRoad. The Winona & Southwestern went bankrupt in the panic of 1893. The Winona & Southwestern Railroad became the Winona & Western RailRoad in 1894. A spur was built in 1900 from Simpson, Minnesota, to Rochester, Minnesota. In 1885, the officers of the railroad were Henry Wilson Lamberton, president, Verrazzano Simpson, vice president, Thomas Simpson, secretary and general counsel, Matthew George Norton, treasurer, and John J. Mahoney, general superintendent, the board of directors of the railroad were Royal D. Cone, S. W. Hamilton, Charles Horton, William H. Laird, C. H. Lamberton, Henry Wilson Lamberton, Mathew G. Norton, Verrazzano Simpson, and Earl S. Youmans, the railroad operated a 114.5 mile rail line, the railroad had $2 million in capital stock, the railroad owned five locomotives, the railroad leased two locomotives, the railroad operated six passenger cars, the railroad operated 204 box cars, the railroad operated 84 flat cars, the railroad operated ten coal cars, the railroad operated four cabooses, the railroad operated 36 other rail cars, and the railroad employed 89 employees. In 1896, the railroad purchased 50 box cars. According to Poor's Manual of the RailRoads of the United States, Volume 33 by Henry Varnum Poor in 1901, as of 1899, the railroad operated 126.26 miles of rail trackage from Winona, Minnesota, to Osage, Iowa, owned six locomotives, four passenger cars, two combination cars, 200 box cars, 84 flat freight cars, ten coal cars, and four cabooses, had $2,000,000 in capital stock, had as its officers H. W. Lamberton, president, V. Simpson, vice president, Thomas Simpson, secretary and general counsel, and Matthew G. Norton, treasurer, had as its board of directors S. W. Hamilton, Charles Horton, William H. Laird, H. W. Lamberton, W. J. Landon, J. R. Mitchell, Matthew G. Norton, V. Simpson, and E. S. Youmans, and had its general office in Winona, Minnesota. In 1901, both A. B. Stickney and James J. Hill were reported in the popular press of the time to be interested in acquiring the railroad. The Chicago Great Western RailRoad acquired the Winona & Western RailRoad in 1901, merged it into the Wisconsin, Minnesota & Pacific RailRoad, a subsidiary of the Chicago Great Western RailRoad, and fully merged into the Chicago Great Western RailRoad in 1920. Royal Day Cone (1821-1898,) the son of Benjamin Cone and Elizabeth Root Cone, was born in Columbus/Berlin, New York, was educated on the home farm, became a clerk in a locale mercantile in 1841, was the town clerk of New Berlin, New York, married Ruena Merchant ( -1870) in New Berlin, New York, in 1849, moved to Rochester, New York, to enter the stove business with a cousin in 1852, relocated to Winona, Minnsota, opening a stove and tin ware store in 1855, homesteaded 160 acres of land in Winona County, Minnesota, established the R. D. Cone Company, was a member of the Winona, Minnesota, school board, was a member of the Winona, Minnesota, city council, was an unsuccessful candidate for mayor of Winona, Minnesota, in 1864, was mayor of Winona, Minnesota, from 1866 until 1868, was an active member of the Old Settlers Association, served as treasurer of the Central Methodist Episcopal church, was a member of the board of directors of the First National Bank of Winona, Minnesota, , was a member of the board of directors of the Winona Wagon Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Winona & Western Railway Company, and died in Hudson, Wisconsin. Henry Wilson “Harry” Lamberton (1831-1905,) the son of Major Robert Lamberton (1787-1852) and Mary Harkness Lamberton (1791–1880,) was born in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, was educated in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, studied law in the law offices of his brother, Robert A. Lamberton, was admitted to the practice of law in Pennsylvania in 1852, married Margaret J. Plumer ( -1902) in Franklin, Pennsylvania, in 1852, practiced law in Franklin, Pennsylvania, until 1856, moved to Winona, Minnesota, with his brother-in-law, Samuel Plumer, and practiced law, was elected city attorney of Winona, Minnesota, moved from Winona, Minnesota, to Faribault, Minnesota, resided at St. Peter, Minnesota, during the 1862 Dakota War, returned to Winona, Minnesota, in 1863, was the unsuccessful Democratic candidate for Congress from SouthEastern Minnesota in 1864, was appointed land commissioner of the Winona & St. Peter Railroad Company in 1866, organized and was the president of the Winona Deposit Bank in 1868, was the commissioner of the Winona and St. Peter Land Company, was a member of the Winona, Minnesota, Board of Education in 1880, was a Democrat, was a delegate and attended the 1880 Democratic National Convention at Cincinnati, Ohio, was the mayor of Winona, Minnesota, from 1881 to 1883, was the chairman of the 1888 Democratic State Convention, was a member of the Minnesota State Capitol Building Commission, was president of the Winona & Southwestern Railway Company before 1894, and was the president of the Winona & Western Railway Company after 1893. C. H. Lamberton was a Winona, Minnesota, city alderman from 1881 until 1883 and was a founding member of the Winona, Minnesota, Elks Lodge No. 327 in 1895. Verrazano Simpson (1832-1905,) the son of Benjamin F. Simpson (1799-1883,) a physician and surgeon, and Elizabeth McDermaid Simpson, was born at Windham, Rockingham County, New Hampshire, was educated in the public schools of Lowell, Massachusetts, was initially a drug store clerk and pharmacist, then was a sailor in the East Indies for three years, moved to the Mississippi River Valley in 1853, resided in Dubuque, Iowa, from 1853 until 1855, resided in Winona, Minnesota, after 1855, open a merchandise store, constructed a large grain warehouse in 1856, made a fortune in the wheat trade, then was in the commission forwarding business, married Ann Manahan of Lowell, Massachusetts, in 1854, divorced, engaged in the real estate, development, and loan business, married Mary L. Lockwood Dyer Simpson (1847-1876) in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, married Josephine Harb Simpson (1855-1917,) was a Democrat, was the mayor of Winona, Minnesota, on two occasions, died in Winona, Winona County, Minnesota, was an incorporator of the Scroth & Ahrens Company, a sash and door manufacturer located in Winona, Minnesota, and was buried at Woodlawn Cemetery, Winona, Winona County, Minnesota. Matthew G. Norton (1831-1917,) the son of John Norton and Isabella Black Norton, was born at Lewisburg,Pennsylvania, was educated in Lewisburg, Pennsylvania, attended Bucknell University, was a cashier and purchasing agent with Harris & Black, a railway contractor under contract with the Canadian Grand Trunk RailRoad, moved to Winona, Minnesota, went into the lumber business, built a swmill in 1857, was the treasurer of Winona County, Minnesota, married Emma Beulah Hayes of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1866, was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, was a member of the board of trustees of Hamline University of St. Paul, was a Republican, became the firm’s president in 1883, when the company incorporated as Laird, Norton Company, and authored The Mississippi River Logging Company : an historical sketch. Matthew George Norton, his brother, James Laird Norton (1825-1904,) and William Harris Laird, his cousin, formed in 1855 the Laird Norton Company, the first of several family-owned companies engaged in the lumber business, first in the Midwest, later in the Pacific Northwest, and finally all over the West, including Alaska. In 1905, the company invested in nearly 1 million acres of Pacific Northwestern timberlands in a partnership with Frederick Weyerhaeuser and R. L. McCormick and was instrumental in the founding of major lumber companies in the Western states. The company moved its headquarters to Seattle in 1955.

Winston Brothers Company RailRoad: The Winston Brothers Company was an engineering and contracting company in Minneapolis that initially did railroad track grading. The company began as railroad builders in the 1870's and went on to become dam, tunnel, road and bridge contractors. Winston Brothers Company developed into one of the more successful general contracting businesses in the West and became an international company, with projects in Columbia. The company had a subsidiary, the Winston Brothers & Dear Company.

Winston Brothers & Dear Company RailRoad: The company was a subsidiary of the Winston Brothers Company, along with Winston, Dear & Company. The Winston Brothers Company was a construction and engineering company, began as railroad builders in 1875, was incorporated in 1902, was located in Minneapolis, principally worked on the Minnesota Iron Range and in the Western United States, became the Winston Dear Company, and also did business as Winston & Green. R. B. Dear and Hans C. Hansen were partners in Winston Brothers & Dear. Elbridge Harlow Beckler was a member of Winston Brothers Company in 1902, upon its incorporation. Winston Brothers Company developed into one of the more successful general contracting businesses in the West. The Winston Dear Company operated railroads in connection with its railroad building, dam construction, tunnel construction, and canal building activities. In 1928, pursuant to a reorganization plan, the Winston Brothers Company acquired all of the assets and assumed all of the liabilities of the Winston-Dear Company and the Winston-Dear Company was dissolved as a corporation. William O. Winston (1853-1919) was born in Hanover County, Virginia, was educated in Virginia public schools, was an engineer for the Chesapeake & Ohio RailRoad in 1872, went to Minnesota in 1874 and 1875 with U. S. Government engineering parties, joined his brothers, Phillip B. Winston and Fendall G. Winston, in Winston Brothers in Minneapolis in 1876, joined them in incorporating the business as Winston Brothers Company and Winston-Dear Company, was vice president of Winston Brothers Company from 1902 until 1914, was president of Winston-Dear Company after 1902, became the president of Winston Brothers Company in 1914, and was elected the president of the Association of General Contractors in 1921. Fendall Gregory Winston (1849-1928,) the son of William Overton Winston (1812-1862) and Sarah Anne Gregory Winston (1823-1901,) was born in Courtland, Hanover County, Virginia, attended public schools in Virginia, came to Minnesota, joined one of the engineering parties engaged in laying out the Northern Pacific RailRoad in 1872, engaged in government surveying in Northern Minnesota with his brother, P. B. Winston, in 1873-1875, worked for the Minneapolis Harvester Works in 1875, formed a railroad contracting business with P. B. Winston, included brother W. O. Winston in the contracting business in 1876, married Alice Louise Olmsted/Olmstead (1856-1881,) the daughter of David Olmsted, the first mayor of St. Paul, in Minneapolis in 1876, married Lillian Jones ( -1903,) the daughter of Henry Robinson Jones and Sallie Stagg Jones, of Richmond, Virginia, in 1884, built, in 1887 and 1888, as part of Winston Brothers, in association with D. C. Shepherd & Company of St. Paul, over 2,300 miles of railroad, operated in the states of Idaho, Washington, Minnesota, Michigan, Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, Kansas, Iowa, New Mexico, Ohio, Nebraska, Virginia, Kentucky, Texas, Louisiana, North Dakota, and South Dakota, was president of the Winston-Harper-Fisher Company, a reformulation of the wholesale grocery house of Harrison, Farrington & Company, resided at 436 Clifton Place in 1887, was a member of the board of directors of the Security Bank in 1891, was a member of the board of directors of the First National Bank of Minneapolis, was a member of the board of directors of the Minneapolis Trust Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Minneapolis Business Men’s Union, was the unsuccessful Democratic candidate fro Lieutenant Governor of Minnesota in 1904, was the chairman of delegates at the Denver Democratic Party convention in 1908, became a Republican in 1912, was a member of Westminster Presbyterian Church, was a member of the Minikahda Club, and was a member of the Minneapolis Club. Phillip “P. B.” Winston (1845-1901) was born in Courtland, Hanover County, Virginia, was an aide-de-camp during the American Civil War to Thomas Rosser, a Confederate general and subsequent chief engineer for the Northern Pacific RailRoad, came to Minnesota in 1872, married Katherine W. Stevens, the daughter of Minneapolis pioneer Colonel John Stevens, was a Democrat, resided at 1826 Park Avenue in Minneapolis in 1886, was the unsuccessful candidate for mayor of Minneapolis in 1888, was the mayor of Minneapolis in 1892, was a railroad contractor and farm owner, and was a member of the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Hennepin County (Districts 32 and 41) from 1892 until 1895 and from 1898 until 1901. Horace Edward Stevens (1848-1922) was an investor and a member of the board of directors of Winston Brothers Company in 1902 and was the vice president of the Winston Brothers Company from 1914 until 1920. James Hollister Ellison (1860- ,) the son of William W. Ellison and Sarah R. Pond Ellison and the grandson of Gideon Pond, was the president of the Cedar Lake Ice Company in Minneapolis, was employed by the Winston Brothers as superintendent of construction from 1895 until 1902, was a stockholder and a member of the board of directors of the Winston Brothers Company after 1902, and was the vice president of the Winston Dear Company in 1923. Henry Harrison Wilson (1882- ) became the managing partner in 1925 of Winston Brothers Company & H. H. Wilson. The Winston Brothers Company owned over 60 per cent of the stock of the Winston-Dear Company.

