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RailRoads in Minnesota, Part II

RailRoads in Minnesota, Part II

Assembled by

Lawrence A. Martin

Webpage creation: April 28, 2010

Minneiska, Plainview & Zumbro Valley RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in 1876 by John Bigham, T. G. Bolton, L. R. Brooks, E. B. Eddy, A. Y. Felton, L. M. Gregg, H. S. Kellom, G. G. Knowles, C. O. Landon, J. R. McLaughlin, H. J. O'Neill, N. S. Tefft, J. P. Waste, H. D. Wedge, and H. P. Willson to build and operate a railway from Minneiska, Minnesota, by way of Plainview, Minnesota, to the Zumbro River Valley. It had initial capital stock of $500,000 and its principal place of business was Plainview, Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1876. [See note for Lester Ranney Brooks for 2535 Park Avenue South.]

Minnesota Air Line RailRoad: The railroad was chartered by First Extra Session Territorial Laws of Minnesota 1857, Chapter 71, was incorporated C. P. Adams, H. C. Bailly, E. Baldwin, W. L. Breckenridge, I. Daniels, David Day, William Freeborn, William B. Gere, Warren J. Howell, William D. Lowry, H. L. Morse, W. P. Murray, R. Ottman, William C. Picket, T. J. Safford, B. F. Tillotson, T. B. Twiford, and others, had capital stock of $5,000,000, had its general office in Rochester, Minnesota, and was intended to locate and construct a rail line from a point along the Minnesota-Iowa border North to St. Paul. The railroad was organized in 1871.

Minnesota Belt Line Railway & Transfer Company: The railroad was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1887, built 11.5 miles of rail line in Minneapolis and St. Paul (from St. Anthony, Minnesota, to New Brighton, Minnesota, and Fridley, Minnesota) between 1889 and 1892, was controlled by the Minneapolis Stock Yards & Packing Company, and had its general office in St. Anthony, Minnesota. According to the Manual of the RailRoads of the United States, Volume 27 by Henry Varnum Poor in 1895, the railroad operated a 14 mile belt line in Minneapolis and St. Paul, was chartered in 1889, was completed in 1893, handled live stock to the Minneapolis stock yard, handled packinghouse products, handled rolling mill products, had capital stock of $100,000, had as its officers R. B. Langdon, president, A. H. Linton, secretary and treasurer, E. McNeil, general manager, and had its general office in Minneapolis. The railroad was purchased by the Minnesota Transfer Railway Company in 1898, when the Minnesota Transfer Railway Company purchased the New Brighton, Minnesota, stockyards, for $300,000. The railroad was ultimately succeeded by the Minnesota Commercial RailRoad in 1987. [See note for Robert Bruce Langdon for 2200 Pillsbury Avenue South.]

Minnesota & Black Hills RailRoad was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1878 by C. H. Bigelow, R. Blakeley, E. F. Drake, George A. Hamilton, F. A. Harrison, H. G. Harrison, R. F. Hersey, W. R. Merriam, J. W. Pense, J. S. Prince, H. H. Sibley, Horace Thompson, J. W. Thompson, and A. H. Wilder to build a railway from a point along the route of the Sioux City & St. Paul RailRoad/St. Paul & Sioux City RailRoad in Jackson County, Minnesota, Northwesterly through Murray County, Minnesota, and Pipestone County, Minnesota, to the Western boundary of the state, with branches. It had initial capital stock of $1,200,000 and its principal place of business was St. Paul. The railroad was organized in 1879. In 1879, the officers of the railroad were H. G. Harrison, president, H. H. Sibley, vice president, George A. Harrison, secretary, and Horace Thompson, treasurer, the members of the board of directors of the railroad were C. H. Bigelow, J. W. Bishop, R. Blakeley, E. F. Drake, G. A. Hamilton, H. G. Harrison, T. A. Harrison, R. F. Hersey, John L. Merriam, J. W. Pence, John S. Prince, H. H. Sibley, Horace Thompson, W. D. Washburn, and A. H. Wilder, and the location of the general office of the railroad was in St. Paul. The railroad, running from Heron Lake, Minnesota, Westerly to the Western State boundary, was sold to the St. Paul & Sioux City RailRoad in 1879. [See note for Charles Henry Bigelow for 415 Laurel Avenue.] [See the note for Elias Franklin Drake for 324 Bates Avenue.] [See note on John S. Prince for 339 Summit Avenue.] [See the note on Henry Hastings Sibley for 614 North Fountain Place.] [See note on Horace E. Thompson for 808 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Amherst H. Wilder for 255 Summit Avenue.]

Minnesota Central RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1992, operated until 1999 a 94 mile rail line between Norwood, Minnesota, and Hanley Falls, Minnesota, that was abandoned in 1982 by Chicago & Northwestern Transportation Company and that was subsequently purchased by the Minnesota Valley Regional Rail Authority, and filed for bankruptcy in 2000. The former Minnesota Central RailRoad rail line is now owned by the Minnesota Valley Regional Railroad Authority and is now operated by Minnesota Prairie Line Inc., a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Twin Cities & Western Railroad.

Minnesota Central RailRoad: In 1905, the officers of the railroad were D. H. Beecher, president, and George R. Van Reed, chief engineer. The railroad surveyed a planned rail line from Mankato, Minnesota, 110 miles to St. Cloud, Minnesota, in 1905.

Minnesota Central RailRoad Company: The railroad was authorized by legislative enactment by the State of Minnesota shortly after statehood in 1857. The railroad was incorporated in 1860 by Selah Chamberlain, R. B. Mason, Amasa Stone, and A. B. Vaughan to build a railroad from Winona, Minnesota, to St. Peter, Minnesota, a railroad from LaCrescent, Minnesota, to Rochester, Minnesota, a railroad from Minneapolis to the Southern border of the State, a railroad from West St. Paul to Mankato, Minnesota, and a railroad from St. Paul to St. Cloud, Minnesota. The railroad had $2,000,000 capital stock at incorporation. The railroad was organized in 1865 and was permitted by Minnesota legislation to consolidate with the Cannon River Improvement Company, incorporated in 1857. The Minnesota Central Railroad was an early predecessor of the Milwaukee Road RailRoad. In 1857, the Minnesota Central Railroad Company was incorporated under a special act of the Minnesota Territory. The railroad’s charter was amended by a Minnesota legislative enactment in 1867. State legislation in 1872 authorized the Cannon River Improvement Company to build a railroad. State legislation in 1873 authorized the Cannon River Improvement Company to consolidate with the railroad. The railroad built a 66 mile rail line from Red Wing, Minnesota, to Waterville, Minnesota, by way of Welch, Minnesota, Cannon Falls, Minnesota, Randolph, Minnesota, Waterford, Minnesota, Northfield, Minnesota, Dundas, Minnesota, Faribault, Minnesota, Warsaw, Minnesota, and Morristown, Minnesota, by 1882. The stock was controlled by the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railway Company in 1883 and the railroad was operated by Minneapolis and Saint Louis Railroad Company. The Minnesota Central Railroad connected to Minneapolis, having entered the city from Faribault, Minnesota, in 1865 from the South and extending into the mill district, becoming the first railroad to serve the Minneapolis West Side mill district. The Minnesota Central Railroad shops in Minneapolis operated in the mid-1860's on 2nd Avenue South between 6th and 7th Streets. The Cannon River Improvement Company, created in 1865 with the intent of constructing canals, locks, dams and a slack water navigation system from the Mississippi River through the Cannon River and its connecting lakes and through Lake Elysian to the Minnesota River near Mankato, Minnesota, and the Minnesota Central Railroad Company had both been given land grants, and, in 1873, by legislative enactment, the franchises and land grants of the Cannon River Improvement Company were consolidated with the franchises and land grants of the Minnesota Central RailRoad Company. Blooming Prairie, Minnesota, started as a place of shelter for the section crews and a railroad station for the Minnesota Central Railroad and was established as a city in 1867. Special Laws of Minnesota 1866, Chapter XI, authorized the Minnesota Central Railroad to build a branch line of the railroad from Faribault, Minnesota, through Zumbro Falls, Minnesota, to a junction point along the St. Paul & Winona RailRoad. In 1873, the railroad had as its officers L. F. Hubbard, president, L. Z. Rogers, secretary, J. F. Meagher, treasurer, and A. B. Rogers, chief engineer, and had as its board of directors W. W. Brown, T. B. Clement, L. F. Hubbard, J. F. Meagher, Levi Nutting, L. Z. Rogers, and J. A. Wiswell. After the consolidation was fully implemented in 1878, the Minnesota Central RailRoad then built the 66 mile line from Red Wing, Minnesota, to Waterville, Minnesota, in 1882, which formed the first link in the chain making up the Wisconsin, Minnesota & Pacific RailRoad. In 1882, the railroad owned 4,039.30 acres of land in Minnesota. In 1883, the officers of the railroad were L. F. Hubbard, president, L. Z. Rogers, secretary, and M. Auerbach, treasurer. The line was operated in 1883 and 1884 as the Cannon Valley Division of the Minneapolis & St. Louis Railway. The name of the company was officially changed in 1883 to the Wisconsin, Minnesota & Pacific Railway Company and the company next extended its line from Waterville, Minnesota, to Mankato, Minnesota. In 1883 and 1884, the railroad constructed a 121.7 mile rail line from Morton, Minnesota to Watertown, Dakota Territory. The railroad soon went into receivership and its property was sold under foreclosure in 1894. The railroad was eventually folded into the Chicago Great Western RailRoad. The Big Rivers Regional Trail, 4.5-mile walking and cycling trail between Mendota Heights, Minnesota, and Lillydale, Minnesota, was built by Dakota County, Minnesota, on the rail bed of the former Minnesota Central Railroad. [See note on Maurice Auerbach for 400 Summit Avenue.]

Minnesota Central Railway: The railroad was chartered by Extra Session Territorial Laws of Minnesota 1857, Chapter 2, was incorporated by James Akers, Leman Bates, Amos Cogswell, Andrew Cotur, William Folander, Norris Hobart, William Lauver, Charles McClure, John McClure, Alexander Ramsey, Thomas J. Smith, W. W. Sweeney, and N. P. Willis. The railroad was intended to survey. locate, construct, and operate a rail line from a point along the Mississippi River in the city of Red Wing, Goodhue County, Minnesota Territory, Westerly in the direction of the Great Bend of the Missouri River. The railroad initially had $5,000,000 in capital stock. The railroad was organized in 1864, operated until 1867, and was succeeded by the McGregor Western RailRoad. In 1881, the officers of the railroad were Selah Chamberlain, president, Russel Sage, vice president and treasurer, and James McKinlay, secretary, and the members of the board of directors of the railroad were Selah Camberlain, N. A. Cowdrey, W. S. Gurnee, F. P. James, Alexander Mitchell, Russel Sage, D. C. Shepard, and E. B. Wesley.

Minnesota Central Electric RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in 1913, with $1,000,000 in capital stock, to build an electric rail line from Minneapolis NorthWest by way of Robbinsdale, Minnesota, and Champlin, Minnesota, to St. Cloud, Minnesota, and potentially to Mille Lacs, Minnesota. Petris & Smith of Osseo, Minnesota, received the grading contract for the portion of the rail line from Robbinsdale, Minnesota, to Champlin, Minnesota, in 1913. In 1913, the officers of the railroad were E. G. Potter, president, E. M. Nye, secretary, and E. M. Potter, treasurer.

Minnesota Commercial RailRoad: The terminal and switching line railroad was formerly known as the Minnesota Transfer Railroad and was organized in 1987. It operates 150 miles of trackage in metropolitan Minneapolis/ St. Paul, including St. Paul, Minneapolis, Bayport, Minnesota, Hugo, Minnesota, Fridley, Minnesota, and New Brighton, Minnesota. It has a roundhouse on Cleveland Avenue in St. Paul. Its roster consists of mainly Alco and GE locomotives and its two dozen locomotives include one from Hamersley Iron in Australia.

Minnesota & Dakota RailRoad: The railroad was chartered by Territorial Laws of Minnesota 1857, Chapter 24, and the incorporators of the railroad were Francis Baasen, George L. Becker, Charles Blair, John R. Brown, N. R. Brown, Emanuel Case, George Culver, Thomas Holmes, Robert Kennedy, E. T. Mixer, Alexander Ramsey, Edmund Rice, Michael Schultz, Franklin Steele, and Henry S. Wells. The railroad was intended to locate and construct a single rail line or a double rail line from a point in or near St. Paul by way of Henderson, Sibley County, Minnesota, to the Southern boundary of the Territory and thence to a point along the Missouri River. The railroad had initial capital stock of $2,000,000. The railroad was reportedly organized in 1871. The railroad was incorporated in 1879. The railroad continued until at least 1883. [See note on Alexander Ramsey for 265 South Exchange Street.] [See note for George Loomis Becker for 194 McBoal Street.] [See note on Edmund Rice and Henry Mower Rice for 4 Crocus Hill.]

Minnesota & Dakota Northern RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in 1879 to construct, operate and maintain a branch rail line from Barnesville, Minnesota, on the rail line of the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba RailRoad, to Moorhead, Minnesota, Fargo, Dakota Territory, and West. The railroad was organized in 1879 or 1883, operated until 1883, amended its articles of incorporation in 1883, and was succeeded by the St. Paul, Minnneapolis & Manitoba RailRoad.

Minnesota, Dakota & Pacific RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated under South Dakota law in 1905, built a 171.22 mile rail ine from Watertown, South Dakota, to LeBeau, South Dakota, before 1908 and a 57.13 mile rail line from Conde, South Dakota, to Leola, South Dakota, before 1908, and was succeeded by the Minneapolis & St. Louis RailRoad in 1912.

Minnesota & Dakota Western RailRoad was incorporated in 1879 by Henry A. Bruns, F. J. Burnham, N. P. Clark, S. G. Comstock, J. Douglas, F. A. Elder, J. Eriksen, A. E. Henderson, And. Holes, J. Kurtz, J. C. Kurtz, L. Loring, A. McCrea, J. H. Sharp, and C. P. Slaggy to build a railway from Moorhead, Minnesota, Northerly to the West bank of the Red River of the North. It had initial capital stock of $100,000 and its principal place of business was Moorhead, Minnesota.

Minnesota, Dakota & Western RailRoad: The railroad succeeded the International Bridge & Terminal Company, a Minnesota corporation organized in 1902 and changed its name in 1910. In 1913, the railroad had as its officers Edward W. Backus, president, William F. Brooks, vice president, C. J. Rockwood, general counsel, Thomas McLaren, auditor, and P. B. Smith, general superintnendent, had as its board of directors Edward W. Backus, William F. Brooks, R. L. Horr, and R. S. McDonald, had total capital stock of $500,000, had rail trackage from International Falls, Minnesota, to Nakoda Junction, Minnesota, had 24.95 miles of track in Minnesota, had six locomotives, had 241 freight cars, and had 107 total employees. In 1918, the railroad operated 42.576 miles of rail trackage, owned eight locomotives, owned 386 freight cars, owned eight work cars, had constructed 24.411 miles of rail line (a 20.097 mile rail line from International Falls, Minnesota, to Falls Junction, Minnesota, a 3.564 mile rail line from Nakoda, Minnesota, to Loman, Minnesota, a 0.750 mile rail line from Little Fork, Minnesota, to Seymour, Minnesota) between 1910 and 1911, and had acquired the International Bridge & Terminal Company in 1910. [See note for William F. Brooks for 2201 East Lake of Isles Boulevard]. [See the note for the Minnesota, Dakota & Western RailRoad for 2701 East Lake of the Isles Parkway.]

Minnesota Eastern RailRoad was incorporated in 1878 by Edwin R. Barber, Joel B. Bassett, Leonard Day, George W. Goodrich, Francis S. Hinckle, Correll T. Hobart, and Jabez Robinson to build a railroad between Minneapolis and St. Paul. [See the note for Joel Bean Bassett in the introduction.]

Minnesota & Great Eastern Transportation Company: The railroad was organized in 1876. The railroad was incorporated in 1874 by J. Fletcher, J. B. Gilfillan, D. M. Godwin, C. T. Hobart, W. W. Hungerford, John Martin, and W. W. McNair to lease, purchase or build railways and other transportation facilities or means in the State. It had initial capital stock of $150,000 and its principal place of business was Minneapolis. [See note for John Bachop Gilfillan for 2115 Stevens Avenue South.]

Minnesota & Great Northern RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1904 under an 1894 Minnesota law, had as its officers Louis W. Hill, president, R. I. Farrington, vice president, E. Sawyer, secretary and treasurer, R. A. Wilkinson, general counsel, and John G. Drew, comptroller, in 1907, had as its board of directors W. R. Begg, R. I. Farrington, Louis W. Hill, E. Sawyer, and F. E. Ward in 1907, had total capital stock of $2,500,000 in 1909, had total rail trackage of 41.09 miles in 1909, and was succeeded by the Great Northern RailRoad. [See note on Robert I. Farrington, Thayer B. Farrington, and John D. Farrington for 457-459 Portland Avenue.] [See note on Louis Warren Hill for 260 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Edward Sawyer for 461 Holly Avenue.] [For more information on Frank Earl Ward, see 1522 Portland Avenue.]

Minnesota Improvement Company: The company, under First Extra Territorial Laws 1857, Chapter 56, was authorized to locate, construct, maintain, operate, and alter a rail line from Henderson, Minnesota Territory, on the Minnesota River, through McLeod County, Minnesota Territory, to a point along a rail line to be constructed from Crow Wing, Minnesota Territory, to the Red River of the North, with the privilege of extending the road from St. Anthony, Minnesota Territory, to the Sioux Wood, River.

Minnesota & International RailRoad was formed in 1900, was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1900, and was the successor of the Brainerd & Northern Minnesota Railway and the Big Fork & Northern Railway, both incorporated in 1892. The initial purpose of the two railroads was to tap the cedar tree forests of Northern Minnesota and transport logs, pulp, and lumber products to International Falls, Minnesota, and to more southerly destinations through connections with the Northern Pacific RailRoad at Brainerd, Minnesota. In 1902, construction was ongoing for 62 miles of rail line from Black Duck, Minnesota, to Koochiching, Minnesota, by Halverson & Company, contractors, under the general direction of W.L. Darling, railroad chief engineer. In 1904, the officers of the railroad were Howard Elliott, president, D. S. Lamont, first vice president, William F. Brooks, secretary, C. A. Clark, treasurer, M. W. Downie, auditor, and W. H. Gemmell, general superintendent, and the members of the board of directors of the railroad were E. W. Backus, C. W. Bunn, Thomas Cooper, Howard Elliott, W. H. Gemmell, A. E. Horr, and R. H. Pelf. In 1904, the railroad had capital stock of $500,000, had 748 employees in Minnesota, owned 18 locomotives, owned six passenger cars, owned 454 freight cars, owned 15 company service cars, owned one bridge, owned 26 trestles, and operated 164.76 total miles of railway trackage, all in Minnesota. The Poor's Directory of RailRoad Officials, published by the Poor's RailRoad Manual Company in 1905, indicates that the officers of the railroad were Howard Elliott, president, D. S. Lamont, first vice president, William F. Brooks, secretary, C. A. Clark, treasurer, M. W. Downie, auditor, and W. H. Gemmell, general superintendent. In 1907, the railroad reached International Falls, Minnesota, owned 24 locomotives, owned 547 logging cars, and was controlled by the Northern Pacific RailRoad. In 1913, the railroad had as its officers J. M. Hanaford, president, W. P. Clough, vice president, R. H. Relf, secretary, C. A. Clark, treasurer, M. W. Downie, auditor, and W. H. Gemmell, general manager, had as its board of directors E. W. Backus, W. F. Brooks, C. W. Bunn, Thomas Cooper, W. H. Gemmell, J. M. Hanaford, D. C. Shepard, total capital stock of $500,000, had 192.95 miles of track in Minnesota, had 21 locomotives, had 14 passenger cars, had 520 freight cars, and had 728 total employees. The railroad built a 10.90 mile rail line from Funkley, Minnesota, to Kelliher, Minnesota, in 1902, built a 25.00 mile rali line from Bemidji, Minnesota, to Black Duck, Minnesota, from 1900 until 1902, acquired the Brainerd & Northern Minnesota Railway in 1901, built a 16.00 mile rail line from Black Duck, Minnesota, to Northome, Minnesota, from 1902-1903, and built a 5.84 mile rail line from Leaks, Minnesota, to West Brainerd, Minnesota, in 1913. In 1916, the railroad had as its officers J. M. Hannaford, president, W. H. Gemmell, general manager, J. L. Hurd, accountant, and M. W. Downie, auditor, operated 175 miles of rail trackage, owned 22 locomotives, owned 98 box cards, owned 428 flat rail cars, 15 passenger cars, and 15 cabooses, and had its general offices in Brainerd, Minnesota. In 1917, the railroad operated 185.984 miles of rail trackage, owned 25 locomotives, owned 13 passenger cars, owned 528 freight cars, owned 17 work cars, controlled the Big Fork & Northern Railway, and was controlled by the Northern Pacific Railway. In 1930, the officers of the railroad were W. H. Gemmell, president and general manager, C. W. Bunn, vice president, R. H. Relf, secretary, P. B. Lacy, treasurer, and F. E. Stout, auditor. The railroad operated until 1941, was purchased by the Northern Pacific Railroad at a foreclosure sale, and was merged into the Northern Pacific RailRoad in 1942. The Minnesota & International RailRoad was owned by Northern Pacific RailRoad, but was originally run as a separate railroad. The Northern Pacific RailRoad took over the operation of the Minnesota & International RailRoad in 1937 and purchased the Minnesota & International RailRoad in 1941. The rail line became part of the Burlington Northern RailRoad in 1971 and was abandoned in 1986. The abandoned right of way was used to form the Paul Bunyan State Trail. [See note on Jule M. Hannaford for 405 Portland Avenue.] [See note on William Pitt Clough for 500 Summit Avenue.] [See the note for Charles Wilson Bunn for 549 Portland Avenue.] [See note for William F. Brooks for 2201 East Lake of Isles Boulevard]. [See note for Edward Wellington Backus for 2201 East Lake of Isles Boulevard]. [See note for David Chauncey Shepard for 2200 Pillsbury Avenue South.] [See note on Richard Howard Relf for 600 Portland Avenue.]

Minnesota & Iowa RailRoad: The railroad was authorized by the Minnesota Legislature shortly after statehood in 1857. The railroad incorporated in 1869 by H. P. Norton, J. A. Roosevelt and A. C. Woolfolk to construct and operate a rail line from a point along the Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad at or near Austin, Minnesota, through Mankato, Minnesota, and along the Minnesota River Valley to a junction point with the Northern Pacific RailRoad. The railroad was organized in 1871, was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1876, had $4,000,000 in capital stock, had a 119 mile rail line from Burt, Iowa, to Vesta, Minnesota, and operated until 1900. In 1899 and 1900, the railroad built a branch rail ine from Vesta, Redwood County, Minnesota, to its main rail line at Sanborn, Minnesota, and built a cut-off rail line from Sanborn, Minnesota, SouthEast into Iowa through Ceylon, Martin County, Minnesota. The railroad was acquired by the Chicago & NorthWestern RailRoad in 1900 and was succeeded by the Chicago & NorthWestern RailRoad.

Minnesota & Iowa Southern RailRoad: The railroad was an Iowa corporation, was incorporated in 1878 by S. G. Housey, J. M. Hull, William Larson, J. W. Mahoney, Mikkel Peterson, David Secor, C. D. Smith, J. Thompson, and S. D. Wadsworth, had as its officers David Secor, president, J. Thompson, vice president, William Larson, treasurer, and J. W. Mahoney, secretary, and had its general offices at Forest City, Iowa. In 1879, the railroad entered into a contract with the Minneapolis & St. Louis RailRoad to build its rail line North of the Iowa-Minnesota border. The railroad built a 60.00 mile rail line from the Minnesota/Iowa state line to Livermore, Iowa, from 1879 until 1880. The railroad was succeeded by the Minneapolis & St. Louis RailRoad in 1881.

Minnesota Iron Company: Charlemagne Tower (1848-1923) was a Philadelphia lawyer, was the president of Duluth & Iron Range RailRoad, was the managing director of Minnesota Iron Company, was Ambassador to Austria from 1897 until 1899, was Ambassador to Russia from 1899 until 1902, was Ambassador to Germany from 1902 until 1908, held extensive interests in the Northern Pacific RailRoad, retained the services of Duluth, Minnesota, banker, George Stone, brought in a government surveyor, who was undoubtedly bribed to describe the prospective mineral areas as "swampland," successfully devaluing the price, and purchased 26,800 acres of Minnesota's Iron Range. Stone lobbied a bill through the Minnesota State Legislature to fix a royalty of one cent per ton shipped. From 1878 to 1880, the demand for iron ore pushed prices up 68.2 percent to $9.25 per ton. Between 1884 and 1886 the company shipped 647,128 tons of iron ore to the Carnegie (Pilgrim Society) interests in Cleveland, netting the state of Minnesota $6,471.28 on proceeds of over $6 million. The Minnesota Iron Company had 13 locomotives, 340 cars and 95.7 miles of track in the Vermillion Iron Range. The Minnesota Iron Company was later sold to a syndicate that included the Rockefellers.

Minnesota Land & Construction Company RailRoad The company railroad owned four Shay geared steam locomotives. The railroad was located at Virginia, Minnesota. The railroad operated 11 miles of temporary branch rail line in addition to its regular 27.7 miles of rail trackage in 1904. Wirt H. Cook and William O’Brien, owners of sizable timber holdings in the Sand Lake, Minnesota, area, about 20 miles northwest of Virginia, Minnesota, formed the Minnesota Land & Construction Company to conduct their logging and railroad-building operations and built a new mill in Virginia at Silver Lake, Minnesota. The Duluth, Rainy Lake & Winnipeg RailRoad operated under contract with the Minnesota Land & Construction Company in 1906. [See the note for William J. O'Brien for 1034-1038 Summit Avenue.]

Minnesota Logging RailRoad: The railroad was organized by the Gull River Lumber Company in 1889 to provide access to forest lands 20 miles East of Gull Lake, Minnesota. The railroad's headquarters were in Gilpatrick Lake, Minnesota. The railroad was renamed as the Gull Lake & Northern Railway Company later in 1889. The Gull River Lumber Company was formed by Charles A. Pillsbury in 1880. In 1889, the Minnesota Logging Railroad was built from Gilpatrick Lake, later renamed Margaret Lake,Minnesota, to Spider Lake, Minnesota. This railroad was a narrow gauge railroad, was one of the first logging railroads in Minnesota, and was the only narrow gauge railroad in the state. The railroad moved logs from the cutting areas to the log dump on Gilpatrick Lake, Minnesota. Logs were then rafted across Gull Lake and down the Gull River to the sawmill. In 1889, the railroad renamed the Gull Lake & Northern. By 1890 12 miles of track had been built and the railroad had three locomotives. [See note for Charles Alfred Pillsbury for 116 East 22nd Street South.]

Minnesota & Manitoba RailRoad was incorporated in the State of Minnesota in 1899 to form a 43.76 mile connecting rail line between the Ontario & Rainy River RailRoad and the Manitoba Southeastern RailRoad around the southern end of Lake of the Woods, with the eventual development of a 534 mile entire rail line system from Port Arthur, Ontario, Canada, to Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, by way of Northern Minnesota. The railroad was operated by the Canadian Northern RailRoad after 1904. In 1900, F. H White was the civil engineer for the railroad. In 1904, the officers of the railroad were Hector Baxter, president and general solicitor, E. W. Hawley, third vice president, and A. W. Mackenzie, secretary, and the members of the board of directors were Hector Baxter, C. H. Childs, E. W. Hawley, D. W. Knowlton, and C. E. Sanford. In 1904, the railroad had capital stock of $1,000,000, owned 28 bridges, and had 43.73 miles of track, all in Minnesota. In 1913, the officers of the railroad were Hector Baxter, president and general counsel, Ed. E. Hawley, secretary, and J. D. Morton, assistant comptroller, and the board of directors were Hector Baxter, Clarence H. Childs, Ed. E. Hawley, David W. Knowlton, and Charles E. Sanford. In 1913, the railroad had total capital stock of $400,000, had its principal place of business in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, had 43.70 miles of track in Minnesota, and was operated by the Canadian Northern RailRoad. The railroad was succeeded by the Canadian Northern RailRoad.

Minnesota Midland RailRoad: The railroad was organized under an 1876 Minnesota law in 1876, was incorporated in 1876 by W. C. Andrews, G. N. Chase, S. P. Snyder, H. L. Terrell, and W. S. Walton to build and operate a railway line from Wabasha City, Minnesota Westerly through Wabasha county, Minnesota, Goodhue county, Minnesota, and Rice County, Minnesota, to Faribault, Minnesota, had capital stock of $2,000,000, had Wabasha, Minnesota, as its principal place of business, completed railway construction in 1878, was leased to the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad for two years in 1878, operated until 1883, and was succeeded by the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad. The officers of the railroad in 1880 were S. S. Merrill, president, and James G. Lawrence, secretary and treasurer, and the board of directors of the railroad in 1880 were John W. Cary, James G. Lawrence, S. S. Merrill, Alex. Mitchell, and C. H. Prior.

Minnesota & North Wisconsin RailRoad was incorporated in 1898 to connect the Brooks-Scanlon Lumber Company mill at Scanlon, Minnesota, with the timber lands of Lake County, Minnesota, near Two Harbors, Minnesota. The railroad's officers in 1898 were D. F. Brooks, president, M. I. Scanlon, vice president, L. R. Brooks, treasurer, and A. S. Brooks, superintendent. According to Poor's Manual of the RailRoads of the United States, Volume 33 by Henry Varnum Poor in 1901, as of 1899, the railroad operated 11 miles of rail trackage from Nickerson, Minnesota, to Lake Graham, Minnesota, and from Nickerson, Minnesota, to Nemadji, Minnesota, owned two locomotives, owned 35 rail cars, had capital stock of $10,000, had as its officers D. F. Brooks, president, M. I. Scanlon, vice president, L. R. Brooks, treasurer, H. E. Gipson, secretary, and A. S. Brooks, superintendent, and had as its board of directors Anson S. Brooks, D. F. Brooks, H. K. Brooks, L. R. Brooks, P. R. Brooks, H. E. Gipson, and M. I. Scanlon. In 1913, the railroad had 17 total employees. Ultimately, the railroad had a rail line of 75 miles of heavy duty rail to furnish logs to the Brooks-Scanlon Lumber Company in Nickerson, Minnesota, and Scanlon, Minnesota. [See note for Anson Brooks for 2535 Park Avenue South.] [See note for Lester Ranney Brooks for 2535 Park Avenue South.]

Minnesota Northern RailRoad was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1878 by A. P. Crowl, Neal Currie, George D. Dayton, J. M. Dickson, A. H. Dunneke, H. P. Lewis, J. A. Maxwell, J. P. Moulton, D. K. Raknes, J. F. Schneider, Daniel Shell, and C. H. Smith to build a railway from SouthWestern Minnesota by way of Worthington, Minnesota, Currie, Minnesota, and Fergus Falls, Minnesota, to NorthWestern Minnesota. It had initial capital stock of $5,000,000 and its principal place of business was Worthington, Minnesota. The railroad functioned as a portion of the branch rail lines of the Minneapolis & St. Louis RailRoad. Under Special Laws of Minnesota 1878, Chapter 1854, the railroad was authorized to receive the proceeds of the railroad bonds that were issued by Otter Tail County, Minnesota, under Special Laws of Minnesota 1877, Chapter 69, if the railroad previously designated as the Minnesota Northern RailRoad , as the successor of the Minnesota Western RailRoad organized under Laws of Minnesota 1853, Chapter 10, as amended, transferred to the railroad all claim to the bonds.

Minnesota Northern RailRoad: The railroad was formed in 1996 when Railamerica Incorporated purchased 204 miles of rail trackage from BNSF, was organized in 1997, and was transferred to KBN Incorporated and the Independent Locomotive Service, owners of the St. Croix Valley Railroad and the Dakota Northern Railroad, in 2001. It is a Class III short line railroad that operates over 224 miles of rail trackage in northern Minnesota, from Warroad, Minnesota, to Erskine, Minnesota, by way of Badger, Minnesota, Greenbush, Minnesota, and St. Hilaire, Minnesota, from Erskine, Minnesota, to Crookston, Minnesota, by way of Tilden, Minnesota, from Crookston, Minnesota, to Ada, Minnesota, and from Crookston, Minnesota, to Perley, Minnesota.

Minnesota & Northern Railway: The railroad was organized in 1912, operated until 1915, and was succeeded by the Minneapolis, Anoka & Cuyuna Range RailRoad.

Minnesota & Northern Wisconsin RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1895. In 1901, the railroad had graded a 16 mile rail line from Nickerson, Minnesota, planned to add a 2.5 mile extension, had A. S. Brooks as its general manager, and had its general offices in Minneapolis. In 1902, a 50 mile extension of the rail line from a point 35 miles North of Scanlon, Minnesota, into St. Louis County, Minnesota, and Lake County, Minnesota. In 1902, A. S. Brooks was the general manager of the railroad and was located at Minneapolis. In 1904, the officers of the railroad were D. F. Brooks, president, M. J. Scanlon, first vice president, H. E. Gipson, secretary, P. R. Brooks, treasurer, George C. Ripley, general counsel, George A. Keyes, auditor, and John P. Keyes, general manager, and the members of the board of directors were D. F. Brooks, H. K. Brooks, H. S. Brooks, P. R. Brooks, S. D. Brooks, H. E. Gipson, and M. J. Scanlon. In 1904, the railroad had capital stock of $10,000, had 97 employees in Minnesota, owned 14 locomotives, owned one passenger car, owned 285 freight cars, owned 14 company service cars, owned four bridges, owned eight trestles, and operated 75.20 total miles of railway trackage, all in Minnesota. The Poor's Directory of RailRoad Officials, published by the Poor's RailRoad Manual Company in 1905, indicates that the officers of the railroad were Dwight F. Brooks, president, M. J. Scanlon, vice president, P. R. Brooks, treasurer, H. E. Gipson, secretary, G. R. Ripley, general counsel, George A. Keyes, auditor, and J. P. Keyes, general manager. The railroad operated until 1912. [See note for Michael Joseph Scanlon for 2535 Park Avenue South.]

Minnesota Northwestern Electric Railway Company: The railroad was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1913, was organized in 1914, and operated until 1940. In 1913, right of way was secured the right of way for its rail line from Thief River Falls, Minnesota, to Goodridge, Minnesota, by way of Germantown, Minnesota, North, Minnesota, Silverton, Minnesota, and Cloverleaf, Minnesota. In 1914, the railroad completed surveys for a 20 mile rail line between Thief River Falls, Minnesota, and Goodridge, Minnesota, and ordered a 70 foot gasoline-electric motor car from General Electric. The railroad owned no property, but leased from the Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sault Ste. Marie RailRoad 20.123 miles of rail trackage (a 18.671 mile main line from Thief River Falls, Minnesota, to Goodridge, Minnesota, and 1.452 miles of yard rail trackage and rail sidings) in 1917. The railroad utilized gasoline motor cars, but considered itself to be an electric interurban railroad. The president of the railroad in 1914 was Daniel Shaw. The McGraw transit directory, published in 1918 by the McGraw-Hill Publishing Company, indicates that the railroad operated 19.87 miles of rail trackage from Thief River Falls, Minnesota, by way of Silverton, Minnesota, and Mavie, Minnesota, to Goodridge, Minnesota, owned one gasoline-electric car, had repair shops at Thief River Falls, Minnesota, had as its officers Daniel Shaw, president and treasurer, D. N. Winton, vice president, H. W. Protzeller, secretary and general manager, and E. M. Schutt, auditor, and had its general office in Thief River Falls, Minnesota.

Minnesota & NorthWestern RailRoad Company/Minnesota & Northwestern RailRoad: The railroad was chartered with extraordinary powers by Territorial Laws of 1854, Chapter 47, authored by Joseph R. Brown, amended as to its deposit of funds and deadline for initial construction by Territorial Laws of 1855, Chapters 20 and 52, amended as to its deadline date for construction by Territorial Laws 1856, Chapter 47, and rechartered by Extra Session Territorial Laws of 1857, Chapter 49, was incorporated in 1855 by Edward Bement, George W. Billings, Charles W. Borup, William P. Burrall, Erastus Corning, John M. Forbes, John Gardner, Willis A. Gorman, Frederic S. Jessup, Morris Ketchum, R. B. Mason, Wyman B. S. Moore, Alexander Ramsey, Curtus B. Raymond, J. Travis Rosser, George L. Schuyler, Robert Schuyler, Franklin Steele, James Stinson, Orange Walker, and Alexander Wilkin, was incorporated in 1858 by George Ackley, Francis Baason, H. C. Balcombe, F. E. Bissell, Jacob Brust, John McLean, Jr., William R. McMahan, Bazil Moreland, William Pfainder, J. B. Tabes, Mathew Thompson, and others, was intended in 1854 to build a railroad from the northwest shore of Lake Superior to some point to be selected on the northern line of Iowa in the direction of Dubuque, Iowa, was intended in 1857 to locate and construct a rail line from a point along the Minnesota-Iowa border by way of Austin, Minnesota, and South Bend, Minnesota, to New Ulm, Minnesota, and to the Minnesota River, then to Big Stone Lake, Minnesota, to intersect with a railroad between Minneapolis and Big Stone Lake, Minnesota, and was organized in 1871. Lyman Dayton reportedly was an incorporator, with Alexander Ramsey and Edmund Rice, of the Minnesota & Northwestern RailRoad. The U.S. Congress gave a railroad in Minnesota, arguably the Minnesota & Northwestern RailRoad, a 30,000-acre land grant in 1854, but that grant was repealed and the railroad was unsuccessful in challenging the repeal before the U. S. Supreme Court in United States v. Minnesota and Northwestern Railroad Company, 59 U.S. 241 (1858,) in Rice v. Minnesota & Northwestern Railroad Company, 62 U.S. 82 (1859,) and in Rice v. Railroad Company, 66 U.S. 358 (1861.) Russell Sage was a member of the U. S. House of Representatives from New York, was known as the “father of railroad construction companies in Wisconsin and Minnesota,” and was accused of involvement in a bribery arrangement resulting in the enactment of a Congressional grant of land to the Minnesota & North Western Railroad Company. In 1870, the officers of the railroad were John A. Willard, president, Clark W. Thompson, vice president, James B. Hubbell, secretary, John N. Hall, treasurer, and H. W. Holley, engineer,and the members of the board of directors of the railroad were Shelden F. Barney, J. W. Hoerr, James B. Hubbell, William F. Lewis, J. F. Meagher, William Pfaender, O. O. Pitcher, J. J. Shaubut, Clark W. Thompson, H. C. Wait, and John A. Willard. The railroad operated until 1872, was initially succeeded by the Central RailRoad Company of Minnesota, and was ultimately succeeded by the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad. [See note for Edmund Rice for 194 McBoal Street.] [See note on Alexander Ramsey for 265 South Exchange Street.]

Minnesota & North Western RailRoad Company/Minnesota & North Western Railway Company: Territorial Laws of Minnesota 1857, Chapter 49, authorized the railroad to be incorporated by George Ackley, Francis Baasen, H. C. Balcombe, F. E. Bissell, Jacob Brust, John McLean, Jr., William R. McMahan, Bazil Moreland, William Pfainder, J. B. Tabes, and Mathew Thompson and to locate and construct a rail line from the Iowa border to New Ulm, Minnesota, by way of Austin, Minnesota, Mankato, Minnesota, and South Bend, Minnesota, and thence to Big Stone Lake, Minnesota, to connect with a railroad from Minneapolis to Big Stone Lake, Minnesota. The initial capital stock of the railroad was set at $8,000,000. The Minnesota & Northwestern Railroad was subsequently chartered in 1885 to build a line between St. Paul, Minnesota, and the Iowa State Line. The railroad was organized in 1886 and operated until 1887. By a series of mergers and acquisitions, it came to be the Chicago Great Western Railway in 1892, with main lines running between Minneapolis, Omaha, Kansas City and Chicago. Its principal promoter was Alpheus Beede Stickney (1840-1916,) who was president from 1884-1909. The Poor's Directory of RailRoad Officials, published by the Poor's RailRoad Manual Company in 1898, indicates that the officers of the railroad were A. B. Stickney, president, C. W. Benson, vice president, W. B. Bend, treasurer, John I. Thompson, secretary and solicitor, Raymond Du Puy, general manager, and F. W. Davis, auditor, that the general office of the railroad was in St. Paul, and the the railroad operated 444.5 miles of rail trackage. In 1887, Maurice Auerbach, A. B. Stickney, and S.C. Stickney were members of the board of directors of the railroad. The railroad was succeeded by the Chicago, St. Paul & Kansas City RailRoad. [See note on Alpheus B. Stickney for 846 Lincoln Avenue.]

Minnesota & Northwestern RailRoad/Minnesota & Northwestern Transit RailRoad: The railroad was chartered by Territorial Laws of Minnesota 1854, Chapter 47. Its incorporators were Edward Bement, George W. Billings, Charles W. Borup, William P. Burrall, Erastus Corning, John M. Forbes, John Gardner, Willis A. Gorman, Fredric S. Jesup, Morris Ketchum, R. B. Mason, Wyman B. S. Moore, Alexander Ramsey, Curtis B. Raymond, J. Travis Rosser, George L. Schuyler, Robert Schuyler, Franklin Steele, James Stinson, Orange Walker, and Alexander Wilkin. The railroad had initial capital stock of $10,000,000. The railroad was intended to survey, locate, constuct, maintain, and operate a rail line from a point on the NorthWest shore of Lake Superior, North of the St. Louis River, in Minnesota Territory, by way of St. Anthony, Minnesota, and St. Paul, to a point along the Iowa-Minnesota border in the general direction of Dubuque, Iowa. The deadline dates for the railroad to complete various portions of its rail line were extended in Territorial Laws of Minnesota 1856, Chapter 47. Territorial Laws of Minnesota 1857, Chapter 49, authorized George Ackley, Francis Baasen, H. C. Balcombe, F. E. Bissell, Jacob Brust, John McLean, Jr., William R. McMahan, Bazil Moreland, William Pfaender, J. B. Tabes, and Mathew Thompson as additional investors in the railroad and changed the location of the railroad from a point along the Iowa border by way of Austin, Minnesota Territory, and South Bend, Minnesota Territory, to New Ulm, Minnesota Territory, and the Minnesota River and then to Big Stone Lake, Minnesota Territory, to connect with another railroad. [See note on Charles W. Borup for 555 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Willis Arnold Gorman and the Gorman family for 11 Alice Court.] [See note on William Pfaender for 696 Goodrich Avenue.] [See note on Alexander Ramsey for 265 South Exchange Street.] [See note on Alexander Wilkin.]

Minnesota & Ontario Bridge Company RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in 1899 under the general laws of the State of Minnesota, was organized in 1900, was authorized and empowered by an act of Congress to construct and maintain a steel bridge over Rainy River at or near a point known as Cathcarts Point in Minnesota in 1900, was owned in part by the Canadian Northern RailRoad in 1903, was leased to the Canadian Northern RailRoad in 1905, and was succeeded by the Canadian National RailRoad. The Minnesota & Ontario Bridge Company consisted of a railroad bridge over the Rainy River, located in Minnesota and in the Canadian Province of Ontario that extends 0.204 mile from a junction with the Minnesota & Manitoba RailRoad's tracks at Baudette, Minnesota, to a junction with Canadian Northern Railroad tracks on the Canadian side of the river. The entire property was acquired by construction during the year 1901. The construction work was performed by MacKenzie, Mann & Company, Limited, of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. The bridge pilings were placed by Cameron Brothers & Finley under contract to MacKenzie, Mann & Company, Limited, who utilized illegally obtained logs from the Red Lake, Minnesota, Indian Reservation. Cameron Brothers & Finley disappeared before legal action could be taken against them over the conversion of the timber.

Minnesota & Pacific RailRoad: The railroad was chartered under Extra Session Territorial Laws of Minnesota 1857, Chapter 1, and was organized in 1858. The members of the original board of directors of the railroad were William L. Ames, David Bassett, J. B. Chrittenden, Richard Chute, F. R. Delano, Abraham M. Fridley, S. B. Lowry, R. R. Nelson, Charles H. Oakes, Alexander Ramsey, Edmund Rice, Franklin Steele, Henry T. Wells, William Willum, and Dwight Woodbury. The railroad was established to survey, locate, construct, maintain, and operate one or more rail lines from Stillwater, Minnesota, by way of St. Paul, St. Anthony, Minnesota, and Minneapolis, to Breckenridge, Minnesota, on the Sioux Wood River and a branch line from St. Anthony, Minnesota, by way of Anoka, Minnesota, St. Cloud, Minnesota, and Crow Wing, Minnesota, to St. Vincent, Minnesota, near the mouth of the Pembina River. The railroad was also empowered to locate, construct and operate a railroad from Winona, Minnesota, up the valley of the Mississippi to St. Paul, and to extend its line of railroad from its terminal point between Big Stone Lake, Minnesota, and, the mouth of the Sioux Wood River, to any point on the Missouri River North of the 55th parallel North latitude. Its capital stock was fixed at $5,000,000. The railroad was not, however, to consolidate with any railroad company owned or operated outside of the State without the consent of the Legislature. In 1858, the officers of the railroad were Edmund Rice, president, James W. Taylor, secretary, and E. Farnsworth, Edward P. Cowles, and William H. Welch, trustees. The railroad operated until 1862 and was renamed as and was succeeded by the St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad. [See the note for Richard Chute for 1812 Marshall Street NE.] [See note on Alexander Ramsey for 265 South Exchange Street.] [See note for Edmund Rice for 194 McBoal Street.]