Wisconsin Central RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1887 under an 1878 Wisconsin law, was the reorganization of an 1871 railroad company, and was the result of the acquisition of several railroads, the Wisconsin Central Company, the Wisconsin Central Railroad Company, the Milwaukee & Lake Winnebago Company, the Chicago, Wisconsin & Minnesota RailRoad, the Packwaukee & Montello RailRoad, and the Marshfield & Southeastern RailRoad. The original Wisconsin Central RailRoad Company was established by an act of the Wisconsin State Legislature, was incorporated in 1871, the only land-grant railroad in Wisconsin, built track throughout Wisconsin, connecting to neighboring states, before being leased to Northern Pacific Railway between 1889-1893, resumed as a free-standing railroad when the Northern Pacific defaulted on its lease terms, became the Wisconsin Central Railway Company in 1897, was leased by the Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sault Ste. Marie Railway (the Soo Line) in 1908, entered receivership in 1932, declared bankruptcy in 1944, re-emerged as the Wisconsin Central RailRoad Company in 1954, and was entirely merged into the Soo Line RailRoad in 1961, which has subsequently become the Canadian Pacific RailRoad. The railroad began operations with service between Menasha, Wisconsin, and Stevens Point, Wisconsin, then reached Ashland, Wisconsin, in 1877, then reached St. Paul in 1884, the reached Chicago, Illinois, in 1886, and finally reached Superior, Wisconsin, in 1908. Gardner Colby of Boston, Massachusetts, a principal of the Colby-Philips Construction Company, built the rail line for the Wisconsin Central Company. In 1889, the railroad operated 373.56 miles of total trackage (25.62 miles in Minnesota,) had $15,000,000 in capital stock, had 2,860 employees, owned 105 locomotives, owned 31 passenger cars, owned 1,652 freight cars, owned 25 company service cars, owned 21 bridges, and owned 203 trestles. In 1889, the officers of the railroad were Charles S. Colby, president, E. H. Abbott, vice president and secretary, Charles L. Colby, treasurer, D. S. Wegg, general solicitor, Frederick Abbott, comptroller, and S. R. Ainslee, general manager, and the members of the board of directors of the railroad were Edwin H. Abbott, Frederick Abbott, S. R. Ainslie, H. O. Barlow, Charles L. Colby, F. N. Finney, Colgate Hoyt, T. J. Hyman, Howard Morris, Charles H. Roger, and David S. Wegg. In 1889, the railroad consolidated with the Minnesota, St. Croix & Wisconsin RailRoad. The railroad was leased to the Northern Pacific RailRoad in 1890, but the lease was terminated in a court action in 1893 for the nonpayment of rent. In 1900, the officers of the railroad were H. F. Whitcomb, president, Charles M. Morris, secretary, Frederick Abbott, treasurer, Robert B. Tweedy, chief engineer, Charles C. Braman, general counsel, and Robert Tombs, auditor, and the members of the board of directors of the railroad were Charles C. Braman, John C. Brown, William L. Bull, James C. Colgate, George Coppell, Fred T. Gates, Francis R. Hart, Gerald L. Hoyt, Howard Morris, and H. F. Whitcomb. In 1904, the officers of the railroad were William L. Bull, the chairman of the board, Henry F. Whitcomb, president, Charles M. Morris, secretary, W. R. Hancock, treasurer, Edward W. Sheldon, general counsel, Robert Toombs, auditor, and Earl F. Potter, general superintendent, and the members of the board of directors were John Crosby Brown, William L. Bull, James C. Colgate, Joseph S. Dale, Fred T. Gates, Francis R. Hart, Gerald C. Hoyt, Howard Morris, Edward W. Sheldon, William F. Vilas, and Henry F. Whitcomb. The Poor's Directory of RailRoad Officials, published by the Poor's RailRoad Manual Company in 1898, indicates that the officers of the railroad were John A. Stewart, trustee, Edwin H. Abbott, trustee, vice president and secretary, Charles L. Colby, trustee, president and treasurer, William S. Mellen, general manager, D. S. Wegg, solicitor, and Edward Ferguson, auditor, that the general office of the railroad was in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and that the railroad operated 765 miles of rail trackage. In 1899, Edwin H. Abbott (1831- ) was the president and treasurer of the Wisconsin Central RailRoad. In 1904, the railroad had capital stock of $30,000,000, had 186 employees in Minnesota, owned 181 locomotives, owned 136 passenger cars, owned 7,872 freight cars, owned 153 company service cars, owned four bridges, owned 14 trestles, and operated 917.10 total miles of railway trackage (25.32 miles in Minnesota.) In 1913, the railroad had total capital stock of $30,000,000, had also invested in the St. Paul & St. Croix Falls Railway, the Chippewa Falls & Western Railway, the Gogebic & Montreal River RailRoad, the Milwaukee Terminal Railway Company, the Tri State Land Company, the Minnesota Transfer Company RailRoad, the Manitowoc Land Improvement Company, and the La Sainte Iron Company, and had 8.19 miles of track in Minnesota. In 1917, the railroad operated 1,470.649 miles of rail trackage, owned 192 locomotives, owned 8,499 freight cars, owned 172 passenger cars, was a result of the acquisition of the Minnesota, St. Croix & Wisconsin RailRoad in 1888, the Wisconsin & Minnesota RailRoad in 1888, the Penokee RailRoad in 1888, the Wisconsin Central Company in 1899, the Wisconsin Central RailRoad in 1899, the Milwaukee & Lake Winnebago RailRoad in 1899, the Chicago, Milwaukee & Minnesota RailRoad in 1899, the Chicago & Wisconsin RailRoad in 1899, the Packwaukee & Montello RailRoad in 1899, the Marshfield & Southeastern RailRoad in 1901, the Lake Superior & Southeastern RailRoad in 1906, the Owen & Northern Railway in 1906, and the Abbotsford & Northeastern RailRoad in 1910, acquired 120.095 miles of rail trackage from its predecessor railroads, built 175.20 miles of rail line (a 4.42 mile rail line from Owen, Wisconsin, to Ladysmith, Wisconsin, in 1906, a 112.36 mile rail line from Ladysmith, Wisconsin, to Duluth, Minnesota, from 1906 to 1909, a 10.10 mile rail line from Athens, Wisconsin, to Goodrich, Wisconsin, in 1909, a 19.49 mile rail line from Spencer, Wisconsin, to Owen, Wisconsin, in 1910, a 10.86 mile rail line from Howard, Wisconsin, to Colfax, Wisconsin, in 1910, and a 17.97 mile rail line from New Richmond, Wisconsin, to Withrow, Wisconsin, in 1910,) leased from the Stanley, Merrill & Phillips Railway a 38.06 mile rail line from Stanley, Minnesota, to Vallee, Wisconsin, in 1923, and was controlled by the Minneapolis, St. Paul and Sault Ste. Marie Railway. The original Wisconsin Central RailRoad Company was established by an act of the Wisconsin State Legislature and was incorporated in 1871, the only land-grant railroad in Wisconsin, built track throughout Wisconsin, connecting to neighboring states, before being leased to Northern Pacific Railway between 1889-1893, became the Wisconsin Central Railway Company in 1897, was leased by the Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sault Ste. Marie Railway (the Soo Line) in 1908, entered receivership in 1932, declared bankruptcy in 1944, re-emerged as the Wisconsin Central RailRoad Company in 1954, and was entirely merged into the Soo Line RailRoad in 1961, which has subsequently become part of the Canadian Pacific RailRoad. The railroad operated until 1961 and was succeeded by the Soo Line RailRoad. In 1987, the Soo Line RailRoad sold its Lake States Transportation Division to private investors, who formed the Wisconsin Central Transportation Corporation. The Wisconsin Central Transportation Corporation/Wisconsin Central Ltd. eventually owned or operated railroads in the United States, in Canada (in the form of the Algoma Central Railway), in the United Kingdom (in the form of the English Railway, the Welsh Railway, and the Scottish Railway), in New Zealand (in the form of Tranz Rail), and in Australia (in the form of the Australian Transport Network.) Wisconsin Central Ltd. was a regional railroad that was acquired by the Canadian National Railway in 2001. Charles S. Colby was a member of the board of directors of the Oregon Railway and Navigation Company in 1888 and resided in New York City, New York, in 1893. Charles L. Colby ( -1896,) the son of Gardner L. Colby, a Boston merchant and importer, financier, railroad executive and philanthropist, was born on a farm near Boston Highlands, Massachusetts, completed his education in Boston Highlands, Massachusetts, graduated from Brown University, worked in foreign trade until 1870, was the treasurer of the Phillips & Colby Construction Company, retired from the railroad business in 1878, returned to Massachusetts, and died of a heart attack in Newton Center, Massachusetts. James Colby Colgate (1863-1944,) the son of James Boorman Colgate (1818-1904) and Susan Farnum Colby (1817-1919,) was born in Yonkers, New York, graduated from Colgate university in 1882, graduated from the Columbia University Law School in 1884, married Hope Hubbell Conkling (1868-1955,) the daughter of Daniel H. Conkling, in 1890, was a member of the New York Stock Exchange firm of James C. Colgate & Company, founded Fillmore Farms in Bennington, Vermont, and began raising prizewinning Dorset sheep in 1892, was a member of the board of directors of the Aurora Iron Mining Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Spanish-American Mining Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Wiosconsin Central RailRoad, was a member of the University Club of New York, was a member of the Lawyers’ Club of New York, was a member of the New York Bar Association, was a founder of the Sleepy Hollow Country Club in Scarborough, New York, and was a member of the Phi Beta Kappa Society. David Spencer Wegg (1847-1919,) the son of John Wegg and Jerusha Duncombe Wegg, was born in St. Thomas, Ontario, Canada, apprenticed as a carriage maker, then was a teacher in St. Thomas, Ontario, Canada, moved to Wisconsin in 1872, initially resided in Madison, Wisconsin, graduated from the Law Department of the University of Wisconsin in 1873, resided in Racine, Wisconsin, was employed by the law firm of Fish & Lee, then settled in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, was a lawyer, worked in the law firm of Jenkin, Elliott & Winkler in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, was a member of the law partnership of Dixon, Hooker, Wegg & Noyes in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, married Evangeline Russell (1853-1942,) the daughter of Andrew Russell (1808- ) and Helen Keir Hendry Russell, in Concord Township, Jefferson County, Wisconsin, in 1878, was the assistant solicitor for the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad, moved to Chicago, Illinois, in 1885, was the general solicitor of the Wisconsin Central RailRoad, was the president of the Chicago & Northern Pacific RailRoad, was a member of the board of directors of the Northern Pacific RailRoad, formed the law partnership of Wegg & Wegg with his son, Donald R. Wegg, in 1893, was the assignee of seven railroad-related patents awarded to Phillip Hien in 1900, was the chairman of the board of directors of the RailRoad Supply Company in 1901, was a Republican, was a member of the Literary Club of Chicago, Illinois, was a member of the Milwaukee Club, was a member of the Manhattan Club of New York, New York, was a member of the American Bar Association, was a member of the Illinois Bar Association, was a member of the Wisconsin Bar Association, was a member of the Chicago Bar Association, was a member of the Chicago Law Institute, was a member of the Historical Society of Chicago, Illinois, was a member of the Chicago Art Institute, was a member of the 20th Century Club of Chicago, Illinois, was a member of the Union League of Chicago, Illinois, was a member of the St. James Episcopal Cathedral, summered in Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, in 1905, died in Chicago, Illinois, of acute peritonitis, and was buried in Nashotah, Wisconsin. S. R. Ainslee was the general agent for the Kansas Pacific Railway Company in 1878, was the general freight manager of the Denver & Rio Grande RailRoad in 1890, was the superintendent of the Yellowstone Division of the Northern Pacific RailRoad, was the general superintendent of the Northern Pacific RailRoad, was the general manager of the Wisconsin Central RailRoad in 1893, was the general manager of the Chicago & Calumet Terminal RailRoad, was the president and general manager of the Chicago & Northern Pacific RailRoad during its receivership in 1897, was the general manager and a member of the board of directors of the Chicago Terminal Transfer RailRoad Company in 1898, subsequently was the president of the Chicago Terminal Transfer RailRoad Company, was an investor in the Ohio Mine on the Mesabi Iron Range of Minnesota, and resided in Chicago, Illinois. Frederick Norton Finney (1832-1916,) the son of Rev. Charles Grandison Finney, the president of Oberlin College, and Lydia R. Andrews Finney, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, attended Oberlin College, was admitted to the practice of law in 1857, settled in Oshkosh, Wisconsin, in 1857, practiced law for a few years, was a railroad construction engineer and built lines in Ohio, Michigan, Illinois, and Pennsylvania, was a construction engineer for the Chicago & Northwestern RailRoad in 1860, was the city engineer for Toledo, Ohio, from 1862 until 1864, married Willianna Wallace Clarke (1841- ) in Oberlin, Ohio, in 1863, was the first assistant engineer of the Mountain division of the Union Pacific RailRoad in 1864, was the resident engineer and superintendent of the Jamestown Division of the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern RailRoad from 1864 until 1867, was the chief engineer and superintendent of the Erie & Pittsburgh RailRoad from 1867 until 1870, was an official of the Soo Line RailRoad, was an official of the Missouri,Kansas & Texas Railroad, resided in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, was the chief engineer of the Canada SouthernRailRoad/Michigan Central RailRoad in 1870, was the chief engineer and superintendent of the Toledo, Peoria & Warsaw Railway from 1874 until 1878, was the general manager and a member of the board of directors of the Wisconsin Central RailRoad in 1879 and 1882, was the general manager of the Wisconsin & Minnesota RailRoad in 1881, was the general manager of the Chippewa Falls & Western RailRoad in 1881, was the general manager of the Minnesota, St. Croix & Wisconsin RailRoad in 1885, was an organizer of the Wisconsin Union Trust Company in 1890, was the chairman and president of the Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sault Ste. Marie RailRoad from 1900 until 1902, was a principal in the contracting company Colby & Finney that was created by the board of directors of the Wisconsin Central RailRoad, was the builder of the Wisconsin & Minnesota RailRoad rail line, was the builder of the Minnesota, St. Croix, and Wisconsin RailRoad rail line, left Wisconsin in 1899, was engaged in railroad building in the Southwest for several years, was the president of the Missouri, Texas & Oklahoma Railway Company from 1902 until 1904, was president of the Missouri, Kansas and Oklahoma RailRoad from 1904 until 1907, was a Republican, was a member of the Chicago Club of the Chicago, Illinois, was a member of the board of trustees of Oberlin College, retired to Pasadena, California, in 1907, died in San Francisco, California, was cremated in California, and was buried in the Forest Home Cemetery of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Robert Benedict Tweedy (1864-1929,) the son of John H. Tweedy, a lawyer, a Wisconsin territorial legislator, and a Wisconsin gubernatorial candidate, and Anna M. Fisher Tweedy, was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, was reared in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, was educated partly in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and partly in Boston, Massachusetts, was employed as chief engineer by the Wisconsin Central Railway until 1901, married Edna Bradley, the daughter of Edward Bradley, a lumber merchant, was a leading business men of Tomahawk,Wisconsin, was the president and treasurer of the Tomahawk Light, Telephone, & Improvement Company in 1912, had charge of the Bradley holdings after the death of William H. Bradley ( -1903,) resided in Goshen, New York, in 1917, and was buried in the Forest Home Cemetery, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin. T. J. Hyman was a member of the original committee of 15 for organizing the Association of American Railroads Accounting Division in 1888, was a member of the Passenger Committee of the Association of American Railroads Accounting Division in 1889 and 1890, was an assistant to James J. Hill of the Great Northern RailRoad in 1893, was a member of the Car Accounting Committee of the Association of American Railroads Accounting Division in 1897 and 1898, was the treasurer of the Chicago Automobile Club in 1908, was the secretary, the treasurer, and a member of the board of directors of the Illinois Steel Company in 1908, was a member of the board of directors of the Illinois Steel Warehouse Company, was a member of the board of directors of the South Chicago Savings Bank in 1908, was a member of the board of directors of the Gary Land Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Cundy Iron Company, was the secretary, the treasurer, and a member of the board of directors of the Scully Steel & Iron Company in 1918, and was a member of the board of directors of the Indiana Steel Company. In 1900, H. F. Whitcomb and Howard Morris were the receivers of the Wisconsin Central Company. Henry F. Whitcomb (1848-1932) was a capitalist who resided in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, was the general freight and passenger agent of the Milwaukee, Lake Shore & Western Railroad Company in 1878 and 1879, was the president and a member of the board of directors of the Wisconsin Electric Railway in Oshkosh, Wisconsin, in 1914, invested in the Minneapolis & St. Louis RailRoad Company, was the president and a member of the board of directors of the Eastern Wisconsin Railway & Light Company in Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, in 1914, and was an inventor in 1926 with a patent for a roller skate (U. S. Patent #1,640476.) George Coppell (1837-1901) was born in England, emigrated to the United States when young, resided in New York City, New York, married Helen Hoffman Gillingham (1844-1894,) the daughter of Harper Gillingham and Elizabeth Gillingham, in 1862, became associated with Maitland, Phelps & Company in 1871, became a senior member of Maitland, Coppell & Company in 1886, was the chairman of the board of directors of the Denver & Rio Grande RailRoad, was the chairman of the reorganization committee of the Norfolk & Western RailRoad, was the chairman of the reorganization committee of the Wheeling & Lake Erie RailRoad, was the chairman of the reorganization committee of the Wisconsin Central RailRoad, was a member of the board of directors of the Metropolitan Trust Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Mercantile Trust Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Atlantic Mutual Insurance Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Rapid Transit Subway Construction Company, was the vice president of the United States Guaranty Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Securities Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Western Union Telegraph Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Audit Company, was a member of the board of directors of the American Car & Foundry Company, was the vice president of the McKenna Steel Working Company, was the president of the Railroad Equipment Company, was associated with the St. Louis & Southwestern Texas RailRoad/Cotton Belt RailRoad, was a member of the Metorpolitan Company, was a member of the Church Club, was a member of the Reform Club, was a member of the City Club, was a member of the Downtown Association, and died in New York City, New York. Gerald L. Hoyt was a partner in the banking firm of Maitland. Coppell & Company. Reverend Frederick Taylor Gates (1853–1929,) the son of Granville Gates, a Baptist minister, and Sarah Jane Bowers Gates, was born at Maine, Broome County, New York, graduated from the University of Rochester in 1877, graduated from the Rochester Theological Seminary in 1880, was a Baptist minister, was the superintendent of missions for the American Home Missionary Society in Kansas, served as the pastor of the Central Baptist Church in Minneapolis, from 1880 to 1888, married Lucia F. Perkins in 1882 at Rochester, Monroe County, New York, married Emma Lucile Cahoon (1855- ,) the daughter of Lyman H. Cahoon ( -1868) and Cordelia C. Tague Cahoon, in 1886 at Racine, Racine County, Wisconsin, left the ministry, worked for George A. Pillsbury and Pillsbury Flour, was appointed the secretary of the American Baptist Education Society in 1888, championed the founding of a Baptist university in Chicago, Illinois, was a philanthropic fund-raiser, was a member of the General Education Board, the predecessor to the Rockefeller Foundation organized by John D. Rockefeller, designed the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research/Rockefeller University in 1901, was a member of the board of trustees of the Rockefeller Foundation, was a member of the board of trustees of the University of Chicago from 1896 until 1910, designed the China Medical Board in 1914, died of pneumonia in Phoenix, Maricopa County, Arizona, in 1929, and was buried at Mount Hebron Cemetery, Upper Montclair, Essex County, New Jersey. Francis Russell Hart (1868-1938,) the son of Thomas Mandell Hart and Sarah Davis Watson Hart, was born in New Bedford, Massachusets, was educated at the Friends' Academy in New Bedford, Massachusets, attended the Massachusetts Institute of Technology from1885 until 1889, married Helen Bronson Hobbey in 1896, did engineering work of various kinds in the West Indies and South America from 1889 until 1895, was the general manager of the Cartagena Terminal and Improvement Company, Ltd., in 1893, was the general manager of the Cartagena-Magdalena Railway Company in Colombia in 1893, was the vice-president of the theCartagena-Magdalena Railway Company in 1894, was the president theCartagena-Magdalena Railway Company in 1895, became vice-president of the Old Colony Trust Company in 1896, became a member of the board of directors of the United Fruit Company in 1901, was the treasurer of the Massachusets Institute of Technology from 1907 until 1909 and from 1913 until 1921, was a member of the board of directors of the Old Colony Trust from 1908 until 1934, was a member of the board of trustees of the Massachusets Institute of Technology from 1909, was consul of Colombia in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1919, authored Admirals of the Caribbean, published by the Houghton Mifflin Company in 1922, authored The disaster of Darien: the story of the Scots settlement and the causes of its failure, 1699-1701, published by the Houghton Mifflin Company in 1929, authored The siege of Havana, 1762, published by the Houghton Mifflin Company in 1932, was a member of the American Academy of the Arts and Sciences, was a member of the Council of Foreign Relations, was a member of the English-Speaking Union, was a member of the American Geographical Society, was a member of the Imperial Institute, was a member of the Royal Geographical Society, was a member of the Academia Nacional de Historia inColombia, was a member of the Club of Odd Volumes of Boston, Massachusetts, was a member of the Colonial Society of Massachusetts, was a member of the New England Historic Genealogical Society, and was a member of the Massachusetts Historical Society. Howard Morris was the president of the Wisconsin Central RailRoad and was a receiver of the Wisconsin Central Company in 1893. William Freeman Vilas (1840–1908,) the son of Levi Baker Vilas (1811–1879) and Esther Green Smilie Vilas, was born in Chelsea, Vermont, moved to Madison, Wisconsin, with his family in 1851, graduated from the University of Wisconsin–Madison in 1858, graduated from the University of Albany Law School in 1860, was admitted to the practice of law in Wisconsin, enlisted in the Union Army during the American Civil War, was the lieutenant colonel of the 23rd Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry Regiment, fought at the Siege of Vicksburg, married Anna M. Fox, the daughter of Dr. William H. Fox of Fitchburg, Wisconsin, in 1866, was a law partner of Edwin Eustace Bryant (1835-1903,) became a professor of law at the University of Wisconsin in 1868, was a trustee of the Wisconsin Soldiers' Orphans Home from 1874 until 1893, was one of three revisors appointed by the Wisconsin Supreme Court in 1875 to prepare a revised body of the statute law, was a regent of the University of Wisconsin–Madison from 1880 to 1885 and from 1898 to 1905, was the chairman of the Democratic National Convention in Chicago, Illinois, in 1884, served as a member of the Wisconsin State Assembly in 1885, was the Postmaster General under President Grover Cleveland between 1885 and 1888, was Secretary of the Interior under President Grover Cleveland from 1888 to 1889, led Wisconsin German Americans in the protest against the Bennett Law of 1889, which required schools to only use the English language, was a member of the Democratic Party, served in the United States Senate for Wisconsin from 1891 to 1897, was unsuccessful in a 1896 reelection bid, was a delegate to the Democratic National Convention of 1896, became one of the chief organizers of the National Democratic Party and attended the convention at Indianapolis, Indiana, in 1896, retired from politics in 1897, was a member of the Wisconsin State Historical Library Building Commission, was vice-president of the Wisconsin State Historical Society in 1898, was a member of the commission to provide for the construction of the Wisconsin State capitol in 1907, was a member of the Wisconsin Vicksburg Military Park Monument Commission, was a member of the Society of the Army of the Tennessee, died in Madison, Wisconsin, and was buried at the Forest Hill Cemetery in Madison, Wisconsin. [See note on the Wisconsin Central RailRoad for 767 East Sixth Street.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/TNHrail2.html" [See note for Colgate Hoyt for the Duluth & Manitoba Railway.]