Minnesota Point Street RailRoad: The railroad was chartered in 1887/1888 for 50 years. In 1892, the Minnesota Point Street Railway Company had its rail line right-of-way confirmed in the village of Park Point, with animal or pneumatic power to be used, and with R. W. Petre, A. McDougall, R. P Edson, Bernard Silberstein, and others associated with the corporation. In 1893, the railroad had 8.125 miles of track, had eight horse drawn rail cars, had capital stock of $100,000, had as its board of directors R. P. Edson, J. J. Hibbard, W. C. Howenstein, B. Silberstein, E. W. Wakelin, and Wallace Warner, and had as its officers J. J. Hibbard, president, R. P. Edson, vice president, Bernard Silberstein, treasurer, and Wallace Warner, secretary. In 1894, the railroad had 3.5 miles of track, the railroad had six rail cars, the railroad had $100,000 in capital stock, its president was J. J. Hibbard, and its superintendent was W. Warner. In 1898, the railroad operated 3.5 miles of horse rail trackage, had six horse cars, employed 15 horses, and had as its officers G. A. Leland, president and general manager, O. C. Hartman, vice president, F. W. Sullivan, secretary, and A. W. Hartman, treasurer.

Minnesota Power Inc./Minnesota Power & Light: Before 2004, at the Syl Laskin Energy Center, Minnesota Power operated a 45-ton GE switching locomotive. The diesel-electric locomotive was built by General Electric’s Locomotive & Car Equipment Department, Erie, Pennsylvania , had a Cummins Engine Co., Inc., engine, had General Electric main generator, traction motor and traction-motor gear unit, and had a compressor built by Leece Neville. The engine’s first assignment was moving materials for construction of the Laskin plant which is located between Aurora, Minnesota, and Hoyt Lakes, Minnesota. Later, the engine was employed constructing a coal stockpile and processing coal deliveries for electric energy production. The engine is now owned by the Lake Superior Railroad Museum at Duluth, Minnesota.

Minnesota Prairie Line, Inc.: The railroad was organized in 2002, is a subsidiary of the Twin City & Western RailRoad, and operates on 94 miles of track owned by the Minnesota Valley Regional Railroad Authority on a line that connects to parent Twin City & Western RailRoad at Norwood, and extends westward to Hanley Falls, Minnesota. In 2006, the Twin City & Western RailRoad reportedly began using B2, a fuel blend of two percent biodiesel and 98 percent standard petroleum diesel, in its Minnesota Prairie Line locomotives.

Minnesota Railway Construction Company: The railroad was authorized by the Minnesota Legislature shortly after statehood in 1857. It contracted with the St. Paul & Chicago Railway Company in 1868. The company was incorporated in 1869 by Selah Chamberlain, Henry Keep, Russell Sage and others to construct, purchase, own, sell, and operate railroads, telegraphs, bridges, ferries, storehouses, freight houses, and warehouses, had $2,000,000 in capital stock, and was organized in 1871. In 1887, Winona, Minnesota, granted $100000 for use of the Minnesota Railway Construction Company to aid in the construction of the St. Paul & Chicago Railway. In 1906, Russell Sage was a member of the board of directors of the company. In 1915, Edward C. Osborn was the secretary, treasurer, and member of the board of directors of the company. In 1918, Joseph J. Slocum was the president of and a member of the board of directors of the Minnesota Railway Construction Company, Edward C. Osborn was the secretary, treasurer, and member of the board of directors of the Minnesota Railway Construction Company, and Augustus L. Fernald was a member of the board of directors of the Minnesota Railway Construction Company.

Minnesota River & Rail Electric Company: The railroad electric motor and machinery manufacturing company was incorporated in St. Paul in 1889 by Frank Dabney, William Dawson, John J. Flanagan, William Foulke, Henry H. Fuller, and William A. Sommers. The company had $100,000 in capital stock in 1889. [See note on William Dawson for 682 Fairmount Avenue.] [See note on William Foulke for 558 Lincoln Avenue.]

Minnesota, St. Croix & Wisconsin RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1884 as a result of the consolidation of the St. Croix & Chippewa Falls RailRoad, a Wisconsin corporation, and the St. Paul & St. Croix RailRoad, a Minnesota corporation, was incorporated under Minnesota law and Wisconsin law in 1884, acquired the St. Paul and St. Croix Falls Railway in 1888 and the Chippewa Falls & Western Railway in 1888, had its principal place of business in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and had its general office in St. Paul. The consolidation was approved in 1884 by Fredrick Abbott, Brigham Bliss, Joseph L. Colby, George W. Dunbar, W. S. Fitch, James G. Flanders, William H. Lightner, Howard Morris, and Henry B. Wenzell, representing the St. Croix & Chippewa Falls RailRoad and the St. Paul & St. Croix RailRoad. The general contractor on the rail line was Colby & Finney, comprised of Charles L. Colby, president of the Wisconsin Central RailRoad, and F. N. Finney, general manager of the Wisconsin Central RailRoad. The railroad ran from a point on the Chippewa Falls & Western RailRoad near Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin, westerly to the Western boundary of Wisconsin, thence to intersect with the former St. Paul & St. Croix RailRoad, running from St. Paul on a point along the St. Paul & Duluth RailRoad, near Phalen Park, to the Eastern boundary of Minnesota. The initial officers of the railroad were Joseph L. Colby, president, William S. Fitch, vice president, Howard Morris, secretary, and Frederick Elcott, treasurer and the members of the board of directors of the railroad were Frederick Abbott, Joseph L. Colby, George B. Donlar, William S. Fitch, and Howard Morris. In 1885, the railroad leased the Chippewa Falls & Western RailRoad, owned 20 stations (six stations in Minnesota,) operated 112.02 miles of total rail trackage (25.43 miles in Minnesota,) owned ten locomotives, owned eight passenger cars, owned 300 freight cars, owned five company cars, and had 165 total employees (45 in Minnesota.) In 1885, the officers of the railroad were C. L. Colby, president and treasurer, E. H. Abbott, vice president and secretary, F. N. Finney, general manager, James Barker, auditor, and D. S. Wegg, attorney, and the members of the board of directors of the railroad were E. H. Abbott, C. L. Colby, F. N. Finney, Colgate Hoyt, and Howard Morris. In 1887, the officers of the railroad were Charles L. Colby, president and treasurer, Edwin H. Abbott, vice president and secretary, Frederick. N. Finney, general manager, Edward Ferguson, auditor, and David S. Wegg, attorney, and the members of the board of directors of the railroad were E. H. Abbott, C. L. Colby, F. N. Finney, Colgate Hoyt, and Howard Morris. In 1888, the railroad purchased the Chippewa Falls & Western RailRoad outright and operated an 110.96 mile rail line from Eau Claire, Wisconsin, to Lake Phalen Junction, Minnesota, by way of St. Croix Junction, Wisconsin, Centre Junction, Wisconsin, Chippewa Junction, Wisconsin, and Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin. The railroad operated until 1888 and was succeeded by the Wisconsin Central RailRoad.

Minnesota & South Dakota RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1899, was organized in 1900, operated until 1900, and had a 32 mile rail line in Minnesota and South Dakota from Tyler, Lincoln County, Minnesota, to Astoria, South Dakota, in 1900. The railroad was succeeded by the Winona & St. Peter RailRoad, was acquired by the Chicago & NorthWestern RailRoad in 1900, and became part of the Astoria branch of the Chicago & NorthWestern RailRoad. In 1901, the railroad operated a 25.44 mile rail line from Tyler, Minnesota, to the South Dakota state line.

Minnesota Southern RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 2001, is a shortline railroad from a connection with the Union Pacific at Agate, Minnesota (south of Worthington. Minnesota) to a connection with the BNSF RailRoad at Manley, Minnesota, and is headquartered in Luverne, Minnesota. The 42 mile Minnesota Southern RailRoad line was abandoned in 1988 by Chicago and Northwestern Transportation Company, was then purchased by the Buffalo Ridge Regional Railroad Authority, then was leased by the Nobles Rock RailRoad and operated by it from 1993 to 2000, when that railroad became insolvent, and then was leased for 20 years to the Minnesota Southern RailRoad in 2001. The railroad employs seven people, has two locomotives, and has 175 freight cars.

Minnesota SouthEastern RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1887 and was incorporated in 1887 by Frank W. Booth, Horace P. Breed, W. J. Clark, N. P. Junction, A. M. Miller, Asa Paine, James M. Paine, Mark Paine, Edgar W. Wilson, and Eugene M. Wilson to build a railway from Northern Pacific Junction, Minnesota, southeasterly to Chicago, Illinois. It had initial capital stock of $5,000,000 and its principal place of business was North Pacific Junction, Minnesota.

Minnesota Southwestern RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in 1876 by William Crooks, A. DeGraff, B. B. Eaton, William Lee, and Edmund Rice to build and operate a railway from a point along the Winona & St. Peter RailRoad in Brown County, Minnesota, between New Ulm, Minnesota, and the Western boundary of the county, northwesterly to the Western boundary of the State near Big Stone Lake, Minnesota. It had initial capital stock of $2,000,000 and its principal place of business was St. Paul. The railroad was organized in 1876. [See note for Colonel William Crooks for 57 Wilkin Street.] [See note on Edmund Rice and Henry Mower Rice for 4 Crocus Hill.]

Minnesota Transfer RailRoad was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1883 by Herman Haupt, James J. Hill, Sherburne S. Merrill, William H. Truesdale, and Edwin W. Winter to build one or more railways in Ramsey County, Minnesota, and Hennepin County, Minnesota, to connect various other rail lines and to transfer livestock and freight. It had initial capital stock of $300,000 and its principal place of business was St. Paul. The railroad was organized in 1883 and 1886. The railroad succeeded an unincorporated association jointly constructed and operated by the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy RailRoad Company, the Chicago Great Western RailRoad Company, the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway Company, the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railway Company, the Chicago, Saint Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railway Company, the Great Northern Railway Company, the Minneapolis & St. Louis RailRoad Company, the Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sault Ste. Marie Railway Company, and the Northern Pacific Railway Company that was known as the Union Stock Yards-Minnesota Transfer . According to Poor's Manual of the RailRoads of the United States, Volume 33 by Henry Varnum Poor in 1901, as of 1899, the railroad was owned by nine railroads, the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba RailRoad, the Northern Pacific RailRoad, the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad, the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha RailRoad, the Minneapolis & St. Louis RailRoad, the Chicago Great Western RailRoad, the Wisconsin Central RailRoad, the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy RailRoad, and the Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sault Ste. Marie RailRoad, operated 56 miles of rail trackage, acquired the New Brighton, Minnesota, stockyards in 1898, acquired the Minnesota Belt Line Railway & Transfer Company, had $300,000 capital stock, had as its officers E. Pennington, president, W. P. Clough, vice president, H. P. Upham, treasurer, L. A. Robinson, secretary, W. H. Norris, solicitor, and T. F. Hastings, superintendent, had as its board of directors W. P. Clough, L. F. Day, J. W. Kendrick, G. P. Lyman, E. Pennington, W. A. Scott, S. C. Stickney, W. J. Underwood, and H. F. Whitcomb, and had its general office in St. Paul. In 1903, the general superintendent of the railroad was M. J. Dooley, the railroad operated 62 miles of rail trackage, and the railroad had 11 locomotives. In 1904, the officers of the railroad were E. D. Sewall, president, G. P. Lyman, first vice president, L. A. Robinson, secretary and auditor, H. P. Upham, treasurer, W. H. Norris, solicitor, and Matthew J. Dooley, superintendent, and the members of the board of directors were H. L. Cable, L. F. Day, H. J. Horn, G. P. Lyman, E. Pennington, E. D. Sewall, S. C. Stickney, A. D. Trenholm, F. E. Ward, and H. F. Whitcomb. In 1904, the railroad had capital stock of $70,000, had 623 employees in Minnesota, owned 11 locomotives, owned two freight cars, and operated 56.00 total miles of railway trackage, all in Minnesota. The Poor's Directory of RailRoad Officials, published by the Poor's RailRoad Manual Company in 1905, indicates that the officers of the railroad were E. D. Sewall, president, George P. Lyman, vice president, H. P. Upham, treasurer, L. A. Robinson, secretary and auditor, W. H. Norris, solicitor, and Matthew J. Dooley, superintendent. In 1913, the railroad had total capital stock of $63,000, had 91.76 miles of track in Minnesota, owned 20 locomotives, and had 870 total employees. In 1915, the railroad owned the New Brighton Stock Yards, owned the Minnesota Belt Line Railway & Transfer Company, operated 88 miles of terminal rail trackage in Minneapolis and St. Paul, owned 19 locomotives, owned one box car, had as its officers J. H. Foster, president, A. W. Trenholm, vice president, H. A. Kennedy, vice president, F. S. Leavitt, secretary, and E. H. Bailey, treasurer, had as its board of directors E. P. Bracken, J. H. Foster, J. A. Gordon, J. M. Gruber, C. W. Huntington, G. R. Huntington, C. W. Jones, George T. Slade, and A. W. Trenholm, had $70,000 in capital stock, and had its general office in St. Paul. In 1919, the railroad operated 105.478 miles of rail trackage (a 12.624 mile main line and 92.854 miles of yard tracks and sidings,) leased for exclusive use 2.643 miles of yard rail trackage and sidings in the St. Anthony Park section of St. Paul from the Chicago Great Western RailRoad, owned 17 switcher locomotives, owned one freight car, owned one electric crane, acquired the Minnesota Belt Line Railway and Transfer Company in 1898, and was controlled by the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy RailRoad, the Chicago Great Western RailRoad, the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway, the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railway, the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railway, the Great Northern Railway, the Minneapolis & St. Louis RailRoad, the Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sault Ste. Marie Railway, and the Northern Pacific Railway. The railroad was succeeded by the Minnesota Commercial RailRoad in 1986 or 1987, when the labor unions were eliminated at the Minnesota Transfer RailRoad and mergers of the larger railroads reduced the need for inter-line freight transfer. [See note on James Jerome Hill for 240 Summit Avenue.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/tnhrail2.html" [See note on John William Kendrick for the St. Paul Union Depot Company.] [See note for Minnesota Transfer RailRoad for 294 Harrison Street.] [See note on William H. Truesdell for 601 Lincoln Avenue.]/a> [See note on Samuel Crosby Stickney for 653 Goodrich Avenue.] [For more information on Frank Earl Ward, see 1522 Portland Avenue.] [See note on Edwin Wheeler Winter for 415 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Henry Pratt Upham for 277-283 Goodrich Avenue.]

Minnesota Union Electric Railway: The railroad was established and was incorporated either under Minnesota law or under South Dakota law in 1913 by Theodore A. Chadwick, Eugene G. Garwood, G. M. Lawrence, and Achille D. Pouliot to construct and operate an electric railroad from Minneapolis by way of Brooklyn, Minnesota, Corcoran, Minnesota, Burschville, Minnesota, South Haven, Minnesota, Maine Prairie, Minnesota, and Luxemburg, Minnesota, to St. Cloud, Minnesota. The railroad had $2,000,000 in capital stock in 1913. In 1913, the railroad secured the right of way and the financing for a rail line from Minneapolis to St. Cloud by way of Hamel, Minnesota, Hanover, Minnesota, St. Michael, Minnesota, Buffalo, Minnesota, Maple Lake, Minnesota, Annandale, Minnesota, and South Haven, Minnesota. In 1914, Achille D. Pouliot was the secretary of the corporation. G. M. Lawrence was a resident of Huron, South Dakota.

Minnesota Valley RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in 1864 by Eli B. Ames, P. Berkey, Andrew G. Chatfield, F. R. E. Cornell, E. W. Cutter, F. A. Donahower, S. W. Farnham, William Huey, D. W. Ingersoll, B. R. Laird, J. S. Letford, Isaac Lincoln, Isaac Marks, John L. Merriam, John J. Porter, H. C. Smith, and Horace Thompson, and was organized in 1865. Horace Thompson was the first president of the railroad. The railroad was organized in 1871, constructed a 112.90 mile rail line from Mendota, Minnesota, to St. James, Minnesota, from 1865 to 1870, and acquired the Southern Minnesota Railroad in 1864. The State of Minnesota conveyed the property of the Southern Minnesota RailRoad Company to the Minnesota Valley RailRoad Company. In 1864, the Minnesota Valley RailRoad Company was created by an act of the Minnesota Legislature, was given a portion of the forfeited property of the Root River Valley & Southern Minnesota RailRoad, and built its main line from St. Paul to St. Anthony, Minnesota, and Minneapolis, then along the Minnesota River to South Bend, Minnesota, and then Southwesterly to the State border. The Minnesota Valley RailRoad Company's principal stockholders and first Board of Directors were C. H. Bigelow, Russell Blakeley, J. C. Burbank, George Culver, W. F. Davidson, E. F. Drake, John Farrington, T. A. Harrison, R. H. Hawthorne, J. L. Merriam, John S. Prince, H. M. Rice, H. H. Sibley, Franklin Steele, Horace Thompson, J. E. Thompson, and W. D. Washburn, and its officers were E. F. Drake, president, J. L. Merriam, vice-president, G. A. Hamilton, secretary, and Horace Thompson, treasurer. In 1868, according to Poor's Manual of Railroads, the officers of the railroad were E. F. Drake, president, J. L. Merriam, vice president, Horace Thompson, treasurer, George A. Hamilton, secretary, J. F. Lincoln, general superintendent, and J. W. Bishop, chief engineer, the members of the board of the railroad were C. H. Bigelow, Russell Blakeley, J. C. Burbank, W. F. Davidson, E. F. Drake, T. A. Harrison, R. H. Hawthorne, J. L. Merriam, J. S. Prince, H. H. Sibley, H. C. Smith, H. Thompson, J. E. Thompson, and A. H. Wilder, the railroad operated 63 miles of rail line from St. Paul to LeSueur, Minnesota, the railroad had received a land grant of 1,000,000 acres in Minnesota, the railroad owned six locomotives, seven passenger and baggage cars, 46 box cars, 37 platform cars, four coal cars, and 11 service cars, and the general offices of the railroad were located in St. Paul. Special Laws of Minnesota 1872, Chapter 109, authorized the railroad, in the name of the St. Paul & Sioux City Railroad Company, to survey, locate and build a branch rail line from a point along its main line in Blue Earth County, Minnesota, to the Southern boundary of Faribault County, Minnesota, and a further branch rail line to the Iowa state line via Fairmont, Minnesota. In 1869, the name of the company was changed from the Minnesota Valley Railroad Company to the St. Paul & Sioux City Railroad Company and ultimately was changed to the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis, & Omaha RailRoad. In 1880, the officers of the railroad were Marvin Hughitt, president, J. B. Redfield, secretary, M. M. Kirkman, treasurer, and John E. Blunt, chief engineer, the members of the board of directors of the railroad were W. F. Dickinson, Marvin Hughitt, Albert Keep, J. B. Redfield, and Thomas Wilson, the capital stock of the railroad was $300,000, and the general offices of the railroad were in Chicago, Illinois. Eli B. Ames (1820-1897,) the son of William Ames (1786 – 1839,) was born in Colchester, Vermont, moved to Ohio in 1832, moved to Boone County, Illinois, in 1836, moved to Ottawa in 1841, was admitted to the practice of law in Illinois in 1842, married Martha S. McNamara Ames (1822–1850,) moved to Hennepin, Putnam County, Illinois, where he was postmaster from 1844 to 1848, was an Illinois probate judge from 1848 to 1850, was a member of the Illinois state legislature in 1851 and 1852, was the private secretary of Illinois Governor Madison for two years, married Delia A. Payne (1836-1926) in St. Louis, Missouri, in 1854, was consul to Hamburg, Germany, from 1855 until 1857, moved to Minneapolis in 1857, opened a general insurance business in Minneapolis, was the secretary of the Minnesota state senate from 1861 to 1864, was a Democrat, was the mayor of Minneapolis from 1870 until 1871, died in Minneapolis, and was buried in Lakewood Cemetery, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota. . [See note for Charles Henry Bigelow for 415 Laurel Avenue.] [See note on J. C. Burbank for 432 Summit Avenue.] [See note on William F. Davidson for 400 Summit Avenue.] [See the note for Elias Franklin Drake for 324 Bates Avenue.] [See the note for John Dow Farrington for 460 Portland Avenue.] [See note on John L. Merriam for 4 Crocus Hill.] [See note on John S. Prince for 339 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Edmund Rice and Henry Mower Rice for 4 Crocus Hill.] [See the note on Henry Hastings Sibley for 614 North Fountain Place.] [See note on Horace E. Thompson for 808 Summit Avenue.] [See note on James Egbert Thompson for 682 Fairmount Avenue.] [See note for William Drew Washburn for 2119 Third Avenue South.] [See note on Thomas Wilson for 761 Goodrich Avenue.]

Minnesota Valley Railway Company: The railroad was incorporated in 1876 by W. F. Dickinson, William H. Ferry, Marvin Hughitt, Albert Keep, and Thomas Wilson to build and operate a railway from a point along the Winona & St. Peter RailRoad in Brown County, Minnesota, between New Ulm, Minnesota, and the Western boundary of Brown County, Minnesota, northwesterly by way of Redwood Falls, Minnesota, to the Western boundary of the State at or near Big Stone Lake, Minnesota. It had initial capital stock of $300,000 and its principal place of business was Winona, Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1876, operated until 1881, and was purchased by the Winona & St. Peter RailRoad in 1881. The 24.40 mile rail line between Sleepy Eye, Minnesota, and Redwood Falls, Minnesota, was built by the Minnesota Valley Railway in 1878. The railroad became part of the Winona & St. Peter RailRoad in 1881. [See note on Thomas Wilson for 761 Goodrich Avenue.]

Minnesota Valley Transfer Railway: The Minnesota Valley Railroad is a small transfer railroad that operates a rail line located slightly north of Mankato, Minnesota, and due west of Le Center, Minnesota, on the East bank of the Minnesota River near Ottawa, Minnesota. In 1934, a group of business men, many of them sons or grandsons of the original founders of the Minnesota Valley Milling Company, created the Minnesota Valley Transfer Railway, with the intention of operating transfer service for the businesses in the area of North Mankato, Minnesota.

Minnesota Valley Transportation Company: The railroad was organized in 1983, operated until 1992, and was succeeded by the Minnesota Central RailRoad.

Minnesota Western Railway: The railroad was chartered by Territorial Laws of Minnesota 1853, Chapter 10, and by Territorial Laws of Minnesota 1855, Chapter 65. The incorporators of the railroad specified in that law were Benjamin Allen, Christopher Carle, F. R. Delano, Joseph B. Doe, H. Z. Hayner, William Holcombe, Otis Hoyt, Martin McLeod, Elisa McKean, Horace McKinstry, John McKusick, Socrates Nelson, H. M. Rice, R. P. Russell, F. Shulenburg, A. Hyatt Smith, Daniel Stanchfield, Isaac Staples, Franklin Steele, Robert J. Walker, N. Greene Wilcox, Alexander Wilkin, and M. S. Wilkinson. The railroad was originally intended to construct a rail line from a point on Lake St. Croix, Minnesota, by way of St. Paul and St. Anthony Falls Minnesota, West to the Western boundary of the territory. The railroad was organized in 1871 and was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1901. In 1902, the railroad, through Winston Brothers of Minneapolis, was building a 45.82 mile rail line from Evan, Brown County, Minnesota, to Marshall Junction, Lyon County, Minnesota, under the general direction of E. C. Carter, a civil engineer residing in Chicago, Illinois. John MacMillan, Jr., and Cargill Macmillan acquired the Minnesota Western Railway for Port Cargill, Savage, Minnesota, on the Minnesota River. The railroad was succeeded by the Chicago & NorthWestern RailRoad. Socrates Nelson (1814-1867) was born in Conway/Greenfield, Massachusetts, first settled in Illinois, then moved to St. Louis, Missouri, moved to Minnesota in 1844, was a fur trader and merchant who was located in Stillwater, Minnesota, in 1844, married Mrs Bertha D. Bartlett in Hennepin, Illinois, in 1844, was elected by the Minnesota Territorial Legislature as a member of the board of regents of the University of Minnesota from 1851 until 1859, was the Minnesota Territorial auditor from 1853 until 1857, was a member of the Washington County, Minnesota, county board, was a member of the Minnesota Senate representing Washington County, Minnesota (District 1) from 1858 until 1861, was a founder of Bayport, Minnesota, was the partner of Levi Churchill in the lumbering firm of Churchill & Nelson in 1867, and died in Stillwater, Minnesota. [See note on Edmund Rice and Henry Mower Rice for 4 Crocus Hill.] [See note for Alexander Wilkin.]

Minnesota Western RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1924, succeeding by sale and reorganization the Electric Short Line Railroad Company, a railroad that originally ran from Minneapolis to Stubbs Bay, Minnesota, Minneapolis to Hutchinson, Minnesota, and Minneapolis to Lake Lillian, Minnesota. The railroad was extended to Gluek, Minnesota, by 1927 as part of a planned route to Montevideo and then on to Brookings, South Dakota. The railroad was controlled by W. L. Luce and his son, E. D. Luce, until 1927, when it was sold to Harry Pence, the president of the Minneapolis, Northfield & Southern RailRoad. The railroad operated until 1956 and was succeeded by the Minneapolis & St. Louis RailRoad.

Minnesota Western Railway Company: The railroad was organized in 1901, operated until 1902, and was succeeded by the Chicago & NorthWestern RailRoad. In 1901, the route of the 47 mile rail line was graded from Evan, Minnesota, to Marshall, Minnesota, by way of Wabasso, Minnesota

Minnesota Western Air Line RailRoad was incorporated in 1879 by M. Anderson, O. N. Barsness, A. A. Brown, J. B. Cowing, J. W. Cowing, J. F. Goodsell, K. H. Helling, Edward Larssen, A. McCrea, A. D. Perkins, Ole Peterson, A. Railson, A. E. Rice, and J. G. Wittemore to build a railway from some point along the route of the Northern Pacific RailRoad in Otter Tail County, Minnesota, by way of Alexandria, Minnesota, Willmar, Minnesota, and Windom, Minnesota, to the southern boundary of the State in or near Jackson County, Minnesota. It had initial capital stock of $3,000,000 and its principal place of business was Willmar, Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1879.

Minnesota & Wisconsin RailRoad: According to the Manual of the RailRoads of the United States, Volume 27 by Henry Varnum Poor in 1895, the railroad was incorporated as the Minnesota & Wisconsin Railway in 1892, was the successor to the Woodville & Southern RailRoad, incorporated in 1889, in 1892, was completed in 1892, running 26 miles from Spring Valley, Minnesota, to Emerald, Wisconsin, and leasing four locomotives, one combination rail car, 37 flat freight cars, and one caboose, had capital stock of $520,000, had its general office at Stillwater, Minnesota, went into receivership in 1893, had as its officers David B. Dewey, receiver, D. M. Sabin, president, E. D. Buffington, vice president, and H. C. Truesdale, secretary and treasurer, and had as its board of directors E. D. Buffington, E. F. Doige, D. G. McKay, and H. C. Truesdale. In 1900, the president and general manager of the railroad was E. D. Buffington, the railroad operated 21 miles of rail line, the railroad owned two locomotives, the railroad owned 22 rail cars, and the railroad had its general offices at Stillwater, Minnesota. According to Poor's Manual of the RailRoads of the United States, Volume 33 by Henry Varnum Poor in 1901, as of 1899, the railroad operated 26 miles of rail trackage, owned two locomotives, one passenger car, 20 flat freight cars, and one caboose, had capital stock of $200,000, had as its officers E. D. Buffington, president, G. D. Braman, vice president, Hermann Scheffer, treasurer, and James W. Jones, secretary and auditor, had as its board of directors Maurice Auerbach, G. D. Braman, G. T. W. Braman, E. D. Buffington, C. H. Cannon, H. L. Horton, James W. Jones, N. W. Jordan, and C. A. Severance, and the general office of the railroad was located at Spring Valley, Wisconsin. The railroad was initially succeeded by the Minnesota & Wisconsin RailRoad, incorporated under Wisconsin law in 1896, in 1896, constructed a 16.29 mile rail line from Spring Valley, Wisconsin, to Weston, Wisconsin, in 1902, and was ultimately succeeded by the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha RailRoad in 1902. [See note on Maurice Auerbach for 400 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Cordenio A. Severance for 710 West Linwood Avenue.]

Minnesota Zephyr Dinner Train: The heritage railroad was organized in the late 1980's, ran North from Stillwater, Minnesota, along the St. Croix River, and operated until 2008, when its owner, Dave Paradeau, retired. The five-course, white-linen dinner train operated a 6.5 mile rail line North from Stillwater, Minnesota. The rail line owned an EMD FP7 locomotive and owned five restored dining cars. The rail line was purchased by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources in 2010 and is being developed as the Browns Creek State Trail to connect Stillwater, Minnesota, with the Gateway section of the Willard Munger State Trail.

Minnetonka & White Bear Navigation Company: The extension of the Minneapolis & St. Paul Street Railway to Excelsior and Deephaven, in 1906 revolutionized Lake Minnetonka steam navi­gation. Opening an amusement park at Morse Island/Big Island, three identical sidewheel ferry boats were constructed to run between the island and Excelsior and six "Express Boats" were constructed to radiate from the Excelsior docks to all points on the upper and lower lake. The 70 foot long "express boats," the White Bear, the Stillwater, the Hopkins, the Harriet, the Minnehaha (2nd) and the Como, were iden­tical in appearance, were designed by Roy Moore, and were constructed in Minneapolis. The navigation company was incorporated in 1910, was the successor to the Minneapolis & St. Paul Suburban RailRoad as the owner of amusement parks, summer resorts, and the navigation business at Lake Minnetonka, Minnesota, and White Bear Lake, Minnesota, and had capital stock of $250,000. Because of Minnesota tax laws on railroads, the Twin City Rapid Transit Company, the parent corporation for the company, decided to organize its suburban businesses separately and to account for and pay taxes related to them separately. No boats were operated by the company on White Bear Lake, Minnesota, and the connection to the Wildwood Park there was by rail.

Missaba Southern Railway/Missabe Southern Railroad: The railroad was found by the State Auditor to be owned and operated by the Northern Lumber Company in 1905 according to State ex rel. Board of Commissioners of St. Louis Couinty v. Iverson , 106 NW 309 (1906.) The board and the officers of the railroad were the officers and the board of the Northern Lumber Company.

Mississippi Branch RailRoad Company/Mississippi Branch Railway Company: Minnesota Territorial Laws 1857, Chapter 53, authorized the incorporation of the railroad by Richard H. Collins, A. P. Foster, Samuel Geissinger, William Rummel, Burrell S. Ruppy, William F. Sharpe, Daniel Sturges, Austin R. Swan, and others to locate and construct a railroad from a point on the West bank of the Mississippi River at or within three miles of West Newton, Wabasha County, Minnesota, Westerly to Rochester, Minnesota, Orenoco, Minnesota, and Faribault, Minnesota. Special Laws of Minnesota 1869, Chapter 58, revived and continued the authority for Horace E. Barron, James Crowley, A. P. Foster, W. S. Jackson, J. A. Thatcher, Hudson Wilson, and others, renamed the railroad as the Green Bay, Wabasha & Faribault Railway Company, and eliminated the forfeiture provision of the 1857 law. The property of the railroad in Wabasha, Minnesota, near the site of a bridge over the Mississippi River proposed by the Chippewa Valley & Lake Superior RailRoad was authorized to be purchased by the Chippewa Valley & Lake Superior RailRoad under Special Laws of Minnesota 1872, Chapter 108.

Mississippi, Faribault & NorthWestern RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1887 and was incorporated in 1887 by G. W. Batchelder, T. B. Clement, S. L. Crocker, F. W. Frink, A. M. McKinstry, J. R. Parshall, C. C. Perkins, Hudson Wilson, and others to build a railway from SouthEastern Minnesota by way of Faribault, Minnesota, and Willmar, Minnesota, to NorthWestern Minnesota. Its principal office was at Faribault, Minnesota. The railroad had capital stock of $6,000,000.

Mississippi, Hill City & Western RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1910, operated until 1915, and was succeeded by the Hill City RailRoad. In 1913, the railroad had total capital stock of $101,000, had 17.50 miles of track in Minnesota, had four locomotives, had two passenger cars, had 14 freight cars, and had 44 total employees. The Mississippi, Hill City & Western RailRoad was formed in 1907 by Warren Rabey, R. W. Rolsholt, and Julius Rolsholt, faltered in 1915 due to a fire in some of its rolling stock and began losing money, and was finally forced to be sold in 1915 by its creditors under order of the court as a foreclosure proceeding. The railroad was turned over to a new corporation, the Hill City Railway Company, with Stiles W. Burr of St. Paul as its president, and with Walter A. Eggleston of Minneapolis as its trustee under the foreclosure proceedings. In 1915, the Northern Pacific RailRoad acquired the railroad to pursue mining-related business, but there was insufficient interest by the mining companies for the development of the railroad as a mining railroad. [See note on Stiles W. Burr for 943 Summit Avenue.]

Mississippi & Lake Superior RailRoad: The railroad was chartered by Territorial Laws of Minnesota 1853, Chapter 15. The incorporators of the railroad were W. L. Ames, C. W. Borup, Christopher Carli, Emanuel Case, Lyman Dayton, C. D. Fillmore, W. H. C. Folsom, J. R. Irvine, W. G. LeDuc, John G. Lennon, D. B. Loomis, W. R. Marshall, Elias McKain, John McKusick, R. R. Nelson, J. W. North, Charles H. Oakes, Alexander Ramsey, H. M. Rice, R. P. Russell, H. H. Sibley, Franklin Steele, Orange Walker, Alexander Wilkin, and others. The railroad was intended to construct a rail line from a point in St. Paul Northerly to a point near the falls of the St. Louis River or to a point on Lake Superior near the mouth of the St. Louis River. The railroad was organized in 1871. [See note on Charles W. Borup and Maude Borup for 555 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Lyman Dayton in the general introduction.] [See note on John R. Irvine for 41 Kenwood Parkway.] [See note for William Rainey Marshall for 30 Irvine Park.] [See note on Alexander Ramsey for 265 South Exchange Street.] [See note on Edmund Rice and Henry Mower Rice for 4 Crocus Hill.] [See the note on Henry Hastings Sibley for 614 North Fountain Place.] [See note for Alexander Wilkin.]

Mississippi & Leach Lake RailRoad/Mississippi & Leech Lake RailRoad was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1886 by Edward M. Johnson, William C. Johnson, Claude B. Leonard, Ashley C. Morrill, and George Townsend to build a railway on the west side of the Mississippi River from St. Cloud, Minnesota, through Little Falls, Minnesota, to Leach Lake, Minnesota. It had initial capital stock of $3,000,000 and its principal place of business was Little Falls, Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1886.

Mississippi & Missouri RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated under Iowa law in 1847 by James Grant, Antoine Le Clair, and G. C. R. Mitchell, succeeding the unbuilt Davenport & Iowa City RailRoad Company, and was intended to build and operate a rail line from Davenport, Iowa, to Iowa City, Iowa, with a branch line from Iowa City, Iowa, to the Iowa-Minnesota boundary by way of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, and with a branch line from Iowa City, Iowa, to the Missouri River at St. Joseph, Missouri, by way of Washington, Iowa. The railroad was organized in 1853. The railroad had $2,000,000 in capital stock. In 1853, the Mississippi & Missouri Railroad Company entered into an agreement with the Railroad Bridge Company of Illinois for the construction and maintenance of a bridge over the Mississippi at Rock Island, Illinois, with completion of the bridge in 1856. The 67 mile rail line from Davenport, Iowa, to Iowa City, Iowa, was completed in 1856. LeGrand Byington and W. Penn Clarke were original investors in the railroad. The State of Iowa made land grants of 482,374.36 acres to the railroad for the purpose of aiding in the construction of railroads from Burlington, Iowa, on the Mississippi river, to a point on the Missouri river, near the mouth of the Platte river, from the city of Davenport, Iowa, by way of Iowa City and Fort Des Moines, to Council Bluffs, Iowa, from Lyons City, Iowa, Northwesterly to a point of intersection with the main line of the Iowa Central Air Line RailRoad near Maquoketa, Iowa, thence across the state to the 42nd parallel, and from Dubuque, Iowa, to the Missouri River near Sioux City, Iowa. The Chicago & Rock Island Railroad purchased the Mississippi & Missouri RailRoad in 1866 and changed its name to the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railroad. The Mississippi & Missouri RailRoad was chartered by Territorial Laws of Minnesota 1856, Chapter 163. The incorporators named in the 1856 legislation were James J. Belden, Harvey Bell, John R. Bennett, Charles Brown, Job Brown, Henry C. Butler, John J. Dunbar, D. N. Gates, E. A. Goodell, James A. McCarr, Samuel McPhail, Eugene Marshall, Edward Pickett, W. F. Ross, L. D. Selbridge, A. D. Sprague, Edward Thompson, Simon Waller, C. G. Wykoff, and others. The railroad was intended to survey, locate, construct, maintain, and operate one or more rail lines from Brownsville, Houston County, Minnesota Territory, by way of Caledonia, Minnesota Territory, to the border with Iowa. The railroad had $5,000,000 in capital stock and was organized in 1871.

Mississippi River Branch RailRoad: The railroad was chartered by Extra Session Territorial Laws of Minnesota 1857, Chapter 53, was incorporated by Richard H. Collins, A. P. Foster, Samuel Geissinger, Burrell S. Reppey, William Rummel, William F. Sharpe, Daniel Sturges, Austin R. Swan, and others, and was intended to locate and construct a rail line from some point on the West bank of the Mississippi River in a near West Newton, Wabashaw County, Minnesota, West to Rochester, Minnesota, Oronoco, Minnesota, or Faribault, Minnesota, or another point on another rail line between the Mississippi River and the Minnesota River. The railroad had capital stock of $1,000,000. The railroad was organized in 1871. The railroad was renamed the Green Bay, Wabasha & Faribault RailRoad under Special Laws of Minnesota 1869, Chapter 58. Austin Russell Swan (1834- ) resided in West Newton, Wabasha County, Minnesota Territory, in 1856 and married Sarah Jane Harrington (1836- ) in Grand Rapids, Michigan, in 1858.

Mississippi Valley Public Service Company The company was the successor to four utilities, the La Crosse City Railway Company, the La Crosse Water Power Company, the Winona Railway & Light Compny, and the Wisconsin Railway, Light & Power Company. The company operated transit services from 1914 until 1942. In 1954, Clement G. Smith was the president of the company. In 1960, the Northern States Power Company acquired NSP-Wisconsin's Minnesota properties, as well as the Wisconsin properties of Mississippi Valley Public Service Company. The company had its general offices in La Crosse, Wisconsin.

Mississippi Valley RailRoad: In 1852, the Mississippi Valley RailRoad was proposed at a convention held at St. Louis, Missouri, with Dr. E. D. Bevitt, president, J. H. McIlvane, vice president, W. V. Stewart, vice president, Dr. H. Mills, vice president, John D. Coalter, vice president, H. Blackledge, vice president, and George R. Taylor, secretary. The Mississippi Valley RailRoad was incorporated in Arkansas in 1853. The Mississippi Valley RailRoad was incorporated under Missouri law in 1871 and operated a 13.25 mile rail line from Moody, Missouri, to Hannibal, Missouri, in 1871. The railroad was initially succeeded by the Mississippi Valley & Western RailRoad, incorporated in 1873 under Missouri law, and was ultimately succeeded by the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad. The railroad was chartered in nMinnesota by Extra Session Territorial Laws of Minnesota 1857, Chapter 27. The named incorporators of the railroad in the 1857 legislation were Lyman Dayton, W. H. Forbes, William Freeborn, E. A. Goodell, W. P. Hilleary, Morris Hobart, H. D. Huff, W. A. Jones, H. B. Plant, C. R. Rood, and others. The intention in incorporating the railroad was to survey, locate, construct, maintain, and operate a rail line from Winona, Minnesota Territory, through the Mississippi River Valley to Hastings, Minnesota Territory, and then to St. Paul, with a branch from Hastings, Minnesota Territory, to a point of intersection with the Minneapolis & Cedar Valley RailRoad and thence to a point along the Minnesota River and on to the Iowa border. The railroad had capital stock of $5,000,000. The railroad was organized in 1871. In 1882, the Mississippi Valley RailRoad in Louisiana became the successor of the New Orleans, Red River & Texas RailRoad and had as its officers Judge Hiram R. Steele, president, Rufus Learned, vice president, Henry Frank, treasurer, and John Rawle, secretary.

Missouri River, Roscoe & Duluth RailRoad: The railroad was under construction in 1884 and in 1888, ran from La Moure, Dakota Territory, to the Missouri River in 1888, and connected to Duluth, Minnesota. In 1887, the directors of the railroad considered the question of having the Northern Pacific RailRoad operate the rail line. In 1888, the members of the board of directors were Frank E. Couley, Frank B. Gannon, J. N. Heal, Charles N. Herein, Frank M. Hopkins, Samuel P. Howell, Hugh Martin, Edward W. McClure, Charles W. Porter, Byron Ripley, L. G. Sims, Zack T. Sutley, and Charles Turner.

Mitchell & McClure RailRoad The railroad began operations in 1891 in Carlton County, Minnesota. The railroad operated 50 miles of rail trackage at three sites, Barker, Minnesota (25 miles,) Adolph, Minnesota (12 miles,) and at Milepost 39 off the Duluth & Iron Range RailRoad (13 miles.) The railroad owned seven rod locomotives and two general locomotives and operated from 1890 until 1902. The railroad owned two Shay geared steam locomotives. The railroad was headquartered at Barker, Minnesota, where there was a connection with the Northern Pacific RailRoad, allowing logs to be hauled to Duluth, Minnesota. In 1899, the railroad built a 12 mile line northeasterly from Adolph, Minnesota, a junction with the Duluth, Missabe & Northern RailRoad, which was abandoned in 1900 and was acquired by the Brooks-Scanlon Lumber Company and its Minnesota & North Wisconsin RailRoad and added to that railroad's main line.

Moorhead & Lake Superior RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1888 and was incorporated in 1888 by B. R. Briggs, W. H. Davy, Andrew Holes, T. C. Kurtz, and B. F. Mackall to construct and operate a line of railroad from Moorhead, Minnesota, in an easterly direction, to Lake Superior. The railroad had capital stock of $10,000,000 and its principal place of business was Moorhead, Minnesota.

Moorhead, Leech Lake, Duluth & Northwestern RailRoad/Moorhead, Leach Lake, Duluth & Northwestern RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1887 and was incorporated in 1887 by William J. Bodkin, Jorgen Jensen, A. O. Kragnes, P. H. Lamb, George N. Lamphere, John McDonald, Frank H. Mitchell, Ole Mosnes, R. M. Probstfield, and A. Wilson to build a railway from Moorhead, Minnesota, to Duluth, Minnesota, with branch lines. It had initial capital stock of $5,000,000 and its principal place of business was Moorhead, Minnesota.

Moorhead, McCauleysville & Breckenridge RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1881. The railroad was incorporated in 1881 by W. J. Bodkin, H. A. Bruns, F. J. Burnham, S. G. Comstock, F. A. Elder, J. Erickson, A. Holes, John Kurtz, P. H. Lamb, B. F. Mackall, E. C. Sprague, John Thorsgaard, and A. A. White to construct and operate a railway from Moorhead, Clay County, Minnesota, southerly by way of McCauleysville, Wilkin County, Minnesota, to Breckenridge, Wilkin County, Minnesota. The railroad had $100,000 in corporate stock. The principal place of business of the railroad was Moorhead, Minnesota.

Moorhead & Southeastern RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1888 and operated until 1891. The railroad connected Morehead, Minnesota, with Wahpeton, Dakota Territory, in 1887 and was controlled by the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba RailRoad. The railroad was succeeded by the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba RailRoad.

Moorhead & Southwestern RailRoad was incorporated in 1884 by W. J. Bodkin, F. E. Briggs, R. R. Briggs, Frank J. Burnham, W. H. Davy, John Erickson, Andrew Hales, Erick Hanson, Thomas C. Kurtz, and P. H. Lamb to construct, maintain and operate a railway and telegraph line from Moorhead, Minnesota, southerly to some point on the Southern boundary of the State. The railroad was organized in 1884 to run from Moorhead, Minnesota, to Redwood Falls, Minnesota, in order to connect with the Minneapolis & St. Louis RailRoad. The capital stock of the railroad was $5,000,000 and its principal place of business was Moorhead, Minnesota.

Morris & Southwestern RailRoad was incorporated in 1884 by W. D. Cornish, H. P. Hall, J. C. Hunter, Crawford Livingston, A. M. Miller, A. J. Sawyer, and W. W. Spaulding to construct, maintain and operating a railway from Morris, Stevens County, Minnesota, to run southwesterly to some point on the Union Pacific RailRoad line in or near Columbia, Nebraska. The initial capital stock of the railroad was $10,000,000 and its principal place of business was Duluth, Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1884. [See note on William Dalton Cornish for 534 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Harlan P. Hall for 614 North Fountain Avenue.] [See note on Crawford Livingston for 432 Summit Avenue and for 339 Summit Avenue.] [See note for Andrew Jackson Sawyer for Park Avenue and 26th Street.]

Morton Mine Narrow Gauge RailRoad: The Morton mine was located in Hibbing, Minnesota, and Stuntz Township, Minnesota. Morton Mine #1 was a shaft mine operated by the Tod-Stambaugh Company of Cleveland, Ohio, in 1914 and 1918 and Morton Mine #2 was an open pit mine operated by the M. A. Hanna Company in 1951 and 1960. The railroad apparently connected with the Great Northern RailRoad. The former open pit Morton Mine is now a lake located Northwest of Hibbing, Minnesota, and North NorthEast of Kelly Lake, Minnesota.

Motor Line Improvement Company: The railroad was chartered in 1890 for 20 years and opened for operation in 1891, with operations conducted by the Duluth Street Railway Company. In 1893, the railroad operated six miles of track, had four cars in an electric system, had capital stock of $150,000, had as its board of directors W. W. Billson, H. W. Coffin, J. D. Ensign, G. G. Hartley, J. B. Howard, R. M. Hunter, A. R. Macfarlane, A. A. Mendenhall, Joseph Sellwood, J. D. Streyker, and J. A. Willard, and its officers were G. G. Hartley, president, A. R. Macfarlane, treasurer, and T. W. Hoopes, secretary. In 1894, the railroad had eight miles of track in Duluth, Minnesota, the railroad had four rail cars, the railroad had $150,000 in capital stock, and its president was G. G. Hartley. In 1898, A. R. Macfarlane, as a trustee for the bond holders of the company, brought an action in Minnesota District Court to foreclose on the mortgage of the company. Losses sustained by the company contributed to financial failures by John A. Willard of Mankato, Minnesota, and by W. W. Bilson of Eau Claire, Wisconsin. In 1899, the railroad had capital stock of $150,000, had six miles of rail trackage that were operated by the Duluth Street RailRoad, owned four motor cars, had its general office in Duluth, Minnesota, had as its officers G. G. Hartley, president, J. D. Stryker, vice president, T. W. Hoopes, secretary, A. R. Macfarlane, treasurer, and A. A. Mendenhall and T. W. Hoopes, general superintendents, and had as it board of directors J. M. Billson, H. W. Coffin, I. D. Eusi, Jr., G. G. Hartley, J. B. Howard, R. M. Hunter, A. R. Macfarlane, A. A. Mendenhall, Joseph Sellwood, J. D. Stryker, and J. A. Willard. The railroad consolidated into the Duluth Street Railway in 1901. The 1918 McGraw Transit Directory indicates that the railroad was owned by the Duluth-Superior Traction Company. Angus R. Macfarlane was born in Stornoway, Isle of Lewis, Scotland, came to Duluth, Minnesota, in the early 1880’s, was associated with the American Exchange Bank of Duluth, Minnesota, married Catherine Hunter, was a founder of the Hunters Park and Glen Avon neighborhoods of Duluth, Minnesota,the Glen Avon Presbyterian Church, and the Duluth Curling Club, built the first Glen Avon school building in 1887 and built the second Glen Avon school building in 1893, raised white Minorcas chickens in 1902, and donated real property to the City of Duluth, Minnesota, which resulted in litigation in John A. Sinclair v. Samuel E. Matter, 125 Minn. 484 (1914.) Joseph Sellwood (1846-1914) was born in Cornwall, England, became a miner in 1855, moved to Michigan in 1865, married Ophelia __?__ ( -1903,) resided at Ispeming, Michigan, in 1870, where he mined iron ore cheaply and took many large, opened a number of important mines in Michigan, including the Colby Mine, the Brotherton Mine, and the Chandler Mine, became an iron range mining manager,including, in 1888, the Chandler Mine and the Ely Mine on Minnesota’s Iron Range, owned several mines on the Minnesota Iran Range, including, in 1912, the Adriatic Mine, the Cyprus Mine, the Morrow Mine, the Pearson Mine, and the Perkins Mine, and owned several banking institutions, including the Bessemer Bank of Michigan and the Exchange Bank of Ely, Minnesota, was the president in 1902 of the Sunday Lake Iron Company and of the Brotherton Iron Mining Company, with mines in Wakefield, Michigan, and the Chester Mining Company, with a mine near Negaunee, Michigan, was an investor in the Nashwauk, Minnesota, Townsite Company, died in Duluth, St. Louis County, Minnesota, and was buried at Forest Hill Cemetery, Duluth, St. Louis County, Minnesota.

Mountain Iron Mine Narrow Gauge RailRoad: The Mountain Iron Mine was discovered in 1890 and the Mountain Iron Mine's first shipment of iron ore occurred in 1892. The mine is on the National Register of Historic Places. The ore was shipped from the mine by a narrow gauge railroad.

Mullery-McDonald Lumber Company RailRoad: The railroad was headquartered at Iverson, Minnesota, operated ten miles of rail trackage, operated from 1908 until 1915, also operated at Zebulon, Minnesota, and Carlton, Minnesota, and was operated for the Northern Lumber Company. Lumber pilers employed by the Mullery-McDonald Lumber Company engaged in a strike over higher wages in 1913. The company was formed by William O'Brien, John C. Mullery, V. J. Mullery, and James P. McDonald in 1909 and the company operated until 1934. James McDonald, John C. Mullery, and William J. O'Brien (1856- ) were principals in the firm, which had capital stock of $100,000. The company operated a lumber mill at West Duluth, Minnesota, and averaged a daily output of lumber of 200,00 board feet.

National Iron Company RailRoad The company owned one Shay geared steam locomotives. The company was located at West Duluth, Minnesota. The National Iron Works Foundry and Machine Shop, located at 116 South Seventeenth Avenue West, became the National Iron Company in 1896.

Nebraska & Lake Superior RailRoad: The railroad was chartered by Extra Session Territorial Laws of Minnesota 1857, Chapter 93, was incorporated by S. B. Abbe, Anson Blake, Joseph R. Brown, John F. Butterworth, Sam F. Butterworth, Reuben H. Carlton, Thomas Clark II, Erastus Corning, Edward C. Delavan, Edward F. Ely, Lowell Holbrook, Ward Hunt, William B. Jackson, W. W. Kingsbury, S. B. Lowry, Edward Martindale, Guillaume Merle, Benjamin W. Raymond, Edmund Rice, John F. Seymour, Sumner J. Smith, Franklin Steele, Benjamin Thompson, Daniel Tyler, J. S. Watrous, and Alexander Wilkin, and was intended to build and authorize a rail line from the Western end of Lake Superior or Superior Bay West to the Nebraska State Line, with a branch rail line from some point East of the Mississippi River to the Minnesota-Wisconsin boundary at Taylor's Falls, Minnesota. The railroad had capital stock of $10,000,000. The 1857 territorial law was amended by Special Laws of Minnesota 1861, Chapter 1, changed the incorporators of the railroad to Anson Blake, Levi Butler, A. G. Chatfield, Richard Chute, Orville Clark, Thomas Clark, Erastus Corning, Lyman Dayton, E. O. Hamlin, A. H. Hanchett, A. F. Hawley, Sidney Luce, John McKusick, C. T. Stearns, Henry A. Swift, Eber B. Ward, and Dwight Woodbury. The revised railroad had $5,000,000 in capital stock. Lyman Dayton was the president of the the Nebraska & Lake Superior RailRoad, incorporated in 1857 and subsequently renamed as the Lake Superior & Mississippi RailRoad after its governing legislation was amended in 1861 (Special Laws of Minnesota 1861, Section 1.) The railroad reportedly was organized in 1871. In 1875, the chartering 1857 and 1861 legislation of the railroad was initially found to be unconstitutional in Ramsey County district court, but that decision was overturned by the Minnesota Supreme Court in Oakes Ames v. Lake Superior & Mississippi RailRoad Company, 21 Minn. 240 (1875.)

C. N. Nelson Lumber Company RailRoad In 1890, Charles N. Nelson, formerly a Stillwater, Minnesota, lumberman, began logging along the St. Louis River and built a railroad to haul out his logs from ten miles inland from the St. Louis River to Gowan, Minnesota, on the Duluth & Winnipeg RailRoad. The company railroad, headquartered in Gowan, Minnesota, operated 11 miles of rail trackage from 1890 until 1895, owned one rod locomotive and one general locomotive, and owned 40 logging rail cars. The railroad operated off of the Duluth & Winnipeg RailRoad. The company railroad owned one Shay geared steam locomotive. It was located at Cloquet, Minnesota. The railroad became the Mesabe Southern Railway Company in 1894.

Nestor RailRoad: The railroad was formed in 1900 by the estate of Thomas Nestor, a Michigan logging company owned by sons George Nester, John F. Nester, and Frank P. Nester and brother Patrick Nester, and was financed by the Calumet & Hecla Copper Company of Calumet, Michigan. Brothers Timothy Nestor (1846-1913,) a Canadian of Irish extraction, and Thomas Nestor (1833-1890,) an Irishman, were engaged in the lumber business and the railroad contracting business, primarily in Michigan, after 1865. One Nestor railroad went Northwestward to the upper Gooseberry River watershed, while a Nestor railroad branch line went North to connect with the Alger Smith Railway at Split Rock River. Large scale logging took place along the Nestor railroads, the logs being hauled to the lakeshore, dumped into a pond at the mouth of Gooseberry River, and rafted to the company's mills. The estate of Thomas Nestor shipped huge rafts of logs from Gooseberry River, Minnesota, to Ashland, Wisconsin, and Baraga, Michigan, from 1900 until 1909. The railroad operated at least 11 miles of rail trackage near Gooseberry River, Minnesota, including a balloon lop track near the mouth of the Gooseberry River for turning the train. In 1906, the United States Interstate Commerce Commission reported that the Nestor RailRoad operated 25 miles of rail trackage. The railroad owned three locomotives, including an 1893 Mogul, and owned 57 logging cars. In 1909, the railroad ceased operation and the rails were removed. Parts of the the former Nestor RailRoad rail grade were used by the Virginia & Rainy Lake Logging Company railroad after 1909. The estate of Thomas Nestor held the record for the largest load of logs on a horse-drawn sled, 36,055 feet of virgin Michigan pine that weighed 144 tons, hauled by a single team of horses, at the Ontonagon River, Michigan, in 1893. The feat was commemorated on a coin issued as part of the World’s Columbian Exposition. The Nestor Grade Amber Ale is produced by the Castle Danger Brewery of Two Harbors, Minnesota. There is a Nestor Grade hiking trail, part of the Superior Hiking Trail, North of Two Harbors, Minnesota.

New Ulm, Redwood & Big Stone Lake RailRoad: The railroad was authorized by the Minnesota Legislature shortly after statehood in 1857 and was incorporated in 1871 by W. L. Brackenridge, C. T. Brown, J. H. Stewart, and others to build and operate a railway from New Ulm, Minnesota, to Big Stone Lake, Minnesota. The railroad had $3,000,000 in capital stock at incorporation. The railroad was organized in 1871.

Nichols-Chisholm Lumber Company The company railroad, headquartered in Park Rapids, Minnesota, operated 30 miles of rail trackage in isolated locations, owned one rod locomotive and three general locomotives, and owned 60 logging cars. The company owned two Shay geared steam locomotives, with one locomotive located at Park Rapids, Minnesota, and the other locomotive located at Frazee, Minnesota. The Nichols-Chisholm Lumber Company logged on the White Earth Indian Reservation and in Northwestern Minnesota from 1900 or 1904 until 1918. The railroad was associated with the last major logging company located in Becker County, Minnesota.

Nininger, St. Peter & Western RailRoad: The railroad was chartered by Territorial Laws of Minnesota 1857, Chapter 7, and was incorporated by M. E. Ames, J. R. Case, Charles E. Clark, George B. Clitherall, John B. Cook, Ignatius Donnelly, John Eason, Charles L. Emerson, L. Faiver, William S. Hinckley, William D. Lowry, John Nininger, Alexander Ramsey, Joseph A. Paine, G. O. Robertson, and Phillip Rohr. The railroad had $2,000,000 in capital stock. The railroad was to run from a point along the Mississippi River in Nininger, Minnesota, to a point on the Minnesota River in St. Peter, Minnesota. Plans for the railroad collapsed after the Panic of 1857 and when the U. S. Congress, riven by the slavery issue, failed to enact legislation containing the required land grants.

Nobles & Rock RailRoad: The railroad was organized in the 1990's, succeeded the Buffalo Ridge Railroad, Inc., operated until 2001, and was succeeded by the Minnesota Southern RailRoad. The Buffalo Ridge Rail Authority bought the Buffalo Ridge RailRoad and Rail Equipment & Transportation, Inc., owned by Bill Dahlin and Dirk Lenthe, and was contracted to operate on the rail line, running from Agate Junction, Minnesota, to Manley Interchange, Minnesota, as the Nobles Rock Railroad.

North & South RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in 1901 under Iowa law by H. B. Brandenberg, T. M. Hanley, E. C. Hollinge, and others to build and operate a railroad from Duluth, Minnesota, or some point on Lake Superior across Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa, to New Orleans, Louisiana, or some point in Texas. The general office of the railroad was in Nevada, Iowa. The railroad had capital stock of $300,000. The railroad was intended to replace the defunct Duluth & New Orleans RailRoad. In 1901, the board of directors of the railroad included S. V. Brandenburg, Ellwood Furnas, S. M. Hanley, E. C. Hotlidge, S. V. Wardall, T. V. Wardall, and Thomas Wardall. Lawlor & Reid was the contractor for the building of the rail line.

North Dakota & Pacific RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1887 and was incorporated in 1887 by Joseph T. Avery, Charles G. Lawrence, Harris Richardson, Walter J. Trask, and Louis E. White to build a railway from some point in Norman County, Minnesota, Westerly. It had initial capital stock of $2,000,000 and its principal place of business was St. Paul. In 1888, the railroad completed surveying for a route planned to connect to Duluth, Minnesota. [See note for Charles G. Lawrence for 703 Lincoln Avenue.]

North St. Paul RailRoad/North St. Paul Motor RailRoad: The North St. Paul RailRoad Company was granted, in 1889, by Ordinance 1246, a 50 year charter to build and operate a rail line from the east end of the cable line on East Seventh Street to the City of North St. Paul, Minnesota and it began operation with a steam dummy line between St. Paul and North St. Paul, Minnesota, in 1890. In 1890, the railroad made 29 daily runs from St. Paul to Silver Lake in North St. Paul, Minnesota. In 1892, the North St. Paul Railroad Company was sold to the St. Paul & White Bear Railway Company, the line was electrified, the line was converted to standard gauge, and the line was extended to Mahtomedi, Minnesota. In 1893, the railroad operated 6.5 miles of track, was an electric system, had five rail cars, and had as its officers were W. S. Morton, president, J. W. Jones, secretary, and S. R. Murray, treasurer. In 1899, the St. Paul & White Bear Railway Company was acquired by a Twin City Rapid Transit Company subsidiary, the Minneapolis & St. Paul Suburban Railway, which completed an extension of its interurban line to Stillwater, Minnesota.

North Shore Mining RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1994 as the successor to the Reserve Mining RailRoad. The rail line was constructed by Reserve Mining in 1955. Reserve Mining filed for bankruptcy in 1986, the plant was downsized to 4.8 million tons per year capacity and the plant reopened in 1990 as Northshore Mining Company. In 1994, Cyprus North Shore Mining was sold to Cleveland Cliffs. Northshore Mining handles raw taconite from its mine at Babbitt to its pellet plant located at Silver Bay. North Shore Mining produces 4.5 million tons of taconite pellets.

North Shore RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in 1877 to build and operate a railroad from a point in Cook County, Minnesota, on the North Shore of Lake Superior Northerly and Easterly to the boundary with the British possessions in Canada, was organized in 1877, had capital stock of $300,000, was headquartered in Duluth, Minnesota, and was incorporated by O. Dayton, A. DeGraff, B. B. Eaton, A. G. Foster, C. Markell, and George A. Stone.

North Shore Scenic RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1988, was operated for one year in 1990 by Donald Shank, former General Manager and Vice President of the Duluth, Mesabi & Iron Range Railway, was acquired by the Goldfine family as a for-profit enterprise and was operated by them from 1991 until 1996, and was acquired by the Lake Superior Railroad Museum in 1996 with a substantial grant from the State of Minnesota. The North Shore Scenic Railroad operates excursions along the historic Lakefront Line, a 26-mile section of rail between Duluth, Minnesota, and Two Harbors, Minnesota.

North Side Street RailRoad: The railroad was created when Andrew B. Robbins was unable to convince the Minneapolis Street Railway Company to extend its line to the new town of Robbinsdale, Minnesota. The railroad was chartered in 1890 for a period of 30 years and was granted a city franchise in perpetuity and began construction in 1891. The railroad first used horse drawn cars on the rail line, and then used steam power in 1897, pending the extension of the city electric system from Penn Avenue and 32nd Street. The rail line extended from the Minneapolis North Side to Robbinsdale, Minnesota. The Poor's Directory of RailRoad Officials, published by the Poor's RailRoad Manual Company in 1905, indicates that the officers of the railroad were A. B. Robbins, president and treasurer, A. L. Sorter, Jr., vice president, and A. L. Jones, secretary. In 1906, the electric railroad had 2.5 miles of track, owned three cars, and rented power from the Twin City Rapid Transit Company. The capital stock of the railroad in 1906 was $500,000. The railroad, in 1906, had as its officers A. B. Robbins, president and treasurer, A. L. Surtur, vice president, A. L. Jones, secretary, and J. S. Small, electrical engineer and had its headquarters at the Kasota Block in Minneapolis.

North & South RailRoad: The railroad was the successor to the Duluth & New Orleans RailRoad. In 1902, the railroad operated a 130 mile rail line from Osage, Iowa, to Des Moines, Iowa. In 1902, S. V. Wardall and C. E. Hollidge were associated with the railroad.

North Star Construction Company: The North Star Construction Company was incorporated in 1890 under the laws of the State of New Jersey, succeeded the Duluth & Winnipeg Syndicate, built a significant portion of the Duluth & Winnipeg RailRoad rail line, and operated all or portions of the Duluth & Winnipeg RailRoad, the Superior Belt Line RailRoad, and the St. Paul & Duluth RailRoad in 1893. In 1892, the North Star Construction Company, under contract with the Duluth & Winnipeg Railroad and in conjunction with the Superior Consolidated Land Company, built Allouez Ore Dock Facility Dock No. 1 in West Superior, Wisconsin. In 1893, the company’s officers were Samuel Thomas, president, H. J. Boardman, vice president, Benjamin Whiteley, secretary-treasurer, W. A. Barr, general counsel, C. H. Fisher, auditor, W. H. Fisher, general manager, and Alex Stewart, chief engineer, the members of the company’s board of directors were B. N. Baker, James O. Bloss, H. J. Boardman, Frank H. Church, George H. Church, Samuel A. Duncan, W. H. Fisher, Donald Grant, Henry R. McLane, Samuel Thomas, and John H. Upham, the company had $1,500,000 in capital stock, the company employed 217 personnel, the company operated 125.61 miles of passenger rail line, the company owned seven locomotives, six passenger rail cars, ten box cars, 50 flat rail cars, and five cabooses, and the company located its general office in New York City, New York. In 1894, when the Duluth & Winnipeg Railway Company consented to a foreclosure action by the Guarantee Trust & Safe Deposit Company in federal court, the company successfully intervened, contending that it had a senior and superior martgage lien in Guarantee Trust & Safe Deposit Company v. Duluth & Winnipeg Railway Company , 70 F. 803 (1895.) Amni W. Wright also was the president of the company and the president of the Duluth & Winnipeg RailRoad before 1897. Abner Smith (1843- ) also was a shareholder in the Duluth & Winnipeg RailRoad and was a member of the board of directors of the company.

Northern Lines RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in 2004 as a subsidiary of the Anacostia & Pacific Company, Inc., was organized in 2005 to operate Burlington Northern Santa Fe RailRoad trackage in central Minnesota, headquartered in St. Cloud, Minnesota, had two locomotives, operated 28 miles of track, and employed eight people.

Northern Lumber Company RailRoad: In 1880, the Gull River Lumber Company built a sawmill located near the Northern Pacific Railroad where it crosses the Gull River. The Northern Lumber Company of Cloquet, Minnesota, acquired the Northern end of the Alger Smith Company logging rail line from Brule Lake, Minnesota, Northeasterly to the Canadian border near Rose Lake, Minnesota, and Clearwater Lake, Minnesota, with Cascade Lake, Minnesota, becoming the company’s headquarters. Later, the name of the railroad was changed to the Northern Mill Company RailRoad. The railroad operated until 1894 and was succeeded by the Brainerd & Northern Minnesota RailRoad.

Northern Mill Company RailRoad: In 1880, the Gull River Lumber Company built a sawmill located near the Northern Pacific Railroad crossing of the Gull River. In 1892, the Northern Mill Company leased the Gull River Lumber Company and the Gull River & Northern Railway.

Northern Minnesota RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1888 and was incorporated in 1888 by L. N. Eklund, E. W. Jadis, G. P. L. Kelso, Wm. F. Kelso, Ed. H. Love, C. J. McGollom, A. Nordenmalm, L. B. Riddell, George Thompson, and John Westerson to construct and operate a railway from a point at or near Emerson, Manitoba, in a southerly direction. The railroad had capital stock of $1,000,000. Its principal place of business was Hallock, Minnesota.

Northern Mississippi RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1890 by John B. Atwater, Charles H. Babcock, Samuel Hill (1857-1931,) Anson B. Jackson, and John L. McQuire to acquire and operate a logging railroad in Cass County, Minnesota. In 1894, federal law granted to the railroad 50 feet of land along either side of the centerline of its route through the Leech Lake, Chippewa Indian, and Winnebagishish Reservations. The railroad operated until 1911. The railroad was a Weyerhaeuser Lumber Company affiliate. [See note for Samuel Hill for 240 Summit Avenue.]

Northern Pacific, Fergus & Black Hills RailRoad/Northern Pacific, Fergus Falls & Black Hills RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1878, was renamed from the Minnesota Northern RailRoad in 1881, began operations along a 33.3 mile rail line in 1881 from Wadena, Minnesota, to Battle Lake, Minnesota, and to Underwood, Minnesota, extended the rail line to Fergus Falls, Minnesota, and to Breckenridge, Minnesota, in 1882, was supported financially by bonds issued by Otter Tail County, Minnesota, and was incorporated in 1890 to build, improve and operate a railway from a point in Crow Wing county, Minnesota, to a point in Cass County, Minnesota, and the State boundary at the Red River of the North. In 1882, the officers of the railroad were Thomas F. Oakes, president, Ashbel H. Barney, vice president, George V. Sims, secretary, C. T. Barney, treasurer, George Gray, solicitor, M. P. Martin, auditor, Herman Haupt, general manager, and A. Anderson, chief engineer, the members of the board of directors of the railroad wereA. H. Barney, C. T. Barney, Frederick Billings, B. P. Cheney, Hugh L. Cole, George Gray, Robert Harris, T. F. Oakes, and Elijah Smith, and the railroad had $15,000,000 in capital stock, operated 77.7 miles of rail trackage (76.6 in Minnesota,) owned 29 wooden bridges, owned four wooden trestles, operated 12 railroad stations (11 in Minnesota,) had its operating equipment supplied by the Northern Pacific RailRoad, and had the general office of the railroad in New York, New York. Between 1881 and 1883, the railroad constructed 139.3 miles of rail trackage (built a 75.00 mile rail line from Wadena, Minnesota, to Breckenridge, Minnesota, from 1881 until 1882, built a 22.20 mile rail line from Fergus Falls, Minnesota, to Pelican Rapids, Minnesota, from 1881 until 1882, and completed a 42.10 mile rail line constructed partially by the Saint Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba Railway from Breckenridge, Minnesota, to Milnor, Dakota Territory, from 1882 until 1883,) and sold a 22.20 mile rail line from Fergus Falls, Minnesota, to Pelican Rapids, Minnesota, to the Saint Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba Railway in 1882. In 1889, the officers of the railroad were Robert Harris, president, T. F. Oakes, vice president, George H. Earl, secretary, and George H. Baxter, treasurer, and the member of the board of directors were S. R. Ainslie, Frederick Billings, Robert Harris, James McNaught, T. F. Oakes, Henry Stanton, and J. B. Williams. In 1889, the railroad had capital stock of $15,000,000, owned five bridges, and owned 102 trestles. The railroad leased 117.1 miles of track to the Northern Pacific RailRoad in 1889. In 1890, the railroad had two locomotives. In 1891, the railroad owned three locomotives and 100 logging cars. The railroad operated until 1899 and was succeeded by the Northern Pacific RailRoad after 1908. The railroad eventually became the Otter Tail Valley Railroad. [See note on Thomas Fletcher Oakes for 432 Summit Avenue.]

Northern Pacific & Manitoba RailRoad: In 1888, surveys were completed for a rail route from Morris, Manitoba, Canada, to Brandon, Manitoba, Canada. The railroad ran from Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, down the Red River Valley to Pembina, Dakota Territory, by way of Morris, Manitoba, Canada, connecting with the Duluth & Manitoba RailRoad. The railroad was initially succeeded by the Northern Pacific RailRoad and then was succeeded by the Canadian Northern RailRoad in 1901. The Northern Pacific & Manitoba Railroad Company was a subsidiary of the Duluth & Manitoba RailRoad, which was authorized by an act of the Legislative Assembly in the Province of Manitoba of September 4, 1888, and by a special act of Parliament of the Dominion of Canada of April 16, 1889 to construct a rail line from a point near or at Pembina, North Dakota, on the international boundary to Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, with various other branch lines in Manitoba. This company was created in 1888 and was ultimately acquired by the Canadian Northern RailRoad in 1901.

Northern Pacific RailRoad: The railroad was chartered by Territorial Laws of Minnesota 1856, Chapter 165. The named incorporators of the railroad in the 1856 legislation were John Bradley, John R. Irvine, Joel H. Johnson, William B. Ogden, John J. R. Pease, Alexander Ramsey, Franklin Steele, Jesse M. Stone, Nelson K. Wheeler, and others. The railroad was intended to construct a rail line from a point along St. Croix Lake on the border with Wisconsin by way of Stillwater, Minnesota Territory, St. Paul, and St. Anthony, Minnesota Territory, to the Western boundary of the Minnesota Territory and a branch rail line to the Red River of the North. The railroad was authorized by an 1864 Act of Congress. The railroad had initial capital stock of $5,000,000. The railroad was organized in 1870, defaulted on its debts in 1874, was purchased by a committee appointed by the bondholders, and was reorganized in 1875. In 1875, the officers of the railroad were George W. Cass, receiver, C. B. Wright, president, A. L. Prichard, treasurer, J. B. Power, land commissioner, C. W. Mead, general manager, J. H. Sullivan, superintendent, and R. M. Newport, auditor. In 1875, the railroad operated a 450 mile rail line between St. Paul and Bismarck, Dakota Territory. The Northern Pacific Railway Company was the successor in title of the St. Paul & Duluth RailRoad Company. In 1878, the railroad had capital stock of $100,000,000, had 9,000 shareholders, operated 388.50 miles of rail trackage, including leased track from the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba RailRoad, owned 47 stations, owned 68 bridges, owned 45 trestles, owned 47 locomotives, owned 27 passenger cars, owned 1,326 freight cars, and owned three company cars. In 1878, the officers of the railroad were Frederick Billings, president, George Stark, vice president, Samuel Wilkeson, secretary, George Gray, attorney, George E. Beebe, treasurer, H. E. Sargent, general manager, and R. M. Newport, auditor, and the members of the board of directors of the railroad were J. C. Ainsworth, Richard L. Ashurst, Frederick Billings, Benjamin P. Cheney, John M. Denison, Joseph Dilworth, Johnston Livingston, Hugh McCullogh, Alex. Mitchell, J. Fraley Smith, George Stark, Charlemagne Tower, and Charles B. Wright. In 1882, the railroad had as its officers Henry Villard, president, Thomas F. Oakes, vice president, Samuel Wilkeson, secretary, R. Lenox Belknap, treasurer, J. A. Barker, general auditor, George Gray, general counsel, Herman Haupt, Eastern Division general manager, J. W. Sprague, Western Division general superintendent, and Adna Anderson, chief engineer, had as members of its board of directors Ashbel H. Barney, Frederick Billings, John C. Bullitt, Benjamin P. Cheney, John W. Ellis, Robert Harris, Artemas H. Holmes, Henry E. Johnston, Thomas F. Oakes, Roswell G. Elijah Smith, Rolston, J. L. Stackpole, and Henry Villard, had $100,000,000 in capital stock, operated 431.74 miles of rail trackage in Minnesota, owned 131 locomotives, 49 passenger rail cars, 24 express and baggage rail cars, 2,079 box, freight and stock rail cars, 1,941 flat and coal rail cars,and 623 other rail cars, employed 2,515 personnel, had received 990,619.30 acres in governmental land grants, and operated the Western RailRoad of Minnesota under a 99 year lease after 1878. In 1885, the railroad had $100,000,000 in capital stock, owned 355 stations (99 located in Minnesota,) owned 15 bridges, owned 304 trestles, operated 3,010.60 miles of rail trackage (648.60 miles in Minnesota,) owned 391 locomotives, owned 274 passenger cars, owned 9,181 freight cars, owned 1,046 company cars, and had 4,463 total employees (1,369 in Minnesota.) In 1885, the officers of the railroad were Robert Harris, president, Thomas F. Oakes, vice president and general manager, Samuel Wilkeson, secretary, Robert L. Belknap, treasurer, J. A. Barker, auditor, J. M. Hannaford, general freight agent, and George Gray, general counsel, and the members of the board of directors were August Belmont, Frederick Billings, John C. Bullit, Benjamin P. Chency, John W. Ellis, John H. Hall, N. P. Hallowell, Robert Harris, Johnston Livingston, Thomas F. Oakes, Roswell G. Ralston, J. L. Stackpole, and Charles B. Wright. Before 1886, the railroad constructed 515 88 miles of rail line in or connecting to Minnesota, a 424.50 mile rail line from Carlton, Minnesota, to Bismark, Dakota Territory, built from 1870 until 1873, an 87.65 mile rail line from Ashland, Wisconsin to Carlton, Minnesota, built from 1881 until 1885, and a 3.73 mile rail line from Superior Junction, Wisconsin, to Duluth, Minnesota, in 1885. In 1887, the officers of the railroad were Robert Harris, president, Thomas F. Oakes, vice president and general manager, James B. Williams, third vice president, Samuel Wilkeson, secretary, Robert L. Belknap, treasurer, J. A. Barker, general auditor, Charles B. Lamborn, land commissioner, and Greorge Gray, general counsel, and the members of the board of directors of the railroad were Edwin H. Abbott, August Belmont, Frederick Billings, John U. Brookman, Benjamin P. Cheney, Charles L. Colby, Robert Harris, Colgate Hoyt, Brayton Ives, Thomas F. Oakes, John B. Trevor, Henry Villard, and Charles B. Wright. In 1888, the officers of the railroad were S. R. Ainslie, president, A. Manvel, vice president, C. B. Brunson, secretary and superintnendent, and H. P. Upham, treasurer, the members of the board of directors of the railroad were S. R. Ainslie, E. V. Dudley, A. Manvel, Roswell Miller, and E. W. Winter, the railroad owned or leased 2,376.64 miles of rail trackage, operated 1034.63 miles of subsidiary branch rail lines, owned 390 locomotives, 109 passenger cars, 38 emmigrant sleeping cars, 13 dinning cars, eight passenger and baggage cars, 82 baggage, mail and express rail cars, eight superintendent cars, seven business rail cars, 23 Pullman sleeping cars, 4,967 box cars, 2,515 flat rail cars, 919 stock cars, 853 coal cars, 12 logging cars, 43 beer cars, two oil cars, 15 fruit cars, 216 cabooses, 71 refrigerator cars, 92 boarding cars, ten pile drivers, seven steam shovels, 13 tool cars, two stone derrick cars, 1,119 hand and push cars, one painter’s car, eight wrecking cars, one snow plow, four rotary snow plows, 71 velocipedes, and four ferries, and the rialroad’s principal place of business was in St. Paul. In 1888, the subsidiary railroads were the Little Falls & Dakota RailRoad, the Northern Pacific, Fergus & Black Hills RailRoad, the Fargo & Southwestern RailRoad, the Sanborn, Cooperstown & Turtle Mountain RailRoad, the James town & Northern RailRoad, the James River Valley RailRoad, the Spoklane & Palouse RailRoad, the Helena & Red Mountain RailRoad, the Duluth & Manitoba RailRoad, the Rocky Mountain RailRoad of Montana, the Helena, Boulder Valley & Butte RailRoad, the Helena & Northern RailRoad, the Drummond & Phillipsburg RailRoad, the Missoula & Bitter Root Valley RailRoad, the Northern Pacific La Moure & Missouri River RailRoad, and the Helena & Jefferson County RailRoad. In 1893, the officers of the railroad were Henry Villard, chairman of the board, T. F. Oakes, president, J. B. Williams, first vice president, G. H. Earl, secretary, G. S. Baxter, treasurer, James McNaught, general counsel, J. A. Barker, auditor, and W. S. Mellen, general manager and the members of the board of directors were C. B. Wright, Thomas F. Oakes, Roswell G. Rolston, William L. Bull, Edwin H. Abbot, Charles L. Colby, Colgate Hoyt, William R. Merriman, Charles J. Barney, James B. Haggin, James B. Williams, and David S. Wegg. In 1893, the railroad had capital stock of $49,000,000, owned stock in ten other railroads, the Northern Pacific, Fergus & Black Hills RailRoad, the Lake Superior Terminal & Transfer Railway Company, the St. Paul & Northern Pacific RailRoad, the Montana Union RailRoad, the Northern Pacific & Montana RailRoad, the Coeur D'Alene Railway & Navigation Company, the Minnesota Transfer Railway Company, the Seattle, Lake Shore & Eastern RailRoad, the St. Paul Union Depot Company, the Duluth Union Depot Company, and the Chicago Union Transfer RailRoad, owned 4,453.82 miles of railway trackage (237.17 in Minnesota,) had 13,427 employees (3,631 in Minnesota,) owned 26 bridges, 301 trestles, and four tunnels, owned 649 locomotives, owned 402 passenger cars, owned 14,849 freight cars, and owned 2,022 company service cars. The Poor's Directory of RailRoad Officials, published by the Poor's RailRoad Manual Company in 1898, indicates that the officers of the railroad were Robert Harris, president, T. F. Oakes, first vice president and general manager, A. Anderson, second vice president, James B. Williams, third vice president, S. Wilkeson, secretary, R. L. Belknap, treasurer, J. A. Barker, auditor, and George Gray, general counsel, that the railroad had general offices in St. Paul and in New York, New York, and that the railroad operated 2,708 miles of rail trackage. In 1904, the railroad had capital stock of $156,000,000, had 5,634 employees in Minnesota, owned 913 locomotives, owned 712 passenger cars, owned 32,260 freight cars, owned 841 company service cars, and operated 5,598.91 total miles of railway trackage (1,023.20 miles in Minnesota.) In 1904, the railroad built 105.96 miles in rail line extensions. The Poor's Directory of RailRoad Officials, published by the Poor's RailRoad Manual Company in 1905, indicates that the officers of the railroad were Howard Elliott, president, D. S. Lamont, vice president, J. M. Hannaford, second vice president, C. M. Levey, third vice president, H. A. Gray, comptroller, G. H. Earl, secretary, C. A. Clark, treasurer, Francis Lynde Stetson, general counsel, and H. J. Horn, general manager. In 1913, the railroad had total capital stock of $248,000,000, had 1,038.80 miles of track in Minnesota, had 1,366 locomotives, had 1,153 passenger cars, had 46,988 freight cars, and had 38,012 total employees. In 1916, the railroad operated 8,543.323 miles of rail trackage, owned 1,334 locomotives, owned 1,034 passenger cars, owned 47,521 freight cars, owned 3,358 work cars, owned 26 miscellaneous rail cars, leased one locomotive to the Duluth Union Depot & Transfer RailRoad, leased one locomotive to A. Guthrie & Company, leased two freight cars to the Lake Superior Terminal & Transfer RailRoad, directly controlled the Duluth Union Depot & Transfer Company, the Gilmore & Pittsburgh RailRoad Company, the Minnesota & International Railway, the Northern Pacific Express Company, and the Manitoba Railway Company, and indirectly controlled, through the Northwestern Improvement Company, the Centralia Eastern RailRoad Company and the Billings & Central Montana Railway, partially controlled the Camas Prairie RailRoad, the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy RailRoad, the Lake Superior Terminal & Transfer Railway Company of the State of Wisconsin, the Midland Railway Company of Manitoba, the Minnesota Transfer Railway Company, the Northern Pacific Terminal Company of Oregon, the Saint Paul Union Depot Company, and the Spokane, Portland and Seattle Railway. The Northern Pacific RailRoad either absorbed or acquired as subsidiaries the Bear Creek & Western Railway, the Bellingham Bay & Eastern RailRoad, the Big Fork & International Falls Railway, the Big Fork & Northern Railway, the Brainerd & Northern Minnesota Railway, the Central Washington RailRoad, the Centralia Eastern RailRoad, the Clealum RailRoad Company, the Clearwater Short Line Railway, the Cle-Elum Coal Company, the Coeur D'Alene Railway & Navigation Company, the Connell Northern Railway, the Cuyuna Dock Company, the Cuyuna Northern Railway, the Dakota & Montana Railway, the Drummond & Philipsburg RailRoad, the Duluth & Manitoba RailRoad, the Duluth Short Line Railway, the Duluth, Crookston & Northern RailRoad, the Fargo & Southwestern RailRoad, the 565th Avenue Corporation, the Gaylord & Ruby Valley Railway, the Grantsburg, Rush City & St. Cloud RailRoad, the Grays Harbor & Columbia River Railway, the Green River & Northern RailRoad, the Helena & Jefferson County RailRoad, the Helena & Northern RailRoad, the Helena & Red Mountain RailRoad, the Helena, Boulder Valley & Butte RailRoad, the Howell Mining Company, the Intra-Montana Railway, the James River Valley RailRoad, the Jamestown & Northern Extension RailRoad, the Jamestown & Northern RailRoad, the Kennewick Northern Railway, the Klickitat Valley Development Company, the Lehigh Dock Company, the Little Falls & Dakota RailRoad, the Little Falls & Southern RailRoad, the Mill Creek RailRoad, the Minneapolis Railway Terminal Company, the Missoula & Bitter Root Valley RailRoad, the Missoula & Hamilton RailRoad, the Missouri River Railway, the Montana Railway, the Montana Union Railway, the Monte Cristo Railway, the Mountain Side Coal Company, the National Park Transportation Company, the North Yakima & Valley Railway, the Northern Pacific & British Columbia Railway, the Northern Pacific & Cascade RailRoad, the Northern Pacific & Manitoba Railway, the Northern Pacific & Montana RailRoad, the Northern Pacific & Puget Sound Shore RailRoad, the Northern Pacific Coal Company, the Northern Pacific Express Company, the Northern Pacific Steamship Company, the Northern Pacific, Fergus & Black Hills RailRoad, the Northern Pacific, La Moure & Missouri River RailRoad, the Northwest Equipment Company of Minnesota, the Olympic Peninsula Railway, the Port Angeles & Olympia Railway, the Portage and North Western Railway, the Portland Vancouver & Yakima Railway, the Puget Sound & Alaska Steamship Company, the Red Rock & Salmon River Telephone Company, the Rocky Fork & Cooke City Railway, the Rocky Fork Coal Company of Montana, the Rocky Mountain Railroad Company of Montana, the Saint Paul & Northern Pacific Railway, the Sanborn, Cooperstown & Turtle Mountain Railway, the Seattle & International Railway, the Seattle & San Francisco Railway and Navigation Company, the Seattle, Lake Shore & Eastern Railway, the Shields River Valley Railway, the South Eastern Dakota RailRoad, the Spokane & Palouse Railway, the Spokane & Seattle Railway, the Spokane Falls & Idaho RailRoad, the St. Cloud, Grantsburg & Ashland RailRoad, the Stillwater & St. Paul RailRoad, the Tacoma, Orting & Southeastern RailRoad, the Taylors Falls & Lake Superior RailRoad, the Topenish, Simcoe & Western Railway, the Union Depot & Transfer Company of Stillwater, the United RailRoads of Washington, the Virginia Land & Town-Site Company, the Walla Walla Valley Traction Company, the Washington & Oregon Railway, the Washington Central Railway, the Western Dakota Railway, the Western RailRoad, and the Winnipeg Transfer Railway. The railroad operated until 1970, and was initially succeeded by the Burlington Northern RailRoad and ultimately was succeeded by the Burlington Northern Santa Fe RailRoad. [See note on Thomas Fletcher Oakes for 432 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Jule M. Hannaford for 405 Portland Avenue.] [See note on the Northern Pacific RailRoad for 432 Summit Avenue.]

Northern Plains RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1997, reportedly considered itself a continuation of the Soo Line RailRoad's "Wheat Line" division, leased 388 miles of track in North Dakota and Minnesota from the Canadian Pacific RailRoad, operated 484 total miles of track, interchanged with the Canadian Pacific RailRoad at Kenmare, North Dakota, and at Thief River Falls, Minnesota, the Minnesota Northern RailRoad at Thief River Falls, Minnesota, and the BNSF RailRoad at Ardoch, North Dakota, employed 43 people in 2006, and operated 25 locomotives in 2006. Gregg Haug was the president of the railroad in 2009. Larry Jamieson was the president of the railroad and the chief operating officer of the railroad after 2009. The railroad’s general office was in Fordville, North Dakota.

Northern RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in 1877 by Benjamin P. Cheney, William Fargo, Lauren P. Hilliard, Jacob H. Stewart, and Charles B. Wright, to build and operate a railway line from a point along the Northern Pacific RailRoad in Becker County, Minnesota, or Clay County, Minnesota, to a point at or near the intersection of the Red River of the North with the boundary line with the British possessions in Canada, with a principal place of business at St. Paul, and with capital stock of $2,000,000.

Northern RailRoad Terminal Company/Northern RailRoad & Terminal Company was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1886 by F. D. Hager, George B. Harris, N. B. Hinckley, William H. Lightner, and Charles C. Upham to build one or more railways from the terminus of the Chicago, Burlington & Northern RailRoad in St. Paul westerly to Minneapolis and to acquire and operate terminals in each city. It had initial capital stock of $100,000 and its principal place of business was St. Paul. [See note on William Hurley Lightner for 318 Summit Avenue.]

Northfield, Kasota & Western RailRoad was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1885 by R. Butler, George L. Cheadle, Alex. R. Eckert, Joel P. Heathwole, W. P. Henderson, A. B. Kelley, N. B. Lampmann, Philip Plaisance, C. A. Remillard, Jacob Vrenik, Soloman S. Whipps, and F. D. Woodbury to build one or more railways from Northfield, Rice County, Minnesota, to Kasota, Le Sueur County, Minnesota, and then to some point on the western boundary of Minnesota. It had initial capital stock of $1,000,000 and its principal place of business was Northfield, Rice County, Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1886.

Northshore Mining RailRoad: The railway, a 47-mile long company owned railroad, runs between the mine in Babbit, Minnesota, on the northeastern end of the Mesabi iron formation, and the taconite plant in Silver Bay, Minnesota. The company originally was Reserve Mining, then was Cyprus NorthShore, and is now Cliff NorthShore, owned by Cleveland Cliffs. The railway operates four trains per 24 hour period. The rail line was built in 1955.

North Shore Scenic RailRoad: Donald Shank, former General Manager and Vice President of the Duluth, Mesabi & Iron Range Railway, began the North Shore Scenic Railroad in 1990, and operated the railroad for one season, using both St. Louis County funding, and private funding. The Goldfines took over operation of the railroad in 1991 as a for-profit entity, using purchased equipment, for five seasons. The Lake Superior Railroad Museum assumed operation of the North Shore Scenic Railroad in 1996, operating it with of volunteers and a fleet of historic museum equipment. The railroad operates excursions along the historic Lakefront Line, a 26-mile section of rail between Duluth, Minnesota, and Two Harbors, Minnesota. The Lakefront Line was first built in 1886 as the Lake Division of the Duluth & Iron Range Railway. In 1887, the Duluth & Iron Range Railway and the St. Paul & Duluth Railway jointly operated 15 daily trains between downtown Duluth, Minnesota, and Lester Park, Minnesota, but the suburban rail service was discontinued in 1892 when the Duluth Street Railway began operation. In 1953, passenger trains pulled by steam locomotives were replaced by a self-propelled diesel Budd Car, which handled the ever-diminishing passenger traffic until 1961, when all passenger service was discontinued. In the early 1980's, a sharp decline in business prompted the successor Duluth, Mesabi & Iron Range RailRroad to apply to the Interstate Commerce Commission for permission to abandon the Lakefront Line and the Lake Superior Railroad Museum lobbied successfully for the creation of the St. Louis & Lake Counties Regional Railroad Authority, which purchased the 27 mile railroad with a substantial monetary grant from the State of Minnesota.

Northwestern Coal RailRoad Company: The railroad company was incorporated under Wisconsin law in 1892, was a subsidiary of the Northwestern Fuel Company, was intended to construct a 12 mile rail line from the Nemadji River, Wisconsin, to the St. Louis River on the Minnesota-Wisconsin border, was located in Douglas County, Wisconsin, purchased the property of the Superior Belt Line & Terminal Railway Company in 1894, was part of the acquisitions that made up the Pittsburg Coal Company, which was formed in 1899, and owned eight miles of rail trackage in 1917. Ether Leonard Shepley (1862- ,) the son of Leonard Downes and Frances Ellen Chase Shepley, was born in Portland, Maine, was educated in public schools of Portland, Maine, attended St. Augustine Academy in Portland, Maine, was employed by E. D. Bangs & Company, brokers, in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1879; came to St. Paul in 1886, married Sophia Perin, occupied various positions in the National German American Bank until 1891, entered the employ of the Northwestern Fuel Company as assistant treasurer from 1891 until 1896, was the secretary, the treasurer, and a member of the board of directors of the Northwestern Coal Railway Company from 1893 until 1901, was the president St. Paul Credit Men's Association, was a member of the Minnesota Club, was a member of the Town and Country Club, resided at 12 Swmmit Court in St. Paul, and was the first vice president of the Northwestern Fuel Company after 1905. The railroad company was acquired by the Great Northern RailRoad in 1954.

Northwestern Construction Company: The railroad was authorized by the Minnesota Legislature shortly after statehood in 1857, was incorporated in 1870 by William W. Eastman, D. Morrison, William D. Washburn, and others to build railways, telegraphs, steamboats, and ferries, had capital stock of $120,000, and became organized in 1870.