Wisconsin Central Ltd.: The railroad was organized in 1987 as a subsidiary of the Wisconsin Central Transportation Corporation, acquired the Green Bay and Western RailRoad and the Fox River Valley RailRoad in 1993, acquired the Algoma Central Railway in 1995, had over 2,850 miles of rail trackage in the Great Lakes region, extended from Chicago, Illinois, into and through Wisconsin to Minneapolis/St. Paul and Duluth, Minnesota, to Sault Ste Marie, Michigan, and North, through the Algoma Central Railway, to Hearst, Ontario, Canada, operated until 2001, and was succeeded by purchase by the Canadian National RailRoad. In 2011, the Duluth, Winnipeg & Pacific Railway and the Duluth, Missabe & Iron Range Railway were merged into the Wisconsin Central. The Wisconsin Central Transportation Corporation was founded by Richard Buell Ogilvie, the Governor of Illinois from 1969 until 1973 and was governed by a board of directors that included John William Rowe, President and CEO of Exelon, before 2001.

Wisconsin, Minnesota & Pacific RailRoad: The railroad was originally organized in 1857 as the Minnesota Central RailRoad, and was chartered in 1857. The name of the railroad was changed from the Minnesota Central RailRoad Company to the Wisconsin, Minnesota & Pacific Railway Company in 1883. The stock of the railroad was controlled by the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railway Company in 1883. When the 1873 land grant from the Minnesota Legislature to the unsuccessful Cannon River Improvement Company was transferred to the Wisconsin, Minnesota & Pacific Company to aid in the construction of the line from Red Wing, Minnesota, to Mankato, Minnesota, the railroad was built. In 1872, the Minneapolis & St. Louis Railroad (north-south) and the Cannon Valley Railroad (east-west) were surveyed. The railroad built a 123 mile rail line from Morton, Minnesota, to Watertown, North Dakota by way of North Redwood, Minnesota, Delhi, Minnesota, Belview, Minnesota, Echo, Minnesota, Wood Lake, Minnesota, Hanley Falls, Minnesota, Hazel Run, Minnesota, Clarkfield, Minnesota, Boyd, Minnesota, Dawson, Minnesota, Madison, Minnesota, Haydenville, Minnesota, and Marietta, Minnesota, Revillo, North Dakota, Strandburg, North Dakota, Troy, North Dakota, and Waverly, North Dakota, by 1884, was operated by the Minneapolis & Saint Louis Railroad Company in 1884, built a 27 mile rail line from Waterville, Minnesota, to Mankato, Minnesota, by way of Elysian, Minnesota, Madison Lake, Minnesota, and Benning, Minnesota, by 1887, and was operated by the Minneapolis & Saint Louis Railroad Company in 1887. In 1885, the railroad ran from Red Wing, Goodhue County, Minnesota, to Eagle Lake, Le Sueur County, Minnesota, and from Morton, Renville County, Minnesota to Watertown, Coddington County, Dakota Territory, operated 205.5 miles of total rail trackage (166 miles in Minnesota,) had capital stock of $20,000,000, had 31 stations (26 in Minnesota,) owned 102 bridges, and owned two passenger cars. In 1885, the officers of the railroad were C. F. Hatch, president, J. C. Pierce, vice president, L. Z. Rogers, secretary, Maurice Auerbach, treasurer, and J. D. Springer, attorney, and the members of the board of directors were Maurice Auerbach, T. B. Clement, C. F. Hatch, C. Livingston, J. C. Pierce, L. Z. Rogers, and D. M. Sabin. In 1889, the railroad was controlled and operated by the Minneapolis & St. Louis RailRoad and, in 1893, the railroad was sold under foreclosure to the Chicago, Rock Island, & Pacific RailRoad. In 1893, the railroad operated 216.60 miles of rail trackage (177.76 miles in Minnesota,) had 239 total employees (193 employees in Minnesota,) owned two passenger cars, owned one company car, owned six bridges, and owned 117 trestles. In 1893, the receiver of the Minneapolis & St. Louis RailRoad supplied the equipment for the railway under contract. In 1893, the officers of the railroad were Lester Charles Mitchell, president, T. E. Clarke, vice president, L. B. Arnold, secretary, Jos. Gaskell, treasurer, A. E. Clarke, general solicitor, O. C. Post, auditor, W. H. Truesdale, general manager, and the members of the board of directors of the railroad were L. B. Arnold, A. E. Clark, T. E. Clarke, Jos. Gaskell, L. C. Mitchell, O. C. Post, and H. T. Wright. The railroad was was acquired through a mortgage foreclosure sale and was reorganized in 1894. In 1904, the officers of the railroad were F. B. Kellogg, president and general solicitor, A. B. Stickney, first vice president, G. F. Philleo, secretary, R. O. Barnard, treasurer, C. O. Kalman, auditor, and S. C. Stickney, general manager, and the members of the board of directors were Kenneth Clark, F. B. Kellogg, C. A. Severance, A. B. Stickney, and R. C. Wright. In 1893, the railroad was sold in a foreclosure sale to the United States Trust Company as an agent for the Chicago, Rock Islanad & Pacific RailRoad, was reorganized as the Wisconsin, Minnesota & Pacific Railway Company in 1894, and was operated by the Minneapolis & St. Louis RailRoad Company until 1898. According to Poor's Manual of the RailRoads of the United States, Volume 33 by Henry Varnum Poor in 1901, as of 1899, the railroad operated 93.7 miles of rail trackage from Red Wing, Minnesota, to Mankato, Minnesota, had its rolling stock supplied by the Chicago Great Western RailRoad, had capital stock of $5,205,000, had as its officers Frank B. Kellogg, president, A. B. Stickney, vice president, C. O. Kalman, treasurer, W. J. Conway, secretary, R. C. Wight, auditor, and S. C. Stickney, general manager, had as its board of directors Kenneth Clark, F. B. Kellogg, C. A. Severance, A. B. Stickney, and R. C. Wight, and had its general office in St. Paul. In 1904, the railroad was operated by the Chicago Great Western RailRoad, had capital stock of $5,871,600, had 371 employees in Minnesota, owned 17 locomotives, owned 14 passenger cars, owned 800 freight cars, owned 13 company service cars, owned eight bridges, owned 287 trestles, and operated 268.13 total miles of railway trackage (245.63 miles in Minnesota.) In 1913, the railroad had as its officers S. M. Felton, president, J. W. Blabon, vice president, J. F. Coykendall, secretary and treasurer, and Con F. Krebs, auditor, had as its board of directors J. W. Blabon, S. M. Felton, C. J. McConville, John H. Rich, and Benjamin Sommers, had total capital stock of $5,893,400, and had 277.43 miles of railway trackage, which were leased to the Chicago Great Western RailRoad. The railroad owned one Shay locomotive (#1686,) acquired from the Pine Tree Lumber Company. The railroad was succeeded by the Chicago Great Western RailRoad in 1899. The railroad was a subsidiary of the Chicago Great Western RailRoad, consisted of that railroad's eastern Minnesota lines, and was fully merged into the Chicago Great Western RailRoad in 1920. Luther Zoan "L. Z." Rogers (1837-1897,) the son of Captain Zoan Rogers (1801-1881) and Phebe Sparrow Kenrick Rogers (1804-1877,) was born in Brewer, Penobscot County, Maine, came to Minnesota in 1857, resided in Waterville, Minnesota, married Sarah N. Lawton, was a merchant in 1865 and in 1872, was a member of the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Blue Earth County, Minnesota, and Le Sueur County, Minnesota (District 17,) from 1864 until 1866, was a member of the Minnesota Senate representing LeSueur County, Minnesota (District 19,) from 1871 until 1873, published a newspaper in English and German in Waterville, Minnesota, from 1871 until 1873, secured, with L.F. Hubbard of Goodhue County, a land grant from the Minnesota Legislature to improve navigation to the Mississippi River on the Cannon River from Red Wing, Minnesota, to Waterville, Minnesota, bred American Shorthorn cattle in 1884, was a Mason, was the Past Grand Commander of the Grand Commandery of Minnesota of the Knights Templar in 1894, died in Waterville, Minnesota, and was buried in Sakatah Cemetery, Waterville, Le Sueur County, Minnesota. William Haynes Truesdale (1851–1935,) the son of Dr. Calvin Truesdale, a prominent physician in Rock Island, Illinois, was born in Poland, Ohio, was educated in Rock Island, Illinois, became a clerk in the Rockford, Rock Island & St. Louis RailRoad, became cashier and purchasing agent of the Rockford, Rock Island & St. Louis RailRoad in 1872, married Annie Topping of Terre Haute, Indiana, joined the law firm of Osborn & Curtis in Rock Island, Illinois, in 1874, was general freight agent of the Logansport & Crawfordsville RailRoad in 1879, was traffic manager and then the vice president of the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & St. Louis Railway in 1881, became the president of the Minneapolis & St. Louis Railway in 1887, was the receiver of the bankrupt Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & St. Louis Railway in 1888, worked his way up the ranks, was third vice president and general manager of the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railroad in 1894, then served as the first Vice President and General Manager of the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific RailRoad, became president of the Lackawanna Railroad in 1899, was the president of the Delaware, Lackawana & Western RailRoad in 1903 and 1905, was the president of the Morris & Essex RailRoad before 1912, was the vice president and a member of the board of directors of the Mutual Life Insurance Company of New York in 1914, was a member of the board of directors of the Temple Iron Company in 1914, was a member of the board of directors of the United States Rubber Company in 1914, and was a member of the National Committee to raise money for the Church Pension Fund of the Episcopal Church. Con F. Krebs, a resident of Chicago, Illinois, was the auditor of disbursements for the Illinois Central RailRoad in 1900, was the comptroller of the Dubuque & Sioux City RailRoad in 1909, and was the auditor of the Chicago Great West RailRoad, the Mason City & Fort Dodge RailRoad, and the Wisconsin, Minnesota & Pacific RailRoad in 1921. Joseph Ward Blabon, the son of Joseph Eaton Blabon ( -1899,) was a resident of Seattle, Washington in 1901, was a resident of St. Paul in 1902, was a resident of Chicago, Illinois, in 1919, was a partner of Alva H. Warren and Marshal D. Chipley in Blabon, Warren & Chipley, a lace, notions and white goods importing and jobbing firm, was the Western Traffic Manager of the Great Northern RailRoad in 1901, was the fourth vice president of the Great Northern RailRoad in 1902, was the freight traffic manager of the Chicago & Alton RailRoad in 1905, and was the vice president of the Chicago Great West RailRoad, the Mason City & Fort Dodge RailRoad, and the Wisconsin, Minnesota & Pacific RailRoad, and was a member of the board of directors of the Mason City & Fort Dodge RailRoad and the Wisconsin, Minnesota & Pacific RailRoad in 1919, was assigned to the United States Shipping Board in 1918, was a Republican, and was a member of the local committee for the 1912 Republican National Party Convention in Chicago, Illinois. John H. Rich (1857-1924) was born at Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, was the mayor of Red Wing, Minnesota, married Julia W. Williston, the daughter of William C. Williston, a judge, was a founder of the Red Wing, Minnesota, Civic League, was the owner of the John H. Rich Sewer Pipe Works of Red Wing, Minnesota, was a Mason in 1890, later became involved with the Minneapolis business community, and became the first Federal Reserve agent and chairman of the board of directors for the Minneapolis Federal Reserve Bank in 1914. Lester Charles Mitchell (1842-1915,) the son of Charles H. Mitchell and Margaret Barlow Mitchell, was born in Altmar, Oswego County, New York, was a veteran of the American Civil War on the staff of General George Armstrong Custer, graduated from New York University, New York City, New York, in 1867 with a medical degree, resided in Sand Bank, New York, in 1867, married Marcia M. A. Hatch (1844-1905,) the daughter of Revillo Clark Hatch (1801-1890) and Marcia Pratt Hatch (1810-1844) in Fayetteville, New York, in 1867, was a physician, initially practiced medicine in Joliet, Illinois, subsequently married Sarah A. Hatch Niven Smith, the daughter of Rodney D. Hatch and Mary Fairfield Hatch, subsequently was a resident of Minneapolis, was the first superintendent of the Minnesota College Hospital, was a member of the Grand Army of the Republic at the John A. Rawlins Post No. 126 of Minneapolis, was the president of the Wisconsin, Minnesota & Pacific RailRoad from 1889-1894, was a prominent figure in grain and milling interests in the NorthWest, was the president of Aberdeen Mill Company, was the vice-president of Great Western Elevator Company, moved to Hamburg, New York, in 1913, and died in Hamburg, New York. Robert C. Wight (1861- ) was born in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, emigrated to the United States, settled in Minnesota, was a partner with W. G. Bronson in the firm of Bronson & Wight, a commission shipping company in St. Paul, was a notary public in Ramsey County in 1892, was the secretary and treasurer of the DeKalb & Great Western Railway Company in 1901, was the secretary and auditor of capital accounts of the Chicago Great Western RailRoad in 1901, was the auditor and a member of the board of directors of the Wisconsin, Minnesota & Pacific RailRoad Company in 1901, was the agent for the Mason City & Fort Dodge RailRoad Company in 1906, was the secretary, the Illinois agent for transfer of stock, and a member of the board of directors of the Chicago Great Western RailRoad in 1907, and was the president and a member of the board of directors of the Wisconsin, Minnesota & Pacific RailRoad Company in 1908. Dwight May "D. M." Sabin (1843-1902,) the son of Horace Carver Sabin, an abolitionist and Underground Railroad host, and Maria Elizabeth Webster Sabin, was born in Marseilles, La Salle County, Illinois, moved to Connecticut in 1857 with his parents, attended Connecticut Common Secondary Schools, attended Phillips Academy, Andover, Massachusetts, served in a Connecticut Regiment in Beaufort's Calvary Brigade during the American Civil War from 1862 until 1864, was employed as a clerk in Washington, D.C., moved to Minnesota in 1866 or 1867, initially resided in Minneapolis, was employed in the iron works of Wilder, Taylor & Company, subsequently resided in Stillwater, Minnesota, after 1868, married Ellen Amelia Hutchins of Norwich, Connecticut, in 1870, engaged in lumbering, became a promoter and partner in the lumber operations of the C.N. Nelson Lumber Company at Cloquet, Minnesota, engaged in the general manufacture of railroad cars and agricultural machinery, utilizing labor from the Minnesota State Prison at Stillwater, Minnesota, produced the “Minnesota Chief” threshing machine, was a Republican, was a member of the Minnesota Senate representing Chisago County, Kanabec County, Pine County, and Washington County (Districts 2 and 22) from 1870 until 1874, was a member of the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Washington County (Districts 22 and 24) from 1878 until 1883, was the chairman of the Republican National Committee from 1883 until 1884, was a U. S. Senator from Minnesota from 1883 until 1887, was an unsuccessful candidate for renomination to the United States Senate in 1886, went bankrupt in the Crash of 1884, had investments in the the Duluth Iron Company and the Chicago Railway and Equipment Company, moved to either Duluth, Minnesota, or Ashland, Wisconsin, in 1890, married Jessie Larmon Swann, the widow of W.G. Swann of St. Paul, in 1891 or 1895, was a member of the Knights of Pythias, died of heart failure in Chicago, Illinois, and was buried in Fairview Cemetery, Stillwater, Washington County, Minnesota. Gilbert F. Philleo (1875-1951) was the chief clerk of the Chicago Great Western RailRoad as well as the secretary of the Wisconsin, Minnesota & Pacific RailRoad Company, resided at 364 Bates Avenue, and died in Ramsey County. John Franklin Coykendall (1859-1917,) the son of Cyrus Coykendall (1812-1894) and Catherine Faucett/Fawcett Coykendall (1816-1889,) was educated in Canton, Fulton County, Illinois, was employed as the assistant postmaster of Canton, Illinois, for five years, was a stenographer employed by the Wabash, St. Louis & Pacific RailRoad, married Eliza Belle Edmiston (1857/1861- )in 1879 in Farmington, Illinois, was the secretary to the superintendent of the Iowa lines of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy RailRoad in 1883, was the stenographer employed by the vice president and general superintendent of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy RailRoad, was the chief clerk in the general manager’s office of the Union Pacific RailRoad from 1888 until 1891, and joined a real estate firm in Chicago, Illinois, in 1891, was the traffic manager of Fraser & Chalmers/Allis-Chalmers Company in Chicago, Illinois, from 1892 until 1895, and was the secretary-treasurer of the Chicago Great Western RailRoad Company in 1909. [See note on Maurice Auerbach for 400 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Frank B. Kellogg for 710 West Linwood Avenue.] [See the note for Kenneth Clark for 403 Portland Avenue.] [See note on C. O. Kalman for 590 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Crawford Livingston for 432 Summit Avenue and for 339 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Constantine J. McConville for 470 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Cordenio A. Severance for 710 West Linwood Avenue.] [See note on Alpheus Beede Stickney for 846 Lincoln Avenue.] [See note on Samuel Crosby Stickney for 653 Goodrich Avenue.] [See note on William Albert Truesdell for 601 Lincoln Avenue.]

Wisconsin Railway, Light & Power Company: The McGraw transit directory, published in 1918 by the McGraw-Hill Publishing Company, indicates that the railroad was the successor to the Winona Railway & Light Company, owned and operated the former property of the La Crosse City, Wisconsin, Railway Company and the La Crosse City, Wisconsin, Water Power Company, operated 7.5 miles of rail trackage from Winona, Minnesota, via Hatfield, Minnesota, and Onalaska, Wisconsin, to La Crosse, Wisconsin, owned 15 motor cars, had a repair facility at Winona, Minnesota, generated its own power, had as its officers Clement C. Smith, president, Peter Valier, vice president, Henry L. Rice, vice president, Howard Greene, secretary, J. P. Pulliam, treasurer, S. M. Rothermel, auditor, H. C. Mackey, comptroller, and R. M. Howard, general manager, and had its general office in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The company was a Wisconsin corporation, was incorporated in 1913 by N. F. Adams, J. B. Black, and J. G. Hardgrove, and had $1,229,000 in capital stock. The company double tracked and reconstructed some of its lines in 1917. The Wisconsin Railway, Light & Power Company developed a method for undercutting commutators of motor armatures by the use of a commutator slotter mounted on a lathe spindle in 1917. The railroad was succeeded by the Mississippi Valley Public Service Company in 1926. A 1914 Wisconsin Railway, Light & Power St. Louis Car Company street car (order #1012; railroad #10) is owned by the Minnesota Streetcar Museum in Excelsior, Minnesota. J. Gilbert Hardgrove was a lawyer, resided in Fond du lac, Wisconsin, in 1910, was a a circuit court commissioner in 1910, was a member of the Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Bar Associaion, and represented the Milwaukee Gas Light Company in the U. S. Supreme court litigation Amalgamated Association of Street Electric Railway Motor Coach Employees of America Division 998 v. Wisconsin Employment Relations Board, 340 U.S. 416 (1951.) John Page Pulliam (1875-1951,) the son of Henry Clay Pulliam and Mary Thomas Page Pulliam, was born in Louisville, Kentucky,became a telegrapher in 1889, then became the station agent for the Louisville & Southern RailRoad, then became the train master for the Grand Haven & Muskegon RailRoad, married Pearl/Mary Alice Brigham (1873-1919,) the daughter of Doctor Reader Smith Brigham (1832-1890) and Mary Goe Brigham (1835-1922,) in Kentucky, moved to Wisconsin in 1907, was the manager of the Winnebago Traction Company, a street railroad, in Oshkosh, Wisconsin, moved to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in 1917, married Adell/Adella Elida Norem (1893-1985/1986,) the daughter of Nils Johannes Helgesen (1862-1934) and Anne Marie Nelson (1868- ,) in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, was an associate of Clement C. Smith at the Wisconsin Public Service Corporation from 1917 until 1932, was the president of the Wisconsin Public Service Corporation from 1932 until 1948, was the president of the Wisconsin Securities Company of Delaware, was the president of the Mississippi Valley Public Service Company, was the member of the board of directors of the Badger Paper Mills of Peshtigo, Wisconsin, was the member of the board of directors of the Employers Mutual Insurance Company of Wausau, Wisconsin, was the member of the board of directors of the Aquaterra Company of Wilmington, Delaware, was the member of the board of directors of the Curtis Bay Towing Companies of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Baltimore, Maryland, and Norfolk, Virginia, was the member of the board of directors of the Pusey & Jones Corporation of Wilmington, Delaware, was the member of the board of directors of the Evanston, Illinois, Bus Company, was the member of the board of directors of the Wisconsin Investment Company of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, was the member of the board of trustees of Carroll College of Waukesha, Wisconsin, was the member of the YMCA, was the member of the Plymouth Congregational Church, was the member of the Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Country Club, was the member of the Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Club, was the member of the University Club, and died of a pulmonary embolism in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Clement C. Smith (1866- ) was born in Ohio to a father who was born in Washington, D.C., and to a mother who was born in Virginia, married Ella Madeline Miller (1871- ,) the daughter of Benjamin Kurtz Miller and Annie McLain Smith Miller, in 1899, was a civil engineer in 1900 and 1910, the president of a company in 1920, reorganized Pusey & Jones, a shipbuilding firm, in 1927, was an executive in the public utilities industry, the Wisconsin Light and Power Company, in 1930, and resided in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in 1900, 1910, 1920, and 1930. Peter Valier of LaCombre, Wisconsin, was a member of the board of directors of the Provident Loan and Savings Association of La Crosse, Wisconsin, in 1901, was the manager of the La Crosse & Southeastern RailRoad before 1909, supervised, in 1909, at the behest of William Wallace Cargill, the building of the Montana Western Railroad, with a total length of 22.2 miles and connected with the main line of the Great Northern RailRoad, was the namesake of Valier, Pondera County, Montana Territory, was an incorporator, with W. G. Cargill of La Crosse, Wisconsin, of the Valier Townsite Company, was a member of the board of directors of the La Crosse City RailRoad Company in 1908, and was the president and a member of the board of directors of the La Crosse & Onalaska RailRoad in 1921. Ms. S. M. Rothermel was secretary of the Citizens’ Traction Company of Kalamazoo, Michigan, until 1897, was employed by the Citizens’ Traction Company of Oshkosh, Wisconsin, from 1897 until 1900, was the treasurer and assistant secretary of the Winnebago Traction Company after the Citizens’ Traction Company of Oshkosh, Wisconsin, was reorganized as that company in 1900, until 1907, when the company went into receivership, resided in Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, in 1907, was the chief clerk of the Winnebago Traction Company during its receivership, was the assistant secretary of the Wisconsin Electric Railway of Oshkosh, Wisconsin, from 1908 until 1910, resided in Oshkosh, Wisconsin in 1908, became the confidential secretary to E. E. Downs, the general manager of the Chicago & Milwaukee Electric RailRoad in 1910, was the auditor of the Winona Railway & Light Company in 1912 and 1915, and was the assistant treasurer of the Winona Railway, Light and Power Company in 1916 and 1920.