Northwestern, Minnesota & Red River Valley RailRoad was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1883 by New Yorkers George H. Cook, E. J. Fallon, Jesse Larabee, A. B. Paine, S. G. Primrose, Edgar Smith, George McC. Taylor, A. C. Tully, and A. C. Wall to build a railway from Brainerd, Minnesota, or from a point between Brainerd, Minnesota, and the crossing of the Crow Wing River by the Northern Pacific RailRoad Northwesterly to a point along the Northern boundary of the State between the Red River of the North and the Lake of the Woods. It had initial capital stock of $5,000,000 and its principal place of business was St. Paul. The railroad was organized in 1883. In 1883, the member of the board of directors of the railroad were William E. Cook, E. J. Fallon, A. B. Paine, George McC. Taylor, S. G. Primrose, Edgar Smith, and A. C. Tully, and the officers of the railroad were Edgar Smith, president, E. J. Fallon, vice president, A. C. Tully, secretary, and William E. Cook, treasurer.

North Wisconsin RailRoad: In 1875, the railroad operated a rail line from St. Paul to Richmond, Wisconsin, by way of Hudson, Wisconsin, where it connected with the West Wisconsin Railway, and employed William G. Swan as its general superintendent.

Oliver Iron Mining Company RailRoad: Henry Oliver, who started out as a railroad man, formed the Oliver Iron Mining Company in 1890, leased ore properties owned by John D. Rockefeller and the Hull-Rust Mine in 1892, became controlled by the United States Steel Corporation in 1901, became known as the Oliver Iron Mining Division of the United States Steel Corporation in 1952, and was wholly absorbed into the United States Steel Corporation in 1963. Ownership of the Soudan Underground Mine on the Vermilion Range in Tower, Minnesota, opened in 1884, passed to the Oliver Iron Mining Division of U.S. Steel Corporation in 1901. Initially, the Oliver Iron Mining Company relied on the Duluth, Missabe & Northern RailRoad to transport ore, augmented by a narrow gauge railway within the mine. The Oliver Iron Mining Company favored rail transportation, especially in the Hull-Rust-Mahoning, Monroe Group, Sherman Group, Coleraine and Rouchleau mines. The Hull-Rust-Mahoning Mine alone had 70 miles of mine rail trackage. Susequently the Oliver Iron Mining Company utilized Duluth, Missabe & Iron Range RailRoad to transport its ore. William James Olcott (1862-1935) was the president of the Oliver Iron Mining Company from 1909 to 1928 and was the president of the Duluth, Missabe and Iron Range Railway from 1901 to 1909. By 1909, the Oliver Mining Company operated rail lines to serve its mines in the Canisteo Mining District of the Western Missabe Range, transported ore to its concentrating operation at the Trout Lake Washing Plant, and had rail shops in Coleraine, Minnesota, to support its railroad. By 1927, the Oliver Iron Mining Company RailRoad had obtained 252 steam locomotives. By 1976, the railroad had obtained 127 diesel locomotives.

Omaha, St. Paul & White Bear RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1894. The railroad had $50,000 in capital stock and had its principal place of business in St. Paul.

O'Neal Brothers RailRoad: The railroad was owned by the O'Neal Brothers, contract loggers from Stillwater, Minnesota, and worked for the Laird-Norton Company of Winona, Minnesota. The railway was built between the log landing at Knife River, Minnesota, to a point 34 miles north of Mora, Minnesota. The railroad operated 27 miles of rail trackage, owned two rod locomotives, and owned 40 logging rail cars. The railroad operated between 1889 and 1898. It supplied logs that were eventually floated by various rivers to Winona, Minnesota. The rails owned by the railroad were eventually purchased by the Nebagamon Lumber Company of Wisconsin, owned by Frederick Weyerhaeuser. [See note on Frederick Weyerhaeuser for 266 Summit Avenue.]

Ontario & Rainy River RailRoad: The railroad was organized by William Mackenzie and Donald Mann before 1900, operated until 1903, and was succeeded by the Canadian Northern RailRoad. The Canadian charter of the Ontario & Rainy River Railway allowed it to build in northwestern Ontario towards the Superior Lakehead. The railway ran from Port Arthur, Ontario, Southwesterly to a point within 20 miles of the Minnesota boundary, thence Westerly to Rainy Lake, then to Fort Francis, Ontario, and proceeded down the Rainy River valley to connect with the Winnipeg & Southeastern RailRoad. In 1892, the railroad acquired running rights over the rail line of the Port Arthur, Duluth & Western RailRoad. In 1899, the railroad received a $886,000 subsidy from the Dominion government, including a prohibition on any amalgamation with thr Canadian Pacific RailRoad.

Ortonville & Lake Superior RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1885 and was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1885 by Charles E. Brooks, Bernhard Dassel, Thomas M. Grant, Leslie McLane, and Cornelius K. Orton to build a double track railway from Ortonville, Big Stone County, Minnesota, NorthEastwardly to some point on Lake Superior. It had initial capital stock of $1,000,000 and its principal place of business was Ortonville, Minnesota. The members of the initial board of directors in 1885 were Charles E. Brooks, Leslie C. Lane, Thomas M. Grant, and Bernard Dassel.

Ortonville & Southern RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1888 to construct and operate a line of railroad from Ortonville, Minnesota in a southerly direction to the Iowa border in Nobles County, Minnesota. The incorporators of the railroad in 1893 were William Van Eps, A. D. La Due, C. E. Brooks, C. E. Dinehart, Thomas M. Grant, C. H. S. Lange, Jay Henry Long, G. A. Moore, T. M. Moore, and R. Norrish. Its initial capital stock was $3,000,000. Its principal place of business was Ortonville, Minnesota. Work on the railroad was expected to begin in 1894.

Osceola & St. Croix Valley RailRoad: The railroad was organized in the late 1990's. The Osceola & St. Croix Valley Railway is located in Osceola, Wisconsin, and crosses the St. Croix River on the Cedar Bend Draw Bridge through William O’Brien State Park and on to Marine on the St. Croix, Minnesota. The railroad is operated by the Minnesota Transportation Museum.

Otter Tail Valley RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1986. The Ottertail Valley Railroad is a Rail America line that runs South out of Moorhead, Minnesota, and serves northwestern Minnesota. The railroad operates 81 miles of track in west central Minnesota between its connection with the BNSF Railway at Dilworth Yard, Moorhead, Minnesota, and Fergus Falls, Minnesota, and with branch lines from Fergus Falls, Minnesota, to French, Minnesota, and to Hoot Lake, Minnesota. James Bonner is the railroad's assistant general manager.

Owatonna & State Line RailRoad/Owatonna State Line RailRoad: The railroad was authorized by the State of Minnesota shortly after statehood in 1857. The railroad was incorporated in 1867 by Augustus Armstrong, A. Chambers, J. F. Jones, and others to build and operate a railway from Owatonna, Minnesota, by way of Geneva, Minnesota, and Albert Lea, Minnesota, to the Southern boundary in Freeborn County, Minnesota. The Legislature permitted the Freeborn County board to issue $100,000 in county bonds to support the railroad under Special Laws of Minnesota 1868, Chapter 108, subject to voter approval. The railroad was organized in 1871 and had capital stock of $200,000.

J. M. Paine & Company RailRoad The company railroad owned one Shay geared steam locomotive. The railroad was located at Carlton, Minnesota. In 1880, James Paine, McNair & Company built a water-powered mill in Cloquet, Minnesota. In 1886, J. M. Paine & Company built the first logging railroad in Minnesota, connecting the Paine mill at the Northern Pacific Junction, now Carlton, Minnesota, with its pine stands five or ten miles distant in Silver Brook Township, Minnesota. In 1887, the J. M. Paine & Company had one locomotive, "Lizzie," and nine rail cars and, in 1888, the J. M. Paine & Company had three locomotives and 25 logging cars. The Poor's Directory of RailRoad Officials, published by the Poor's RailRoad Manual Company in 1898, indicates that the officials of the company were J. M. Paine, president, and Asa Paine, secretary and treasurer, that the railroad was located in Canton (Carlton) County, Minnesota, that the railroad officed at N. P. Junction, Minnesota, and that the railroad operated ten miles of rail trackage, and that the railroad owned three locomotives and 25 rail cars. There also was a J. M. Paine Memorial Presbyterian Church in Carlton, Minnesota.

Park Point RailRoad, Dock & Elevator Company: The railroad was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1885 and had its principal place of business in Duluth, Minnesota.

Park Point Street Railway Company: The railroad was being organized in 1889 by R. W. Petre and apparently had this name.

Park Point Terminal & Transfer RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1887 by John B. Atwater, Henry H. Bell, R. P. Edson, R. H. Hartley, John J. Hibbard, R. H. Palmer, R. W. Petre, Bernard Silberstein, Stephen Van Wyck, and Wallace Warner. The general office of the railroad was in Duluth, Minnesota.

Park Point Traction Company: The railroad was a real estate promotion railroad in Duluth, Minnesota, was incorporated in Maine in 1913, had $50,000 in capital stock, had as its initial officers R. S. Buzzell, president, and L. J. Coleman, treasurer, and began operation in 1914. The McGraw electric railway manual: the red book of American street railway, published in 1914, indicates that the railroad operated seven miles of electrified rail trackage from the Aerial Bridge to the Duluth Boat Club, owned seven motor cars, owned seven other cars, owned one snow plow, had as its officers Robert R. Dunn, president, J. B. Crane, vice president, secretary, and general manager, Oscar Mitchell, treasurer, had its repair facilities on Park Point, and had its general office in Duluth, Minnesota. The railroad equipped a 1907 open rail car purchased by the City of Duluth, Minnesota, as a piece of firefighting apparatus for any fires on the narrow Park Point spit of land, picking up volunteer firefighters as it traveled to the fire. The railroad was purchased by the Duluth Street Railway Company for $145,475 in 1917. Robert R. Dunn was the president of the railroad and owned a controlling interest in the railroad in 1917. The power plant of the former company was relegated to reserve and emergency duty when the Duluth Street Railway Company was granted permission to string an electric feed cable across the Aerial Bridge over the Duluth Ship Canal in 1917.

Park Rapids & Leech Lake RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated by Great Northern RailRoad interests in 1897, was organized in 1897, built a 49-mile rail line from Park Rapids, Minnesota, to Cass Lake, Minnesota, and had its properties acquired in 1899 by the Eastern Railway Company of Minnesota. According to Poor's Manual of the RailRoads of the United States, Volume 33 by Henry Varnum Poor in 1901, as of 1899, the railroad was chartered in 1897, was leased by the Great Northern RailRoad, operated 53.11 miles of rail trackage from Park Rapids, Minnesota, to Cass Lake, Minnesota, began operation in 1899, had as its officers Louis W. Hill, president, M. D. Grover, vice president, E. Sawyer, secretary and treasurer, R. I. Farrington, comptroller, and had its general office in St. Paul. In 1904, the officers of the railroad were Louis W. Hill, president, M. D. Grover, first vice president and general counsel, E. Sawyer, secretary-treasurer, R. A. Wilkinson, general solicitor, and John G. Drew, and the members of the board of directors were R. I. Farrington, M. D. Grover, Louis W. Hill, H. H. Parkhouse, and E. Sawyer. In 1904, the railroad had capital stock of $500,000, owned 249 boxcars which were leased to the Great Northern RailRoad, owned four bridges, owned eight trestles, and owned 49.04 miles of track. In 1897, the Park Rapids & Leech Lake Railroad was constructed between Park Rapids, Minnesota, Walker, Minnesota, and Cass Lake, Minnesota, and, in 1899, was leased to the Great Northern RailRoad. In 1898, the railroad built the first bridge over the Steamboat River, an outlet from Steamboat Lake, Minnesota, which was replaced by a center pier turntable bridge built by the Great Northern RailRoad in 1914. The Park Rapids & Leech Lake Railway Company extended the Great Northern East from Park Rapids, Minnesota, to Cass Lake, Minnesota, in 1899. The railroad continued to operate until 1907, when it was sold to the Great Northern RailRoad, and was succeeded by the Great Northern RailRoad. The corporation was dissolved in 1928. (The railroad bed for the former rail line from Park Rapids, Minnesota, to Cass Lake, Minnesota, is now the Heartland State Trail.) [See note on Louis Warren Hill for 260 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Edward Sawyer for 461 Holly Avenue.] [See note on Robert I. Farrington, Thayer B. Farrington, and John D. Farrington for 457-459 Portland Avenue.]

Parker Railway/Parker Street RailRoad/C. N. Parker’s Street RailRoad: The railroad apparently was a street railroad in Brainerd, Minnesota, in or shortly after 1877.

Pelican Valley RailRoad: The railroad was organized before 1882, was operated as a branch of the Northern Pacific, Fergus Falls & Black Hills Railway, extended from Fergus Falls, Minnesota, up the Pelican Valley to Pelican Rapids, Minnesota, and received State railway bond proceeds. The railroad was transferred from the Northern Pacific, Fergus Falls & Black Hills RailRoad to the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba RailRoad in 1882.

Pine Tree Manufacturing Company: The company succeeded the Pine Tree Lumber Company and was a contracting company in the mining and logging businesses. The company owned two Shay geared steam locomotives, with one locomotive located at Remer, Minnesota, and the other located at McGregor, Minnesota. The Musser Mine in Crow Wing County, Minnesota, was sold to the company. The Pine Tree Lumber Company was organized in Little Falls, Minnesota, in 1891 by Richard Drew Musser (1865-1958) and Charles A. Weyerhaeuser. In 1909, it became the Pine Tree Manufacturing Company. The board of the company included representatives from the Weyerhaeuser, Laird, Norton, Denkmann, and other lumber interests. The company operated on land acquired from the Northern Pacific RailRoad in the Upper Mississippi pine lands of north central Minnesota.

Plainview Narrow Gauge RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1877 by John Bigham, William Clark, E. R. Corwell, F. J. Cornwell, E. B. Eddy, A. Y. Felton, A. P. Foster, L. M. Gregg, H. S. Kellom, C. O. Landon, William Lawton, James McHench, J. R. McLaughlin, Levi Sixton, and N. S. Tefft, to build and operate a railway line from Plainview, Minnesota, Northeasterly by way of East Indian Creek Village to a point of intersection with the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad or to the Mississippi River at an accessible point within Wabasha County, with capital stock of $65,000, with a principal place of business at Plainview, Minnesota, and was organized in 1878. The railroad operated a 15.01 mile rail line from Eyota, Minnesota, to Plainview, Minnesota, in 1878. The railroad was succeeded by the Winona & St. Peter RailRoad by purchase in 1881.

Plainview RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1878 and was organized in 1878. In 1880, the officers of the railroad were M. Hughitt, vice president, J. B. Redfield, secretary, and M. M. Kirkman, treasurer, and the members of the board of directors were M. Hughitt, Albert Keep, J. B. Redfield, G. W. Van Dusen, and H. P. Wilson. In 1880, the railroad had capital stock of $125,200. The railroad operated until 1881 and was purchased by the Winona & St. Peter RailRoad in 1881.

Plainview & Zumbro Valley RailRoad Company: The railroad was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1876.

Polymet Mining RailRoad: Cleveland-Cliffs Inc. agreed in 2006 to sell a portion of the former Erie Mining Company/LTV Steel Mining taconite plant at Hoyt Lakes, Minnesota, to PolyMet Mining Corporation for development of Minnesota's first commercial base and precious metals mine. Under the agreement, PolyMet Mining acquired a 120-car rail fleet, locomotive fueling and maintenance facilities, water rights, pipelines, administrative offices and 6,000 acres of property near a tailings basin at the former taconite plant near Hoyt Lakes. PolyMet leases the locomotives for use on the 72 mile former Erie Mining Company/LTV Steel Mining rail line from Hoyt Lakes, Minnesota, to Taconite Harbor, Minnesota. Cleveland-Cliffs owns 9.2 million shares of PolyMet stock, or 7.8 percent of the company.

Port Arthur, Duluth & SouthWestern RailRoad: The railroad was under construction in 1888 and connected to Duluth, Minnesota.

Port Arthur, Duluth & Western RailRoad: The railroad was the successor to the Thunder Bay Colonization Railway, incorporated by Ontario Provincial Charter in 1883 by Thomas Marks, D.F. Burk, and James Conmee. The corporate name was changed to the Port Arthur, Duluth & Western Railway by Ontario Provincial statute in 1887. In 1888, Thomas Marks was the president of the railroad. Construction commenced in 1889 and, by 1892, the railway had reached its Canadian terminus at Gunflint Lake, Ontario, Canada. In 1891, the railroad owned two locomotives, two box cars, and 45 flat rail cars. In 1892, the Port Arthur, Duluth & Western Railway was built 91.5 miles to the boundary at Gunflint Lake, Ontario, Canada, with a plan to tap the Gunflint Iron Range along the lake shore in Ontario, Canada, and across the boundary in Minnesota, with plans for an additional 25 mile rail line extension to Ely, Minnesota. The Gunflint Lake Iron Company was organized in 1892 in Minnesota by O. D. Kinney, Kristian Kortgaard and John Paulson, owned lands six miles across the Ontario, Canada-Minnesota boundary, and signed a contract for one million tons of iron ore to be shipped to the Port Arthur and Fort William, Onatario, Canada, over ten years. A marine railroad also was built in 1891-1892, during the construction of the Port Arthur, Duluth & Western RailRoad, to move boats loaded with supplies around the river separating Little North Lake from Little Gunflint Lake. Boats would be driven onto a small trolley under the water and then manually winched over the rails by a capstan. The Port Arthur, Duluth & Western RailRoad of Minnesota was built in 1892 as the United States extension of the Canadian Port Arthur, Duluth & Western RailRoad that terminated at Gunflint Narrows, Ontario. The Minnesota railway was built specifically to access the iron at the Paulson Mine, and was intended to be extended to reach the terminus of the Duluth & Iron Range RailRoad at Ely, Minnesota. In 1893, the officers of the railroad were W. R. Brock, president, D. F. Burke, vice president, A. J. McComber, secretary, T. A. Gorham, general attorney, and R. A. Hazlewood, chief engineer. The line was damaged by fires in 1894 and was never repaired. A six-mile branch, the Port Arthur, Duluth & Western RailRoad of Minnesota, incorporated in 1892, was constructed across the Ontario-Minnesota border to the Gunflint Lake, Minnesota, iron mine. The engineering was very difficult as the 5.75 mile line had to climb, through the use of a number of switchbacks, nearly 250 feet in elevation in that short distance. By 1893, the mine closed after a fall in the price of iron ore associated with the Panic of 1893 and the discovery of more profitably mined ore elsewhere in Minnesota caused the Gunflint Company to collapse. In 1893, the officers of the railroad were W. R. Brock, president, D. F. Burk, vice-president and general manager, A. J. McComber, secretary and treasurer, and Ross Thompson, superintendent, and the members of the board of directors were C. C. Abbott, David Blain, W. R. Brock, D. F. Burk, George Clavet, M. Dwyer, A. B. Lee, Jr., Peter McKellar, and Ross Thompson. In 1895, the railroad owned four locomotives, two first class passenger cars, four second class passenger cars, two baggage, mail & express cars, ten box cars, and 85 flat rail cars. By virtue of its perpetual bad luck and its failures to hold to a schedule, the railroad was dubbed the "Poverty, Agony, Distress and Want" railway. In 1893, the officers of the railroad were W. R. Brock, president, Ross Thompson, secretary, treasurer, and superintendent, and D.B. Hanna, general manager, and the members of the board of directors were J. Aird, A. B. Barker, W. R. Brock, A. E. Hoskin, R. Jaffray, A. D. Langmuir, A. B. Lee, Jr., A. B. Lee, Sr., and E. A. Meredith. In 1898, the railroad owned four locomotives, two passenger cars, two baggage, mail & passenger car, four vans, ten box cars, 80 flat rail cars, one flange rail car, one snow plow, six hand cars, and two velocipedes. By 1898, the railway was bankrupt and was purchased by Canadian Northern Railway. In 1899, the Ontario & Rainy River RailRoad was authorized to acquire the holdings of the railroad. In 1901, the railroad became the Canadian Northern Railway-Duluth Extension. A large forest fire destroyed a 1,000 foot trestle West of Mackies, Ontario, Canada, on North Lake, Ontario, Canada, in 1909, which severed the rail line to Gunflint Lake, Minnesota, and to the United States. In 1920, the troubled Canadian Northern RailRoad became nationalized under the name of the Canadian National Railways. In 1938, the "Pee-Dee" line was abandoned and its rails were removed in 1939. The railroad owned a total of six steam locomotives and operated 91.25 miles of track. There is a cross that is a memorial to Joseph Montegen, who was killed while working on the Port Arthur, Duluth & Western Railway on Oct 8, 1892. The cross is located at N48 06.278 W90 44.408 on the Canadian side of Gunflint Lake.

Port Arthur & Western RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1893, operated in Western Ontario, Canada, until 1900, and was succeeded by the Ontario & Rainy River RailRoad.

Powers & Simpson Logging Company: The logging company operated a 22 mile rail system in the Western Mesabi Iron Range, the Duluth, Missabe & Western RailRoad .

Preston & Southwestern RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in 1874 by H. A. Billings, William W. Fife, William P. Gonkey, A. Howell, J. P. Tibbetts, A. Weiser, H. R. Wells, and C. A. Wheeler to build and operate railways and telegraphs from Preston, Fillmore County, Minnesota, to its intersection with the Southern Minnesota RailRoad and with branch lines to the East boundary of Fillmore County, Minnesota, and to the North boundary of Fillmore County, Minnesota. It had initial capital stock of $100,000 and its principal place of business was Preston, Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1876.

Princeton & Anoka RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1877. The railroad was organized in 1878. A preliminary survey for the railroad was completed in 1878. In 1878, Mille Lacs County voters approved $68,000 in aid for the railroad. In 1878, state legislation was enacted to legalize the organization of the railroad and to convey the State interest on some lands to support the railroad. State legislation extending the time for the building of the railroad passed the Minnesota House of Representatives in 1883.

Progressive Rail: The railroad was organized in 1996. Progressive Rail, headquartered in Lakeville, Minnesota, operates 156 miles of track serving 16 communities. It operates the Cannon Valley line, from Northfield East to Randolph, Minnesota, and Cannon Falls Minnesota, and South to Faribault, Minnesota, the Dan Patch line, from from Auto Club Junction in Bloomington, Minnesota, to Minneapolis, the Eagandale line, from Eagan, Minnesota, to Rosemount, Minnesota, and the Jesse James line, from Northfield, Minnesota, to Lakeville, Minnesota. Progressive Rail’s Wisconsin Northern Division operates from Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin, to Rice Lake, Wisconsin, and Barron, Wisconsin. Its Central Midland RailRoad division runs from Union, Missouri, northeasterly to St. Louis, Missouri. The officers of the railroad are Dave Fellon, president, Duane Jenkins, customer service vice president, Jeff Gillman, carload connection vice president, Doug Whiteley, chief financial officer, and Lon Van Gemert, chief operating officer.

Railway Transfer Company of the City of Minneapolis was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1883 by Joseph Haskell, John A. Hawley, Eben Ryder, James D. Springer, and William H. Truesdale to build a system of railway transfer tracks between different railroads in and about the City of Minneapolis. It had initial capital stock of $300,000 and its principal place of business was Minneapolis. The railroad was organized in 1886. According to Poor's Manual of the RailRoads of the United States, Volume 33 by Henry Varnum Poor in 1901, as of 1899, the railroad operated 8.8 miles of rail trackage, did the switching business for the Minneapolis flour mills and other industries, was owned by the Minneapolis & St. Louis RailRoad, had as its officers A. E. Clarke, president, L. F. Day, vice president and general manager, Joseph Gaskell, secretary and treasurer, and J. A. Moynihan, superintendent, had as its board of directors A. E. Clarke, L. F. Day, Joseph Gaskell, H. G. Kelly, and F. Nay, and had its general office in Minneapolis. In 1904, the officers of the railroad were A. E. Clarke, president, L. F. Day, first vice president and general manager, Joseph Gaskell, secretary-treasurer, and L. O. Merriam, accountant, the members of the board of directors of the railroad were A. E. Clarke, L. F. Day, Joseph Gaskell, H. G. Kelley, and L. G. Scott, does rail car switching for the railroads entering Minneapolis and the Minneapolis flour mills, and the railroad was owned by the Minneapolis & St. Louis RailRoad. In 1904, the railroad owned four switching locomotives, operated 8.8 miles of track, and had 57 employees, all in Minnesota. Poor's Directory of RailRoad Officials, published by the Poor's RailRoad Manual Company in 1905, indicates that the officers of the railroad were A. E. Clarke, president, L. F. Day, vice president and general manager, Joseph Gaskell, secretary and treasurer, and J. A. Moynihan, superintendent. In 1913, the railroad had as its officers Newman Erb, president, C. W. Huntington, vice president, A. E. Smith, secretary, W. W. Cole, treasurer, and J. A. Moynihan, general superintendent, had as its board of directors W. H. Bremner, F. H. Davis, Newman Erb, C. W. Huntington, and A. E. Smith, had total capital stock of $300,000, had 8.80 miles of track in Minnesota, had four locomotives, and had 59 total employees. In 1917, the railroad leased five switching locomotives from the Minneapolis & St. Louis RailRoad, which controlled the railroad. The railroad operated until 1984 and was succeeded by the Chicago NorthWestern RailRoad.

Rainy Lake River & Southwestern RailRoad was incorporated in 1886 by V. A. Bigelow, Elbert E. Buckingham, E. Clark, William Crooks, Francis M. Egbert, Charles Franz, James H. A. Grinder, Alfred Harrison, Lafe Holmes, Samuel Y. Hyde, George J. Johnson, Abram H. Looney, Martin T. Moore, Nathan Myrick, John P. Richmond, Henry A. Salzer, and F. S. Walker to build a railway from a point on the west bank of the Rainy Lake River in Beltrami County, Minnesota, southwesterly to Bismarck, Dakota Territory. It had initial capital stock of $500,000 and its principal place of business was La Crescent, Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1886. [See note for William Crooks for 57 Wilkin Street.] [See note on Nathan Myrick for 103-105 Wilkin Street.]

Ramsey County Gravity RailRoad was incorporated in 1884 for 14 years by George Crawford, George L. Holt, A. W. Lebron, C. F. Muscrove, Louis A. Roth, and W. L. Woodburn to construct, operate and maintain railways in St. Paul and in White Bear Lake, Minnesota. In 1884, the railroad erected a roller coaster/gravity railroad at the corner of 13th Street and Cedar Street, on the old ice skating rink grounds. The railroad had initial capital stock of $9,000 and its principal place of business was St. Paul. The railroad was organized in 1884.

Rapid City, Missouri River & St. Paul RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in 1891 or 1901 under South Dakota law to build and operate a 500 mile rail line from Rapid City, South Dakota, to St. Paul. The railroad was succeeded, by franchise purchase, by the Pierre, Rapid City & Northwestern RailRoad, part of the Chicago & NorthWestern RailRoad system, in 1905.

Red Lake Transportation Company: The railroad was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1897 and was organized in 1899. The Red Lake line was initially a logging railroad with a main line of about nine miles between Nebish, Minnesota, and Redby, Minnesota. In 1896-1897, Arpin Brothers had the contract for getting timber out of the Nebish area of Minnesota to Red Lake, Minnesota. The Arpin Brothers, from Arpin, Wisconsin, had a contract from the St. Hilaire Lumber Company. The difficulty in driving logs on the Mud River and the distance of the available timber stands from the rivers that could be used gave the St. Hilaire Lumber Company the idea of building a railroad across the Red Lake Indian Reservation to Red Lake, Minnesota, to bring out the logs. In 1897, when the federal Department of Interior granted permission to the St. Hilaire Lumber Company of Minneapolis to construct a temporary railroad for transporting timber to market from a point about two miles east of the township line of Township 153, Range 33 on the south boundary of the Red Lake Indian Reservation Northward a distance of eight miles to the shore of Red Lake. The railroad was constructed by the firm of Halvorson & Richards, the contractors for the Chicago River Drainage Canal between Lake Michigan and the Des Plaines River. The St. Hilaire Lumber Company became the Crookston Lumber Company. According to Poor's Manual of the RailRoads of the United States, Volume 33 by Henry Varnum Poor in 1901, as of 1899, the railroad operated 12 miles of rail trackage, from Red Lake, Minnesota, to Nebish, Minnesota, had capital stock of $100,000, owned two locomotives, owned one flat freight car, owned 30 road cars, and owned one caboose, had as its officers C. H. Richards, president and treasurer, H. K. Halvorson, vice president, A. Knudson, secretary, and G. A. Westman, superintendent, had as its board of directors C. F. Carlson, H. K. Halvorson, A. Knudson, William Lundeen, and C. H. Richards, and had its general office in Minneapolis. Red Lake Transportation Company Locomotive #1 was a Baldwin Vauclain Compound Fourney engine and was purchased from the Chicago South Side Elevated RailRoad. The Red Lake Transportation Company also owned two steamboats, the sternwheeler Chippewa and the sidewheeler Beltrami. In 1902, fire totally destroyed the entire plant of the Red Lake Transportation Company, including its round house and machine shops. Red Lake Transportation Company Locomotive #3 was a Porter Mogul engine. The railroad was put into receivorship in 1903. Walter G. Marson was the receivership trustee in 1904. In 1904, the railroad owned two locomotives, 48 freight cars, owned one company service car, had 12 employees, and had 12.50 total miles of railway trackage, all in Minnesota. Redby, Minnesota, was not platted until 1904. The railroad operated until 1905, and was succeeded by the Minneapolis, Red Lake & Manitoba RailRoad in 1904.

Red Lake & Western Railway & Navigation Company: In 1890, the railroad was granted authority to purchase an easement to cross the Red Lake Indian Reservation. Frank Ives (1831-1918) was the president of the railroad in 1890. Frank Ives was a judge in Crookston, Minnesota, the county seat of Polk County, was a commissioner of the federal circuit court, settled in Cass Lake, Minnesota, in 1899, and founded the Cass Lake Times, and his son, Harry Ives, was the postmaster when the St. Hilaire, Minnesota, post office began in 1882 while still part of Polk County and was also the publisher of the St. Hilaire Spectator. Frank Ives owned land in St. Hilaire, Minnesota, once in Polk County, Minnesota, and subsequently part of Pennington, County, Minnesota, but never lived there.

Red River & Lake of the Woods RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in 1882 by J. B. Copeland, Q. F. Copeland, Frank Ives, W. J. Ives, and Arthur Yvernault, to construct a rail line from the Red River of the North in Polk County, Minnesota, through Polk County, Minnesota, Marshall County, Minnesota, Kittson County, Minnesota, and Beltrami County, Minnesota, to Lake of the Woods, Polk County, Minnesota, had $2,500,000 in capital stock, and had its general office in Crookston, Minnesota. The railroad was was organized in 1882, operated until 1883, was initially succeeded by the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba RailRoad, and was ultimately succeeded by the Great Northern RailRoad. In 1882, the railroad ran 21.46 miles from Shirley, Polk County, Minnesota, on the Minnesota border, to St. Hilaire, Polk County, Minnesota, at Red Lake Falls. The railroad was formed to be a spur for the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba RailRoad. In 1883, the officers of the railroad were Frank Ives, president, J. J. Hill, vice president, and E. Sawyer, secretary and treasurer. [See note for Frank Ives for the Red Lake & Western Railway & Navigation Company.] [See note on James Jerome Hill for 240 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Edward Sawyer for 461 Holly Avenue.]

Red River Lumber Company RailRoad: In 1901 the Red River Lumber Company constructed a logging railroad off the Great Northern RailRoad at Wheelock,Minnesota, a small station about three miles west of Solway, Minnesota. A Guthrie & Company built a rail line for the company South from Solway, Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1904 and operated until 1918. The Red River Lumber Company was established by Thomas Barlow Walker. The Red River Lumber Company was born in the vast pine forests of Minnesota, and for several years it operated a large sawmill in the town of Akeley, Minnesota. The company began moving to northeastern California in 1912.

Red River & Manitoba RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in 1877 by John S. Barnes, Samuel S. Beals, William H. Fisher, John S. Kennedy, and Walter G. Oakman, to build and operate a railway line from a point near or at Breckenridge, Minnesota, to a point near or at St. Vincent, Minnesota, with its principal place of business at St. Paul, with capital stock of $500,000, and was organized in 1877. In 1877, the railroad had a railway line that was 33.5 miles long, from Breckenridge, Minnesota to the St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad 12 miles South of Glyndon, Minnesota, with stations at Breckenridge, Minnesota, Mauston, Minnesota, and Barnesville, Minnesota, had as its officers J. P. Farley, general manager, and W. H. Fisher, superintnendent, and had as its board of directors John S. Barnes, S. J. Beals, W. H. Fisher, John S. Kennedy, and W. G. Oakman. The railroad operated until 1879, was initially succeeded by the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba RailRoad, and was ultimately succeeded by the Great Northern RailRoad.

Red River Northern Railway Company/Red River Northern RailRoad was incorporated in 1880 by F. G. Burnham, S. G. Comstock, W. H. Davy, John Erickson, H. G. Finkle, A. J. Harwood, John Kurtz, P. H. Lamb, H. F. Miller, S. G. Roberts, James H. Sharp, and A. A. White to survey, locate, and build a railway from a point in or near Barnesville, Clay County, Minnesota, to a point at or near the Western boundary of the State in or near Moorhead, Clay County, Minnesota. It had initial capital stock of $50,000 and its principal place of business was Moorhead, Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1880.

Red River Valley RailRoad Company: The railroad was incorporated in 1875 by G. L. Becker, R. B. Galusha, P. H. Kelly, L. E. Reed, and H. H. Sibley to build and operate a railway from Breckenridge, Minnesota, to Glyndon, Minnesota, and other rail lines. It had initial capital stock of $500,000 and its principal place of business was St. Paul. The railroad was organized in 1876, operated until 1879, was initially succeeded by the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba RailRoad, and was ultimately succeeded by the Great Northern RailRoad. [See note for George Loomis Becker for 194 McBoal Street.] [See note on Reuben Barney Galusha for 885 Goodrich Avenue.] [See 231 Maria Avenue for information about P. H. Kelly.] [See note on Lathrop E. Reed for 650 Summit Avenue.] [See the note on Henry Hastings Sibley for 614 North Fountain Place.]

Red River Valley & Western RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1987.

Red Wing & Iowa Railway Company: The railroad was organized in 1881. The railroad was incorporated in 1881 by C. Betcher, E. W. Brooks, S. B. Foot, J. S. Hoard, J. M. Hodgman, William Howe, J. C. Pierce, T. B. Sheldon, T. K. Simmons, and G. R. Sterling to construct and operate a railway from Red Wing, Goodhue County, Minnesota, to some point along the Southern boundary of the State. The railroad had $800,000 in corporate stock. The principal place of business of the railroad was Red Wing, Minnesota.

Remington Park RailRoad was incorporated in 1883 by Benjamin S. Bull, S. P. Channell, Robert S. Innes, Louis F. Menage, and Julius E. Minor to build a railway and telegraph or telephone line from a point near the Minneapolis market house to or near Lake Harriet and to other points in the State. It had initial capital stock of $100,000 and its principal place of business was Minneapolis. The railroad was organized in 1883. [See note on Louis F. Menage for 2400 Stevens Avenue.]

Reserve Mining Company RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1953, when the Reserve Mining Company was incorporated, operated from 1955 until 1986, and was succeeded by the Cyprus Mining RailRoad. The railroad moved taconite ore from its mine and crusher and Babbitt, Minnesota, to its pelletizing plant at Silver Bay, Minnesota.

Rice Lake & Zumbro River RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in 1871.

Rice's Point RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated by J. B. Dower, George Gray, C. W. Mead, B. M. Newport, and B. S. Russell to construct and operate a rail line from a point in Duluth, Minnesota, on or over Rice’s Point to the St. Louis River and Superior Bay in 1873. The railroad had capital stock of $50,000, had its general office at Duluth, Minnesota, and was organized in 1873.

Richards Lundeen Construction Company RailRoad/Richards, Lundeen & Company : The Richards Lundeen Construction Company was located in Minneapolis, was awarded a contract by the Soo Line for the construction of a 125 mile rail line from Glenwood, Minnesota, through Alexandria, Minnesota, to Fosston, Minnesota, and the White Earth Indian Reservation in Minnesota in 1903, and became insolvent in 1906.

Rochester & Minnesota Railway Company: The railroad was incorporated in 1877 by J. V. Daniels, William H. Ferry, Marvin Hughitt, J. B. Redfield, and C. C. Wheeler to build and operate a railway line from a point along the Winona & St. Peter RailRoad in Olmsted County at or near Rochester, Minnesota, Northwardly to the Northern boundary of the State. It had initial capital stock of $300,000 and its principal place of business was Rochester, Minnesota.

Rochester & Minnesota RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in 1889 by C. W. Benson, Raymond Du Pay, Charles E. Marvin, Joel May, W. W. Mayo, A. Nelson, and R. C. Wright to build a railway from Rochester, Minnesota, to some point on the Chicago, St. Paul & Kansas City RailRoad in Dodge County, Minnesota. It had initial capital stock of $200,000 and its principal place of business was St. Paul.

Rochester & North Minnesota RailRoad/Rochester & Northern Minnesota RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1876 or 1878 and was incorporated in 1877. The railroad sought a $20,000 grant from Oronoco, Minnesota, to construct the railroad through that town in 1878. The railroad operated a 24.48 mile rail line from Rochester, Minnesota, to Zumbrota, Minnesota, by way of Pine Island, Minnesota, and crossed the Zumbro River at New Haven, Minnesota, in 1879. In 1880, the officers of the railroad were M. Hughitt, vice president, J. B. Redfield, secretary, and M. M. Kirkman, treasurer, and the members of the board of directors were J. V. Daniels, M. Hughitt, Albert Keep, J. B. Redfield, and M. L. Sykes. In 1880, the railroad had capital stock of $300,000. The Rochester & Northern Minnesota RailRoad carried passengers and freight and was a feeder line to the Chicago & Northwestern RailRoad. The railroad operated until 1881 and was purchased by the Winona & St. Peter RailRoad.

Rochester & St. Paul Railway: The railroad was organized in 1889.

Rochester & St. Paul RailRoad was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1886 by Thomas Cochran, Jr., John R. Cook, M. J. Daniels, William B. Dean, Elias F. Drake, Fredrick Driscoll, George R. Finch, Thomas L. Fishback, Charles W. Hackett, Walter Hurlbut, William D. Hurlbut, Cyrus H. Kellogg, Williams Lindeke, Charles E. Marvin, Daniel H. Moon, Daniel R. Noyes, Aaron M. Ozmun, Alonzo T. Stebbins, Dennis H. William, Charles C. Wilson and Granville Woodworth to build a railway from a point along the southern Minnesota boundary through Rochester, Olmstead County, Minnesota, to St. Paul. It had initial capital stock of $500,000 and its principal place of business was St. Paul. The railroad was organized in 1886. [See the note for Elias Franklin Drake for 324 Bates Avenue.]

Rochester Southern RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated and organized in 1878.

Rock Island, Minneapolis Terminal & Transfer Company: The railroad was organized in 1902 and was succeeded by the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific RailRoad.

Root River & Mankato RailRoad; The railroad was authorized by the State of Minnesota shortly after statehood in 1857. The railroad was incorporated in 1863 by E. McMurtrie, John J. Porter, Charles D. Sherwood, and others to build a railroad from Fillmore County, Minnesota, to Manakto, Minnesota. The railroad had capital stock of $2,000,000 at incorporation.

Root River & Southern Minnesota RailRoad: The railroad was chartered by Territorial Laws of Minnesota 1855, Chapter 24, was incorporated by Edward Bell, W. W. Bennett, William Bross, Benjamin F. Brown, William F. Dunbar, H. N. Farnham, Thomas Foster, W. B. Gear, Joseph P. Hamelin, H. D. Huff, Ole Knudson, John Looney, James McCan, Jacob McCrary, J. S. McCuen, Samuel McPhail, David Olmsted, B. Pringle, Robert H. Shankland, James Smith, Joseph Sovesse, Benjamin Thompson, Edward Thompson, and T. B. Twiford, was authorized to build a railroad from Hokah, Houston County, Minnesota, Westerly to the Missouri River, and was given a land grant by the 1857 Minnesota Territorial Legislature. The railroad never began work on its line and forfeited its land grant rights, property, and franchises to the State of Minnesota in 1864, which were conveyed to the company reorganized as the Minnesota Valley RailRoad and to the Southern Minnesota RailRoad. The line opened for traffic in 1865. The successor to the railroad was the St. Paul & Sioux City RailRoad.

Root River Valley & Southern Minnesota RailRoad: The railroad was chartered by Laws of the Minnesota Territory 1855, Chapter 24, as amended by Laws of the Minnesota Territory 1856, Chapter 55, as amended by Laws of the Minnesota Territory 1857, Chapter 37, and as modified by First Extra Session Territorial Laws of Minnesota 1857, Chapter I, Chapter 3, was intended to survey, construct, maintain, and use a single rail line or a double rail line from Hokah, Houston County, Minnesota Territory, to a point on the Minnesota River, and then to the Great Bend of the Missouri River,and was incorporated by Edward Bell, W.W. Bennett, William Bross, Benjamin F. Brown, William F. Dunbar, H. N. Farnham, Thomas Foster, W. B. Gear, Joseph P. Hamelin, H. D. Huff, Ole Knudson, John Looney, James McCan, Jacob McCrary, J. S. McCuen, Samuel McPhail, David Olmsted, B. Pringle, Robert H. Shankland, James Smith, Joseph Sovess, Benjamin Thompson, Edward Thompson, T. B. Twiford, and others. The railroad was intended to survey, locate, construct, maintain, and operate a rail line from Hokah, Houston County, Minnesota Territory, Westerly to a point between the South bend of the Minnesota River and the Southern boundary of the Minnesota Territory, and thence Westerly to the great bend of the Missouri River, to construct and operate a branch rail ine from Hokah, Houston County, Minnesota Territory, to Eagle Bluffs, Winona County, Minnesota Territory, by way of Brownsville, Houston County, Minnesota TerritoryTarget Lake, Minnesota Territory, to construct and operate a branch rail line to the Western boundary of the Territory by way of Mower County, Minnesota, Freeborn County, Minnesota, and Faribault County, Minnesota, and to extend the railroad to Puget Sound on the Pacific Ocean. The railroad had $5,000,000 in capital stock and the general office of the railroad was to be in Hokah, Houston County, Minnesota Territory. The railroad was organized in 1871, became the Minnesota Valley Railroad Company, then became the Southern Minnesota Railway Company, was initially succeeded by the Sioux City & St. Paul RailRoad, then was succeeded by the Omaha & Milwaukee RailRoad, and then was succeeded by the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha RailRoad.

Rosser & Whitaker Company RailRoad: Rosser and Whitaker were railroad contractors employed by the Northern Pacific RailRoad in 1907 and 1909. Thomas Rosser was the chief engineer of the Northern Pacific RailRoad in 1878. Thomas Lafayette Rosser (1836-1910,) a former roommate of George Armstrong Custer at West Point and a former major general in the Confederate cavalry, was initially a superintendent of the National Express Company after the American Civil War, was a civil engineer with the Pittsburgh and Connellsville Railroad in 1868, was employed as an axeman by the Northern Pacific RailRoad in 1870 at Carlton, Minnesota, was employed by the Lake Superior & Mississippi RailRoad in 1871, was appointed chief surveyor of the Dakota Division of the Northern Pacific RailRoad at Brainerd, Minnesota, in 1872, led a survey party west of the Missouri River to the Yellowstone River to stake out a route for the new railroad, named Jamestown, North Dakota, was the chief engineer of the Dakota Division of the Northern Pacific RailRoad in 1873, moved to Minneapolis in 1873, was the chief engineer of the Canadian Pacific Railway from 1881 until 1882, briefly was the chief engineer employed by the Panama Canal Company in 1884, returned to Virginia as a gentleman farmer, was the president of the New South Mining & Improvement Company in 1887, served during the Spanish-American War, and was the postmaster of Charlottesville, Virginia, in 1905. Thomas Lafayette Rosser, Jr., a graduate of the University of Virginia, also was a railroad contractor.

Jack Saari Lumber Company: The Jack Saari Lumber Company acquired the N. B. Shank Logging Company logging railroad in 1915 and operated the railroad until 1925, when the rails were removed.

St. Anthony Falls Transit RailRoad: The railroad was authorized by the State of Minnesota shortly after statehood in 1857. The railroad was incorporated in 1860 by Richard Chute, B. B. Meeker, and J. H. Talbot, to build a railway around St. Anthony, Minnesota. The railroad had capital stock of $80,000. The railroad was organized in 1871.

St. Anthony RailRoad was incorporated in 1883 by Paul D. Cravath, Jefferson Earle, Albert W. Howard, Lester C. Mitchell, and C. H. Smith to build street railway lines, telegraph lines, and telephone lines in Dakota, Hennepin, and Ramsey. It had initial capital stock of $500,000 and its principal place of business was Minneapolis. The railroad was organized in 1883.

St. Charles & Chatfield RailRoad: The railroad was authorized by the Minnesota Legislature shortly after statehood in 1857 and had its chartering legislation amended by the Minnesota Legislature in 1870. The railroad was incorporated in 1867 by E. Dexter, J. C. Easton, C. G. Ripley, and others to build a rail line from St. Charles, Minnesota, through Chatfield, Minnesota, to cross the Southern border of the state with Iowa and to Ackley, Iowa. The railroad was organized in 1871 and had capital stock of $1,000,000.

St. Cloud City Car Company/St. Cloud City Street Car Company: The railroad was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1887, was constructed in 1887 and terminated at the Great Northern RailRoad passenger depot at Ninth Avenue North. In 1890, the railroad had capital stock of $100,000, had as its officers C. P. McClure, president, O. W. Baldwin, vice-president, Frank Tolman, secretary, A. G. Whitney, treasurer. and R. L. Gale, manager, operated 11 miles of rail trackage, owned two cars, and owned ten horses. In 1894, the railroad had seven miles of track, the railroad had seven rail cars, the railroad had $50,000 in capital stock, its president was H. M. Byllesby, and its superintendent was C. S. Benson. In 1895, the railroad was financed by the Thomson-Houston Company, E. R. Gilman, and C. A. Coffin, had one type D Thomson-Houston Company generator, purchased power from the St. Cloud Water, Light & Power Company, did not build its own power house, added transmission poles to the line, and attempted to extend the line to Sauk Rapids, Minnesota, and its sawmills, an effort thwarted by a 600 foot railway bridge over the Mississippi River that was inadequate to carry electric rail cars. In 1895, the officers of the railroad were H. M. Byllesby, president, C. K. Stearns, vice president, George C. McKnight, secretary-treasurer, and C. S. Benson, superintendent. H. M. Byllesby was the former manager of the defunct Northwest General Electric Company and C. S. Benson was the chief bookkeeper of the defunct Northwest General Electric Company. Also in 1895, the rail cars of the railroad had been seized by the Stearns County, Minnesota, sheriff for unpaid property taxes, was sold to C. H. Harkens of Minneapolis, and became the subject of litigation between the trust company supplying the trust deeds securing the bonds of the company and the successors of the purchaser of the company in a tax sale in St. Paul Title Insurance & Trust Company v. D. E. Lyons in Stearns County, Minnesota, District Court, where the trust company prevailed. In 1936, the St. Cloud Streetcar Company converted to an all bus operation.

St. Cloud City Street Car Company: In 1887, Albert G. Whitney organized the St. Cloud City Street Car Company. The railroad consisted of two horse-drawn cars, ten horses, and a short stretch of single track in St. Cloud, Minnesota. In 1891, the Northwest Thompson-Huston Company of St. Paul purchased the system, laid three additional miles of track to the Great Northern Railway car shops in Waite Park, Minnesota, and changed to an electrical operation. In 1892, track was laid between Sauk Rapids, Minnesota, and the eastern edge of the Germain Street bridge in St. Cloud, Minnesota, until structural modifications were made to the bridge in 1894, and then the first car crossed into downtown St. Cloud, Minnesota. In 1893, the officers of the railroad were H. M. Byllesby, president, C. R. Stearns, vice president, W. P. Johnson, secretary, W. H. Moore, treasurer, and C. S. Benson, superintendent, the members of the board of directors of the railroad were H. M. Byllesby, W. P. Johnson, H. C. Levis, C. R. Stearns, V. M. Watkins, S. P. Wells, Jr., the railroad operated seven miles of rail line, the railroad owned seven electric rail cars, the railroad had capital stock of $100,000, and the railroad had its general office in St. Cloud, Minnesota. The Benton Power & Traction Company purchased the system in 1897.

The St. Cloud, Fort Ridgley & Fort Dodge RailRoad/St. Cloud, Fort Riley & Fort Dodge Railway Company was incorporated in 1879 under Minnesota law by Thomas Bohan, W. T. Bonniwell, J. M. Bowler, H. R. Denny, J. C. Edson, C. A. Gilman, K. H. Helling, J. R. Howard, George P. Johnston, Theodore Lambert, W. B. Latz, Ed. O'Hara, A. H. Reed, J. C. Riebe, and M. E. L. Shanks to build a railroad with one or more branches from St. Cloud Southerly by way of Litchfield, Minnesota, Hector, Minnesota, Fort Ridgely, Minnesota, Sleepy Eye, Minnesota, St. James, Minnesota, and Fairmont, Minnesota, to the southern boundary of the state at or near Tenhassen, Martin County, Minnesota. It had initial capital stock of $3,000,000 and its principal place of business was Litchfield, Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1879.

Saint Cloud-Grantsburgh & Ashland RailRoad/Saint Cloud, Grantsburg & Ashland RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated under Wisconsin law, was organized in 1883, operated until 1899, was initially succeeded by the St. Paul & Dakota RailRoad in 1899, and was ultimately succeeded by the Northern Pacific RailRoad. The railroad operated an 11.9 mile rail line from Grantsburg, Wisconsin, to the West (Minnesota) end of a rail bridge across the St. Croix River from 1879 to 1884.

Saint Cloud & Lake Traverse Railway Company/St. Cloud & Lake Travers RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in 1880 by R. B. Angus, R. B. Galusha, James J. Hill, N. W. Kittson, and Ed. Sawyer to build, maintain and operate a railway from a point of the branch line of the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba RailRoad between St. Cloud, Minnesota, and Alexandria, Minnesota, to a point on the Western boundary of Minnesota between Big Stone Lake and Lake Traverse. It had initial capital stock of $1,500,000 and its principal place of business was St. Paul. The railroad was organized in 1880, operated until 1880 or 1882, was initially succeeded by the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba RailRoad or the Little Falls & Dakota RailRoad, and was ultimately succeeded by the Great Northern RailRoad. [See note on James Jerome Hill for 240 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Edward Sawyer for 461 Holly Avenue.] [See note on Reuben Barney Galusha for 885 Goodrich Avenue.] [See note for Norman Kittson for 225 Summit Avenue.]

Saint Cloud, Mankato & Austin RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1885 under Laws of Minnesota 1885, Chapter 188, operated until 1886, and was succeeded by the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba RailRoad. The railroad went from St. Cloud, Minnesota, through Litchfield, Minnesota, Hutchinson, Minnesota, Mankato, Minnesota, and Austin, Minnesota, to Mona, Minnesota, on the Southern boundary of the State. The general office of the railroad was located at Litchfield, Minnesota, and the railroad had capital stock of $3,000,000. The railroad was initially operated by the Illinois Central RailRoad.

St. Cloud Motor Line Company: The railroad was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1887, had $200,000 in capital stock, and had its general office in st. Cloud. The railroad had 1.5 miles of rail line under construction in 1889. The 1889 board of directors of the railroad were W. C. Wait, William M. Hewitt, and F. E. Searle. William M. Hewitt of Muscatine, Iowa, was the contractor who built the rail line.

St. Cloud Public Service Company: Albert G. Whitney incorporated the St. Cloud Public Service Company in 1915 and repurchased the rail system from Granite City Railway. The McGraw transit directory, published in 1918 by the McGraw-Hill Publishing Company, indicates that the company was the result of the purchase and consolidation of the Union Power Company, the Public Service Company, and the Granite City Railway Company and the railroad operated 9.5 miles of rail trackage connecting East St. Cloud, Minnesota, Waite Park, Minnesota, and Sauk Rapids, Minnesota, Athletic Park, and the Waite Park, Minnesota, dance and swimming pavilion, with St. Cloud, Minnesota, owned 17 motor cars and three other cars, leased the St. Cloud Water Power Company, produced its own energy, had power stations and its repair shop in St. Cloud, Minnesota, had as its officers A. G. Whitney, president, R. L. Gale, vice president, A. D. McKenzie, secretary and auditor, Wheelock Whitney, treasurer, and George M. Marvin, general superintendent, and had its general office in St. Cloud, Minnesota. A. J. Bemis was the general manager of the company in 1916. The Northern States Power Company and Henry Marison Byllesby purchased the company in 1924. [See note on the Northern States Power Company and Henry M. Byllesby for 21-27 South St. Albans Street.]

St. Cloud & St. Peter RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in 1875 by William Bickel, C. T. Brown, L. W. Collins, E. St. J. Cox, J. Frankenfield, J. K. Moore, J. B. Sackett, A. M. Schnell, J. M. Waldron, and J. P. Wilson to build and operate a railway from St. Cloud, Minnesota, by way of Stearns County, Minnesota, Wright County, Minnesota, Meeker County, Minnesota, McLeod County, Minnesota, Sibley County, Minnesota, and Nicollet County, Minnesota, to St. Peter, Minnesota. It had initial capital stock of $800,000 and its principal place of business was Hutchinson, Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1876.

St. Cloud & Sauk Rapids Street Railway Company: The railroad was operated by the Light, Heat, Transit & Public Service Company of St. Cloud in 1901.

St. Cloud Street RailRoad was incorporated in 1883 by N. P. Clarke, L. W. Collins, John Cooper, L. A. Evans, D. H. Freeman, W. B. Mitchell, William Powell, D. B. Searle, F. E. Searle, Frank Tolman, H. C. Waite, and J. E. West to build a street railway in St. Cloud, Minnesota, and in its suburbs in Stearns County, Minnesota. It had initial capital stock of $250,000 and its principal place of business was St. Cloud, Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1883. In 1889, the railroad operated three miles of rail line, owned two cars and 14 horses, had as its officers C. P. McClure, president, A. G. Whitney, secretary, F. Tolman, treasurer, and R. L. Gale, general manager, and had its main office at St. Cloud, Minnesota. In 1893, the railroad operated seven miles of track, was an electric system, had seven rail cars, had capital stock of $100,000, had as its board of directors H. M. Byllesby, George C. Duffle, W. P. Johnson, Howard C. Levis, C. R. Stearns, V. M. Watkins, and S. P. Wells, Jr., and had as its officers H. M. Byllesby, president, C. R. Stearns, vice president, W. P. Johnson, secretary, W. H. Moore, treasurer, and C. S. Benson, superintendent. [See note on Henry M. Byllesby for 21-27 South St. Albans Street.]

Saint Croix & Duluth RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1894 and operated until 1899. The railroad was a logging line for the Empire Lumber Company. This line connected with the Great Northern RailRoad at Dedham, Wisconsin, a few miles SW of Superior, Wisconsin, was surveyed in the Winter of 1898, was constructed in 1899, ran until 1908, was owned by the Empire Lumber Company of Winona Minnesota. The railroad extended South South East from Dedham, Wisconsin, to the St Croix River near Coppermine Dam, Wisconsin. It cost Empire Lumber $90,000 to build. Logs were pulled out of the Black River where the railroad crossed over it, hoisted onto rail cars, and then hauled South where they were dumped into the St Croix River for their final journey down the Mississippi River to Winona, Minnesota. The locomotives owned by the railroad were all woodburning. The rail line that connected with the Great Northern RailRoad at Dedham, Wisconsin, was so steep that a locomotive could haul only one inbound car of supplies at a time. The company always had problems with burning out flues in locomotives used on this portion of the line. The builders of the railroad envisioned it as a larger railroad, connecting Grantsburg, Burnett County, Wisconsin, to Lake Superior. Reportedly, when the rail line was torn up, the salvage train was left where it derailed and remains in the swamp today. The northern end of the railroad was left in place and was used by the Washburn & Northwestern RailRoad and the David Tozer Lumber Company RailRoad.

St. Croix Lumber & Manufacturing Company RailRoad: The company was established in 1899 by three brothers, MartinTorinus, ErnestTorinus, and Burt Torinus, of Stillwater, Minnesota, when they bought the Knox Lumber Company interest at Winton, Minnesota. The company was purchased by the Edward Hines Lumber Company of Chicago, Illinois, in 1910. The company purchased the Swallow & Hopkins Lumber Company railroad in 1911 and continued to operate it until 1920, when it ceased operations at its mill at Winton, Minnesota.

Saint Croix Railway Improvement Company/Saint Croix Railway & Improvement Company: The railroad was incorporated by A. H. Wilder, E. F. Drake, and others under Minnesota law in 1872 to construct, operate, and maintain a railway and a telegraph line in Washington County, Minnesota, from a junction point on the the St. Paul, Stillwater & Taylor’s Falls RailRoad in either Baytown, Minnesota, or Stillwater, Minnesota, to Lake St. Croix. The railroad was organized in 1872 by Isaac Staples and Louis Torinus, had $500,000 in capital stock, and had as its place of business St. Paul. The railroad operated until 1873, and was succeeded through sale by the St. Paul, Stillwater & Taylor's Falls RailRoad. The St. Croix Railway Improvement Company combined the prior villages of Baytown, Minnesota, Bangor, Minnesota, and Middletown, Minnesota, into South Stillwater< Minnesota, in 1873, which was incorporated as a village in 1881, and donated land for School District #15 in 1873. a href="http:// www.msparchhistory.info/DayBluffTNH.html" [See the note for Elias Franklin Drake for 324 Bates Avenue.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/MinnrrsTNH.html" [See note on Isaac Staples for the Stillwater & Hastings RailRoad.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/SumEPortTNH.html"> [See note on Amherst Holcomb Wilder for 226 Summit Avenue.]

St. Croix Short Line Railroad: The railroad was incorporated by A. L. Sanborn, F. C. Hills, W. E. Fagg, L. R. Claude, and E. F. Starke in 1900 and was intended to operate a 155 mile rail line from Superior, Wisconsin, to St. Paul. In 1900, the president of the railroad was A. L. Sanborn, the secretary and treasurer was W. E. Fagg, the railroad had $1,000,000 in capital stock, and the general office of the railroad was located in Madison, Wisconsin. A. L. Sanborn of Madison, Wisconsin, was associated with the railroad in 1901.

St. Croix Valley RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1997, purchased 60 miles of rail line (33.3 miles north from North Branch, Minnesota, to Hinckley, Minnesota and 11.1 miles west from Brook Park, Minnesota, to Mora, Minnesota) from BNSF, was owned by RailAmerica, Inc., was managed by John Neal, a former Santa Fe employee, and had its general offices at Hinckley, Minnesota.

St. James & Fort Dodge RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated by Ellbridge G. Collins, T. Jervis Edwards, Fred A. Paterson, Joseph Ramsdale, and Henry F. Shearman in 1877 to build and operate a railroad from St. James, Minnesota, Southwardly through or near Winnebago City, Minnesota, to the Iowa state line, with a principal place of business in Winnebago City, Minnesota, with capital stock of $1,000,000, and was organized in 1877.

St. Louis & Cloquet River RailRoad/St. Louis River & Cloquet River RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1871 by W. L. Banning, William Branch, J. M. Gilmore, Robert A. Smith, and J. H. Stewart to build and operate a rail line from a junction point along the Lake Superior & Mississippi River RailRoad and the Northern Pacific RailRoad in Carlton County, Minnesota, North to the St. Louis River and thence to the Cloquet River. The railroad was organized in 1872. a href ="http://www.msparchhistory.info/IrvineTNH.html" [See note for William L. Banning for 6 Irvine Park.] a href="http:// www.msparchhistory.info/DayBluffTNH.html" [See note on William Branch for 216 Bates Avenue.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/WestSideTNH.html" [See note on Robert A. Smith for 15 Alice Court.] a href ="http://www.msparchhistory.info/IrvineTNH.html" [See note for Jacob Henry Stewart for 50 Irvine Park.]

St. Louis & Superior Terminal RailRoad: In 1892, work continued in the construction of a belt rail line around Duluth, Minnesota, and Superior, Wisconsin, including three miles of rail line grading from Walbridge, Minnesota.

St. Mary’s & Minneapolis RailRoad: The railroad was incorproated under Michigan law in 1881 to build a 300 mile rail line from St. Mary’s, Michigan, to the Montreal River. The railroad had $10,000,000 in capital stock.

St. Paul, Black Hills & Pacific RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated under Dakota Territory law in 1888 by William C. Houghton, John A. Houlahan, Larman G. Johnson, S. H. Jumper, Eugene K. Lodewick, C. T. McCoy, and James Ringrose to construct and operate a 600 mile rail line from Fargo, Dakota Territory to the Montana line, from Dickinson, Dakota Territory, to Deadwood, Dakota Territory, and from Aberdeen, Dakota Territory, to Fargo, Dakota Territory, and had capital stock of $15,000,000. Federal legislation in 1888 permitted the railroad to cross the Sioux Reservation. A survey of the route for the railroad was completed in 1888. In 1888, Colonel Daniel Lamont, Calvin S. Brice, and Senator __?__ Hearst were promoters of the railroad.

St. Paul, Brainerd & Northwestern RailRoad Company was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1884 by O. H. Havill, William E. Seelye, C. B. Sleeper, F. B. Thompson, and E. E. Webster to construct, operate and maintain a railway from St. Paul northeasterly by way of Princeton, Minnesota, and Brainerd, Minnesota, to a point along the East bank of the Red River of the North in Polk County, Minnesota, or Marshall County, Minnesota, or both. The railroad had initial capital stock of $3,000,000 and had its principal place of business at Brainerd, Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1884. Initial surveying and engineering between Brainerd, Minnesota, and Red Lake Falls, Minnesota, was undertaken by G. S. Canfield, O. H. Havill, F. B. Thompson, W. E. Seelye, A. H. Case, and J. L. Anderson in 1885.

St. Paul Bridge & Terminal RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1908 as a Minnesota corporation. In 1913, the railroad had as its officers William McGivny, president and general manager, A. R. Fay, vice president, and A. A. McKechnie, secretary, treasurer and auditor, had as its board of directors John S. Bangs, Ker D. Dunlop, Albert R. Fay, William McGivny, and Louis F. Swift, had its principal place of business in South St. Paul, Minnesota, had total capital stock of $10,000, owned 5.66 miles of track in Minnesota, had five locomotives, and had 88 total employees. In 1919, the railroad owned 7.421 miles of rail trackage, leased 27.33 miles of rail trackage, owned nine steam locomotives, owned eight freight cars, constructed a 2.311 mile railroad bridge (Bridge #26) over the Mississippi River from St. Paul to South St. Paul, Minnesota, in 1910, and was controlled by Louis F. Swift. The bridge was rebuilt in 1925, was rebuilt again after a flood in 1951, and was rebuilt again in 1982. The railroad operated until 1935 and was initially succeeded by the Chicago Great Western RailRoad, then was succeeded by the Chicago & NorthWestern RailRoad in 1968, and was ultimately succeeded by the Union Pacific RailRoad. The railroad was a switching line, connecting various railroads with the industries located at South St. Paul, Minnesota, and particularly the stockyards of the Saint Paul Union Stockyards Company, a noncarrier corporation. The railroad and the stockyards company were controlled by the Swift interests. Its locomotives included St. Paul Bridge & Terminal Company #10, a Class B-8 built by Alco Dunkirk in 1907, #44155, as Swift & Company #1110 that became Chicago Great Western RailRoad #10 in 1934 and was sold for scrap to the Hyman-Michaels Company in 1948, St. Paul Bridge & Terminal Company #11, aClass B-8 built by Alco-Dunkirk in 1907, #44156, as Swift & Company #1111 that became Chicago Great Western RailRoad #11 in 1934 and was sold for scrap to the Hyman-Michaels Company in 1948, St. Paul Bridge & Terminal Company #12, a Class D-3s built by Alco-Schenectady in 1914, #54589, that became Chicago Great Western RailRoad #12 in 1934 and was sold for scrap to the Hyman-Michaels Company in 1950, St. Paul Bridge & Terminal Company #13, a Class D-3s built by Alco-Schenectady in 1915, #55417, that became Chicago Great Western RailRoad #13 in 1934 and was sold for scrap to the Hyman-Michaels Company in 1950, St. Paul Bridge & Terminal Company #16, a Class D-3s built by Alco-Schenectady in 1917, #57878, that became Chicago Great Western RailRoad #16 in 1934 and was sold for scrap to the Hyman-Michaels Company in 1950, and St. Paul Bridge & Terminal Company #17, a Class J-3 built by Baldwin in 1925, #58644, that became Chicago Great Western RailRoad #17 in 1934 and was sold for scrap to the Hyman-Michaels Company in 1950. [See note on Ker Dunlop for 10 Crocus Place.] [See note for the St. Paul Bridge & Terminal RailRoad for 475 Ohio Street.]

St. Paul Cable RailRoad: The Fourth Avenue and Selby Avenue cable railway was planned in 1887. Thomas P. Wilson was the vice president of the railroad in 1889. The railroad purchased 20 closed rail coaches from the Laclede Car Company in 1889.

St. Paul & Chicago RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in 1869 and was organized in 1871. In 1874, the railroad sued the Governor of the State of Minnesota and the board of trustees of the State Insane Asylum for the recovery of 19,000 acres of swamp land that were to be conveyed to it under an 1865 law upon the railroad’s completion. In 1881, the officers of the railroad were James McKinlay, president, and Russel Sage, vice president, and the members of the board of directors were Seth Chamberlain, W. S. Gurnee, James M. McKinlay, Alex. Mitchell, E. H. Perkins, Jr., Russel Sage, J. J. Slocum, H. S. Taylor, and Julius Wadsworth. The railroad was succeeded by the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad. In 1882, the railroad owned 52,734.20 acres of land in Minnesota.

St. Paul City Railway Company: The railroad was chartered in 1872. In 1889, the railroad operated 48 miles of rail line and 10.17 miles of cable car line, owned 162 rail cars, owned 832 horses, had $5,000,000 in capital stock, had as its board of directors P. F. Barr, George B. Harris, Charles B. Lamborn, Thomas Lowry, and T. P. Wilson, and had as its officers Thomas Lowry, president, P. F. Barr, vice president, A. Z. Levering, secretary, W. R. Merriam, treasurer, and A. L. Scott, superintendent. In 1889, the St. Paul City Council instructed the corporation attorney to undertake legal action to prevent the railroad from laying rail trackage on any St. Paul street, especially Sixth Street, and the city obtained a temporary injunction against Thomas Lowry and his operation of a cable railroad in the city. In 1892, the Minneapolis Street Railway and the St. Paul City Railway Company merged into the Twin City Rapid Transit Company. The Poor's Directory of RailRoad Officials, published by the Poor's RailRoad Manual Company in 1898, indicates that the officers of the railroad were Thomas Lowry, president, Thomas P. Wilson, vice president, A. Z. Levering, secretary, W. R. Merriam, treasurer, and A. L. Scott, superintendent, that the general office of the railroad was in St. Paul, and that the railroad operated 50 miles of rail trackage and owned 416 horses, 201 mules, and 128 rail cars. [See note on William R. Merriam for 4 Crocus Hill.] [See note on Thomas Wilson for 761 Goodrich Avenue.] [See note on Thomas Lowry and Horace Lowry for 670 Goodrich Avenue.]

St. Paul & Dakota RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in 1875 or 1876 by Charles H. Bigelow, J. W. Bishop, R. Blakeley, J. Dean, E. F. Drake, G. A. Hamilton, H. G. Harrison, T. A. Harrison, P. H. Kelly, Walter Mann, J. L. Merriam, W. R. Merriam, J. S. Prince, H. H. Sibley, and Horace Thompson to build and operate a railway from a point along the Sioux City & St. Paul RailRoad line in Nobles County, Minnesota, to the Western boundary of the State in Rock County, Minnesota. It had initial capital stock of $600,000 and its principal place of business was St. Paul. The railroad was organized in 1876, operated only in 1876, and changed its name to the Worthington & Sioux Falls RailRoad in 1878. [See note for Charles Henry Bigelow for 415 Laurel Avenue.] [See note on Judson Wade Bishop and Mary Libania Axtell Bishop for 720 Fairmount Avenue.] [See the note for Elias Franklin Drake for 324 Bates Avenue.] [See note for Hugh G. Harrison for 2309 First Avenue South.] [See 231 Maria Avenue for information about P. H. Kelly.] [See note on John L. Merriam and William Rush Merriam for 4 Crocus Hill.] [See note on John S. Prince for 339 Summit Avenue.] [See the note on Henry Hastings Sibley for 614 North Fountain Place.] [See note on Horace E. Thompson for 808 Summit Avenue.]

St. Paul & Des Moines RailRoad: Control of the railroad, with 121 miles of road between Des Moines, Iowa, to Mason City, Iowa, was acquired by the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific RailRoad in 1911 and was partially purchased from the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific RailRoad by the St. Paul & Kansas City Short Line RailRoad in 1911.

St. Paul & Dubuque RailRoad: The railroad was authorized by the Minnesota Legislature shortly after statehood in 1857. The railroad was incorporated in 1870 by S. Alderson, B. S. Cook, William R. Marshall, and others. The railroad was organized in 1871 and had capital stock of $4,000,000.

St. Paul & Duluth RailRoad: The railroad was chartered under Laws of Minnesota 1876, Chapter 30, was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1877, and was reorganized from the Lake Superior & Mississippi RailRoad, which was sold in a bankruptcy foreclosure sale. The railroad was organized in 1879 and had its general office in St. Paul. It was known as the "Skally Line." It operated from Saint Paul to Duluth, Minnesota, with branches to Minneapolis, Taylors Falls, Minnesota, Kettle River, Minnesota, Cloquet, Minnesota, Grantsburg, Wisconsin, and Superior, Wisconsin. The St. Paul & Duluth RailRoad was incorporated and acquired the Lake Superior & Mississippi RailRoad by mortgage foreclosure in 1877. In 1878, the railroad operated 169 miles of rail trackage, owned 28 stations, owned ten bridges, owned 118 trestles, owned 24 locomotives, owned 14 passenger cars, owned 485 freight cars, and owned 79 company cars. In 1878, the officers of the railroad were John P. Ilsley, president, William H. Rhawn, vice president, E. Q. Sewall, secretary-treasurer, James Smith, Jr., solicitor, George H. Smith, superintendent, and C. F. Cruft, auditor, and the members of the board of directors of the railroad were J. Q. Adams, C. H. Clark, E. W. Clark, C. H. Graves, John P. Ilsley, W. H. Rhawn, E. A. Rollins, James Smith, Jr., and George Whitney. The railroad leased the Stillwater & St. Paul RailRoad, established in 1875, the Taylors Falls & Lake Superior RailRoad, established in 1882, and the Minneapolis & Duluth RailRoad, established in 1882, and owned the stock of the Grantsburg, Rush City & St. Cloud RailRoad and the St. Cloud, Grantsburg & Ashland RailRoad. The St. Paul & Duluth RailRoad leased the Minneapolis & Duluth RailRoad for 99 years in 1882. In 1882, the officers of the railroad were James Smith, Jr., president and solicitor, William H. Rhawn, vice president, Philip S. Harris, secretary-treasurer, F. W. Davis, auditor, and H. P. Breed, general superintendent, the members of the board of directors of the railroad were James J. Hill, R. B. Langdon, Allen Manvel, S. S. Merrill, P. M. Meyers, H. H. Porter, William H. Rhawn, James Smith, Jr., and E. W. Winter, the railroad had $12,000,000 in capital stock, the railroad operated 211.25 miles of rail trackage, all in Minnesota, served 37 stations, owned 100 wooden bridges, one iron bridge, five girder bridges, six combination bridges, and 12 wooden trestles, the railroad owned 34 locomotives, 12 passenger rail cars, seven express and baggage rail cars, 655 box, freight and stock rail cars, 209 flat and coal rail cars, 51 hand rail cars, and 52 other rail cars, the railroad employed 1,141 personnel, the railroad owned 16,127.45 acres of land in Minnesota, the railroad operated the Stillwater & St. Paul RailRoad, the Taylor’s Falls RailRoad Company, the Taylor’s Falls & Lake Superior RailRoad, the Minneapolis Taylor’s Falls RailRoad, and the Taylor’s Falls & St. Louis Railway under lease, and the railroad had its general offices in St. Paul. In 1883, the railroad owned 34 locomotives, 14 passenger cars, three sleeper cars, two mail and express cars, seven baggage and smoking cars, 18 cabooses or way cars, 634 box cars, 40 push cars, 209 flat freight cars, 12 charcoal cars, six stock cars, and 12 miscellaneous rail cars. In 1883, the railroad also controlled the 13 mile White Bear & East Minneapolis RailRoad. In 1885, the railroad had $6,000,000 in capital stock, owned 33 stations (32 stations in Minnesota,) owned 148 bridges, owned 21 trestles, operated 281.25 miles of total rail trackage (269.25 miles in Minnesota,) owned 37 locomotives, owned 39 passenger cars, owned 962 freight cars, owned 104 company cars, and had 1,002 total employees (995 Minnesota employees.) In 1885, the officers of the railroad were W. H. Fisher, president and general superintendent, W. H. Rhawn, vice president, P. S. Harris, secretary and treasurer, D. A. McKinlay, auditor, and James Smith, Jr., attorney, and the members of the board of directors were Charles D. Drake, James M. Erle, W. H. Fisher, James J. Hill, Roswell Miller, W. H. Rhawn, James Smith, Jr., Henry P. Upham, and Edwin W. Winter. According to the Manual of the RailRoads of the United States, Volume 27 by Henry Varnum Poor in 1895, the railroad operated 247.75 miles of rail trackage, had 67 locomotives, 41 passenger cars, 14 combination cars, seven sleeping cars, nine baggage cars, 1932 box cars, five stock cars, nine refrigerator cars, 18 furniture cars, 353 flat cars, 25 coal cars, 22 cabooses, and 125 other rail cars, had as its officers R. S. Hayes, president, A. B. Plough, vice president and general manager, G. G. Haven, Jr., treasurer and secretary, D. A. McKinlay, auditor, and Lusk, Bunn & Hadley, solicitors, and had as its board of directors Clarence S. Day, Thomas Denny, R. B. Dodson, R. S. Hayes, E. W. Peet, A. B. Plough, John L. Riker, J. Smith, Jr., and A. H. Stevens. Between 1870 and 1892, the railroad constructed 21.87 miles of rail trackage (a 10.50 mile rail line from Wyoming, Minnesota, to Center City, Minnesota, from 1879 until 1880, a 6.64 mile rail line from Carlton, Minnesota, to Cloquet, Minnesota, from 1887 until 1890, and a 4.73 mile rail line from Groningen, Minnesota, to Banning, Minnesota, from 1891 until 1892.) The Poor's Directory of RailRoad Officials, published by the Poor's RailRoad Manual Company in 1898, indicates that the officers of the railroad were W. H. Fisher, president and general superintendent, William H. Rhawn, vice president, Philip S. Harris, secretary and treasurer, David A. McKinlay, auditor, and James Smith, Jr., that the general office of the railroad was in St. Paul, and that the railroad operated 225 miles of rail trackage. The St. Paul & Duluth RailRoad purchased the Taylors Falls & Lake Superior RailRoad and the Duluth Short Line RailRoad in 1898 and purchased the Grantsburg, Rush City, & St. Cloud RailRoad, the St. Cloud, Grantsburg & Ashland RailRoad, and the Stillwater & St. Paul RailRoad in 1899. According to Poor's Manual of the RailRoads of the United States, Volume 33 by Henry Varnum Poor in 1901, as of 1900, the railroad was the 1877 reorganization of the Lake Superior & Mississippi RailRoad Company and the 1899 merger of the Taylor's Falls & Lake Superior RailRoad, the Stillwater & St. Paul RailRoad, the Duluth Short Line RailRoad, the Grantsburg, Rush City & St. Cloud RailRoad, and the St. Cloud, Grantsburg & Ashland RailRoad, operated 244.45 miles of rail trackage, owned 59 locomotives, 39 passenger cars, 14 combination cars, seven sleeping cars, ten baggage, mail and express cars, 1,899 box cars, ten stock cars, 17 refrigerator cars, 14 furniture cars, 330 flat freight cars, 23 coal cars, two milk cars, and 211 service cars, had as its officers R. Somers Hayes, president, Daniel S. Lamont, vice president, J. W. Kendrick, general manager, A. V. Williams, secretary and treasurer, D. A. McKinlay, auditor, and Hadley & Armstrong, solicitors, had as its board of directors Edward D. Adams, Charles W. Bunn, Clarence S. Day, G. G. Haven, Jr., R. Somers Hayes, Daniel S. Lamont, F. H. Leggett, Charles S. Mellen, and John L. Riker, and had its general office located in St. Paul. The railroad was acquired by the Northern Pacific RailRoad in 1900. The original Lake Superior & Mississippi RailRoad began as the Nebraska & Lake Superior RailRoad, which was organized in 1857, and was incorporated in 1863 and began building the first railroad linking the Twin Cities and Duluth, Minnesota. The last spike was driven near Thompson, Minnesota, in 1870. The Lake Superior & Mississippi RailRoad received a total of $4,797,890.45 in Congressional lands, swamp lands, and bonds by the Congressional act of May 5th, 1864 (13 Stat. at L. 64, chap. 79.) The route was later known as the "Skally" route and was to become a heavy lumber carrier and a crucial route in a ferocious war over grain transportation rates with the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad. The railroad operated until 1900 and was purchased by and was succeeded by the Northern Pacific RailRoad. The current Lake Superior & Mississippi RailRoad was incorporated in 1981 by a group of volunteers from the Lake Superior Transportation Club. The Maplewood, Minnesota, to Hugo, Minnesota, portion of the rail line is now operated by the Minnesota Commercial Railway and the North Branch, Minnesota, to Hinckley, Minnesota, portion of the rail line is now operated by the St. Croix Valley Railroad. [See note on James Jerome Hill for 240 Summit Avenue.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/tnhrail2.html" [See note on John William Kendrick for the St. Paul Union Depot Company.] [See note on Edwin Wheeler Winter for 415 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Henry Pratt Upham for 277-283 Goodrich Avenue.]

St. Paul & Eastern Grand Trunk RailRoad/St. Paul Eastern Grand Trunk Railway: The members of the board of directors of the railroad in 1881 were O. A. Ellis, D. C. Lamb, Jesse Spalding, I. Stephenson, General W. E. Strong, M. Wescott, and W. H. Young. The railroad was intended to construct and maintain a rail line from a junction with the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad at Wausau, Wisconsin, if a satisfactory contract for the interchange of rail cars could be reached with the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad, and to extend to Oconto, Wisconsin. The general office of the railroad was located in Peshtigo, Wisconsin. Shawano County, Wisconsin, contributed 45,000 acres of land to the railroad. In 1893, the officers of the railroad were F. W. Rhinelander, Jr., president, and A. D. Allibone, secretary-treasurer.

St. Paul, Fort Snelling & Minneapolis RailRoad was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1886 by Kimble P. Cullen, William Dawson, Jr., James P. Gribben, Albert Scheffer, and John J. Watson to build one or more railways from St. Paul to Fort Snelling and to Minneapolis. It had initial capital stock of $500,000 and its principal place of business was St. Paul. The railroad was organized in 1886. [See note for Albert Scheffer for 390 Maple Street.] [See note on James P. Gribben for 1373 Summit Avenue.] [See note on William Dawson for 682 Fairmount Avenue.]

St. Paul, Four Lakes & White Bear RailRoad was incorporated in 1884 by E. P. Bassford, C. N. Bell, J. C. Green, T. M. Metcalf, and A. B. Stickney to construct, operate and maintain a double track railway from St. Paul, by way of Four Lakes, Minnesota, to connect with a railway running from White Bear, Minnesota, with a branch line from Four Lakes, Minnesota, to connect to a railway running from St. Paul to Hudson, Wisconsin. The railroad had initial capital stock of $1,000,000 and its principal place of business was St. Paul. The railroad was organized in 1884. [See note on Edward Payson Bassford.] [See note on Alpheus Beede Stickney for 846 Lincoln Avenue.]

St. Paul, Kasson & Iowa RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in 1882 by George B. Arnold, William Carson, S. E. Cowderry, Jerry Grinnell, J. H. Kelsey, Christen Nelson, S. G. Nelson, P. H. Perry, G. H. Storing, Robert Taylor, Jacob Thompson, Gustavus Westman, and William Wheeler to build a railway Southerly from St. Paul through Kasson, Dodge County, Minnesota, to the Minnesota-Iowa border somewhere in Mower County, Minnesota or Fillmore County, Minnesota, and was organized in 1882. It had initial capital stock of $1,000,000 and its principal place of business was Kasson, Minnesota.

St. Paul, Lakeland & Hudson RailRoad: The railroad was authorized by the State of Minnesota shortly after statehood in 1863. The railroad was incorporated in 1860 by George L. Becker, Henry F. Masterson, Moses Perin, and others to construct a railway from St. Paul to Hudson, Wisconsin. The railroad had $500,000 in capital stock upon incorporation. The railroad was organized in 1871. [See note for George Loomis Becker for 194 McBoal Street.]

St. Paul, Lakeland & Hudson River RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in 1863. The railroad was incorporated in 1860 by Lyman Dayton, Henry F. Masterson, William H. Nobles and others to construct a railway from St. Paul to Hudson, Wisconsin. The railroad had $300,000 in capital stock upon incorporation. The railroad was organized in 1871.

St. Paul & Lake Superior Air Line RailRoad: The railroad was authorized by the State of Minnesota shortly after statehood in 1857. The railroad was incorporated in 1860 by Layman Dayton, E. S. Edgerton, J. C. Burbank, and others, to build and operate a railway from St. Paul to Lake Superior, with a branch to Point Douglas, Minnesota, and with a branch to Taylor's Falls, Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1871. In 1872, the railroad had capital stock of $3,000,000. [See note on J. C. Burbank for 432 Summit Avenue.]

St. Paul & Mendota RailRoad: The railroad was authorized by the State of Minnesota shortly after statehood in 1857. The railroad was incorporated in 1859 to construct a railroad from West St. Paul, Minnesota, to Mendota, Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1871. In 1872, the railroad had capital stock of $100,000. The incorporators of the railroad were William R. Marshall, D. A. Robertson, James M. Winslow and others. [See note for William Rainey Marshall for 30 Irvine Park.] [See note on Daniel Alexander Robertson for 294-296 Laurel Avenue.]

St. Paul & Minneapolis Air & Hour Line RailRoad: The railroad was authorized by the Minnesota Legislature shortly after statehood in 1857. The railroad was incorporated in 1868 or 1869 by Peter Berkey, B. B. Meeker, James M. Winslow and others to construct and operate a rail line from St. Paul to Minneapolis, with branches to the University of Minnesota and to Lake Calhoun, Minnesota. Its articles of incorporation were amended in 1869 to permit the construction of general purpose toll bridges and to provide for a branch line to Lakeland, Minnesota, and Hudson, Wisconsin, with a spur line to Stillwater, Minnesota, and St. Croix Falls, Wisconsin. The railroad was organized in 1871 and had capital stock of $1,000,000.

St. Paul, Minneapolis & Chicago RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1882. The railroad was incorporated in 1881 by M. J. Briggs, Adam Eulberg, Aldro Jenks, Thomas Kennedy, and C. J. Thomas to construct, maintain and operate a railway from Minneapolis easterly and southeasterly to the Eastern boundary of the State in Houston County, Minnesota. The railroad had $4,000,000 in corporate stock. The principal place of business of the railroad was Minneapolis.

St. Paul & Minneapolis Elevated Railway Company: J. B. Bassett and James McMullen were associated with the railroad when it petitioned the City Council of the City of Minneapolis for an ordinance approving the rail line construction and operation from Cedar Street to Nicollet Island in 1884. In 1884, the officers of the railroad were J. H. Drake, president, J. B. Bassett, vice president, O. F. Sherwood, secretary, and Albert Shaeffer, treasurer. In 1888, the St. Paul Board of Aldermen considered the franchise of the elevated railroad. The railroad was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1888 by John H. Ames, William Dawson, Jr., John De Laittre, J. F. R. Rose, E. N. Saunders, F. A. Seymour, Henry Sidle, C. E. Wales, and A. H. Wilder, had $2,000,000 in capital stock, and had its general office in St. Paul.

St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in Minnesota, was organized in 1879. The railroad was the successor of the Minnesota & Pacific RailRoad, organized in 1857, which was renamed the St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad in 1862, was reorganized in 1864, with the St. Paul to Watab, Minnesota, and the St. Anthony, Minnesota, to Breckenridge, Minnesota, portion incorporated as the First Division of the St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad in 1864, and purchased through mortgage foreclosure in 1879. In 1879, the railroad operated 657.03 miles of track in Minnesota. In 1885, the railroad had $20,000,000 in capital stock, owned 239 stations (162 stations in Minnesota,) operated 1,496.63 miles of rail (1,004.37 miles in Minnesota,) owned 191 locomotives, owned 162 passenger cars, owned 4,753 freight cars, owned 156 company cars, and had 3,413 total employees. In 1882, the officers of the railroad were George Stephen, president, James J. Hill, vice president, Edward Sawyer, secretary-treasurer, R. B. Galusha, solicitor, S. S. Breed, auditor, Allen Manvel, general manager, S. R. Stimson, general superintendent, and C. C. Smith, chief engineer, the members of the board of directors of the railroad were R. B. Angus, R. B. Galusha, James J. Hill, N. W, Kittson, O. H. Northcote, D. A. Smith,and George Stephen, the railroad had $20,000,000 in capital stock, the railroad operated 1,018.08 miles of total rail trackage (743.78 miles in Minnesota,) the railroad owned 137 locomotives, 91 passenger rail cars, 28 express and baggage rail cars, 2,498 box, freight and stock rail cars, 1,209 flat and coal rail cars, and 82 other rail cars, the railroad employed 5,765 personnel, the railroad obtained 1,515,388.68 acres of Congressional land grant land and 422,557.66 acres in State deeded land, the railroad owned the Minnesota & Northwestern RailRoad, and the railroad had its general office in St. Paul. In 1885, the officers of the railroad were James J. Hill, president, John S. Kennedy, vice president, Edward Sawyer, secretary and treasurer, Allen Manvel, general manager, S. S. Breed, auditor, and R. B. Galusha, attorney, and the members of the board of directors were Marshall Field, James J. Hill, D. Willis James, J. S. Kennedy, D. A. Smith, George Stephen, and Samuel Thorne. In 1887, the railroad operated 1,126.72 miles of railroad trackage in Minnesota. In 1893, the officers of the railroad were James J. Hill, president, Sir D. A. Smith, vice president, W. P. Clough, second vice president, Edward Sawyer, secretary, and E. T. Nichols, treasurer, and the members of the board of directors of the railroad were George Bliss, W. P. Clough, M. D. Grover, James J. Hill, Samuel Hill, Lord Mount Stephen, and Sir Donald A. Smith. According to Poor's Manual of the RailRoads of the United States, Volume 33 by Henry Varnum Poor in 1901, as of 1899, the railroad was organized in 1879, was leased by the Great Northern RailRoad for 999 years, operated 3,816.12 miles of rail trackage, had as its officers Samuel Hill, president and land commissioner, Lord Strathcona and Mount Royal, vice president, W. P. Clough, vice president, E. Sawyer, secretary, and E. T. Nichols, treasurer, and had its general office in St. Paul. The railroad was a successor of the Minnesota & Pacific RailRoad and the St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad, and was operated by the Great Northern RailRoad in 1904. The Poor's Directory of RailRoad Officials, published by the Poor's RailRoad Manual Company in 1898, indicates that the officers of the railroad were James J. Hill, president, John S. Kennedy, vice president, Edward Sawyer, secretary and treasurer, W. E. Smith, solicitor, Allen Manvel, general manager, John M. Egan, general superintendent, and S. S. Breed, general auditor, that the general office of the railroad was in St. Paul, and that the railroad operated 1,858 miles of trackage. In 1904, the officers of the railroad were Louis W. Hill, president, Lord Strathcona & Mount Royal, vice president, E. Sawyer, secretary, E. T. Nichols, treasurer, M. D. Grover, general counsel, and John G. Drew, comptroller, and the members of the board of trustees were R. I. Farrington, M. D. Grover, James J. Hill, Louis W. Hill, Lord Strathcona & Mount Royal, E. Sawyer, and D. C. Shepard. In 1904, the railroad had capital stock of $20,000,000, had 3,801.656 miles of railway trackage, owned 74 bridges, and owned 1,048 trestles. The railroad operated until 1907 and was succeeded by the Great Northern RailRoad. [See note on James Jerome Hill for 240 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Louis Warren Hill for 260 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Edward Sawyer for 461 Holly Avenue.] [See note on Robert I. Farrington, Thayer B. Farrington, and John D. Farrington for 457-459 Portland Avenue.] [See note on Reuben Barney Galusha for 885 Goodrich Avenue.]

St. Paul, Minneapolis & Minnetonka RailRoad was incorporated in 1884 by John T. James, Silas Avermire, Robert Pierson, Isham J. Publes, and William Ragan to survey, construct, and operate a railway from St. Paul southwesterly to Fort Snelling, Minnesota, and Minneapolis and thence westerly to Lake Minnetonka, Minnesota. The railroad had capital stock of $250,000 and its principal place of business was Minneapolis. The railroad was organized in 1884. In 1884, the officers of the railroad were William Ragan, president, Silas Avermire, vice president, John T. James, secretary, and Robert Pierson, treasurer.

St. Paul & Minneapolis Railway Company/St. Paul & Minneapolis Rapid Transit Company: In 1889, the railroad was incorporated to construct and operate an elevated or surface railroad between St. Paul and Minneapolis. In 1889 and 1890, the railroad had capital stock of $500,000. In 1889 and 1890, P. B. Winston was the president of the railroad, S. D. Morrison was the vice-president of the railroad, and Jacob Barge was the secretary of the railroad.

St. Paul Motor & Horse RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1881. The railroad was incorporated in 1881 by A. K. Barnum, R. H. Dougan, Walter Hewitt, H. H. Horton, and Thomas L. Kerr to survey, locate, construct and operate a railway and telegraph lines from St. Paul, at or near the Harvester Works, by way of the central point in the city, to Fort Snelling. The railroad had $200,000 in corporate stock. The principal place of business of the railroad was St. Paul. [See note on Hiler Hosmer Horton for 598 Summit Avenue.]

St. Paul, New Ulm & SouthWestern RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1888 and was incorporated in 1888 by W. 0. Bredenhagen, Joseph A. Eckstein, E. O. Koch, J. S. Nelson, M. Mullen, George P. Paber, A. W. Perry, William Pfaender, and W. S. Timberlake to construct a line of railroad from St. Paul in a westerly and southwesterly direction through Chaska, Minnesota, and Carver, Minnesota, and through New Ulm, Minnesota, to some point on the Missouri river. The capital stockof the railroad was $2,000,000. The railroad's principal place of business was New Ulm, Minnesota. [See note on William Pfaender for 696 Goodrich Avenue.]