Woodland Railway Company: The Motor Line Improvement Company was organized in 1890 by a group of Duluth, Minnesota, investors and was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1891. The company built a single track rail line along Fourth Street from 24th Avenue, up St. Marie Street, and North along Woodland Avenue. The railroad was built by the Motor Line Improvement Company, a real estate and land company, during or before 1892 and had six miles of rail trackage in 1898. The railroad was operated by the Duluth Street Railway. In 1892, the Railroad had a waiting station at the corner of Woodland Avenue and Lewis Street in Duluth, Minnesota. The Duluth Street Railway and the Woodland Railway Company were engaged in litigation over improvements made along the line in Woodland Company v. Mendenhall, 82 Minn. 483, 85 NW 164 (Minnesota 1901.) According to Poor's Manual of the RailRoads of the United States, Volume 33 by Henry Varnum Poor in 1901, as of 1899, the railroad operated 5.96 miles of rail trackage, was the successor after a mortgage foreclosure sale of the Motor Line Improvement Company in 1899, was operated by the Duluth Street Railway Company, had $40,000 in capital stock, had as its officers T. W. Hoopes, president, R. M. Hunter, treasurer, and James Bardon, secretary, and had its general office in Duluth, Minnesota. The railroad was acquired by the Duluth Street Railway Company in 1901. The company also was responsible for a book, edited by William Franklin Phelps, A vast empire and its metropolis: city of Duluth, published by RandMcNally in 1896. Guilford G. Hartley was president and Luther Mendenhall and Townsend W. Hoopes were the general managers of the business of Motor Line Improvement Company in 1891. In 1906, Porter J. Neff was the receiver for the insolvent Motor Line Improvement Company. Guilford Graham Hartley (1853-1922,) the son of Edward Bennet Hartley and Rebecca Barker Whitehead Hartley, was born in Lower Canterbury, Shogomor County, New Brunswick, Canada, moved to Minnesota in 1873, moved to Brainerd, Minnesota, initially worked as a logger and a farmer in the forests of Northern Minnesota, was a member of the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Benton County, Crow Wing County, Mille Lacs County, Morrison County, and Todd County (District 23) from 1882 until 1885, married Caroline Elizabeth Woodward (1862- ) in Minneapolis in 1883, was a delegate to the 1888 Republican presidential convention, was the general manager of the Duluth Street Railway when the Duluth-Superior Interstate bridge was built, was the registrar at the Duluth, Minnesota, land office, was active in real estate, was a developer of the Western portion of the Mesabi Iron Range, founded the Island Farm herd of Guernsey cattle and the Hartley Stock Farm with his brother, H. L. Hartley, was engaged in the lumber business, was the receiver of the Duluth-Superior Bridge Company in 1901, was a member of the first board of trustees of the Duluth Art Association in 1907, subsequently became a millionaire and the purchaser, between 1890 and 1911, of a large farm, the Greater Allandale Farm, within the Duluth, Minnesota, city limits, built Duluth’s Orpheum Theatre, was a member of the Kitchi Gammi Club, was the chair of the building committee of the Kitchi Gammi Club in 1913, was a member of the St. Paul's Episcopal Church, was a member of the Northland Country Club, and died in Duluth, Minnesota. Townsend W. Hoopes (1857-1937,) the son of Benjamin Hoopes and Elizabeth Walter Hoopes, was born in Chester, Pennsylvania, attended Pennsylvania common schools, attended Westtown Boarding School of Pennsylvania, settled in Duluth in 1882, was a real estate developer and business pioneer, married Mary Eliza Hearvey/Mayme Harvey (1864- ) in 1885, helped plan and construct Duluth’s first street car line, the Duluth Street Railway, oversaw the construction of the Fourth Street Line on behalf of the Motor Line Improvement Company in 1909, established, with Luther Mendenhall, a real estate and insurance company that eventually became the Hoopes-Kohagan Company, retired in 1923, married Grace __?__ ( -1947,) was a member of the Society of Friends, was a member of the Duluth Boat Club, was a member of the Kitchi Gammi Club, was a member of the Northland Country Club, was a Republican, was a member of the Kitchi Gamma Club, was a member of the Duluth, Minnesota, Commercial Club, was a member of the Duluth, Minnesota, Boat Club, was a member of the Northland Country Club, invested in the Spalding Hotel, invested in the Duluth Dry Goods Company, invested in the Duluth Shoe Company, and invested in Sagar Drug.

Worthington & Sioux Falls RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1876, was incorporated under Iowa law in 1876, succeeded the St. Paul & Dakota RailRoad in 1876, which had constructed 58.40 miles of rail trackage from Sioux Falls Junction/Trent, Minnesota, to Sioux Falls, Dakota Territory, from 1876 until 1878, and amended its articles of incorporation in Minnesota in 1876. In 1877, the railroad had Horace Thompson as its president and G. A. Hamilton as its secretary, had a board of directors composed of R. Blakely, E. F. Drake, G. A. Hamilton, P. H. Kelly, J. L. Merriam, and Horace Thompson, had 29.55 miles of railway trackage from Sioux Falls Junction, Minnesota, on the route of the Sioux City & St. Paul RailRoad, three miles from Worthington, Minnesota, to Luverne, Minnesota, had two wooden bridges, and had 19 wooden trestles, but had no rolling stock. The railroad was granted authority by the Minnesota Legislature to build a branch line from Luverne, Minnesota, Southerly to the South State boundary in 1879. The name of the railroad was changed to the Worthington & Dakota Railroad. It became the parent corporation of the Worthington & Sioux Falls RailRoad of Iowa, an Iowa corporation that incorporated in 1879, operated until 1879, and was ultimately succeeded by the St. Paul & Sioux City RailRoad. [See the note for Elias Franklin Drake for 324 Bates Avenue.] [See 231 Maria Avenue for information about P. H. Kelly.] [See note on John L. Merriam for 4 Crocus Hill.] [See note on Horace E. Thompson for 808 Summit Avenue.]

Wright & Davis RailRoad: The logging railroad was organized by two Michigan loggers, Ammi W. Wright and Charles H. Davis, before 1892 and ran into the high elevation timberlands of the Gardner, Minnesota, and Hibbing, Minnesota, areas. In 1892, Ammi Willard Wright and Charles H. Davis, lumbermen from Saginaw, Michigan, constructed the first logging railroad in Itasca County, Minnesota. The railroad was also utilized by James J. Hill to service Mesabi Iron Range mines, connecting with the Great Northern RailRoad at Swan River, Minnesota. The railroad began at Mississippi Landing, Minnesota, ran North to Swan River Junction, Minnesota, and then proceeded to Duluth, Minnesota. In 1895, the railroad, renamed the Duluth, Mississippi River & Northern RailRoad, reached Hibbing, Minnesota, and the Mahoning mine, totaling 45 miles of rail trackage. Wright and Davis sold the railroad and 25,000 square miles of timber and mining land to James J. Hill and the Great Northern RailRoad for $4,050,000. Ammi Willard Wright (1822-1912,) the son of Nathan Wright and Polly Lamson Wright, was born in Grafton, Windham County, Vermont, was educated in the public schools of Rockingham, Vermont, moved to Detroit, Michigan, in 1850, entered the lumber business in Saginaw, Michigan, later in 1850, married Harriet Barton (1824-1884,) the daughter of Jeremiah Barton and Sarah Willoughby Barton, in Rockingham, Vermont, in 1848, joined the partnership of Miller, Paine & Wright, bought the Big Mill at, Saginaw, Michigan, in 1859; bought out his partners and organized the A. W. Wright Lumber Company in 1865, organized the Wells-Stone Mercantile Company of Saginaw, Michigan, in 1867, bought pine land in the Missabe Range of Minnesota, organized the Wright-Blodgett Company in 1899, owned large real estate interests in Kansas City, Missouri, in Minneapolis and in Texas, had banking interests in Minneapolis, Duluth, Minnesota, New York City, New York, Detroit, Michigan, and Saginaw, Michigan, owned 3,000 acres of improved land in Gratiot County, Michigan, was a patron and trustee of Alma College, the former Eastern Michigan Normal School, in Alma, Michigan, from 1887 until 1909, was the president of the Advance Thresher Company, was the president of the Battle Creek, Michigan, was the president of the Peerless Portland Cement Company at Union City, Michigan, was the president of the Alma Manufacturing Company of Alma, Michigan, was the president of the First State Bank of Alma, Michigan, was the president of the Cincinnati, Saginaw & Mackinaw RailRoad Company, was the president of the A. W. Wright Lumber Company of Saginaw, Michigan, was the president of the Taylor-Woolfenden Company of Detroit, Michigan, was the president of the Current River Land & Cattle Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Marshall-Wells Hardware Company of Duluth, Minnesota, was a member of the board of directors of the Alma Grain & Lumber Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Alma Sanitarium Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Old Detroit, Michigan, National Bank, was a member of the board of directors of the Bank of Saginaw, Michigan, was a member of the board of directors of the Detroit, Michigan, Trust Co., was a member of the board of directors of the Atlas Oats Company of Kansas City, Missouri, was a member of the board of directors of the Wright-Blodgett Company, was a member of the board of directors of the America Abell Engine & Thresher Company of Toronto, Ontario, Canada, was a Republican, was an Episcopalian, married Anna Case in of Exeter, Ontario, Canada, in 1885, died in Alma, Gratiot County, Michigan, and was buried at Grafton, Windham County, Vermont. Charles Henry Davis (1848- ,) the son of Edmund Davis (1801- ) and Sarah Folsom Davis (1805- ,) was born in North Andover, Massachusetts, grew up on a farm in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, graduated from the Portsmouth, New Hampshire, High School, attended the Eastman Business College, Poughkeepsie, New York, moved to Saginaw, Michigan, in 1869, was employed first as a lumber piler and later, as a bookkeeper, by Ammi W. Wright, entered into a partnership with A. W. Wright, Charles W. Wells, and Reuben Kimball as Wright, Wells & Company in 1872, married Edith Frink of Hebron, Pennsylvania, in 1872, reformulated the earlier partnership as Wright & Davis in 1883, was interested in the Swan River Logging Company, invested in the Duluth, Mississippi River & Northern RailRoad, built ore docks with A. W. Wright at Allouez Bay, Superior, Wisconsin, for the Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic RailRoad, was a member of the Wright-Blodgett Company, Limited, with John Wood Blodgett, Sr. (1860-1951) and A. W. Wright, with large investments in Louisiana, and wintered in Pasadena, California.

Young America RailRoad: In 1872, the Hastings & Dakota Division of the Milwaukee & St. Louis RailRoad was built, leaving the village of Young America, Minnesota, one mile away from the rail line because the residents of the city refused to pay the railroad a charge. James Slocum, a banker, then moved near the railroad tracks and founded Young America Station, Minnesota. In 1874, through a special act of the state legislature, the name of Young America Station, Minnesota, was changed to Norwood, Minnesota, in honor of Slocum's best friend. Norwood, Minnesota, was platted in 1872. The railroad was organized in 1878. Laws of Minnesota 1879, Chapter 152, authorized the village of Young America, Carver County, Minnesota, to issue bonds to aid in the construction of the railroad, limited to ten percent of the assessed property value of the village. Norwood, Minnesota, had a population of 334 when it was incorporated in 1881. In 1880, Young America, Minnesota, had a population of 151. The Young America RailRoad was never constructed.