St. Paul & Northern Pacific RailRoad was organized in 1883 as the successor to the Western Railway Company of Minnesota, an 1874 Minnesota corporation, and was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1883 by George L. Becker and the board of directors of the Western Railroad Company of Minnesota to build and operate a railway from Brainerd, Minnesota, by way of Minneapolis and St. Paul and Mankato, Minnesota, to Sauk Rapids, Minnesota, and from Little Falls, Minnesota, to a point on the Western boundary of the State between Big Stone Lake, Minnesota, and Lake Traverse, Minnesota, with branch lines easterly to the State boundary, from a point between Brainerd, Minnesota, and Sauk Rapids, Minnesota, to a point along the Northern Pacific RailRoad between Brainerd, Minnesota, and Wadena, Minnesota, and to the northern boundary of the State. It had initial capital stock of $10,000,000 and its principal place of business was St. Paul. In 1883, the Northern Pacific RailRoad purchased a majority of the capital stock of the railroad. The reorganization of the railroad was part of the plan of Henry Villard to obtain additional real estate holdings for the Northern Pacific RailRoad in Minneapolis and in St. Paul to facilitate that railroad transforming itself from a local railroad to a transcontinental railroad. In 1883, John William Kendrick was the chief engineer of the St. Paul & Northern Pacific Railway. The railroad was leased to the Northern Pacific RailRoad for 999 years before 1885. In 1885, the railroad owned 125 miles of rail trackage and considered building a rail line between St. Paul and Minneapolis, including a bridge, to be built by the Winston Brothers. In 1885, the officers of the railroad were Robert Harris, president, Edward Dean Adams, vice president, George S. Jones, secretary-treasurer, A. G. Postlethwaite, comptroller, and George Gray, attorney, and the members of the board of directors were Edward Dean Adams, Frederick Billings, Charles H. Coster, Robert Harris, Thomas F. Oakes, and Charles B. Wright. Between 1883 and 1885, the railroad constructed 56.16 miles of rail line (a 66.10 mile rail line from Sauk Rapids, Minnesota, to Northtown Junction, Minnesota, from 1883 to 1884, a 3.44 mile rail line from Northtown Junction, Minnesota, to Minneapolis Terminal, Minnesota, from 1883 to 1884, a 10.08 mile rail line from Minneapolis to St. Paul from 1885 to 1886, a 1.25 mile rail line in St. Paul from 1888 to 1889, a 33.40 mile rail line from Little Falls, Minnesota, to Staples, Minnesota, in 1889, a 5.26 mile rail line from Northtown Junction, Minnesota, to St. Anthony Park, Minnesota, in 1885, a 0.76 mile rail line in Minneapolis from 1885 to 1886, a 1.01 mile rail line in Minneapolis in 1885, a 0.88 mile rail line in Minneapolis in 1885, and a 1.09 mile rail line connecting with Minnesota Transfer Railway in 1885.) In 1889, the officers of the railroad were Robert Harris, president, Thomas F. Oakes, vice president, George S. Jones, secretary-treasurer, John W. Kendrick, chief engineer, George Gray, general counsel, John H. Randall, comptroller, and Albert G. Postlethwaite, land commissioner, the members of the board of directors were Edward D. Adams, Frederick Billings, Charles H. Carter, Robert Harris, Thomas F. Oakes, James B. Williams, and Charles B. Wright, the general office of the railroad was located in St. Paul, the railroad owned a 142.43 mile main rail line between St. Paul and Brainerd, Minnesota, a 14 mile second rail line, and 71.12 miles of yard track, sidings and spurs, and the railroad was leased to the Northern Pacific RailRoad. In 1893, the officers of the railroad were James B. Williams, president, and George S. Jones, secretary-treasurer. The rail line of the railroad extended from St. Paul to Brainerd, Minnesota, and from Little Falls, Minnesota, to Staples, Minnesota. In 1896, John Henry C. Randall was the auditor of the St. Paul & Northern Pacific Railway. The railroad operated until 1896 and was succeeded by the Northern Pacific RailRoad. Colonel George Gray (1823-1892) was born in County Tyrone, Ireland, graduated from Trinity College in Dublin, Ireland, emigrated to the United States in 1860, organized and was the colonel commanding the Sixth Michigan Cavalry during the American Civil War, fought at the Battle of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, and at the Battle of Five Forks, Virginia, practiced law in Grand Rapids, Michigan, after 1866, initially was the associate counsel for the Northern Pacific RailRoad, defended the land grants received by the railroad in testimony before the Congress, was a general counsel for the Northern Pacific RailRoad in 1887, moved to New York, New York, when the general offices of the Northern Pacific RailRoad moved to New York, New York, suffered paralysis in 1889, was granted an annual pension of $8,000, about 53 percent of his prior annual compensation, by the Northern Pacific RailRoad in 1889, and died in Orange, New Jersey. Robert Harris (1830–1894,) the son of WIlliam Coffin Harris (1767- ,) an educator, and Mary Johnson Harris, was born in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, studied civil engineering in Boston, briefly studied law, became the assistant engineer for the Hartford, Providence & Fishkill RailRoad in 1852, moved to Wisconsin in 1853, assisted in the construction of the Galena & Chicago Union RailRoad, was the resident engineer for Beloit & Madison RailRoad in 1853, was the superintendent of the Racine & Mississippi RailRoad from 1856 until 1860, moved to Texas in 1860, was the superintendent of the Galveston, Houston & Henderson RailRoad in 1860, was superintendent of the Buffalo Bayou, Brazos & Colorado Railway from 1860 until 1861, was with the Quartermaster's department of the Union Army in North Carolina during the American Civil War, was the assistant general superintendent of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy RailRoad from 1863 until 1865, was the general superintendent of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy RailRoad from 1865 until 1876, was the president of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy RailRoad from 1876 until 1878, was the general manager of the New York, Lake Erie & Western RailRoad from 1878 until 1880, was the vice president of the New York, Lake Erie & Western RailRoad from 1880 until 1884, was a member of the board of directors of the Northern Pacific RailRoad from 1879 until 1890 and from 1893 until 1894, was the president of the Northern Pacific RailRoad from 1884 until 1888, resided in Rochester, New York, after 1884, was the vice president of the Northern Pacific RailRoad from 1893 until 1894, and died in Rochester, New York. George S. Jones (1846-1893) was born in Montgomery County, New York, was associated with the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western RailRoad, was associated with the New Jersey Central RailRoad, was the auditor of the Mexican National RailRoad Company, was associated with the banking house of Winslow, Lanier & Company in New York, was the manager of the Lehigh & Wilkesbarre Coal Company, was the vice president of the North American Coal Company, was the receiver for the Norfolk, Albemarle & Atlantic RailRoad Company, was the receiver of the Princess Anne Hotel, was the head of the new management team brought in to operate the Norfolk & Virginia Beach RailRoad in 1891, was the secretary-treasurer and a member of the board of directors of the Orange County RailRoad in 1893, was a Mason, was a member of the Orange Club of New York, New York, and was a member of the Virginia Club of Norfolk, Virginia. Major Albert Gayton Postlethwaite (1845- ,) the son of John Calvin Postlethwaite,was born in Pennsylvania, married Elizabeth Rebaugh Shirey in 1866, was the land commissioner of the Northern Pacific RailRoad in 1886, resided in St. Paul in 1888, was the president of the St. Paul Board of Education from 1888 until 1889, and resided in Passaic, New Jersey, in 1915. John Henry C. Randall (1831-1916,) the son of William Hannaford Randall and Elizabeth Colburn Randall, was born in Roxbury, Massachusetts, attended private school in New York, entered the wholesale silk business in 1847, married Emma Louisa Boggs (1835-1870,) the daughter of William G. Boggs, in 1851 in New York, New York, moved to Minnesota Territory in 1856, resided in St. Paul in 1856, operated William H. Randall’s real estate business from 1856 until 1862, was the general ticket agent, chief accountant, chief clerk in the engineering department, and paymaster of the St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad from 1862 until 1879, divorced Emma Louisa Boggs Randall as a consequence of her institutionalization in a sanitorium and alcohol addiction in St. Paul in 1865, married Sarah Arvila Oakes (1843-1902,) the daughter of John Mead Oakes and Minerva G. Kenyon Oakes, in 1866, was employed by the St. Paul Harvester Works from 1879 until 1886, was a right-of-way agent for the Northern Pacific RailRoad from 1886 until 1907, resided at 604 Summit Avenue in 1916, died in St. Paul, and was interred in Oakland Cemetery. Henry Villard/Ferdinand Heinrich Gustav Hilgard (1835-1900,) the son of Gustav Leonhard Hilgard ( - 1867) and Katharina Antonia Elisabeth “Lisette” Pfeiffer Hilgard, was born and raised in Speyer, Rhenish Palatinate, Kingdom of Bavaria, Germany, moved with his family to Zweibrücken, Bavaria, Germany, in 1839, attended a semi-military academy in northeastern France, attended the Gymnasium of Speyer, Bavaria, Germany, from 1850 until 1852, attended the universities of Munich and Würzburg from 1852 until 1853, emigrated to the United States without parental consent, changed his name to avoid potential deportation, resided in Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1854, resided in Belleville, Illinois, in 1855, resided in Peoria, Illinois, in 1855, resided in Chicago, Illinois, in 1856, studied law briefly, developed a career in journalism, attempted unsuccessfully to establish a colony of "free soil" Germans in Kansas in 1856, was the editor and proprietor of the Racine, Wisconsin, Volksblatt from 1856 until 1857, supported John C. Frémont in the 1856 Republican Party presidential campaign, was associated with the New Yorker Staats-Zeitung and covered the Lincoln-Douglas debates in Illinois, was a correspondent of the Commercial and visited the gold region of Colorado in 1859, was correspondent of the New York Herald in 1861, was a war correspondent covering the American Civil War and the Austro-Prussian War, married women's suffrage advocate Helen Frances Garrison, the daughter of William Lloyd Garrison, in 1866, covered the Paris Exposition in 1867, returned to Germany for his health in 1870, returned to the U.S. in 1874 to oversee German investments in the Oregon & California RailRoad, became president of the Oregon Steamship Company in 1875, became president of the Oregon and California RailRoad in 1875, was the receiver of the Kansas Pacific RailRoad in 1876, purchased the Oregon and San Francisco Steamship Line and the Oregon Steam Navigation Company in 1879, organized the Oregon and Transcontinental Company in 1880, became the president of the Northern Pacific RailRoad in 1881, returned to Europe, returned to New York in 1886, acquired the New York Evening Post and The Nation, and established the predecessor of the General Electric Corporation with Thomas A. Edison, died of a stroke in Dobbs Ferry, New York, and was interred in the Sleepy Hollow Cemetery in Sleepy Hollow, New York. James B. Williams was a member of the board of trustees of the John Day Ferguson Library in Stamford, Connecticut, in 1880, was a member of the board of directors of the Northern Pacific RailRoad in 1889, was the first vice president of the Chicago & Northern Pacific RailRoad in 1892, resided in New York, New York, in 1892, was a member of the board of directors of the St. Paul & Northern Pacific RailRoad in 1894, and resided in Stamford, Connecticut in 1894. a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/ tnhrail2.html " [See note on Edward Dean Adams for the Superior & St. Croix RailRoad.] [See note for George Loomis Becker for 194 McBoal Street.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/ tnhrail2.html " [See note on Frederick Billings for the Western RailRoad Company of Minnesota.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/tnhrail2.html" [See note on John William Kendrick for the St. Paul Union Depot Company.] [See note on Thomas Fletcher Oakes for 432 Summit Avenue.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/SumEPortTNH.html"> [See note on John Henry B. Randall for 604 Summit Avenue.]

St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad: Work began on the rail line in 1857 in the form of the Minnesota & Pacific RailRoad. William Crooks and Edmund Rice were executives of the Minnesota & Pacific RailRoad. In 1857, the recently created State of Minnesota backed a $5,000,000 bond issue to support the railroad. The successor railroad was organized in 1862. The Minnesota & Pacific RailRoad went bankrupt in 1860, the new state legislature purchased all of its assets for a mere $1,000, and, in 1862, the state legislature reorganized the bankrupt railroad as the St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad. In 1862, the railroad operated ten miles of track in Minnesota, between St. Paul and St. Anthony, Minnesota. Egbert E. Litchfield bought most of the road's stock in the early 1860’s and the railroad’s subsequent rail line construction in the 1860’s was financed primarily by Dutch bond holders. The railroad was the state's first active railroad and received a grant of 2,460,000 acres of land from the Minnesota Territorial Legislature, the seventh largest land grant of the 75 given to railroads nationwide between 1850 and 1871. The First Division-Branch was organized in 1864 and the First Division-Main was organized in 1864. In 1867, James J. Hill gets control of the terminal facilities of the St. Paul & Pacific Railroad. According to the Manual of the RailRoads of the United States For 1868-1869, published by Henry Varnum Poor in 1868, the railroad was the successor, in 1864, to the St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad Company, operated 230 miles of rail trackage from St. Paul to Watab, Minnesota, and from St. Anthony, Minnesota, to Big Stone Lake, Minnesota, had seven locomotives, six first class passenger cars, one combination passenger and baggage car, three baggage, mail and express cars, 25 box cars, 25 platform cars, 15 hand cars, and two construction cars, had as its officers George L. Becker, president, William Bachus Litchfield, vice president, Samuel S. Breed, secretary and treasurer, and F. R. Delano, general superintendent, had as its board of directors George L. Becker, Jared Benson, S. S. Breed, T. B. Campbell, F. R. Delano, Leander Gorton, and William B. Litchfield, and had its general office at St. Paul. In 1870, the Northern Pacific RailRoad purchased the St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad, but the Northern Pacific RailRoad went bankrupt in the Panic of 1873, and E. Darwin Litchfield bought the St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad. Dutch investors in the railroad forced Litchfield to allow a receiver to manage the system. In 1871, the railroad had capital stock of $1,468,600, owned 85 miles of rail trackage, owned four bridges, owned one trestle, owned six locomotives, owned six passenger cars, owned 40 freight cars, owned five company service cars, and had 235 employees. In 1871, the First Division-Branch of the railroad had capital stock of $500,000, owned 227 miles of rail trackage, owned 13 bridges, owned 127 trestles, owned 13 locomotives, owned eight passenger cars, owned 220 freight cars, owned eight company service cars, and had 324 employees. The officers of the railroad in 1871 were George L. Becker, president, Samuel S. Breed, secretary, Herman Trott, treasurer, and F. R. Delano, superintendent. In 1875, E. Q. Sewall was the superintendent of the railroad, which operated 217 miles of rail line between St. Paul and Breckinridge, Minnesota. The railroad operated until 1879 and the railroad was succeeded by the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba RailRoad. Jared Benson (1821-1894) was born in Mendon, Worcester County, Massachusetts, received an elementary school education, came to Minnesota in 1855 or 1856, was a Minnesota politician, was an unsuccessful candidate for the first Minnesota Senate in 1857, was the chairman of the Republican State Central Committee from 1858 until 1859, was the Chief Clerk of the Minnesota House of Representatives from 1859 until 1860, was a farmer, resided in Anoka in 1860, was a member of the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Anoka County, Minnesota, Benton County, Minnesota, Hennepin County, Isanti County, Minnesota, Manomin County, Minnesota, Mille Lacs County, Minnesota, and Sherburne County, Minnesota (Districts 4, 25, and 28) from 1860 until 1865, from 1878 until 1881, and from 1888 until 1891, was a Speaker of the Minnesota House of Representatives twice, from 1861 until 1862, and again in 1864, was the Minnesota state agent to look after and report on refugees from the Indian massacre in 1862, graded a considerable part of the roadbed of the St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad, served as a member of the board of regents of the University of Minnesota, was a member of the Minnesota State Agricultural Society, was a member of the board of directors and the right of way agent for the St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad, was a United States Internal Revenue collector from 1870 until 1872, was the president of the Anoka County, Minnesota, Agricultural Society in 1873, and died in St. Paul. Samuel Sidwell Breed (1831-1889,) the son of Elias Breed (1782-1845) and Betsey Randall Breed (1784-1868,) was born in Norwich, Chenango County, New York, received a common school education, began clerking in a mercantile house at New Woodstock, New York, in 1843, married Julia Elizabeth Bennett at Mexico, New York, in 1856, moved to St. Paul in 1863, was the auditor of the First Division of the St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad Company from 1864 until 1879, was the secretary of the First Division of the St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad Company in 1864, married Margaret Florence Ross, was a lay delegate to the Convention of the Episcopal Church, Diocese of Minnesota, from St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in St. Paul in 1887, and died in St. Paul. Thomas B. Campbell (1829-1897) was born in New York, was educated in New York, clerked with his brother in a mercantile firm in Havana, New York, moved to Minnesota Territory in 1854, resided in St. Paul, was employed by Cathcart & Company from 1854 until 1856, married Louisa L. Catlin (1831- ) in 1855, was employed by the Truman M. Smith bank from 1856 until 1859, opened a retail clothing store in St. Paul in 1859, was a partner with Henry Burbank in a wholesale clothing firm from 1864 until 1886, resided at 85 East Ninth Street in 1879, was a member of the board of directors of the First National Bank of St. Paul in 1881 and 1889, resided at 309 South Exchange Street in 1882, was a real estate investor, was judged insane in 1895, and died in St. Paul. Leander Gorton (1814-1889,) the son of David Gorton (1790- ) and Lydia Pierce (1792- ,) was born in Middleburg Middlebury County, Vermont, came to Minnesota Territory in 1856, married Sarah Ann Dunn Wheeler (1815-1889,) was a member of the board of county commissioners of Stearns County, Minnesota, in 1858, was the chairman of a special assembly of Stearns County, Minnesota, residents considering petitioning the federal government on the sale of federal land in 1859, resided in St. Cloud, Minnesota, in 1864, was a member of the board of directors of the First Division of the St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad in 1864, was a real estate dealer in 1876, resided in Minneapolis in 1876, and served in the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Hennepin County (District 26,) from 1875 until 1877. William Bachus Litchfield (1839-1901,) the son of Electus Backus Litchfield (1813-1888) and Hannah Maria Breed Litchfield, was born in Brooklyn, Kings County, New York, graduated from columbia College in 1858, built the Atlantic Avenue RailRoad in Brooklyn, New York, in 1859, married Emily Pope (1843-1908,) the daughter of Daniel N. Pope and Charlotte Sitgreaves Cox, in 1864, went West to Minnesota, was a contractor who built portions of the St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad, was a silent partner in his father’s warehouse business in St. Paul, associated with James J. Hill when he acquired the St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad, returned to New York, reclaimed a large portion of the Gowanus marshes in Brooklyn, New York, built the Delaware & Ulster RailRoad in 1871, lost a good portion of his fortune when the Delaware & Ulster RailRoad went bankrupt in 1873, was a trustee and vestryman of St. Jude’s Protestant Episcopal Church in Brooklyn, New York, and died of a liver ailment. [See note for George Loomis Becker for 194 McBoal Street.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/SAlbTNH.html" [See note for Henry Clay Burbank for 277 Goodrich Avenue.] a href ="http://www.msparchhistory.info/IrvineTNH.html" [See note for Colonel William Crooks for 57 Wilkin Street.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/TNHrail2.html" [See note on Francis Roach “F. R.” Delano for the Western RailRoad Company of Minnesota.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/SumEPortTNH.html"> [See note on James Jerome Hill for 240 Summit Avenue.] a href="http:// www.msparchhistory.info/MiscTNH.html" [See note on E. Darwin (Electus D.) Litchfield.] a href ="http://www.msparchhistory.info/IrvineTNH.html" " [See note for Edmund Rice for 194 McBoal Street.] [See note on the St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad for 461 Holly Avenue.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/MinnrrsTNH.html" [See note on Edmund Quincy Sewall, Jr., for the Stillwater & St. Paul RailRoad.] a href="http:// www.msparchhistory.info/DayBluffTNH.html" [See note on Truman M. Smith for 908 Mound Street.] a href="http:// www.msparchhistory.info/MiscTNH.html" [See note on Henry C. Struchen.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/TNHrail2.html" [See note on Hermann Trott for the Wadena & Park Rapids RailRoad.]

St. Paul Railway Promotion Company: The company was incorporated in 1910 by Kay Alexander, Clovis M. Converse, John D. Davidson, E. J. Dunnigan, W. J. Hoy, A. C. Orthausen, W. L. Sontag/Sonntag, H. C. Struchen, C. E. Van Kirk, and Walter L. Van Ormun to construct a network of interurban rail lines radiating from St. Paul and to operate telegraph and telephone lines in connection with trolley systems. The initial capital stock of the railroad was $400,000. In 1910, the company placed an engineering party comprised of W. J. Hoy of the Hoy Construction Company, A. H. Stem of the Reed & Stem architectural firm, L. P. Ordway of Crane & Ordway, and Phil Herzog of Herzog Iron Company in the field to survey an electric rail line from St. Paul to Mankato, Minnesota, on a route South to Farmington, Minnesota, thence South to Faribault, Minnesota, thence West to Mankato, Minnesota, by way of Waterville, Minnesota, Lake Elysian, Minnesota, Madison, Minnesota, and Eagle Lake, Minnesota. Kay Alexander was the primary force behind the railroad and the chief engineer of the railroad and W. L. Sonntag was the general manager of the railroad in 1910. The company planned for an electric rail line between Inver Grove Heights, Minnesota, to Hastings, Minnesota, letting construction contracts to the Hoy, Elzy Company in 1911, began negotiating its extension to Newport, Minnesota, St. Paul Park, Minnesota, and Langdon, Minnesota, in 1911, planned an extension to Red Wing, Minnesota, Frontenac, Minnesota, Lake City, Minnesota, Mankato, Minnesota, and Faribault, Minnesota, in 1911, and also planned an extension of its rail line from Winona, Minnesota, to La Crosse, Wisconsin, in 1911. In 1911, H. 32341 in the federal Congress authorized the St. Paul Railway Promotion Company to construct bridge across the Mississippi River at or near Nininger, Minnesota. Kay Alexander was a civil engineer who was employed at Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, as a superintendent of construction and chief engineer by Grant Smith & Company of Seattle, Washington, with a branch office in St. Paul and was a Major in the 12th Canadian Railway troops in France during World War I. Clovis M. Converse was born in New Hampshire or Vermont, was a member of the University of Minnesota Engineers' Society in 1908, graduated with an electrical engineering degree from the University of Minnesota in 1909, was a member of the St. Paul Jovian League, was the secretary of the St. Paul illumination Club in 1911, was employed by the St. Paul Gas Light Company in 1911, married Mary Josephine Smith (1884- ) in 1912, was employed by the Electric Construction Company of St. Paul in 1915, was associated with White & Converse, electrical jobbers in Minneapolis and St. Paul, in 1918, resided at 1918 Goodrich Avenue in St. Paul, and moved to Chicago, Illinois, later in the 1920’s. John D. Davidson (1845-1918) was born in Connecticut, came to Minnesota in 1853, resided in Mapleton, Minnesota, in 1906, was a farmer, was a Republican, and served in the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Waseca County, Minnesota (District 10,) from 1906 until 1908. Edward J. Dunnigan (1891-1940,) the son of John Dunnigan (1862-1906) and Bridget O Malley Dunnigan (1865-1911,) married Agnes Wessel (1889-1979,) was a general contractor located at the Guarranty Life Building in St. Paul in 1921, was retained to do brick and tile work for the church, school, and rectory of the Roman Catholic Church of St. Mary in St. Paul in 1921, owned a steam crane in Colgate, Montana, in 1929, was the president of the Associated General Contractors of Minnesota from 1937 until 1938, and died in St. Paul. William J. Hoy ( -1928) was the principal of a St. Paul-based construction company before and after World War I, resided at 1000 Portland Avenue in 1914, 1918 and 1924, and died in Ramsey County. The W. J. Hoy Company performed contract sewer construction work for St. Paul in 1897, was the general contractor for the construction of an elevated roadway through the City of Spokane, Washington, for the Nothern Pacific RailRoad in 1914, undertook drainage ditch construction in Buena Vista County, Iowa, in 1915, built snow sheds in Montana for the Great Northern RailRoad in 1916, did contract construction work for the Board of St. Paul Water Commissioners in 1918, and was the builder for the St. Paul Hotel between 1908 and 1910 and for the Cathedral of St. Paul between 1906 and 1915. W. L. Sontag resided in Evansville, Indiana, before 1909, was employed by the Des Moines & Red Oak Interurban Line located in Red Oak, Iowa, in 1909, was the manager of the Interurban Construction Company when it was granted a franchise to build an electric railway along the principal streets of Hastings, Michigan, in 1911, was the general manager of the St. Paul Southern Electric Company in 1915, and was involved as president of the Fivay Improvement Company in the planning, with M. L. Waggonee, of a 12 mile interurban railway from Tarpon Springs, Florida, and Fivay, Florida, in 1915. Clark E. Van Kirk was a partner in the architectural firm of Cederberg & Van Kirk before 1919, which built the Albert Lea Art Center/Bessessen Historic Opera House Building in 1916, engaged in a solo practice of architecture at the Oppenheim Building in St. Paul in 1919, built the First National Bank of White Bear in White Bear Lake, Minnesota, in 1921, and assisted Edwin Lundie in designing St. John's Church in the Wilderness in White Bear Lake, Minnesota, from 1956 until 1961. a href="http:// www.msparchhistory.info/LinwoodTNH.html" [See the note on the Herzog Iron Works for 936 St. Clair Avenue.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/SumEPortTNH.html"> [See note on Lucius Pond Ordway for 400 Summit Avenue.] a href="http:// www.msparchhistory.info/LinwoodTNH.html" [See note on the St. Paul Gas Light Company for 761 West Linwood Avenue.] a href="http:// www.msparchhistory.info/MiscTNH.html" [See note on Allen H. Stem.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/TNHrail2.html" [See note on W. L. Sonntag for the St. Paul Southern Electric RailRoad.]

St. Paul, Rochester & Iowa RailRoad: The railroad was authorized by the Minnesota Legislature shortly after statehood in 1857. The railroad was incorporated in 1871 by W. L. Brackenridge, J. V. Daniels, D. Heaney, and others to construct and operate a rail line from St. Paul through Rochester, Minnesota, to the Minnesota-Iowa border. The railroad was organized in 1871 and had $3,000,000 in capital stock. Walter Lowry Brackenridge (1824-1899,) was born in Butler County, Pennsylvania, was educated in the public schools of Meadville, Pennsylvania, graduated from an academy at Kingsville, Ohio, read the law in Meadville, Pennsylvania, was admitted to the practice of law in Meadville, Pennsylvania, practiced law in Meadville, Pennsylvania, until 1855, married Margaret McL. Logan in Pennsylvania in 1855, moved to Rochester, Minnesota, in 1855, was the attorney for the Winona & St. Peter RailRoad, was a real estate investor, was an incorporator of the New Ulm, Redwood & Big Stone Lake Railway Company in 1871, was an incorporator of the St. Paul, Rochester & Iowa RailRoad in 1871, bred American Short-Horned cattle, bred American Poland-China pigs, resided in Rochester, Minnesota, in 1871, was a member of the Calvary Episopalian Church in Rochester, Minnesota, in 1872 and in 1885, was a member of the board of directors of the Union National Bank of Rochester, Minnesota, in 1883, was the secretary of the Guarranty Savings & Loan in Rochester, Minnesota, in 1899, and died in Rochester, Minnesota. John V. “J. V.” Daniels (1809-1881) was born in Summit, Schoharie County, New York, attended elementary school in New York, was a school teacher, married Hester Ann Wheeler in 1832, was a dry goods merchant, read the law in Schoharie County, New York, moved to Bradford, Pennsylvania, in 1840, held local political office in Pennsylvania in the 1840’s, came to Minnesota in 1856, was admitted to the practice of law in Minnesota, was the treasurer of the Olmsted County, Minnesota, Bible Society in 1856, initially was a Democrat, was the founder and president of the Union National Bank of Rochester, Minnesota, from 1858 until 1882, was the Rochester, Minnesota, street commissioner from 1858 until 1859, was the postmaster of Rochester, Minnesota, in 1859, was a Rochester, Minnesota, alderman from 1859 until 1861, was a real estate broker, was the Rochester, Minnesota, treasurer and surveyor from 1860 until 1862, was the Rochester, Minnesota, treasurer and assessor from 1862 until 1864, was a Republican, was the mayor of Rochester, Minnesota, from 1865 until 1866, was a lawyer, was a Baptist, was Minnesota Sabbath School Convention president in 1866, served in the Minnesota Senate representing Olmsted County, Minnesota, and Wabasha, County, Minnesota (District 12,) from 1861 until 1869, was unmarried in 1862, was a widower in 1863, was an investor in the LaCrescent, Rochester & Yankton RailRoad in 1866, was married in 1868, was a member of the board of directors of the Rochester & Northern Minnesota RailRoad in 1869, was a banker, was a trustee of the Minnesota Baptist State Convention in 1870, served in the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Olmsted County, Minnesota, (District 10,) from 1874 until 1876, served in the Minnesota Senate representing Olmsted County, Minnesota, (District 10,) from 1875 until 1881, and was a widower in 1875. Captain Daniel D. Heaney was born in the Isle of Man, emigrated to the United States before 1855, resided in Indiana, moved to Minnesota in 1855, settled in Rochester, Minnesota, and was the chief clerk at John R. Cook’s store, was a part proprietor of a store at Durango/New Haven, Minnesota, was a resident of Rochester, Minnesota, in 1861, was the Captain of Company C of the Second Minnesota Regiment during the American Civil War, fought at the Battle of Mill Springs in Kentucky in 1862, was a member of the Rochester, Minnesota, organizing committee that hosted the 1866 Minnesota State Fair at Rochester, Minnesota, built the Heaney Block in Rochester, Olmsted County, Minnesota,in 1866 that were struck by a tornado in 1883, was a member of the executive of the Minnesota State Agricultural Society in 1869, was the mayor of Rochester, Minnesota, from 1869 until 1870, was an enthusiastic horseman and introduced Kentucky stock in Olmsted County, Minnesota, and raised thoroughbred horses that were shown at the Minnesota State Fair in 1872, resided at the Minnesota Old Soldier’s Home in Minneapolis in 1910. a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/tnhrail2.html" [See note on William Logan Brackenridge for the Sleepy Eye Lake & Minnesota River RailRoad.]

St. Paul & St. Anthony RailRoad/St. Paul & St. Anthony Falls RailRoad: The railroad was chartered by Territorial Laws of Minnesota 1853, Chapter 12, amended by Territorial Laws of Minnesota 1856, Chapter 33, and was incorporated in 1853 by Alfred E. Ames, Adna P. Balch, Daniel S. Balch, C. Carli, Emanuel Case, James W. Davis, George Johnson, Eli Kinney, William L. Larned, William P. Murray, Alexander Ramsey, Edmund Rice, John Rollins, R. P. Russell, Luke P. N. Smith, R. M. Spencer, Henry A. Swift, and James Wells. The railroad was intended to construct and operate a rail lline between St. Paul and St. Anthony, Minnesota. The railroad was revived in 1856 by Territorial Laws of Minnesota 1856, Chapter 33. The organizing legislation was revived in 1868 and 1872. The railroad was organized in 1871. The railroad became the St. Paul Street Railway Company and received its first franchise from the City of St. Paul in 1872. Alfred Elisha “A. E.” Ames (1814-1874) was born on a farm near Colchester, Vermont, moved West to Illinois in 1834, was a Mason in the Joliet, Illinois, Lodge U. D., in 1840, resided in Illinois until 1849, founded and was the master of Masonic lodges at Belvidere, Illinois, Rockton, Illinois, Roscoe, Illinois, and Rockford, Illinois, was a representative in the Illinois House of Representatives, was a member of the Illinois Senate in 1849, was a physician, came to St. Anthony, Minnesota, for his health in 1851 or 1852, served in the Territorial House of Representatives representing Dakota County, Minnesota (District 6,) from 1852 until 1854, was one of the founders of the City of Minneapolis, was the first president and one of the founders of the Hennepin County Medical Society in 1855, was a member of the Territorial Democratic Constitutional Convention representing Hennepin County (District 11) in 1857, was a judge of probate, was the postmaster of Minneapolis, was a member of the state normal school board, founded, with Dr. David B. Knickerbocker, a hospital for destitute sick people in 1871, which later became St. Barnabas Hospital, was an Episcopalian, and died in Minneapolis. Adna Perkins Balch (1817- 1889,) the son of Joshua Balch (1778-1883) and Nancy P. Shaw Balch (1780-1850,) was born in Lyme, Grafton County, New Hampshire, married Julia A. Drake (1821-1855) in 1842, was a contractor, with Samuel Zimmerman (1815-1857,) in building the Cobourg & Peterborough Railway in 1852, married Susan Brewster Bibby (1834-1889) in 1856, was a justice of the peace in Hanover, New Hampshire, in 1864, was a member of the board of directors of the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe RailRoad between 1868 and 1871, contracted to build the Montreal & City of Ottawa Junction Railway in 1874, made a considerable fortune in early railroad investments, was a member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives in 1876, was a partner of J. D. Champlin in Champlin, Balch & Company of St. Louis, Missouri, and was a leading citizen of Hanover, New Hampshire. Daniel S. Balch resided in Bradford, Orange County, Vermont, in 1839 and registered the invention of a bridle bit in 1839. Emanuel Case (1796-1871) was born in Canaan, Columbia County, New York, moved to Michigan in 1832, settled in and built, with Harry Gilbert, the first grist mill in Manchester, Washtenaw County, Michigan, built the first hotel and first saw mill in Manchester, Michigan, in 1832, was appointed a Justice in 1833 by the Michigan territorial government, married Mary Ripley (1799-1847,) resided in Coloma, El Dorado Co. California, in 1850, married Mahala E. __?__ (1833- ,) moved to Hennepin County in 1851, owned the first store in St. Anthony, Minnesota, ran a ferry across the Mississippi River in 1852 under Territorial Laws 1862, Chapter 34, was the president of the company that built the first suspension bridge over the Mississippi River in 1855, served in the American Civil War, was a member of the Minnesota State Agricultural Society, was a Mason, and died in Minneapolis. James W. Davis (1824-1907) was born in New York, married Caroline V. Hubbard (1826-1885,) the daughter of James Hubbard (1802-1888) and Catherine Hamilton Hubbard (1805-1863,) and died in Minneapolis. Eli Kinney (1810-1884) was born in Portsmouth, Ohio, married Martha S. Lodwick, moved to Cincinnati, Ohio, formed E. Kinney & Company, founded of the Portsmouth branch of the State Bank of Ohio in 1846, moved to Fort Thomas, Kentucky, in 1867, was a member of the board of directors of the Kentucky & Great Eastern RailRoad in 1875, was a member of the board of directors of the Harrison Branch RailRoad Company in 1877, and was buried in the Spring Grove Cemetery of Cincinnati, Ohio. William L. Larned (1817-1873) was born at North Oxford, Massachusetts, moved to New York, engaged in the mercantile business, married Elizabeth Julia Benson in 1843, moved to Hudson, Michigan, engaged in the mercantile business, moved to Minnesota for his health in 1849, resided in St. Anthony, Minnesota, in 1851, served in the Minnesota Territorial Council representing Dakota County, Minnesota, Hennepin County, and Ramsey County (District 3,) from 1851 until 1854, was a founder of Anoka, Minnesota, in 1854, moved to Anoka, Minnesota, in 1854, built a flour mill, was a Second Lieutenant in the First Minnesota Regiment in 1861 during the American Civil War, was wounded at the Battle of Bull Run, transferred to the Signal Corps in 1862, later served with the Army of the Shenandoah, then was a private in the First Minnesota Mounted Rangers in 1862, was mustered out in 1863, was a member of the James Fisk wagon train party from Minnesota to Montana in 1864, resided in Idaho Territory, returned to Michigan in 1869, was the treasurer for the Michigan Women's Suffrage Association, died of smallpox in Lansing, Michigan, and was buried in Mount Hope Cemetery, Lansing, Ingham County, Michigan. John Rollins (1806-1883) was born in New Sharon, Maine, resided in various places in Maine, married Betsey Martin in Newport, Maine, in 1832, was a partner of Ard Godfrey (1813- ,) moved to St. Anthony Falls, Minnesota, in 1848, was a Democrat, engaged in lumbering, was a steam boat owner and operator, served in Minnesota Territorial Council representing Dakota County, Minnesota, Hennepin County, and Ramsey County (District 5,) from 1849 until 1852, and from 1855 until 1857, built a sawmill with a granite stone boiler house on the Minneapolis riverfront in 1871, and died in Minneapolis. Roswell Phillip “R. P.” Russell (1820-1896) was born in Vermont, moved to Michigan in 1836, moved from Prairie du Chien, Michigan Territory, to Fort Snelling in 1839, worked in the Indian trade until 1845, opened the first store in St. Anthony Falls, Minnesota, around 1847, resided in St. Anthony, Minnesota, was a merchant, married Marian Patch, built the first frame house in St. Anthony, Minnesota, was a Ramsey County county commissioner from 1850 until 1853, served in the Minnesota Territorial House of Representatives representing Hennepin County and Ramsey County (District 3,) from 1852 until 1854, was the receiver in the United States Land Office at Minneapolis after 1854, platted Waconia, Minnesota Territory, in 1857, was the chairman of Minneapolis Township from 1858 until 1859, owned three of the four islands in Lake of the Isles in the late 1870’s, and was a member of the Minneapolis school board in the mid-1880’s. R. M. Spencer ( -1865) was born in Kentucky, moved to Minnesota in 1850, was a incorporator of the St. Paul Lodge Number Two of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows in 1851, was the captain of the steamboat Reveille on the Minnesota River in 1856, was the captain of the steamboat Fire Canoe on the Mississippi and Minnesota Rivers in 1857and died in St. Paul. Henry Adoniram Swift (1823-1869,) the son of Isaac Swift, M. D., and Eliza Thompson Swift, was born in Ravenna, Ohio, attended the common schools of Ravenna, Ohio, graduated from Western Reserve College in Hudson, Ohio, in 1842, tutored the children of a slave owner in Mississippi, returned to Ohio, read the law in the law firm of Tilden & Ranney, earned a law degree, was admitted to the practice of law in Ohio in 1845, was the assistant clerk of the Ohio House of Representatives from 1846 until 1847, was the chief clerk of the Ohio House of Representatives from 1847 until 1849, began a career in business and government service, married Ruth Livingston ( -1881) in 1851, was the secretary of the Portage County Insurance Company, moved to Minnesota in 1853, settled first in St. Paul in 1853, was a real estate and an insurance agent, then moved to St. Peter, Minnesota, in 1856, was the register of the United States Land Office in St. Peter, Minnesota, from 1856 until 1859, traveled to Washington, D. C., to obtain a federal grant of land for newly created railroads, ran unsuccessfully on the Republican ticket for the United States Congress in 1857, was a partner in the St. Peter Land Company, was a Republican, was a member of the Minnesota Senate representing Brown County, Minnesota, Davis County, Minnesota, Nicollet County, Minnesota, Pierce County, Minnesota, Renville County, Minnesota, Sibley County, Minnesota, and Watonwan County, Minnesota (District 19,) from 1861 until 1863 and from 1864 until 1866, served in the defense of New Ulm, Minnesota, as part of the St. Peter Frontier Guards during the U. S.-Dakota War of 1862, served as the president of the Minnesota Senate, became the Lieutenant Governor of Minnesota when Ignatius Donnelly resigned from the position to serve in the United States House of Representatives in 1863, was a reluctant candidate for the U.S. Senate in 1863, became Governor of Minnesota when Alexander Ramsey resigned from the position to serve in the United States Senate later in1863, was an ex officio member of the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota in 1863 and 1864, died of typhoid fever in St. Peter, Minnesota, and was buried in the Maple Grove Cemetery in Ravenna, Ohio. a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/SAlbTNH.html" [See note for Dr. Christopher Carli, Lydia Brown Carli, and Paul Carli for 631 Goodrich Avenue.] [See note on William Pitt Murray for 817 Osceola Avenue.] a href ="http://www.msparchhistory.info/IrvineTNH.html" [See note on Alexander Ramsey for 265 South Exchange Street.] [See note for Edmund Rice for 194 McBoal Street.]

St. Paul & St. Croix Falls RailRoad was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1885 by Henry A. Boardman, William Dawson, Jr., Frank B. Jilson, Patrick T. Kavanaugh, and Edmund Rice, Jr., to build a railway from St. Paul via White Bear Lake, Minnesota, to St. Croix Falls, Wisconsin. It had initial capital stock of $1,000,000 and its principal place of business was St. Paul. The railroad was organized in 1886. The St. Paul & St. Croix RailRoad was chartered in Minnesota and was authorized to build a line 24 miles in length from Trout Brook Junction (located 2.5 miles north of St. Paul) northeastward to the St. Croix River. The St. Croix & Chippewa Falls RailRoad was chartered in Wisconsin, was authorized to project its right-of-way eastward from a point on the east bank of the St. Croix River opposite the terminal rails of the St. Paul & St. Croix RailRoad to Chippewa Falls, a distance of 78 miles. The railroad operated in 1888, was initially succeeded by the Minnesota, St. Croix & Wisconsin RailRoad in 1888, and was eventually succeeded by the Wisconsin Central RailRoad in 1888. Frank Burlingame Jilson ( -1894,) the son of John B. Jilson and Frances Burlingame Jilson, was an organiazer of the Northwestern Telephone Exchange Company in 1878, was the manager of the Northwestern Telegraph Company in 1879, resided at 149 Wabasha Street in St. Paul in 1879, was the secretary of the Northwestern Telephone Exchange Company in 1879, married Caroline Abigail Beals (1857- ,) the daughter of Samuel James Beals and Susan Burrill Greene Beals, in 1880, was the special telegraphist assigned to the “Villard Excursion” railroad trip through the American West in 1883, resided at 134 Nina Avenue in St. Paul in 1887, and died at the Seville in St. Paul. [See note on Henry A. Boardman for 598 Lincoln Avenue.] [See note on William Dawson for 682 Fairmount Avenue.] [See note for Edmund Rice for 194 McBoal Street.] [See note on St. Paul & St. Croix RailRoad for 877 Goodrich Avenue.]

St. Paul & St. Croix RailRoad was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1884 by Brigham Bliss, Edwin A. Jaggard, William H. Lightner, Howard Morris, and Henry B. Wenzell to acquire, construct and maintain for hire railway lines in Ramsey County and in Washington County, Minnesota. The railroad had capital stock of $480,000 and its principal place of business was St. Paul in 1884. James G. Flanders was an investor in the railroad. The railroad was organized iearly n 1884. The St. Paul & St. Croix RailRoad and the St. Croix & Chippewa Falls RailRoad were merged into the Minnesota, St. Croix & Wisconsin RailRoad later in 1884, which in turn was merged with the Wisconsin Central Company in 1887. A portion of the Gateway Trail in Washington County was right of way land originally owned by the St. Paul & St. Croix RailRoad. Brigham Bliss (1854- ,) the son of Horace Griswold Bliss (1824- ) and Marianne Brigham Bliss (1828- ,) was born in Jackson, Jackson County, Mississippi, graduated from the University of Wisconsin with a bachelor’s degree in 1877, married Caroline Rosa Kellogg (1858- ,) the daughter of LaFayette Kellogg (1819-1878) and Rosa Ormsby Catlin Kellogg (1824-1863,) was the teller of the First National Bank of St. Paul in 1900, was the treasurer of the Minnesota Alumni Association of the University of Wisconsin in 1903, was a bookkeeper for the Northern Pacific Railway at St. Paul, in 1906, and resided at 877 Goodrich Avenue in St. Paul in 1906. James Greeley Flanders (1844-1922,) the son of Walter Powers Flanders (1805-1883) and Susan Everett Creeley Flanders (1811 – 1888,) was born in New London, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, moved with his family to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in 1848, entered Phillips Academy at Exeter, New Hampshire, graduated in 1861, taught for two years, graduated from Yale College in 1867, read the law for a year with Emmons & Van Dyke, graduated from the law department of Columbia College, New York, in 1869, was admitted to the practice of law in New York and in Wisconsin in 1869, was a lawyer, married Mary C. Haney, the daughter of Robert Haney, was a member of the school board from 1875 to 1877, was a president of the Milwaukee Public Library, represented the First ward in the Wisconsin General Assembly in 1877, was a delegate at large to the Democratic Party national convention in Chicago in 1889, protested the nomination of William Jennings Bryan, was elected a delegate to the convention of the sound money Democrats which met in Indianapolis, Indiana, in 1889, was the court-appointed defense counsel for John Flammang Schrank, accused of the 1912 attempted assassination of Theodore Roosevelt in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, was the president of the Wisconsin Bar Association from 1909 until 1910, was the president of the Yale Alumni Association of Wisconsin in 1910, resided in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in 1910, was a member of the Milwaukee County Club, was a member of the Milwaukee Town Club, was a member of the Milwaukee Old Settlers' Club, was a member of the Milwaukee Club, was a member of the Yale Club of Chicago, Illinois, was a member of the Yale Club of New York, was a member of the Graduates' Club of New Haven, Connecticut, died in Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin, and was buried in the Forest Home Cemetery, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin. Howard Morris (1856- ) was born at Madison, Wisconsin, graduated from the Madison, Wisconsin, high school, was a prep school and college friend of T. S. Eliot, graduated from the University of Wisconsin in 1877, graduated from the University of Wisconsin Law School in 1879, was a member of Hesperia, was a charter member of both Calliope and Linonia, practiced law in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, was the head of the law department of the Wisconsin Central Railway Company, married Julia A. Robertson of St. Paul in 1886, resided in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in 1888, was the president and a memberof the board of directors of the Oshkosh Transportation Company in 1890, was a subscriber of the Draper-Durrie Portrait Fund in 1891, was the president of the Wisconsin Central RailRoad in 1892, was a special assistant attorney for the Western district of Wisconsin in 1895, was the receiver of the Wisconsin Central RailRoad in 1898, was the first vice president and treasurer of the Milwaukee & Lake Winnebago RailRoad in 1899, and was the first vice president of the Chicago, Wisconsin & Minnesota RailRoad Company in 1899. [See note on Edwin Ames Jaggard for 284 South Exchange Street.] [See note on William Hurley Lightner for 318 Summit Avenue.] a href="http:// www.msparchhistory.info/SAlbTNH.html " [See note on Henry Burleigh Wenzell for 543 Lincoln Avenue.]