Zenith Furnace Company RailRoad: In 1871, Joshua B. Culver, Luther Mendenhall, James D. Ray, John C. Hunter, George K. Schoenberger, and W. W. Spalding formed the Duluth Blast Furnace Company and built, at Rice’s Point, Minnesota, Duluth’s first blast furnace that allowed a foundry to make its own pig iron. The Duluth Blast Furnace Company failed during the Panic of 1873. The Duluth Iron & Steel Company operated on the Rice’s Point, Minnesota, site from 1884 until 1888 before moving to West Duluth, Minnesota. The company reformed as West Duluth Blast Furnace in 1892. Roger S. Munger and associates from the West Duluth Land Company organized the West Duluth Blast Furnace Company. The plant was designed by John Birkenbine, a noted engineer and iron authority of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The West Duluth Blast Furnace closed in 1895 largely as a result of the 1893 financial panic. The Zenith Furnace Company was incorporated by Captain A. B. Wolvin and his associates in 1902, with $1,000,000 in capital stock, to operate the West Duluth furnace at Duluth, Minnesota, that had a capacity of 300 tons of pig iron, and produced coal, coal, pig iron, tar ammonia and benzol. The company was incorporated in 1902 to operate the West Duluth blast furnace at Duluth, Minnesota, and had its general offices at the Wolvin Building in Duluth, Minnesota. The Zenith Furnace Company opened in 1902 on the site of the earlier West Duluth Blast Furnace and opened the coke ovens in 1904. William D. Bailey was the president and J. L. Washburn was the secretary of the Zenith Furnace Company in 1902. The company under Captain Wolvin rebuilt the plant to produce pig iron and its byproducts of coal tar, ammonia, and coal gas could be used by other manufacturers in West Duluth, Minnesota, added a coal dock, began distributing coal, and had its own rail system to receive and deliver freight cars to both the Northern Pacific RailRoad and the Soo Line RailRoad. The Zenith Furnace Company blast furnace had a capacity of 300 tons of pig iron, produced coal, coal, pig iron, tar ammonia and benzol, and supplied Duluth, Minnesota, and Superior, Wisconsin, with gas. Additions to the Zenith facility in 1905 and 1908 created one of the largest industries in Duluth, Minnesota. In 1906, the Zenith Furnace Company produced pig iron more cheaply per ton than by any other furnace in America turning out a similar grade of iron, produced 60 per cent more pig iron than its rated capacity, and made higher production in tons per day than any furnace of similar capacity in the entire country. Fred C. Harris/Charles Frederick Harris became the general superintendent of the Zenith Furnace Company in 1906. In 1913, the Zenith Furnace Company aggregated 600,000 tons of coal, 100,000 tons of coke, 75,000 tons of pig iron, 700,000,000 cubic feet of gas, 600,000 pounds of ammonia, and 1,200,000 gallons of tar. The Zenith Furnace Company site in 1916 covered about 80 acres of land on Saint Louis Bay. The coal dock had a capacity of 700,000 tons and handled three grades of coal. The coking coal came from lower Great Lake ports in large freight boats. The company had 65 coke ovens with an annual capacity of about 150,000 tons. The cooled coke from the coking ovens was shot over a screen into rail cars that took it to the furnace. Coal gas, ammonia and coal tar were by-products. In 1924, Zenith employed four hundred workers. The By Products Coke Corporation, a 1905 New York corporation, acquired the assets of the Zenith Furnace Company in 1929. In 1930, Interlake was acquired the By Products Coke Corporation and the Zenith blast furnace operated until 1960 and the Zenith coking ovens operated until 1961. In 1948, the company became a division of Interlake Iron Company and, by 1955, was the country’s largest producer of pig iron. Dramatic reductions in the demand for pig iron forced the Zenith Furnace to close in 1962. In 1964, part of the complex was demolished, and a portion of the facility became Hallett Dock #6. The Zenith site was declared a Superfund site in 1983 because of the coal tar and the chemical pollutants present on the site and in the St. Louis River. The area currently is mostly vacant. Luther/Martin Luther Mendenhall (1836-1929,) the son of Isaac Mendenhall (1806-1882,) who was a Quaker, a farmer, and a conductor of the first station of the Underground Railway, and Dinah Hannum Mendenhall, who was active in the women s suffrage movement, was born in Mendenhall, Chester County, Pennsylvania, was educated at the New York State Academy, was a student at the University of Michigan in 1861, obtained permission to leave college and join the Union Army, enlisted as a private in Company A, First Regiment, Pennsylvania Reserves and served in the 30th Pennsylvania Infantry, served in the American Civil War from 1861 until 1864, fought at the battles of Second Bull Run, Fredericksburg, Antietam, and Gettysburg, graduated from the University of Michigan with a bachelor’s degree and a master’s degree after the American Civil War, married Ella Jane Watson (1842- ) of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1867/1870, read the law at Philadelphia in the offices of Benjamin Harris Webster, was admitted to the practice of law in Pennsylvania, formed the Western Land Company with Charles C. Hinchman, Jay Cooke, and a number of other Philadelphia investors, moved to Duluth, Minnesota, as the agent of the Western Land Company in 1868, worked in real estate, was a developer of Pine City, Minnesota, in 1869, was the first President of the Duluth Library Association in 1869, married Ellen Randall Watson (1846–1917,) in 1870, aided in the organization of the Mississippi & Lake Superior RailRoad Company, helped establish and was the president of the Duluth National Bank, assisted in the organization and was a member of the board of directors of the Duluth Street Railway, was an incorporator of the First National Bank of Duluth, Minnesota, was an incorporator of the Duluth & Iron Range RailRoad Company in 1874, was a partner in the real estate business with C. R. Haines, T. W. Hoopes, and __?__ Kohagen, was part owner of the Duluth News Tribune, was a member of the Duluth Board of Education, was an incorporator of the Duluth & Northern RailRoad in 1885, incorporated both the Duluth Dry Goods and the Duluth Shoe Company with Guilford Hartley in 1890, was the secretary of the Duluth Shoe Company, was a member of the Gorman-Culver Post of the Grand Army of the Republic in Duluth, Minnesota, was active in the Bethel Institute, was the president of the Kitchi Gammi Club, was the Duluth, Minnesota, Park Board president in 1891, had a romantic scandal that was covered in depth in newspapers, married Kate B. Hardy, the daughter of Isaac Cutting and Mary Cutting Hardy in Chicago, Illinois, in 1898, was a promoter of the Inter-City Bridge of New York City, New York, in 1899, was the receiver of the Duluth Street Railway Company in 1900, was a key figure in the Duluth Art Association in 1907, was a Republican, was a member of the Society of Friends, was a member of the board of trustees of the First Methodist Church, wintered in Cuba and in Washington, D. C., died in Duluth, Minnesota, and was buried at Forest Hill Cemetery, Duluth, St. Louis County, Minnesota. Joshua B. Culver (1830-1883,) the son of John C. Culver, was born in Armenia, New York, moved to Fort Atkinson, Iowa, in 1843, married Sarah V. Woodman (1829-1873) at Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin, in 1852, was a merchant with the American Fur Trading Company at Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, from 1854 until 1856, was a merchant with the American Fur Trading Company at St. Paul and at Superior, Wisconsin, from 1856 until 1858, was the land office receiver at Buchanan, Minnesota, in 1858, then was in the lumber business in Duluth, Minnesota, and Kalamazoo, Michigan, was an early volunteer and a Colonel in the 13th Michigan Volunteer Infantry Regiment of the Union Army during the American Civil War, fought at the battles of Shiloh, Corinth, Chickamauga, Perryville, Stone River, Chattanooga, Missionary Ridge, and Savannah, was wounded at the battle of Chickamauga, was the first superintendent of schools in St. Louis County, Minnesota, in 1869, was the first postmaster in Duluth, Minnesota in 1857, was mayor of Duluth, Minnesota, from 1870 until 1871, married Mary E. __?__ after 1873, and died in Buffalo, New York. George K. Schoenberger (1808-1892) was the son of a pioneer iron manufacturer at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, moved to Cincinnati, Ohio, as an agent of his father’s company, Pittsburgh Steel, married Ella Beatty, the daughter of John Beatty, M.D., and Eleanor Armstrong Beatty in 1883, owned the Juanita Ironworks, and was part owner of the Marmora Iron Works and the Cobourg, Peterborough & Marmora Railway & Mining Company. Captain Augustus Benjamin "Gus" Wolvin (1858-1932,) the son of Benjamin Storey Wolvin (1832-1882) and Finetta Augusta Harrington Wolvin (1838-1882,) was born in Cleveland, Ohio, was a sailor from 1868 until 1879, was a ship captain after 1879, was the captain of the Raleigh, a ship in the Winslow Brothers fleet of Buffalo, New York, in 1880, married Carrie Louise Kilgore (1859-1934) in 1880, moved to Pecatonica, Illinois, and engaged in the produce business until 1888, was a resident of Duluth, Minnesota, was a member of the firm of La Salle & Wolvin in the general vessel commission business, was one of the founders, with three brothers from Duluth, Minnesota, Jacob R. Myers, Henry Myers, and Benjamin F. Myers, of Texas City, Texas, in 1891, was the first president of the Texas City Improvement Company in 1893, organized and incorporated the Zenith Transit Company in 1895, was the ultimate purchaser of its reformulation as the Texas City Company and as the Texas City Terminal Company after its bankruptcy in 1897, established the Texas City Steamship Company, a domestic trade transportation company, established Wolvin Lines, a U.S.-Mexico transportation company, lobbied successfully for the U. S. government to pay $250,000 to dredge and widen the Texas City Channel for the purpose of accommodating ocean-going steamships, was the vice-president and general manager of the Pittsburgh Steamship Company from 1901 until 1904, was the manager of the Acme Steamship Company of Duluth, Minnesota, in 1904, was the president of the Zenith Furnace Company from 1904 until 1909, was a member of the Kitchi Gammi Club, was a member of the Duluth Club, was a member of the Chicago Club of Chicago, was a member of the Minnesota Club of St. Paul, was a member of the Union Club of Cleveland, died in Duluth, Minnesota, and was buried at the Forest Hill Cemetery, Duluth, St. Louis County, Minnesota. William W. Spalding (1820-1901) was born in Bradford County, Pennsylvania, moved to Northern Minnesota Territory in 1844 to prospect for copper, resided at Ontonagon, Michigan, for a period of time, moved to Duluth, Minnesota, in 1869, established a general store with his brother, I. C. Spalding, in Duluth, Minnesota, was an incorporator in 1882 of and was the secretary of the Mesabi Iron Company, was an incorporator, a member of the board of directors, and the president from 1876 until 1883 of the Duluth & Winnipeg RailRoad, was a Duluth, Minnesota, City alderman, was the president of the Duluth, Minnesota, Chamber of Commerce, was the secretary of the Duluth, Minnesota, Board of Trade, was the receiver at the U. S. Land Office in Duluth, Minnesota, was the president of the Duluth &Iron Range RailRoad from 1873 until 1883, was a Mason, and was the president of the Spalding Hotel Company. Fred C. Harris/Charles Frederick Harris (1860-1929) was born in Essex County, New York, lived on a home farm, acquired a public school education, apprenticed himself to the Crown Point Iron Company in 1876, subsequently was employed as a foundry foreman at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, married Mary Liberty in 1885 in Essex County, New York, became assistant superintendent for the American Steel and Wire Company at Cleveland, Ohio, until 1904, was the foreman of the Zenith Furnace Company in 1904, and in October, 1905, was the superintendent of the Zenith Furnace Company in 1905, was the general superintendent of the Zenith Furnace Company plant in 1906, was a Scottish Rite Mason, was a Shriner, was a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, was a Republican, and died in Duluth, Minnesota. Jed Lemuel Washburn (1856-1931,) the son of Christopher C. Washburn and Julia A. Showen Washburn, was born in Montgomery County, Indiana, moved with his family to Blue Earth County, Minnesota, in 1857, read the law in the law offices of Martin J. Severance in Mankato, Minnesota, was admitted to the practice of law in Minnesota in 1880, married Alma J. Pattee of Stockton, Portage County, Wisconsin, the daughter of Joseph Rodney Pattee and Mary Jane Abbott Pattee and a graduate of the State Normal School at Mankato, Minnesota, in 1882, was a member of the board of education of Mankato, Minnesota, moved to Duluth, Minnesota, in 1890, was a prominent Duluth, Minnesota, attorney, headed the law firm of Washburn, Bailey & Mitchell in Duluth, Minnesota, was the attorney at Duluth, Minnesota, for the Northern Pacific RailRoad, the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railway Company, and the Duluth Transfer Railway Company, was involved in the U. S. Supreme Court litigation Central Trust Company of New York v. State of Minnesota 174 U.S. 803 (1898,) was a member of the board of the Independent School District of Duluth from 1900 until 1907, was the president of the Duluth Savings Bank, was the resident director of the Duluth Teachers College/University of Minnesota-Duluth from 1903 until 1920, was a member of the St. Louis County, Minnesota, Historical Society, invested in cattle grazing land in LaSalle County, Texas, and McCullen County, Texas, was a 30 year member of the Minnesota Historical Society, was a member of the executive council of the Minnesota Historical Society for seven years, was the president and a member of the board of directors of the Boston and Duluth Farm Land Company, was the president and a member of the board of directors of the Union Watch Company, was the president and a member of the board of directors of the Alworth-Washburn Company, was the president and a member of the board of directors of the Alworth-Stephens Company, was the president and a member of the board of directors of the Spalding Hotel Company, was the president and a member of the board of directors of the American Land & Timber Company, was the president and a member of the board of directors of the Minnesota & Oregon Land & Timber Company, was the president and a member of the board of directors of the Riverside Land Company, was the vice-president of the Royal Mineral Association, was the vice-president of the Oneida Realty Company, was an investor and a member of the board of directors of the Alworth Mining & Development Company, was the president of the Minnesota State Bar Association from 1907 until 1908, was the president of the Northern National Bank of Duluth from 1909 until 1929, was an organizer and first president of the Duluth Morris Plan Company, donated land to the Duluth State Normal School/University of Minnesota-Duluth and to the Hunter’s Park School, was an instrumental supporter of the establishment of Jay Cooke State Park, was a member of the governing board of Minnesota’s State Teachers Colleges from 1903 until 1920, was a member of the Kitchi Gammi Club, was a member of the Northland Country Club, was a member of Minneapolis Club, was a member of Minnesota Club, was a member of St. Paul Club, was a member of Duluth Club, and was a member of Chicago Club. William D. Bailey (1868- ,) the son of James F. Bailey and Cornelia Doolittle Bailey, was born in Grinnell, Iowa, was educated in the public and high schools of Grinnell, Iowa, graduated from Grinnell College in 1891, graduated from the Yale University Law School in 1893, came to Duluth in 1894, was initially in the law office of Towne & Harris, became associated with J. L. Washburn, was a member of the law partnership of Washburn, Lewis & Bailey, married Ora Gridley, daughter of Col. E. C. Gridley, in 1901, was a member of the Kitchi Gammi Club, was a member of the Commercial Club of Duluth, was a member of the Duluth Boat Club, was a member of Duluth Country Club, was the partner of Jed L. Washburn and a member of the law firm of Washburn, Bailey & Mitchell in Duluth, Minnesota, and was the president of the Minnesota State Bar Association in 1921. Roger Sherman Munger (1830-1913,) the son of Sherman Munger (1801-1857) and Lucretia Benton Munger (1802-1856,) was born in North Madison, Connecticut, moved with his family to New Haven, Connecticut, attended the Hopkins Grammar School, moved to Iowa in 1856, moved to St. Paul in 1857, opened a music store in St. Paul and performed, with his brothers Russell Munger and William Munger, as “The Munger Brothers Orchestra” in 1857, married Olive Gray ( -1894,) the daughter of Edward Gray, at Vasselboro, Maine, in 1858, moved to Duluth, Minnesota, in 1869, formed a partnership in the lumber business with R. A. Gray from 1869 until 1875, organized in 1872 the firm of Munger, Markell & Company, consisting of Roger S. Munger, Clinton Markell, Russell Carlton Munger and Gilbert Munger ( -1903,) built the first flour mill in Duluth, Minnesota, was co-manager , with Col. C. H. Graves, of the Lake Superior Elevator Company, built the first coal dock in Duluth, Minnesota, built, with Clinton Markell, the Grand Opera House in Duluth, Minnesota, in 1883, built the first sawmill in Duluth, Minnesota, was the president of the Imperial Mill Company in 1888, served on the first board of trade in Duluth, Minnesota, served on the first school board in Duluth, Minnesota, served on the first city council in Duluth, Minnesota, was the president of the Duluth Iron & Steel Company in 1898, was the register of deeds of St. Louis County, Minnesota, from 1898 until 1900, built the first 100 houses in Bismarck, North Dakota, erected the government buildings on the Standing Rock Indian Reservation in North Dakota and South Dakota, arranged for and oversaw the digging of the Duluth, Minnesota, ship canal, hiring the W. W. Williams & Company and their dredging tug, the Ishpeming in 1870, and died in Duluth, Minnesota. [For more information on the H. Koppers Company/Minnesota By-product Coke Company, see 1910 Portland Avenue.]

Information about the Port Arthur, Duluth & Western RailRoad was adapted from information presented by Dave Battistel on the Port Arthur, Duluth and Western Railway website.

Information from Interstate Commerce Commission records researched by Richard S. Steele, LaBelle Woodworking, Cheyenne, Wyoming, was used in this website.

With questions about this website, contact Larry Martin at l_a_martin@lycos.com.

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This page was last updated on February 11, 2013.