St. Paul & St. Vincent RailRoad: The railroad connected with the Pembina Branch rail line of the Canadian Pacific RailRoad at Emerson, Minnesota Territory, on the U. S.-Canadian border, in 1878. C. H. Beaulieu was a principal promoter of the planned railroad and Henry M. Rice was responsible for obtaining federal legislation for the building of a railroad, incorporated as the St. Paul & St. Vincent RailRoad. The St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad completed an extension to St. Vincent, Minnesota, in 1878. Col. Clement Hudon “Uncle Clem” Beaulieu, Sr. (1811-1893,) Gay-Bah-Ke-Wen-Zie, the son of Bazile/Bazil Hudon de Beaulieu, a voyageur of the Northwest Fur Company, and Margaret Racine Beaulieu,O-ge-mau-gee-shi-go-quay (Queen of the Skies,) was born at Lac de Flambeau, Oneida County, Michigan Territory, came to Wisconsin Territory that later became Minnesota Territory in 1837 to found for the American Fur Company a permanent trading-post for the fur trade with the Indians at the slit mouth of the Crow Wing River, married Elizabeth Farling (1816-1903,) the daughter of James Farling, a missionary, and Anne Fraser Farling, in 1840, was justice of the peace in La Pointe County, Wisconsin, in 1848, was at one time the agent in charge of the Fond du Lac department of the American Fur Company (J. J. Astor,) with its headquarters at Fond du Lac, Minnesota, formed a partnership with John Fairbanks and, as Beaulieu & Fairbanks, became the principal supplier of all Anishinaabe Indian posts, was one of the initial county commissioners of Crow Wing County in 1879, died after breaking his leg at White Earth, Becker County, Minnesota, and was buried at the Calvary Cemetery, White Earth, Becker County, Minnesota. a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/SAlbTNH.html" [See note on Henry Mower Rice for 4 Crocus Hill.]

St. Paul & Sioux City RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1871. The St. Paul & Sioux City RailRoad Company was a Minnesota corporation. In the late 1860's, the St. Paul & Sioux City RailRoad was working its way through the Southern Minnesota countryside from St. Paul and constructed depots in Le Sueur, Minnesota, St. Peter, Minnesota, and Mankato, Minnesota. In late 1869, the trestle work across Minneopa Creek was completed and the railroad eventually continued on to Lake Crystal, Minnesota. The railroad acquired the Minnesota Valley Railroad in 1870, the Worthington & Sioux Falls Railroad in 1879, the Minnesota & Black Hills Railroad in 1879, the Sioux City & St. Paul Railroad in 1879, and the Saint Paul, Stillwater & Taylors Falls Rail Road in 1880. In 1871, the railroad had capital stock of $4,000,000, operated 131.5 miles of rail trackage, owned 11 bridges, owned 81 trestles, owned 11 locomotives, owned six passenger cars, owned 184 frieght cars, owned four company service cars, owned 292,327 acres of Congressional grant land, and had 280 employees. In 1871, the officers of the railroad were Elias F. Drake, president, John L. Merriam, vice president, George A. Hamilton, secretary and auditor, Horace Thompson, treasurer, and John F. Lincoln, superintendent, and the members of the board of directors were C. H. Bigelow, Russell Blakely, J. C. Burbank, William F. Davidson, Elias F. Drake, George A. Hamilton, H. G. Harrison, T. A. Harrison, Samuel F. Hersey, John L. Merriam, J. W. Pence, John S. Prince, Henry H. Sibley, Horace Thompson, and A. H. Wilder. In 1875, the officers of the railroad were E. F. Drake, president, J. L. Merriam, vice president, J. F. Lincoln, superintendent, H. Thompson, treasurer, and G. A. Hamilton, secretary, and the railroad operated a 270 mile rail line between St. Paul and Sioux city, Dakota Territory. In 1878, the railroad had capital stock of $5,000,000, operated 121.27 miles of rail trackage, including 5.2 miles from St. Paul to Mendota, Minnesota, operated jointly with the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad, owned 18 stations, owned seven bridges, owned 57 trestles, owned 16 locomotives, owned ten passenger cars, owned 492 freight cars, and owned 54 company cars. In 1880, the officers of the railroad were E. F. Drake, president, J. L. Merriam, vice president, G. A. Hamilton, secretary, and Horace Thompson, treasurer, and the members of the board of directors were C. H. Bigelow, J. W. Bishop, Russell Blakely, E. F. Drake, G. A. Hamilton, H. G. Harrison, T. A. Harrison, R. F. Hersey, J. L. Merriam, W. R. Merriam, John S. Prince, William Rhodes, H. H. Sibley, Horace Thompson, and A. H. Wilder. The railroad operated until 1881 and was succeeded by the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha RailRoad. In 1882, the railroad owned 15,682.76 acres of land in Minnesota and operated 158.63 miles of rail trackage in Iowa, Minnesota, and the Dakota Territory. George A. Hamilton was a member of the executive committee of the Minnesota Historical Society in 1871, was a member of the board of directors of the Sioux City & Nebraska RailRoad Company in 1875, was the treasurer of the Roman Catholic Diocese of St. Paul in 1879, was the treasurer of the St. Paul & Sioux City RailRoad and the treasurer of the Sioux City & St. Paul RailRoad in 1880, and was the treasurer of the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha RailRoad in 1881. John F. Lincoln ( -1889) was the superintendent of the St. Paul & Sioux City RailRoad in 1867 and in 1871, was the superintendent of the Sioux City & St. Paul RailRoad in 1876, and was the president of the Railway Loan Association in 1881. John Wesley Pence (1829-1893,) the son of Jacob Pence and Barbara A. Null Pence, was born in Springboro/Springborough, Warren County, Ohio, was educated in rural schools, farmed in Mount Holly, Ohio, opened a country store, successively added to the store a flour mill, a saw mill , and a distillery, moved to Columbus, Ohio, operated a distillery and flour mill as part of the partnership of Pence & Monypeny, sold the distillery and flour mill in 1860, moved to Louisville, Kentucky, was in the produce commission business with his brother as E. H. & J. W. Pence, moved to Minneapolis for his health in 1865, was a business associate of E. F. Drake, invested in the St. Paul & Sioux City RailRoad, was a financier, married Laura A. Ewell/Ewall (1840-1878) in Minneapolis in 1871, organized, with Judge W. W. Woods, and was the president of the City Bank of Minneapolis in 1872, built the Pence Opera House on the corner of Hennepin Avenue and Second Street in Minneapolis, invested in mines and agricultural land in California, Ohio, Michigan, Minnesota, and the Dakota Territory, died in National City, California, and was buried in Lakewood Cemetery in Minneapolis. William Rhodes was the treasurer of the La Crosse & Minnesota Steam Packet Company and the Northwestern Packet Company in 1866, was a St. Paul City alderman from 1868 until 1870 and from 1877 until 1880, was a member of the board of directors of the Merchants National Bank in 1873, resided at 555 Summit Avenue in St.Paul from 1885 to 1886, and was a partner of George H. Ranney in an iron manufacturing works along the levee in St. Paul in 1893 under St. Paul Ordinance #1556. William Rhodes (1851- ) was born in Covington, Kentucky, moved to St. Paul with his family in 1855, received a collegiate education, and was a partner in the firm of Breuer & Rhodes, a steel, iron and general hardware wholesale dealer in St. Paul. [See note for Charles Henry Bigelow for 415 Laurel Avenue.] [See note on Judson Wade Bishop and Mary Libania Axtell Bishop for 720 Fairmount Avenue.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/tnhrail2.html" [See note for Russell Blakeley for the Southern Minnesota RailRoad.] [See note on J. C. Burbank for 432 Summit Avenue.] [See note on William F. Davidson for 400 Summit Avenue.] [See the note for Elias Franklin Drake for 324 Bates Avenue.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/TNHrail2.html" [See note on George A. Hamilton for the Southern Minnesota RailRoad.] [See note for Hugh G. Harrison for 2309 First Avenue South.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/tnhrail2.html" [See note on T. A. Harrison for the Southern Minnesota RailRoad.] [See note on Roscoe Hersey for 467 Portland Avenue.] [See note on John L. Merriam and William Rush Merriam for 4 Crocus Hill.] [See note on John S. Prince for 339 Summit Avenue.] [See the note on Henry Hastings Sibley for 614 North Fountain Place.] [See note on Horace E. Thompson for 808 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Amherst H. Wilder for 255 Summit Avenue.]

St. Paul Southern Electric RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in Delaware in 1913, was organized in 1914, and operated until 1928. The "Southern" was intended to connect St. Paul, Hastings, Minnesota, Pine Bend, Minnesota, Cannon Falls, Minnesota, Red Wing, Minnesota, Frontenac, Minnesota, Lake City, Minnesota, Mankato, Minnesota, Inver Grove, Minnesota, Faribault, Minnesota, and Rochester, Minnesota. In 1912, W. L. Sonntag was the general manager of the railroad. This electric passenger line was an extension of the Twin City Rapid Transit from the Linden and Concord Streets wye at the South St. Paul, Minnesota-Inver Grove Heights, Minnesota, city limits to Second and Tyler Streets in Hastings, Minnesota, 18 miles away, using four cars. A 23-mile extension between Hastings, Minnesota, and White Rock, Minnesota, was planned, but never built. In 1914, the railroad purchased four 51 foot interurban cars from the Niles Car & Manufacturing Company. In 1914, the line opened between Hastings, Minnesota, and Inver Grove, Minnesota, with 25 scheduled trips daily. In 1915, the railroad reached an agreement with the St. Paul City RailRoad for the use of its tracks within St. Paul. The railroad had 17.54 miles of rail trackage, never built the railway south of Hastings, Minnesota, and had the reputation of being one of the least successful interurban railroads in the country. In 1916, the officers of the railroad was A.Hirschman, president, Irving Todd, Jr., vice president, John Heinen, secretary-treasurer, Kay Todd, general counsel, W. L. Sonntag, general manager, H. A. Genung, chief engineer, and J. J. MacDonald, general superintendent, and the members of the board of directors of the railroad were T. H. Bun, A. Hirschman, Loomis F. Irish, William La Plante, W. L. Mayo, G. O. Miller, A. T. Rosen, Foster B. Seager, Irving Todd, Jr., and A. R. Walbridge. In 1917, the officers of the railroad were Irving Todd, Jr., president, Otto Ackerman, vice president, C. A. Linkey, secretary-treasurer, and R. M. LaBelle, general superintendent, the members of the board of directors of the railroad were Otto Ackerman, T. A. Brown, T. H. Bunn, A. Hirschman, Frank W. Finch, Foster B. Seager, Irving Todd, Jr., and E. E. Tuttle, and the general office of the railroad was in Hastings, Minnesota. The railroad went into receivership in 1918. The McGraw transit directory, published in 1918 by the McGraw-Hill Publishing Company, indicates that the railroad operated 17.54 miles of rail trackage from St. Paul by way of Inver Grove, Minnesota, to Hastings, Minnesota, owned four motor passenger cars and one other car, purchased energy from the River Falls Power Company, had repair shops in Inver Grove, Minnesota, and Hastings, Minnesota, had as its receiver E. E. Tuttle, had as its officers Irving Todd, Jr., president, Otto Ackerman, vice president, R. M. La Belle, secretary and treasurer, P. Kuckler, auditor, and A. R. Walbridge, general manager, and had its general office at Hastings, Minnesota. A. R. Walbridge was the first receiver of the railroad. E. E. Tuttle was the receiver in 1925 and C. P. Kuckler was the assistant manager of the railroad in 1925. Competition with bus service caused the railroad to collapse by 1928, with its trackage acquired by the Twin City Rapid Transit Company, but it abandoned the tracks in 1933. Thomas H. Bunn (1866- ,) the son of Isaac Bunn ( -1887) and Cynthia Cryley Bunn ( -1905,) was born in Pine Island Township, Minnesota, received his education in Pine Island, Minnesota, common schools, farmed until 1884, entered the drug store business in 1884, married Florence Miller, the daughter of Charles A. Miller, in 1892, opened his own drug store, the City Drug Store, in Pine Island, Minnesota, in 1893, the City Drug Store, managed the Pine Island, Minnesota, telephone exchange system from 1900 until 1908, operated the Oronoco, Minnesota, telephone exchange with L. L. Cornwell from 1900 until 1903, owned a creamery in Pine Island, Minnesota, was a member of the board of trustees of the Methodist Episcopal Church in Pine Island, Minnesota, was a Democrat, was a Mason, and was a Modern Woodman. H. A. Genung was the chief engineer of the Vinita & Western RailRoad in Indian Territory (Oklahoma) in 1904, was the chief engineer of the Evansville & Eastern Electric RailRoad in 1905, was involved in lead and zinc mining in Missouri in 1906, was the chief engineer of the New Iberia, Lafayette & Northwestern Railway Company in 1912, resided in New Iberia, Louisiana, in 1912, and was the chief engineer of the St. Paul Southern Electric RailRoad and was charged with the direction of the railroad South of Hastings, Minnesota in 1916. John Heinen resided at 705 Vermillion Street, Hastings, Minnesota, in 1890, was the cashier of the First National Bank of Hastings, Minnesota, in 1899, was the secretary-treasurer and a member of the board of directors of the Farmers Trust Company of Hastings, Minnesota, was the registrar of deeds for Dakota County, Minnesota, in 1909, and was the county chairman of the Dakota County Liberty Loan Organization in 1917. Loomis F. Irish (1856-1937,) the son of Joseph Irish ( -1890) and Evelyn Newton Irish ( -1878,) was born at Colden/Ripley, New York, was educated in New York common schools and in the public schools of Dodge County, Minnesota, moved with his family to Minnesota in 1865, resided in Rochester, Minnesota, in 1865, moved with his family to Goodhue County, Minnesota, in 1867, farmed until 1868, moved to Dodge County, Minnesota, until 1873, married Lucy Lura/Lura S. Hawkins (1859-1940,) the daughter of J. F. Hawkins (1829-1887) and Mahalia Phelps Brink Hawkins (1830-1888,) in 1877, moved to Olmstead County, Minnesota, until 1878, moved to Pine Island, Minnesota, in 1878, began in the banking business in 1882, was the owner of the Bank of Pine Island, Goodhue County, Minnesota, was the proprietor of the Pine Island Roller Mills, manufactured brick, operated the Pine Island roller mill, was the proprietor of the Peoples’ Opera House in Pine Island, Minnesota, was the proprietor of the brick yards in Pine Island, Minnesota, was the proprietor of the electric light plant in Pine Island, Minnesota, was the receiver of the Farmers Indemnity Mutual Hail Insurance Company of Pine Island, Minnesota, from 1903 until 1908. C. P. Kuckler was a agent for the Columbia National Insurance Company and for the Aachen & Mum. Insurance Company in 1916 and resided at 148 George Street West in St. Paul in 1918. J. J. MacDonald was a general agent for Minnesota and the Dakotas for the Continental Insurance Company in 1888. William LaPlant/LaPlante (1855-1938) was born in New Jersey, resided in Rochester, Minnesota, married Margaret __?__ (1863-1909) in 1886, and died in Olmsted County, Minnesota. Gustav O. Miller ( -1933) owned a creamery in White Rock, Minnesota, in 1891, was engaged in the general merchandising business and other business affairs at White Rock, in Goodhue County, Minnesota and organized the G. O. Miller Company, a mercantile business, was the postmaster of White Rock, Minnesota, received a franchise to string telephone wires on the poles of the Northwestern Telephone Exchange Company in 1901, organized the G. O. Miller Telephone Company, and was the president and a member of the board of directors of theWhite Rock, Minnesota, State Bank in 1916. Adolph Theodore Rosen (1856- ) was born in Stockholm, Sweden, married Charlotte Josephine Rosen in 1877, emigrated to the United States in 1880, moved to St. Paul, was initially employed by a fur dressing house, founded a fur dressing and curing business in 1885, married Anna Sophia Flink, was the vice president and a member of the board of directors of the Central Bank of St. Paul in 1919, was a mason, was a Shriner, was the president of the Norden Club, was the president of the Union Cemetery, was a Republican, was a member of the St. Paul City Council for two years, and was a member of the South St. Paul City Council for six years. Foster B. Seager (1847- ,) the son of William N. Seager and Sophia Eldridge Seager, was born in Cattaraugus County, New York, attended New York common schools, the resided temporarily in Illinois, Kansas, Missouri, and Nebraska, moved to Cannon Falls, Minnesota, in 1869, farmed until 1875, became a fruit and vegetable grower and a nursery owner with William Tanner, married Susie Cross, the daughter of George H. Cross and Olive Noble Cross, in Cannon Falls, Minnesota, in 1879, invested in the Cannon River Electric Power Company, was a Democrat, served on the Cannon Falls, Minnesota, school board, was the mayor of Cannon Falls, Minnesota, for 14 terms after 1880, was a Mason, and was an Episcopalian. Irving Todd (1841- ,) was born at Lewisboro, New York, received a New York common school education, moved to Prescott, Wisconsin, in 1857, worked in the saw mill, running the mill engine and sawing lath, returned to New York later in 1857, returned to Prescott, Wisconsin, in 1858, worked for C. E. Young of The Prescott Transcript in 1860, was a compositor on The Hastings Conserver in Hastings, Minnesota, in 1861, then was the editor of the Prescott Journal, then worked for the The Hudson Star, bought the plant of the defunct Hastings Conserver in 1862, married Helen Lucas in 1865, consolidated the Hastings Conserver with The Independent as The Hastings Gazette with __?__ Stebbins in 1866, was the assistant doorkeeper of the U. S. House of Representatives at Washington, D. C., was the collector of internal revenue at St. Paul from 1872 until 1876, bought out Stebbins' half interest in The Hastings Gazette in 1878, was a Mason, and was a Republican, Irving Todd, Jr. (1866- ,) was the son of Irving Todd and gained a half interest in the The Hastings Gazette in 1887. Edwin Ewing "E. E." Tuttle (1853-1935,) the son of Stiles Edwin Tuttle (1817-1897) and Martha Ann Duffy Tuttle (1828-1916,) was born in Louisville, Kentucky, moved to Rock County, Wisconsin, with his family in 1854, moved with his family to Hastings, Minnesota, in 1863, was educated by a private tutor and in the Hastings, Minnesota, public schools, farmed for many years, entered into a grain and feed business in partnership with S. N. Greiner in South Hastings, Minnesota, married Eva Elnore Frank (1854-1925,) the daughter of Hiram G. Frank (1832-1895) and Cordelia Poor Frank (1837-1900,) in 1874, was mayor of Hastings, Minnesota, for two years, was a member of the Hastings, Minnesota, city council from 1891 until 1901, was a member of the council committee that formulated plans for the famous spiral bridge in Hastings, Minnesota, that spanned the Mississippi River, was the Hastings, Minnesota, post master, from 1901 until 1915, was an organizer of the St. Paul Southern Electric Company, was a receiver of the St. Paul Southern Electric RailRoad, married Sarah E. Bottomley (1873-1949) in 1929, was a Mason, was a member of the Hastings, Minnesota, Commercial Club, died of flu-pneumonia, and was buried at the Lakeside Cemetery, Hastings, Dakota County, Minnesota. W. L. Sonntag was the general manager of the St. Paul Promotion Company in 1911, was the president of the Evansville Railway Company in 1907, and was the general manager of the Evansville & Eastern Electric RailRoad in 1907. Adelbert R. Walbridge ( -1919) was born in Belmont, New York, moved to Minnesota in 1889, married Floretta Lovejoy in Hastings, Minnesota, in 1894, resided in Hastings, Minnesota, in 1915 and 1918, became a Kissel/KisselKar automobile dealership in Hastings, Minnesota, in 1915, was appointed the receiver of the St. Paul Southern RailRoad in 1918 upon application to the courts by the Northwestern Trust Company, and died in Hastings, Minnesota. a href= "http://www.msparchhistory.info/SAlbTNH.html" [See note on Adolph Hirschman for 637 Grand Avenue.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/WestSideTNH.html" [See note on Albert T. Rosen for 334 Cherokee Avenue.] a href="http:// www.msparchhistory.info/SAlbTNH.html " [See note on Kay Todd for 771 Fairmount Avenue.]

St. Paul & Southern RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1887, had capital stock of $1,000,000, and had its general office in Waseca, Minnesota. The railroad was succeeded by the Minneapolis, St. Paul & Southwestern RailRoad in 1888. In 1914, K. A. Schaller resigned from the job of railway specialist with the Westinghouse Electric & Manufacturing Company and became the superintendent of the St. Paul & Southern Railway. K. A. Schaller was the electrical engineer and master mechanic for the Seattle & Ranier Valley RailRoad in 1918.

St. Paul Southern Electric Company: In 1915, the St. Paul Southern Electric Company planned to construct a 30 mile electric railway to connect Cannon Falls, Minnesota, Zumbrota, Minnesota, Pine Island, Minnesota, and White Rock, Minnesota, W. L. Sontag was the general manager of the St. Paul Southern Electric Company in 1915.

St. Paul, Stillwater & Taylors Falls RailRoad Company/St. Paul, Stillwater & Taylors Falls RailRoad: The railroad was authorized by the Minnesota Legislature shortly after statehood in 1857. The railroad was organized in 1871 and had capital stock of $1,000,000. The railroad was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1869 by Peter Berkey, R. Blakeley, F. R. Delano, and others to build a line from St. Paul to Taylors Falls, Minnesota, via Stillwater, Minnesota, with a branch line to Hudson, Wisconsin, and completed construction of the St. Paul to Stillwater, Minnesota, link, by way of Lake Elmo, Minnesota, in 1872. The railroad was intended to carry lumber from Stillwater, Minnesota, lumber mills to St. Paul. In 1872, its articles of incorporation were amended, with an increase in capital stock to $1,000,000, and with a board of directors of 13 members. In 1873, the railroad purchased the St. Croix Railway & Improvement Company, with a 2.10 mile rail line from Stillwater Switch, Minnesota, to South Stillwater, Minnesota, constructed in 1872. The railroad operated a 17.70 mile rail line from St. Paul to Stillwater, Minnesota, constructed in 1871, and a 3.50 mile rail line from the Stillwater Junction, Minnesota, to the St. Croix Drawbridge, Minnesota. The railroad acquired part of the lands originally granted to the Stillwater, White Bear & St. Paul RailRoad. In 1880, the railroad sold its line from St. Paul to Stillwater, Minnesota, and its branch line to Hudson, Wisconsin, to the St. Paul & Sioux City RailRoad. A. B. Stickney was a vice president, general manager, and chief counsel of the railroad in the 1870's. In 1880, the officers of the railroad were Peter Berkey, president, A. B. Stickney, vice president and superintendent, E. W. Ruff, secretary, and Horace Thompson, treasurer, and the members of the board of directors were Maurice Auerbach, Peter Berkey, Russell Blakely, William Crooks, W. B. Dean, E. F. Drake, E. L. Hersey, R. F. Hersey, J. L. Merriam, Isaac Staples, A. B. Stickney, Horace Thompson, and A. H. Wilder. In 1880, the railroad had capital stock of $557,093 and had 23.7 miles of rail trackage, owned two locomotives, owned four passenger cars, owned ten freight cars, and owned 30 flat cars. It amended its articles of incorporation regarding governing board composition in 1886. The railroad was purchased by the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha RailRoad. The railroad was ultimately succeeded by the St. Paul & Sioux City RailRoad. Edward W. Ruff (1849- ,) the son of Joseph Wilson Ruff and Jane Ruff, was born at Piqua, Miami County, Ohio, was educated in the common schools of Piqua, Ohio, was a warehouseman and telegraph operator for the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad from 1867 until 1871, married Belle S. Green in Postville, Iowa, in 1871, was a station agent for the Lake Superior & Mississippi RailRoad at White Bear Lake, Minnesota, and at Hinckley, Minnesota, from 1871 until 1873, was the station agent at Stillwater, Minnesota, for the West Wisconsin RailRoad and the St. Paul, Stillwater & Taylors Falls RailRoad from 1873 until 1874, was the general freight and ticket agent for the St. Paul, Stillwater & Taylors Falls Railroad from 1874 until 1879, and was the secretary of the St. Paul, Stillwater & Taylors Falls RailRoad in 1879, was a traveling auditor for the Denver & South Park Railway in 1880, was a traveling auditor for the Denver & Rio Grande RailRoad later in 1880, was a purchasing agent and assistant cashier for the Denver & Rio Grande Western Construction Company from 1880 until 1881, was an accountant and bookkeeper in Salt Lake City, Utah, from 1881 until 1887, was a freight solicitor for the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba RailRoad from 1887 until 1888, was the general freight and passenger agent for the Seattle, Lake Shore & Eastern RailRoad from 1889 until 1892, and was a traveling freight agent for the Northern Pacific RailRoad after 1892. [See note on Maurice Auerbach for 400 Summit Avenue.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/tnhrail2.html" [See note for Peter Berkey for the St. Paul Street RailRoad.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/tnhrail2.html" [See note for Russell Blakeley for the Southern Minnesota RailRoad.] a href ="http://www.msparchhistory.info/IrvineTNH.html" [See note for Colonel William Crooks for 57 Wilkin Street.] [See note on William Blake Dean for 353 Summit Avenue] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/TNHrail2.html" [See note on Francis Roach “F. R.” Delano for the Western RailRoad Company of Minnesota.] [See the note for Elias Franklin Drake for 324 Bates Avenue.] [See note on Roscoe Hersey for 467 Portland Avenue.] [See note on John L. Merriam for 4 Crocus Hill.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/MinnrrsTNH.html" [See note on Isaac Staples for the Stillwater & Hastings RailRoad.] [See note on Alpheus Beede Stickney for 846 Lincoln Avenue.] [See note on Horace E. Thompson for 808 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Amherst H. Wilder for 255 Summit Avenue.]

St. Paul Street RailRoad: The city of St. Paul authorized, in 1862, the creation of a horse railway by Peter Berkey, A. Vance Brown, J. C. Burbank, H. L. Carver, George Culver, William F. Davidson, William Dawson, E. F. Drake, William Lee, J. A. Lusk, P. F. McQuillan, J. L. Merriam, Bartlett Presley, Louis Robert, Horace Thompson, A. H. Wilder, James M. Winslow, and W. S. Wright. The original ordinance prohibited the railway using any motive force other than animal power. The rail line began, with two miles of rail trackage in current the Lowertown section of St. Paul, six horse or mule drawn rail cars, 14 employees, and 30 horses or mules, in 1872, had as its board of directors in 1872 Peter Berkey, J. C. Burbank, H. L. Carver, George Culver, William F. Davidson, William Dawson, E. F. Drake, William Lee, P. F. McQuillian, John L. Merriam, Bartlett Presley, Horace Thompson, John Wann, A. H. Wilder, and W. S. Wright, and had as its officers in 1872 J. C. Burbank, president , John Wann, vice president , H. L. Carver, secretary, William Dawson, treasurer, and H. L. Carver, manager. In 1873, the main line was extended out West Seventh Street nearly to the city hospital, and on Wabasha Street and College Avenue to Rice Street. The street railroad operated 45 miles of rail trackage as of 1877. The railroad either became or was sold to St. Paul City Railway Company in 1877, introduced cable car service on Selby Avenue in 1887, opened a second cable car line on East Seventh Street in St. Paul in 1889, and opened the first electric streetcar line in St. Paul on Grand Avenue in 1890 under an agreement negotiated by Archbishop John Ireland and Thomas Cochran. The University Avenue line was completed in 1890, which connected the Twin Cities by connecting to the Minneapolis Street RailRoad. In 1892, the Minneapolis Street Railway and the St. Paul City Railway Company merged into the Twin City Rapid Transit Company. Peter Berkey (1822-1909,) the son of John Berkey and Mary Bonner Berkey-Pile ( -1828,) was born in Johnstown, Somerset County, Pennsylvania, was a Dunkard, was first employed as a driver on the Pennsylvania Canal from 1836 until 1840, was an agent and later was the captain of a canal packet between Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and Clarion, Pennsylvania, moved to St. Paul in 1853, married Anna E. Porter, the daughter of William Porter and Elizabeth Ried Porter, of Freeport, Pennsylvania, in 1853, was member of firm of Nicols & Berkey/Nicols, Dean & Gregg, established 1855, was an original life member of the Minnesota Historical Society in 1857, moved to California in 1858, returned to St. Paul, was a St. Paul City alderman from 1859 until 1861, in 1864, in 1865, and from 1868 until 1870, sold out his iron interests in 1860, was a refugee agent and claims commissioner during the U. S. Dakota War in 1862, was a Ramsey County county commissioner from 1863 until 1875, was one of the organizers of St. Paul Fire & Marine Insurance Company in 1865, resumed connection and was a partner in Nicols & Dean until 1868, built the St. Paul, Stillwater & Taylor Falls RailRoad in 1872 and was the president of the St. Paul, Stillwater & Taylor Falls RailRoad until he resigned in 1880 and it consolidated with the Chicago & NorthWestern RailRoad, served in the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Ramsey County (District 23,) from 1871 until 1873, organized and was the president of the St. Paul National Bank from 1883 until 1893, organized, with others, banks in St. Peter, Minnesota, and Stillwater, Minnesota. William Lee (1822-1906) was born in Milford, Hunterdon County, New Jersey, was educated in Milford, New Jersey, engaged in the mercantile business in Easton, Pennsylvania, before 1859, moved to Minnesota in 1859, established a wholesale and retail dry goods business in St. Paul in 1859, was a sole dry goods store proprietor from 1866 until 1875, partnered with George Lee of Philadephia, Pennsylvania, in 1875, renamed the business William Lee & Company, resided in St. Paul in the 1870’s, began the manufacture of overalls, blankets, and lumberman clothes, was a Ramsey County county commissioner in 1871, 1875, and 1876, was a Democrat, was the mayor of St. Paul from 1870 until 1872, was a member of the board of directors of the St. Paul Water Company from 1871 until 1880, was a delegate to the Democratic National Convention from Minnesota in 1876, died in St. Paul, and was buried in Oakland Cemetery in St. Paul. Louis Robert (1811-1874,) the son of Charles Robert (1777- ) and Jeanne Courtois Robert (1782-1815,) was born in Carondelet/St. Louis, Missouri, was a trapper in the Rocky Mountains and a trader on several rivers, married Mary Rose Turpin (1825- ,) the daughter of Amable Turpin (1766-1866) and Marie Eulalie Chalifour Turpin, in 1839 at Prairie du Chein, Wisconsin Territory, moved to St. Paul in 1843, walking through the snow and wilderness from Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin Territory, 150 miles to the South, bought Pigs Eye Parrant's claim in St. Paul, was among the original proprietors of St. Paul, took a prominant part in the “Stillwater Convention” of 1848, was largely responsible for locating the territorial capitol at St. Paul, was appointed County Commissioner for Ramsey County in 1849, was also elected to the Territorial Board of Building Commissioners, was a steamboat owner and pilot until 1859, was active in trading posts along the Minnesota River after 1859, escaped death at Fort Ridgely during the 1862 U. S Dakota War, donated the bells to the St. Louis, King of France, Roman Catholic Church, the Little French Church, in St. Paul, and died in St. Paul. a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/SumEPortTNH.html"> [See note on James Burbank for 432 Summit Avenue.] a href ="http://www.msparchhistory.info/IrvineTNH.html" [See note for Henry L. Carver for 292 Walnut Street.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/SumEPortTNH.html"> [See note on Thomas Cochran, Jr., for 79 Western Avenue North.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/tnhrail2.html" [See note on George Culver for the Southern Minnesota RailRoad.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/SumEPortTNH.html"> [See note on William F. Davidson for 400 Summit Avenue.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/SAlbTNH.html" [See note on William Dawson for 682 Fairmount Avenue.] a href="http:// www.msparchhistory.info/DayBluffTNH.html" [See the note for Elias Franklin Drake for 324 Bates Avenue.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/SumEPortTNH.html"> [See note on James W. Lusk for 549 Portland Avenue.] a href= "http://www.msparchhistory.info/SAlbTNH.html" [See note on Philip Francis McQuillan for 26 Kenwood Parkway.] a href= "www.msparchhistory.info/SAlbTNH.html" [See note on John L. Merriam and William Rush Merriam for 4 Crocus Hill.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/SumEPortTNH.html"> [See note on Bartlett Presley for 265 Summit Avenue.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/SumEPortTNH.html"> [See note on Horace E. Thompson for 808 Summit Avenue.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/SumEPortTNH.html"> [See note on Amherst Holcomb Wilder for 226 Summit Avenue.] a href ="http://www.msparchhistory.info/IrvineTNH.html" [See note for James M. Winslow for 287 Banfil Street.] a href= "http:// www.msparchhistory.info/SAlbTNH.html " [See note on William Henry Sterling Wright for 9 Crocus Place.]

St. Paul & Suburban Street RailRoad The railroad reorganized in 1899, and was the successor of the St. Paul & White Bear Railway Company, which was sold in a foreclosure sale. It operated a rail line from St. Paul through North St. Paul to the Wildwood Park, a summer resort owned by the company on White Bear Lake, Minnesota, and to Mahtomedi, Minnesota, a summer residence municipality on White Bear Lake, Minnesota. It had a 50 year franchise from the City of St. Paul and owned the rail right of way outside of the City of St. Paul. The Wildwood Park was a five acre excursion and amusement park that had a casino, a skating rink, a roller coaster, and bath houses. It also had a three mile bicycle path from White Bear Lake, Minnesota, built in 1893. The railroad had capital stock in 1899 of $37,900. The railroad had 10.59 miles of electric track, nine motor cars, four steam trail cars, and two Baldwin locomotives in 1899. The railroad, in 1899, had as its officers E. W. Peet, president, W. F. Peet, vice president, and Ambrose Tighe, secretary and counsel, and had as its board of directors William Dawson, Jr., E. W. Peet, W. F. Peet, Ambrose Tighe, and James R. Walsh. Its headquarters was the Manhattan Building in St. Paul in 1899. The railroad was succeeded by the Minneapolis & St. Paul Suburban RailRoad in 1899 in a mortgage foreclosure sale. James R. Walsh was the first superintendent of the Harvester Works Chapel, a nominally Presbyterian denomivantion institution, in 1874, married Emily G. Stanton, was the treasurer and the general manager of the St. Paul City RailRoad in 1879, boarded at 16 Summit Avenue in 1879, was the brother-in-law and the real estate business partner of Thomas Cochran, Jr. (1843- ,) was a member of the board of directors of the St. Paul Library Association in 1881, was a member of the board of directors of the St. Paul Harvester Works in 1881, was the treasurer of the Minnesota State Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals in 1884, was an accountant who prepared the financial statements of the Minnesota Church Foundation and the Episcopate Endowment Funds in 1896, was a member of Company "C" of the First Infantry of the Minnesota National Guard in 1905. a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/SumEPortTNH.html"> [See note on Thomas Cochran, Jr., for 79 Western Avenue North.] [See notes for Emerson William Peet for 271 Summit Avenue.] [See notes for William Fellows Peet for 271 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Ambrose Tighe, Harriet Gotzian Tighe, Laurence Gotzian Tighe, and Richard Lodge Tighe for 505 Summit Avenue.] [See note on William Dawson for 682 Fairmount Avenue.]

St. Paul & Taylor's Falls RailRoad: The railroad was chartered by Territorial Laws of Minnesota 1857, Chapter 17. The railroad was organized in 1871. The members of its initial board of directors were William H. C. Folsom, Robert W. Lowber, John D. Ludden, Henry McKenty, Daniel Moor, Wyman B. S. Moore, William H. Newton, Alexander Ramsey, Edmund Rice, Daniel L. Seymour, Joshua L. Taylor, and Benjamin Thompson. The railroad was intended to survey, locate, construct, maintain, and operate a rail line from St. Paul Northwardly to Taylor's Falls, Minnesota Territory, and a point along the rail line of the Minnesota & Northwestern RailRoad if that railroad builds the line by its statutory deadline or to the Bay of St. Louis and Lake Superior if the Minnesota & Northwestern RailRoad does not build the line by its stautory deadline. The railroad had $3,000,000 in capital stock initially. Robert Wilson Lowber (1816- ,) the son of John Lowber and Margaret Wilson Lowber (1793-1857,) was born in Smyrna, Delaware, was educated at the Franklin institute of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, was educated at the Cazenovia Seminary, was educated at the Lima Institute, was initially employed in the office of the Holland Land Company at Batavia, New York, in 1833, went to Chicago, Illinois, in 1837, visited Henry Hastings Sibley in Mendota, Wisconsin Territory, in 1837, traveled extensively in what became Minnesota in 1837 before traveling to St. Louis, Missouri, was retained by the the Farmers' Loan & Trust Company to manage land trusts held by the company in New York from 1840 until 1844, married Maria Bergen ( -1842,) the daughter of John T. Bergen, of Brooklyn, New York, in 1840, purchased an invention for making lead pipe by hydraulic pressure and coating its inside with pure tin, obtained a patent for the process, and established a firm, Lowber & LeRoy, and a factory in New York City, New York, for its production in 1844, went to Europe on behalf of the the Farmers' Loan & Trust Company to pursue settlement of trust bonds held there in 1844, married Elizabeth Ellsworth/Elizabeth G. Redfield ( -1890,) the daughter of Herman J. Redfield, in 1845, was a partner of Dr. Eliphalet Nott in Cuban copper mining interests, Stuyvesant Cove in New York City, New York, and the Bald Mountain Lime Quarry in the 1840’s and 1850’s, partnered with Cyrus W. Field in the New York, Newfoundland & London Telegraph Company in 1854, was active in organizing the Minnesota & Northwestern RailRoad Company, resided in New York, New York, in 1854, was the acting president of the Minnesota & North Western Railroad Company in 1854 and in 1856, established cotton seed mills in Alabama and Louisiana in 1857 that were expropriated during the American Civil War, and was a member of the board of directors of the Greenwich & Johnsonville RailRoad in 1874. John Dwight Ludden (1819-1907) was born in Easthampton, Massachusetts, was educated in the Massachusetts common schools, attended the Williston Seminary in Easthampton, Massachusetts, moved to New York in 1840, moved to Galena, Illinois, was a lead miner, moved to Wisconsin in 1842, moved to St. Croix Falls, Wisconsin, in 1845, came to Marine Mills, Minnesota, in 1849, was a lumberman, served in the Territorial House of Representatives representing Chisago County, Minnesota, Doty County, Minnesota, Itasca County, Minnesota, Superior County, Minnesota, and Washington County, Minnesota (Districts 1 and 4,) from 1850 until 1854, was a supporter of the University of Minnesota, served in the Territorial Council representing Chisago County, Minnesota, Doty County, Minnesota, Itasca County, Minnesota, Superior County, Minnesota, and Washington County, Minnesota (District 1,) from 1855 until 1857, was the Speaker of the Territorial House of Representatives in 1852 and 1853, moved to Stillwater, Minnesota, in 1857, married Margaret Rhodes ( -1894) after 1857, moved to St. Paul in 1861, built and operated a lumber mill at Pine City, Minnesota, was a member of the Minnesota Historical Society from 1866 until 1907, was the vice president of the State Saving Bank of St. Paul, was a Unitarian, was a founder of Unity Church in St. Paul, died in St. Paul, and was buried in Oakland Cemetery in St. Paul. Wyman Bradbury Seavy Moor/Moore (1811-1869,) the son of Daniel Moor, Jr. (1771-1851,) and Rebecca Spring (1771-1851,) was born in Waterville, Maine, attended the Waterville, Maine, town school, prepared for college at China Academy, graduated from Waterville College, taught school for one year in St. Stephen’s, New Brunswick, returned to Waterville, Maine,to study law, attended Dane Law School in Cambridge, Massachusetts, married Clara Ann Niel Cook (1813-1853) in Waterville, Maine, in 1834, was admitted to the practice of law in 1835, was a lawyer in Waterville, Maine, was a member of the Maine House of Representatives in 1839, was the Maine Attorney General from 1844 until 1848, was a Democrat, was appointed a U. S. Senator for six months from the State of Maine in 1848, resumed the practice of law in Bangor, Maine, in 1848, was the superintendent of construction of a railroad from Waterville, Maine, to Bangor, Maine, resided in Bangor, Maine, in 1854, was an incorporator of the Minnesota & NorthWestern RailRoad in 1854, was appointed by President James Buchanan as the U. S. consul general to the British North American Provinces from 1857 until 1861, returned to Waterville, Maine, in 1861, resumed the practice of law, purchased an estate near Lynchburg, Virginia, in 1868, engaged in the operation of an iron furnace at Lynchburg, Virginia, died in Lynchburg, Virginia, and was buried in the Pine Grove Cemetery in Waterville, Kennebec County, Maine. Daniel L. Seymour ( -1909) resided in Chicago, Illinois, in 1887, married Emma A. __?__, was a principal in D. L. Seymour & Company, a grain elevator company, in Chicago, Illinois, in 1886, 1887, 1889, and 1891, was a manager with Keith & Company, a flour and mill feed business, was a member of the Board of Trade of Chicago, Illinois, in 1898, was associated with the Armour Grain Company grain department in 1899, and died in Paris, France, while on a European trip. a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/MinnrrsTNH.html" [See note for W. H. C. Folsom for the Taylor's Falls & Superior RailRoad RailRoad.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/tnhrail2.html" [See note on Henry McKenty for the Transit RailRoad Company.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/TNHrail2.html" [See note on William H. Newton for the Transit RailRoad Company.] [See note on Alexander Ramsey for 265 South Exchange Street.] [See note for Edmund Rice for 194 McBoal Street.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/MinnrrsTNH.html" [See note for Joshua Lovejoy Taylor for the Taylor's Falls & Superior RailRoad RailRoad.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/TNHrail2.html" [See note on Benjamin Thompson for the Transit RailRoad Company.]

St. Paul Terminal & Transfer RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1902, was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1902 to survey, locate, construct, acquire, equip, maintain and operate a rail line from a point at or near the northern terminus of the South St. Paul Belt Railroad Company in South St. Paul, Dakota County, Minnesota, Northerly and Northwesterly to a point at the South bank of the Mississippi River in St. Paul and connect with the freight depot and terminal facilities of the Burlington, Cedar Rapids & Northern Railway Company of Iowa. The railroad was granted permission by city ordinance (#2295) to cross and run along various St. Paul city streets in 1902. The railroad again was granted specific authority to construct railway tracks across and run along various streets in the City of St. Paul in ordinance No. 6518 in 1903. The railroad had capital stock of $150,000. The railroad purchased the South Saint Paul Belt Railroad Company in 1903. The railroad also connected with West St. Paul, Minnesota. The name of the railroad was changed to the Minneapolis & Saint Paul Terminal Railway Company in 1903. The railroad operated until 1904 and was ultimately succeeded by the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific RailRoad.

The St. Paul Union Depot Company was incorporated in 1879 by Judson W. Bishop, Frank B. Clarke, James J. Hill, Sherburne S. Merrill, Homer E. Sargent, George H. Smith, and Alpheus B. Stickney to build a transfer railway and rail trackage in the area of the Union Passenger Depot in St. Paul. It had initial capital stock of $250,000 and its principal place of business was St. Paul. The railroad was organized in 1879. In 1882, the officers of the railroad were S. S. Merrill, president, and Charles B. Brunson, secretary and general superintendent, the members of the board of directors of the railroad were Charles F. Hatch, H. Haupt, James J. Hill, S. S. Merrill, H. H. Porter, James Smith, Jr., and E. W. Winter, the railroad had $250,000 in capital stock, the railroad operated four miles of rail trackage, all located in Minnesota, the railroad owned one iron rail car and one push rail car, the railroad employed 22 personnel, and the general offices of the railroad were in St. Paul. In 1885, the railroad had capital stock of $500,000, owned one locomotive, owned one station, operated 5.5 miles of track, and had 47 employees. In 1885, the officers of the railroad were A. Manvel, president, J. T. Odell, vice president, C. B. Brunson, secretary, and H. P. Upham, treasurer, and the members of the board of directors of the railroad were A. Manvell, Roswell Miller, J. T. Odell, James Smith, Jr., and E. W. Winter. In 1888, the officers of the railroad were S. R. Ainslie, president, A. Manvel, vice president, C. B. Brunson, secretary, H. P. Upham, treasurer, the members of the board of directors of the railroad were S. R. Ainslie, W. H. Fisher, A. Manvel, Roswell Miller, and E. W. Winter, the railroad owned two locomotives, the railroad owned 19 hand and other rail cars, the railroad employed 112 personnel, and the general offices of the railroad were in St. Paul. In 1893, the officers of the railroad were A. B. Plough, president, W. G. Collins, vice president, C. B. Brunson, secretary and superintendent, and H. P. Upham, treasurer, and the members of the board of directors of the railroad were W. P. Clough, W. G. Collins, A. B. Plough, W. S. Mellen, and E. W. Winter. According to the Manual of the RailRoads of the United States, Volume 27 by Henry Varnum Poor in 1895, the railroad operated 5.63 miles of rail trackage in St. Paul, was incorporated in 1879, began operations in 1881, owned two locomotives, owned 19 baggage, truck and push cars, had capital stock of $500,000, had as its officers E. W. Winter, president, H. P. Upham, treasurer, and C. B. Brunson, secretary, had as its board of directors W. P. Clough, W. G. Collins, J. W. Kendrick, A. B. Plough, and E. W. Winter, and had its general office in St. Paul. The Poor's Directory of RailRoad Officials, published by the Poor's RailRoad Manual Company in 1898, indicates that the officers of the railroad were E. W. Winter, president, J. T. Odell, vice president, C. B. Brunson, secretary and superintendent, and H. P. Upham, treasurer, and the railroad operated 5.5 miles of rail trackage. In 1900, W. F. McMillan was the superintendent and purchasing agent for the railroad. Poor's Directory of RailRoad Officials, published by the Poor's RailRoad Manual Company in 1905, indicates that the officers of the railroad were A. W. Trenholm, president, S. C. Stickney, vice president, W. G. Johnson, secretary, and H. P. Upham, treasurer. In 1915, the company owned and operated 0.54 miles of terminal rail trackage and the Union Depot in St. Paul, had as its officers E. Pennington, president, J. T. Clark, vice president, W. G. Johnson, secretary, and E. H. Bailey, treasurer, had as its board of directors R. Budd, D. L. Bush, J. T. Clark, S. M. Felton, J. M. Hannaford, C. W. Huntington, H. U. Mudge, E. Pennington, had $1,000,000 in capital stock, and had its general office in St. Paul. In 1916, the company had $932,400 in capital stock. The company operated until 1982. Charles Burr Brunson (1849- ) was born in St. Paul, was employed as a freight clerk by the Hannibal & St. Joseph RailRoad Company in 1868, then was employed as a transfer agent by the St. Paul & Duluth RailRoad, was a freight and passenger auditor of the St. Paul & Sioux City RailRoad, was a contracting freight agent for the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad before 1881, was the secretary of the St. Paul Union Depot Company after 1881, resided at 543 Burr Street in St. Paul in 1895, was the administrator of the estate of John W. Winters, the inventor of improvements in fluid pressure air brakes (Patent #594,228) in 1897, and resided at 287 Nelson Avenue in St. Paul in 1898. Ralph Budd (1879-1962,) the son of John Budd and Mary Budd, was born on a farm near Waterloo, Iowa, graduated from the Highland Park College in Des Moines, Iowa, in 1898, was a draftsman in the Chicago Great Western RailRoad’s divisional engineering office in 1898, joined the Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Railroad for the construction of its St. Louis-Kansas City rail line in 1902, worked on the engineering of the Panama Railway, helped construct the Oregon Trunk RailRoad from the Pacific Northwest into Northern California, was an American railroad executive, was the president of the Great Northern Railway from 1919 until 1932, was the president of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad in 1932, and was chairman of the Chicago Transit Authority. David L. Bush (1855-1921) was born in Sharon, Walworth County, Wisconsin, was a night operator for the Western Union RailRoad in 1872, held a succession of positions with the Western Union RailRoad until 1880, was the superintendent of the Western Union RailRoad from 1877 until 1882, was the superintendent of the Sabula, Ackley & Dakota RailRoad from 1877 until 1882, was the superintendent of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad after 1880, was the general manager of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad in 1903, resided in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in 1903, resided in Chicago, Illinois, in 1909, was the vice president of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad in 1913, was the president and a member of the board of directors of the Davenport, Rock Island & Northwestern Railroad in 1917, was a member of the board of directors of the Des Moines Union Railway Company in 1917, and died in Chicago, Illinois. James T. Clark (1852-1922,) the son of William Clark and Sarah Jane McMaster Clark, was born in Auburn, New York, moved to Springfield, Illinois, in 1860, was educated in the common schools of Springfield, Illinois, was initially employed by the Illinois Central RailRoad in clerk positions from 1870 until 1873, was employed in various office positions by the Chicago & North Western RailRoad from 1873 until 1880, resided in Omaha, Nebraska, in 1880, was a general agent for the Chicago & North Western RailRoad from 1880 until 1883, was the assistant traffic manager for the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha RailRoad in 1883, was the assistant general freight agent for the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha RailRoad from 1883 until 1884, was the general freight agent for the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha RailRoad after 1884, was the general taffic manager of the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha RailRoad in 1890, resided in St. Paul in 1890, . Francis B. Clarke (1838- ) was born in Madison County, New York, was a general freight agent for the West Wisconsin Railway from 1868 until 1872, was a general freight and passenger agent for the West Wisconsin Railway from 1872 until 1878, was the general traffic manager of the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha RailRoad from 1878 until 1892, married Lena Thompson (1857- ,) the daughter of James Egbert Thompson, president of the First National Bank of St. Paul and railroad promoter, and Susan L. Thompson, in 1880, was the traffic manager of the Great Northern Steamship Company before 1896, was the general traffic manager for the Great Northern RailRoad from 1896 until 1904, resided at 236 Summit Avenue in St. Paul, was associated with the Mobile & Ohio RailRoad Company, was the president of the Spokane, Portland & Seattle RailRoad in 1908, was a member of the board of directors of the Spokane, Portland & Seattle RailRoad in 1910, was a member of the board of directors of the United Railways Company in 1911, and was the president of the Oregon Electric Railway Company in 1912. Wallace G. Collins (1851-1920,) the son of Washington W. Collins and J. A. Collins, was born in Oconomowoc, Wisconsin, entered railroad employment in 1868, initially was employed by the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway, was a telegraph operator and train dispatcher for the Northern Pacific RailRoad from 1870 until 1872, was employed on the engineer corps of the Canada Southern RailRoad from 1872 until 1873, resumed employment by the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway after 1873, resided in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in 1891, was the vice president and a member of the board of directors of the Milwaukee, Dexterville, & Northern Railway Company in 1888, was the vice president and a member of the board of directors of the Wisconsin, Pittsville & Superior Railway Company in 1888, was the vice president and a member of the board of directors of the St. Paul Union Depot Company in 1893, was a member of the Car Service Committee of the American Railway Association in 1893, was the general manager of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway in 1893, was a member of the board of directors of the Minneapolis Eastern Railway in 1893, resided in Chicago, Illinois, in 1893, then was employed in the lumber business with W. H. Bradley at Tomahawk, Wisconsin, in 1899, resided in Tomahawk, Wisconsin, in 1899, was a member of the board of directors of the Marinette, Tomahawk & Western Railway in 1902, was a member of the board of directors of the Bradley Bank of Tomahawk, Wisconsin, in 1903, was authorized by the Wisconsin General Assembly to build a dam on the Wisconsin River in 1903, resided in Minneapolis in 1903, resided in Seattle, Washington, in 1910, was a member of the American Bankers Insurance Company of Chicago, Illinois, in 1913, sued the Bradley Company in Washington state court for an accounting as part of the dissolution of the former Wisconsin partnership in 1915, was the vice president and a member of the board of directors of the United Copper Mining Company in 1918, was a Mason, and was buried at Acacia Memorial Park and Funeral Home, Lake Forest Park, King County, Washington. Charles F. Hatch ( -1889) was the general superintendent of the Lake Shore & Southern Michigan RailRoad, was the superintendent of the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha RailRoad, was the general manager of the Minneapolis & St. Louis RailRoad in 1880, resided in Minneapolis in 1880, was a member of the board of directors of the Minnesota & Iowa Southern RailRoad in 1880, was a member of the board of directors of the Fort Dodge & Fort Ridgely RailRoad in 1880, was an original incorporator of the Minneapolis Club in 1885, was the president of the Wisconsin, Minnesota & Pacific RailRoad in 1887, and committed suicide with a firearm in Minneapolis. W. G. Johnson was the Auditor of Disbursements and the Assistant Comptroller of the Northern Pacific RailRoad from 1903 until 1914. Charles W. “C. W.” Huntington was a freight brakeman for the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific RailRoad in 1876, was employed by the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific RailRoad until 1892, was the superintendent of the Des Moines Northern & Western RailRoad in 1893, was the general superintendent of the Iowa Central RailRoad from 1894 until 1902, resided in Oskaloosa, Iowa, in 1900, was the general superintendent of the Iowa Central & Western RailRoad in 1900, was the general superintendent of the Albia & Centerville RailRoad in 1900, was the general superintendent of the Central RailRoad of New Jersey after 1902, was an incorporator of the Staten Island Midland Railway Company in 1907, was a vice president of the New York Railroad Club in 1913, was the first vice president and a member of the board of directors of the Railway Transfer Company of Minneapolis in 1914, resided in Minneapolis in 1916, was a vice president and a member of the board of directors of the Minneapolis & St. Louis RailRoad in 1916, was a vice president and a member of the board of directors of the Des Moines & Fort Dodge RailRoad Company in 1916, resided in New York, New York, in 1917, was a member of the board of directors of the St. Paul Union Depot in 1917, was the president of the Virginian RailRoad Company before 1918, when his retirement was forced by William G. McAdoo, the federal Director General of Railroads, was the president and a member of the board of directors of the Southfield Beach RailRoad Company in 1921, was the president and a member of the board of directors of the Richmond Light & RailRoad Company in 1921, and was a member of the Law Association of Harvard University. John William Kendrick (1853-1924,) the son of John Abbott Kendrick and Mary Elizabeth Crosby Kendrick, was born in Worcester, Massachusetts, graduated with a degree in civil engineering from the Worcester Polytechnic Institute in 1873, was a levelman with a construction party for the Northern Pacific RailRoad in the Yellowstone Valley in 1879, did location work for the Northern Pacific RailRoad from 1879 until 1880, was in charge of the construction for 160 miles of rail line for the Missouri and Yellowstone Divisions of the Northern Pacific RailRoad from 1880 until 1883, married Elizabeth Foster Dolliver ( -1942,) the daughter of daughter of Edward Syms Lange Dolliver and Helen Amelia Carroll Dolliver, in Gloucester, Massachusetts, in 1880, was the chief engineer of the St. Paul & Northern Pacific RailRoad from 1883 until 1888, was the chief engineer of the the Northern Pacific RailRoad after 1888, instigated a series of studies concerning grade revisions to the main line of the Northern Pacific RailRoad in 1890, was the general manager and a vice-president of the Northern Pacific Railway, was a vice president of the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway in 1901, was vice-chairman of the board of directors of the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway, died in Chicago, Illinois, and was buried in the Oak Grove Cemetery in Minneapolis. Allen A. Manvel (1837-1893) was born in Alexander, New York, was educated in New York, moved to Chicago in 1859, began employment with the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific RailRoad as a clerk in the purchasing agent's office in 1859, married Anna E. Fellows of Batavia, New York in 1861, worked his way up through the ranks to become the general superintendent, became employed as assistant general manager by the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba Railway in 1881, became the general manager of the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba Railway, was the general passenger agent for the Great Northern Railway in 1881, was the vice president of the Minneapolis Union Railway, was the president of the St. Louis & San Francisco RailRoad, was the president of the Gulf, Colorado & Santa Fe RailRoad, was the president of the Rio Grande & El Paso RailRoad, was the vice president of the Southern California RailRoad, was the president of the Sonora RailRoad, was the president of the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway from 1889 until 1893, had Bright's disease, got into a dispute with Fred Harvey, the dining car, restaurant, and hotel magnate, died in San Diego, California, allegedly worn out by the strain of refinancing the railroad and “cooking” its financial books, and was buried in Mount Hope Cemetery, San Diego, San Diego County, California. William Franklin McMillan (1843-1907,) the son of Dr. Andrew McMillan (1807- ) and Effe/Effie Drake Wheeler McMillan (1807- ,) moved with his mother from Ohio to Sparta, Wisconsin, in 1855, initially farmed , enlisted in Company "A" of the Third Regiment of the Wisconsin Cavalry during the American Civil War, was wounded during the Battle of Little Blue River, Missouri, in 1864, was employed in railroad work in 1868, was successively promoted from brakeman to superintendent of operations, married Odessa Ray (1853- ,) the daughter of Jackson Lansing Ray and Mary West Ray, in 1870, was the general agent of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy RailRoad, received an increase in his Civil War pension in 1885, retired from railroad employment in 1907, was an author of four works of fiction, published a genealogy, McMillan genealogy & history; a record of the descendants of John McMillan and Mary Arnott, his wife in St. Paul in 1908, resided at Mahtomedi, Minnesota, was a Free Mason, was a member of the Royal Arcanum, was a member of the Ancient Order of United Workmen, and was a member of the Grand Army of the Republic. William Solon Mellen (1846-1893,) the son of Reuben Marsh Mellen and Mariam/Miriam Davis Mellen (1816- ,) was born in Crete, Will County, Illinois, was educated at a Chicago, Illinois, High School, was employed as a telegraph operator by the Chicago & NorthWestern RailRoad in various places in Wisconsin from 1865 until 1871, was a general freight and passenger agent for the Green Bay & Lake Pepin RailRoad from 1872 until 1873, was a general agent at Winona, Minnesota, for the Chicago & NorthWestern RailRoad in 1874, was an assistant general freight agent for the Chicago & NorthWestern RailRoad at Chicago, Illinois, from 1875 until 1881, was the assistant general superintendent of the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe RailRoad in 1881, was the general freight agent for the Chicago & NorthWestern RailRoad from 1882 until 1885, was the assistant general superintendent for the Chicago & NorthWestern RailRoad from 1885 until 1886, was the general manager of the Wisconsin Central Railroad from 1886 until 1889, was the general manager of the Minnesota, St. Croix & Wisconsin RailRoad in 1888, was the general manager of the Northern Pacific RailRoad after 1889, and died of a neuralgia of the heart attack at Victoria, British Columbia. Sherburne/Sherburn S. Merrill (1818-1885,) the son of Moses Merrill, a farmer, and Mariam Barnard Merrill, was born in South Alexandria, Grafton County, New Hampshire, was educated in New Hampshire common schools, worked in a Concord, New Hampshire, hotel, then worked for Moses Kimball in Boston, Massachusetts, then was a hotel clerk in Troy, New York, resided at Bristol, New Hampshire, was a Lieutenant Colonel of the 34th New Hampshire regiment, married Sarah Dix Kidder (1825-1855,) the daughter of Francis Kidder, in 1849, moved to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in 1850, worked as a section grader for the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad, was promoted to various positions with the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad, was the superintendent of the Milwaukee & Watertown Railway, married Mary Ellen Freeman (1831- ) in 1858, was the superintendent of the La Crosse & Milwaukee RailRoad until 1864, was the superintendent of the Winona & St. Peter RailRoad from 1864 until 1865, was an incorporator of the Minneapolis & St. Paul RailRoad in 1878, was the general manager of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad after 1865, was the president of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad, and died in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Jabez Theodore Odell (1844-1926) was born at Twinsburg, Summit County, Ohio, was a telegraph operator employed by the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern RailRoad from 1861 until 1863, was a train dispatcher for the Atlantic & Great Western RailRoad from 1863 until 1872, was a train dispatcher for the Erie RailRoad from 1872 until 1873, was the superintendent for the Atlantic & Great Western RailRoad from 1873 until 1876, was a New York civil engineer, was the assistant superintendent of the Kansas Pacific RailRoad in 1878, married Rozeltha Ingram, the daughter of Benjamin Franklin Ingram and M. Harris Ingram, was a construction superintendent for the Gulf, Colorado & Santa Fe RailRoad from 1881 until 1882, was a superintendent for the Northern Pacific RailRoad from 1882 until 1883, was an assistant general manager of the Northern Pacific RailRoad from 1883 until 1887, resided in Richmond, Virginia, in 1889, invented a train indicator improvement in 1889 (U. S. patent #407548) was the general manager of the Baltimore & Ohio RailRoad before 1893, was the second vice president and the general manager of the New York & New England RailRoad Company in 1896, was the assistant general freight agent for the Lima Northern Railway Company before 1897, was the second vice president and the general manager of the New England RailRoad Company in 1897, was associated with the Seaboard Air Line Railway, was associated with the Kansas City, Mexico & Orient Railway, was associated with the reorganization committee of the Detroit & Lima RailRoad in 1899, was a general agent for the Chesapeake & Ohio RailRoad in 1899, was the president of the Colorado & Northwestern RailRoad Company in 1909, was a member of the board of directors of the Kansas City Outer Belt & Electric Railway Company in 1909, was the vice president of the Pittsburgh, Bessemer & Lake Erie RailRoad Company in 1909, was the president Marquette & Bessemer Dock & Navigation Company, and resided at New Rochelle, New York, in 1926. Roswell Miller, Sr. (1843-1913,) was born in Hartford, Susquehanna County, Pennsylvania, was first employed by the Cairo & Vincennes RailRoad, was the secretary of the Cairo & Vincennes RailRoad, married Mary Louise Roberts (1866-1955,) the daughter of William C. Roberts, the president of Centre College from 1898 to 1903, was the general manager of the Cairo & Vincennes RailRoad, resided in Cairo, Alexander County, Illinois, in 1880, worked in the offices of J. P. Morgan, was the vice president and treasurer of the Chicago & Western Indiana RailRoad in 1882, was the president of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad from 1888 until 1899, became the chairman of the board of directors of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad, was a member of the board of directors of the Union Pacific RailRoad before 1901, and resided in New York, New York, in 1910. Roswell Miller, Jr. (1895-1983,) married Andrew Carnegie’s only daughter, Margaret Cameron Carnegie (1897-1990.) Edmund E. Pennington (1848-1926,) the son of Edmund Pennington (1810-1876) and Sarah Jackson Pennington (1815-1849,) was born in Peru, La Salle County, Illinois, moved to St. Paul with his family in 1853, moved to St. Anthony, Minnesota, in 1855, was educated in the common schools, began as a switchman on the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad in 1864, was ultimately promoted to assistant superintendent of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad before 1884, became the superintendent of the Minneapolis & Pacific RailRoad in 1884, married Carra L. Johnson (1851-1905,) the daughter of Nelson Davidson Johnson (1817-1880) and Sarah Fisher Streeter Johnson (1807-1882,) joined the Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sault Ste. Marie RailRoad in 1888, when it acquired the Minneapolis & Pacific RailRoad, was a member of the board of directors of the Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sault Ste. Marie RailRoad in 1901, resided in Minneapolis in 1903, was the president of the Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sault Ste. Marie RailRoad in 1906, was the president of the Wisconsin Central RailRoad, was the president of the Central Terminal Company, was the president of the Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic Railway, was the president of the Mineral Range Railway, was the president of the Spokane & International RailRoad Company, married Ella Maria Sturgis Lawler (1858- ,) the daughter of Colonel Samuel D. Sturgis, the belle of the Seventh Cavalry at Fout Meade, Dakota Territory, in 1876, and the former wife of Dakota Territorial Senator John D. Lawler (1855-1889,) in St. Paul in 1905 or 1906, was the president of the Tri-State Land Company in Aitkin County, Minnesota, in 1910, was the chairman of the board of directors of the Western Express Company in 1914, was a member of the Minneapolis Club, was a member of the Minneapolis Athletic Club, was a member of the Minikahda Club, was a member of the Minnesota Club of St. Paul, was a member of the Northland Club of Duluth, Minnesota, and was a member of the University Club of St. Paul. Henry U. Mudge (1857-1921) was born in Minden, Michigan, moved with his family to Sterling, Kansas, in 1871, was a as water boy and common laborer employed by the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe RailRoad in 1871, was a night telegraph operator employed by the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe RailRoad from 1872 until 1875, successively was employed as a brakeman, a conductor, a train dispatcher, and a roadmaster for the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe RailRoad from 1876 until 1888, was a train master and assistant superintendent for the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe RailRoad from 1889 until 1896, was the general superintendent for the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe RailRoad from 1896 until 1900, was the general manager of the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe RailRoad from 1900 until 1905, was the second vice president of the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific RailRoad from 1905 until 1910, was the president of the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific RailRoad from 1910 until 1915, was a receiver of the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railway Company in 1915, was the president and a member of the board of directors of the Denver & Rio Grande RailRoad from 1915 until 1918, resided in Denver, Colorado, in 1918, and died of a cerebral hemorrhage in Denver, Colorado. Alexander Bower Plough (1849-1900,) the son of William Plough and Angeline Cooper Plough, as born in Jacksonville, New York, married Ella Frances Skilton (1846- ,) the daughter of Dr. Avery J. Skilton and Mary Augusta Candee Skilton, at Jacksonville, New York, in 1869, resided in Iowa from 1869 until 1885, was a baggageman employed by the Central Iowa RailRoad in 1871, was the general freight agent of the Central Iowa RailRoad in 1877, moved to St. Paul in 1888, was the general freight agent of the St. Paul & Duluth RailRoad in 1889, was the president of the Duluth Union Depot in 1891, was the vice president of the Duluth Short Line RailRoad in 1892, was the vice president and a member of the board of directors of the St. Cloud, Grantsburg & Ashland RailRoad Company in 1896, was the vice president, the general manager, and a member of the board of directors of the St. Paul & Duluth RailRoad in 1897, was the vice president of the Lake Superior Terminal & Transfer Railway Company in 1900, died of illness in St. Paul, and was buried at Oakwood Cemetery, Troy, Rensselaer County, New York. Homer Earle Sargent (1822-1900,) the son of Asa Sargent (1784-1854) and Charlotte Earle Sargent (1786-1865,) was born in Leicester, Massachusetts, was educated in the Leicester, Massachusetts, district schools, was educated in the Leicester, Massachusetts, Academy, became a station clerk for the Western RailRoad of Massachusetts/Boston & Worcester RailRoad/Boston & Albany RailRoad in 1843, returned to his father's farm in 1844, was employed by the Boston & Worcester RailRoad from 1845 until 1858, married Maria Bottomly (1825-1852,) the daughter of Thomas Bottomly and Alice Bottomly, in 1848, was employed as general superintendent and general manager by the Michigan Central RailRoad Company from 1858 until 1874, married Rebecca Eddy Wheaton, the daughter of John R. Wheaton and Rebecca Maxwell Wheaton (1837- ,) in Warren, Rhode Island, in 1861, was a member of the board of trustees of Farwell Hall in Chicago, Illinois, in 1861, was a member of the war finance committee of Chicago, Illinois, in 1861, was a member of the Fourth National Bank of Chicago, Illinois, in 1864, was a member of the board of directors of the Pullman Place Car Company, was an organizer of the Chicago Union Stock Yard, was a member of the Provident Life Insurance & Investment Company in 1865, was a member of the board of directors of the Union Stock Yards & Transit Company, was a member of the board of trustees of the Chicago Relief & Aid Society in 1871, was the general manager of the Northern Pacific RailRoad from 1878 until 1881, was a member of the board of trustees of St. Luke's Free Hospital in 1879, was the president of the Fargo & Southern RailRoad in 1883, was the president of the board of trustees of the Young Men's Christian Association in 1885, summered in Detroit Lakes, Minnesota, and died in Chicago, Illinois. George H. Smith was the superintendent of Lake Superior & Mississippi RailRoad in 1874. Arthur W. Trenholm (1858-1927,) the son of Howard Trenholm (1825- ) and Julia Clara Layton Trenholm (1833-,) was born in Point de Bute, Westmoreland County, New Brunswick, Canada, was a railroad official at Point de Bute, New Brunswick, Canada, in 1861, was a railroad official at Dorchester, New Brunswick, Canada, in 1871, was a railroad official at Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada, in 1891, was a railroad official at St. Paul in 1891, was a railroad official at Spooner, Wisconsin, in 1893, was the general manager of the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railway Company from 1903 until 1916, was the vice president of the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railway Company early in 1918, resided at 770 Fairmount Avenue in Saint Paul in 1918, was the federal manager of the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha RailRoad later in 1918, was an Episcopalian. a href=http://www.msparchhistory.info/ tnhrail2.html > [See note on S. R. Ainslee for the Wisconsin Central RailRoad.] [See note on Judson Wade Bishop and Mary Libania Axtell Bishop for 720 Fairmount Avenue.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/SAlbTNH.html" [See note for James T. Clark for 702 Fairmount Avenue.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/SumEPortTNH.html"> [See note on Francis Byron Clarke for 808 Summit Avenue.] [See note on William Pitt Clough for 500 Summit Avenue.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/MinnrrsTNH.html" [See note on Samuel Morse Felton for the Stillwater & St. Paul RailRoad.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/SumEPortTNH.html"> [See note on Jule M. Hannaford for 405 Portland Avenue.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/SumEPortTNH.html"> [See note on General Herman Haupt for 312 Summit Avenue.] [See note on James Jerome Hill for 240 Summit Avenue.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/tnhrail2.html" [See note on Sherburn S. Merrill for the St. Paul Union Depot Company.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/TNHrail2.html" [See note on Henry H. Porter for the Winona City RailRoad.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/MinnrrsTNH.html" [See note on James K. Smith, Jr., for the Stillwater & St. Paul RailRoad.] [See note on Alpheus Beede Stickney for 846 Lincoln Avenue.] a href= "http:// www.msparchhistory.info/SAlbTNH.html " [See note on Samuel Crosby Stickney for 653 Goodrich Avenue.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/SumEPortTNH.html"> [See note on General Samuel Davis Sturgis and Samuel D. Sturgis III for 427 Portland Avenue.] a href= "http:// www.msparchhistory.info/SAlbTNH.html " [See note on James Egbert Thompson for 682 Fairmount Avenue.] [See note on Henry Pratt Upham for 277 Goodhue Avenue.] [See note on Edwin Wheeler Winter for 415 Summit Avenue.] [See note on the St. Paul Union Depot Company for 165 Western Avenue North, the Albion Hotel/Angus Hotel.]

St. Paul Union Stockyards Company RailRoad: The company railroad was organized in 1886, operated until 1941, and was succeeded by the Chicago Great Western RailRoad. The St. Paul Union Stockyards Company once spanned 160 acres on the South St. Paul, Minnesota, riverfront. The stockyards, the brainchild of railroad magnate Alpheus B. Stickney, were once among the nation's largest. For much of the 20th century, they supplied the giant onsite meatpackers, Armour & Company and Swift & Company. a href="http:// www.msparchhistory.info/WestSideTNH.html" [See note on Philip Danforth Armour and Armour & Company for 3 Alice Court.] a href=" http:// www.msparchhistory.info/SAlbTNH.html " [See note on Alpheus B. Stickney for 846 Lincoln Avenue.]

St. Paul & White Bear RailRoad: The electric railroad was organized in 1892 to build a railroad from St. Paul Northeasterly to White Bear Lake, Minnesota and to connect the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad, the Chicago, Burlington & Northern RailRoad, the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha RailRoad, the Wisconsin Central RailRoad, the St. Paul & Duluth RailRoad, and the Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sault Ste. Marie RailRoad. The members of the first board of directors of the railroad were H. M. Byllesby, H. C. Lewis, Joseph Lockey, W. S. Morton, and Lane Stone. In 1892, the rail line was mortgaged to the St. Paul Ttile Insuance & Trust Company. In 1892, the North St. Paul Railroad Company, a steam railroad of three locomotives and six rail cars that was owned by Lane Stone and Walter S. Morton, was sold to St. Paul & White Bear Railway Company, had its line electrified and converted to standard gauge, and had its rail line extended to Mahtomedi, Minnesota. Oscar Claussen was in charge of the construction of the railroad. In 1893, the railroad operated 12 miles of track, was a partial Thomson-Houston electric/partial steam rail line, operated 12 rail cars, had capital stock of $200,000, had as its board of directors H. M. Byllesby, Howard C. Lewis, Joseph Lockey, W. S. Morton, and L. K. Stone, and its officers were W. S. Morton, president, L. K. Stone, vice president, Henry A. Castle, secretary, and Walter Ruan, treasurer. In 1894, H. M. Byllesby was the president of the railroad and S. B. Livermore was the superintendent of the railroad, the railroad had capital stock of $200,000, the railroad had 11.5 miles of track, and the railroad had 13 rail cars. In 1895, F. A. G. Moe was appointed receiver for the St. Paul & White Bear RailRoad Company, an electric rail line that ran from St. Paul to White Bear Lake, Minnesota, on behalf of the St. Paul Title Insurance & Trust Company. In 1896, E. W. Peet and Arthur Perry became the owners of the railroad in a sheriff’s sale. In 1897, the bondholders committee of the railroad purchased the railroad in a foreclosure sale and reorganized it as the St. Paul & Suburban Railway. The formation of the railroad was alleged by the journal Electricity to be part of a bond sale swindle and scam by Charles A. Coffin. The railroad operated until 1899 and was succeeded by the Twin City Rapid Transit Lines Company. Oscar Claussen (1860- ) was born in Terre Haute, Indiana, attended school in Terre Haute, Indiana, attended the Real Gymnasium of Wiesbaden, Germany, attended the Canton school at Zurich, Switzerland, graduated as a civil engineer from the Polytechnicum at Zurich, Switzerland, in 1882, was an assistant instructor at the Polytechnicum at Zurich, Switzerland, until 1883, returned to the United States, was employed by the Keystone Bridge Company of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, for two years, then was the assistant engineer of the St. Paul &Northern Pacific RailRoad, returned to Switzerland in 1886, returned to the United States, was a civil engineer with Gattlieb & Company in Chicago, Illinois, thenwas the bridge engineer with the Chicago Great Western RailRoad, then was the assistant bridge engineer with the City of St. Paul, married Martha Willius, the daughter of Ferdinand Willius (1830- ) and Clara Holterhoff Willius, then was a civil engineering manager with the Northwest General Electric Company, was in charge of the construction of the St. Paul & White Bear Railway, the Winona Street Railway, the St. Cloud Street Railway, and the Ashland Street Railway, and then became the Western representative of the Fort Wayne Electric Corporation installing municipal and commercial electric apparatus. Howard C. Lewis was the vice president of the Mansfield, Coldwater & Lake Michigan Railway Company in 1872, was a member of the board of directors of the Buffalo, North Main Street & Tonawanda RailRoad in 1898, resided in Schenectady, New York, in 1898, became the receiver of the Buffalo, North Main Street & Tonawanda RailRoad in 1901, and was an incorporator of the Houston Light & Power Company in 1901. Seward B. Livermore was the receiver of the Winona General Electric Company in 1895, was the chairman of the Legislation Committee of the Northwestern Electrical Association in 1902, resided in Winona, Minnesota, in 1902, was the superintendent of the Winona Railway & Light Company in 1903, was a projector of the proposed Winona & Rushford Interurban Electric Railway in 1903, and was the head of the La Crosse City Railway in 1905. F. A. G. Moe was the president of the Associated Wheelmen of St. Paul in 1909 and resided at 257 Pascal Avenue in 1919. Walter S. Morton, the son of former Indiana Governor Oliver P. Morton/Oliver Hazard Perry Throck Morton (1823-1877) and Lucinda M. Burbank Morton (1825-1907,) graduated from the Pennsylvania Military Academy, at Chester, Pennsylvania, in 1877, was employed by the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers on river projects on the Upper Mississippi River in 1878, was a bidder, with his engineering partner, Vine D. Simar, for a contract to construct dams and shore protection along the Chippewa River in Wisconsin in 1881, married Susie L. __?__, was a member of the board of directors of the North St. Paul Land Company in 1887, was an operator of a steamboat in 1888, was a member of the St. Paul Chamber of Commerce in 1890, was the secretary of the White Bear Yacht Club in 1895, resided on Manitou Island in White Bear Lake, Ramsey County, Minnesota,in a lake cottage, designed by Cass Gilbert, in 1896, was a bicycling enthusiast in 1896, resided in Hartford, Connecticut, in 1906, moved to New York City, New York, in 1908, was the partner of Wilmot W. Burritt in civil engineering in New York City, New York, in 1908, was the consulting engineer of the New York City Water Supply Commission in 1912, was the president general of the Union Society of the Civil War in 1912, was an engineer in 1913, resided in New York City, New York, in 1913, and resided in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania in 1918. Walter Ruan was the cashier of the Northwest General Electric Company in 1892. [See note on Henry Anson Castle for 255 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Joseph Lockey for 21 South St. Albans Avenue.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/SumEPortTNH.html"> [See note on Emerson William Peet for 271 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Lane K. Stone for 255 Summit Avenue.] a href="http:// www.msparchhistory.info/SAlbTNH.html " [See note on the White Bear Yacht Club for 18 Kenwood Parkway.] a href="http:// www.msparchhistory.info/CapCathTNH.html" [See note on Ferdinand Willius for 469 Laurel Avenue.]

St. Paul, White Bear Lake & Wisconsin RailRoad was incorporated in 1886 by Edward D. Corning, William Dawson, William Dawson, Jr., Henry H. Fuller, H. H. Horton, W. R. Sache, Robert A. Smith, and W. A. Somers to build one or more railways from a point in St. Paul easterly through White Bear Lake, Minnesota, to the eastern boundary of Minnesota along the St. Croix River. It had initial capital stock of $500,000 and its principal place of business was St. Paul. The railroad was organized in 1886. Captain Edward Corning (1839-1914,) the son of Edward Corning (1802-1861) and Catharine Matilda Austin Corning (1813- ,) was the quartermaster of the 85th New York Regiment from 1861 until 1862, was the quartermaster of the 1863 punitive expedition of General Henry H. Sibley against the Dakota in Dakota Territory, was a member of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States, was a member of the Sons of the American Revolution, was a member of the Minnesota Society Sons of the Revolution, was the agent for the service of process for the Home Life Insurance Company in 1884, was a member of the Knights of Pythias, and was the author of Thoughts for thoughtful Americans. William Robert Sache (1847-1915,) the son of Henry Hardwick Sache and Mary Corbett Sache, was born in Perth, Canada, was educated in the common schools of Toronto, Ontario, Canada, learned the printer's trade worked as a printer at Southampton until 1872, was employed by Canadian government in the survey of northwestern Canada until 1874, moved to St. Paul, engaged in the printer's trade until 1882, was employed by the city engineer's office in St. Paul as an inspector until 1884, was in the real estate busi ness in the partnership of Somers & Sache from 1884 until 1888, was in the real estate busi ness as W. R. Sache after 1888, was the general manager and the treasurer of the St. Paul Homestead Company, married Lucretia F. Barrett (1842- ,) the daughter of Jessee Gilbert Barrett and Rachel Hugenin Barrett, was a delegate from the Sixth Ward at the St. Paul City Republican Convention in 1883, was a member of the St. Paul Chamber of Commerce in 1886, married Marie Belle Barrett (1884- ,) the daughter of Charles Edward Barrett (1840-1917) and Mary Ella Gamble Barrett (1854- ,) resided in St. Paul in 1894, resided at 667 South Smith Avenue in St. Paul, moved to New York, and was buried in the Grand Army of the Republic Cemetery in Seattle, Washington. William A. Somers was the secretary of the West St. Paul Building Association No. 1 in 1879, was a former city engineer who had taken up the real estate business, was the secretary of the St. Paul Permanent Loan Company in 1889, was a member of the board of directors of the St. Paul Chamber of Commerce in 1881 and in 1890, was the deputy tax assessor of St. Paul and Ramsey County in 1891, was a City of St. Paul plat commissioner in 1891, was the St. Paul City tax assessor in 1896, was the author of The Valuation of Real Estate for the Purpose of Taxation, published by Rich & Clymer, Printers, in St. Paul in 1901, was a member in 1903 of the special committee to oversee the expenditure of City of St. Paul funds for the St. Louis Exposition of 1904, was the president of the City of St. Paul board of plat commissioners in 1906, was subsequently employed as an assessor by Minneapolis, was employed as an assessor in New York City, New York, was employed as an assessor by Chicago, Illinois, and was employed as an assessor by Cleveland, Ohio. [See note on William Dawson for 682 Fairmount Avenue.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/SumEPortTNH.html"> [See note on Hiler Hosmer Horton for 598 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Robert A. Smith for 15 Alice Court.]

St. Vincent RailRoad: The railroad was granted 1,500,000 acres of land by the State of Minnesota in 1871 and eventually was succeeded by the St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad. The projected railroad was the dream of John Hamilton, the bogus “Lord Gordon Hubert Gordon”, a.k.a. Lord Glencairn, Hon. Mr. Herbert Hamilton, George Herbert Gordon, George Gordon, George Hubert Smith, and John Herbert Charles Gordon, in 1872 and was to run from Fergus Falls, Minnesota, up the valley in Otter Tail County, Minnesota, past the Loomis, Minnesota, rapids. Colonel John S. Loomis was the land commissioner of the Northern Pacific RailRoad. “Lord Gordon” ( -1874) induced W. G. Tuttle to participate in the development of the railroad and logging on land alleged owned by the railroad. Gordon had a special Northern Pacific train placed at his command for weeks, was kidnapped in 1873 at Jay Gould’s behest by Loren Fletcher, a Minnesota legislator, and Michael Hoy, a Minneapolis police man, in Manitoba, Canada, escaped, fled to the wilderness, was arrested for high crimes committed in England, and ended his life in 1874 by a pistol ball through his head. John Hamiltonwas rumoured to be the illegitimate son of a North Country clergyman and his family parlour maid and was reared in Kent, England, by two spinsters who named him such after he was abandoned at age two by his mother.

Sauk Center Northern RailRoad/Sauk Center & Northern RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in 1881 by J. V. Brower, C. A. Gilman, J. R. Howard, A. Moore, and E. Sawyer to construct, equip, and operate a railway from Sauk Center, Stearns County, Minnesota, Northerly to a point along the Northern Pacific RailRoad line between Motley, Minnesota, and Perham, Minnesota. The railroad had $1,000,000 in corporate stock. The principal place of business of the railroad was Sauk Center, Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1882, received local aid in 1882 from Todd County, Minnesota, authorized under an 1881 act of the Minnesota Legislature, operated until 1883, and was succeeded by the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba RailRoad. Jacob V. Brower was the president of the railroad and Edward Sawyer was the secretary-treasurer of the railroad in 1883. In 1883, the railroad was planned to extend from Browerville, Todd County, Minnesota, to the NorthWestern boundary of Todd County, Minnesota. John R. Howard (1840-1933) was born in Winthrop, Maine, attended the Winthrop Public Schools in Winthrop, Maine, attended Towle Academy in Maine, moved West in 1858, came to Blue Earth County, Minnesota, in 1860, moved to Sauk Center in 1865, was a Second Lieutenant in Company E of the Second Minnesota Cavalry Regiment from 1865 until 1867 during and after the American Civil War, married Carrie P. Briggs ( -1892,) the daughter of Captain and Mrs. Joshua Briggs, in St. Cloud, Minnesota, in 1866, was the Second Assistant Clerk of the Minnesota House of Representatives during 1876, was the Reading Clerk of the Minnesota House of Representatives from 1877 until 1880, was an incorporator of the St. Cloud, Fort Ridgely & Fort Dodge RailRoad in 1879, was the chief clerk of the Minnesota House of Representatives from 1881 until 1888, was a Republican, served in the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Stearns County, Minnesota (District 54,) from 1906 until 1909, was the superintendent of the White Earth Indian Reservation in 1909, and operated an agricultural implement agency at Sauk Centre, Minnesota, before 1915. a href="http:// www.msparchhistory.info/tnhrail2.html" [See note on Jacob Vandenberg Brower for the Sauk Centre Southern RailRoad.] a href= "http:// www.msparchhistory.info/MinnrrsTNH.html" [See note on Charles Andrew Gilman for the Minneapolis, St. Cloud & Sauk Rapids RailRoad.] a href ="http://www.msparchhistory.info/IrvineTNH.html" [See note for Adolphus Moore for 230 Banfil Street.] [See note on Edward Sawyer for 461 Holly Avenue.]

Sauk Centre Southern RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in 1882 by George W. Bennett, J. V. Brower, W. R. Gillis, Henry Keller, and Alexander Moore, to construct, maintain, and operate a rail line from Sauk Centre, Stearns County, Minnesota, Southerly towards the Minnesota-Iowa border and was organized in 1882. The railroad had capital stock of $2,000,000 and its principal place of business was Sauk Centre, Minnesota. Jacob Vandenberg "J.V.”/”J. H." Brower (1844–1905,) the son of Abraham D. Brower and Mary Stevens Brower, was born in York, Washtenaw County, Michigan, came to Long Prairie, Minnesota in 1860, served in Company D of the First Minnesota Mounted Rangers with Henry Hastings Sibley during the 1862 wars against the Dakota in Minnesota, moved to St. Louis, Missouri, in 1863, was a seaman during the balance of the American Civil War, was the County Auditor of Todd County, Minnesota, in 1867, studied law in 1870, was a Republican, served in the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Becker County, Minnesota, Beltrami County, Minnesota, Clay County, Minnesota, Otter Tail County, Minnesota, Pembina County, Minnesota, Polk County, Minnesota, Todd County, Minnesota, Traverse County, Minnesota, Wadena County, Minnesota, and Wilkin County, Minnesota (District 41,) from 1872 until 1874, was admitted to the practice of law in Minnesota in 1873, was the county attorney of Todd County, Minnesota, in 1873, moved to St. Cloud, Minnesota, in 1873, was the register at the U. S. Land Office at St. Cloud, Minnesota, in 1874, was an amateur archeologist and ethnologist, was a surveyor who visited Lake Itasca, Minnesota, to settle a dispute over the source of the Mississippi River in 1888, was the first commissioner of Itasca State Park in 1891, led a campaign to stop logging around Lake Itasca, Minnesota, by companies owned by Friedrich Weyerhäuser, was a prolific writer of the Upper Midwest region of the United States who championed the location and protection of the headwaters of the Mississippi River and Missouri River, was a member of the Minnesota Historical Society, and died in St. Cloud, Minnesota. W. R. Gillis was the chief engineer of the Sauk Centre Northern RailRoad in 1882 and was a member of the board of directors of the Sauk Centre Southern RailRoad, was a member of the J. S. Cady, Post #2, of the Grand Army of the Republic in Anoka, Minnesota, in 1891, was the county surveyor of Anoka County, Minnesota, in 1899, was a Republican, and was an alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from Minnesota in 1904. Henry Keller (1845-1907) was born in Hessen Darmstadtt, Germany, was educated in Germany, emigrated to the United States in 1864, served in Company A of 10th United States Infantry from 1864 until 1868, moved to Minnesota in 1868, was a manufacturer, was the president and manager of the Keller Manufacturing Company, was the manager of the National Syrup & Oil Tank Association at St. Cloud, Minnesota, was the president of the First National Bank of Sauk Centre, Minnesota, was the president of the Norman County Bank at Ada, Minnesota, was a farmer, was a stock breeder, served in the Minnesota Senate representing Benton County, Minnesota, Sherburne County, Minnesota, and Stearns County, Minnesota (Districts 40 and 45,) from 1886 until 1899, and died in Nebraska. a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/SumEPortTNH.html"> [See note on Frederick Weyerhaeuser for 266 Summit Avenue.]

Sauk Rapids & Taylor's Falls RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in 1875 by Daniel Anderson, G. W. Benedict, S. P. Carpenter, J. L. Cater, C. H. Chadbourne, Ph. S. Harris, and G. W. Sweet to build and operate a railway from Sauk Rapids, Minnesota, by way of Princeton, Minnesota, and Cambridge, Minnesota, to Taylor's Falls, Minnesota. It had initial capital stock of $2,000,000 and its principal place of business was Sauk Rapids, Minnesota. Special Laws of Minnesota 1875, Chapter 130, permitted various municipalities in Benton County, Minnesota, Chisago County, Minnesota, Isanti County, Minnesota, Mille Lacs County, Minnesota, and Sherburne County, Minnesota, to bond for and contribute funds for the railroad. The railroad was organized in 1876. Daniel Anderson (1842- ) was born in Hassela, Sweden, received a common school education, emigrated from Sweden with his family to the United States in 1850, initially settled in Chicago, Illinois, came to Minnesota in 1851, served in Company E of the Tenth Minnesota Volunteer Infantry during the American Civil War from 1862 until 1865, moved to Cambridge, Isanti County, Minnesota, in 1868, was the postmaster of Cambridge, Minnesota, married __?__ __?__ in 1869, resided in Cambridge, Minnesota, in 1873, was a laborer in 1873, was the county surveyor of Isanti County, Minnesota, was a county commissioner of Isanti County, Minnesota, was a justice of the peace in Isanti County, Minnesota, was a Republican, served in the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Anoka County, Minnesota, Hennepin County, and Isanti County, Minnesota (Districts 25 and 28,) from 1872 until 1881 and from 1888 until 1891, was the county auditor of Isanti County, Minnesota, resided in Isanti County, Minnesota, in 1875, was a probate court judge in Isanti County, Minnesota, in 1887, was a district court commissioner in Isanti County, Minnesota, in 1887, was a commissioner, with H. J. Gouldberg and Enoch Olson, for the building of a bridge in Isanti County, Minnesota, in 1901, and eventually resided in Coronado, California. George W. Benedict (1825-1910) was born in Rochester, New York, moved with his family to Lower Canada in 1830, was reared and received his early education in Lower Canada, learned the printer's trade, was employed as a printer in Hamilton, Lower Canada, in other portions of Canada, and in New York State until 1851, married Anna Cronk (1830- ) of Canada in 1851, moved to Tecumseh, Michigan, founded the Tecumseh Herald, was a delegate to the Whig Presidential convention which nominated General Winfield Scott in 1852, continued the Tecumseh Herald until 1854, came to Minnesota in 1853, was the associate editor of Sauk Rapids Frontiersman in 1854, was the clerk of the District Court of Benton County, Minnesota, in 1856, was the foreman of the old St. Paul Press, established the Sauk Rapids Sentinel in 1868, sold the Sauk Rapids Sentinel in 1872, re-established the Sauk Rapids Sentinel in 1873 and operated it until 1875, was a friend of Oliver Kelly, was associated with the Grange, served in the Minnesota Senate representing Benton County, Minnesota, Crow Wing County, Minnesota, Mille Lacs County, Minnesota, Morrison County, Minnesota, and Sherburne County, Minnesota (District 30,) from 1873 until 1876, was a U. S. Deputy Revenue Collector after 1875, resided in Benton County, Minnesota, in 1875, and was the Sergeant-at-Arms of the Minnesota Senate in 1876. Samuel P. Carpenter (1835-1909,) the son of Justus Carpenter (1809-1887) and Wealthy A. Parsons Carpenter, was born in Carpenters Corners, Washtenaw County, Michigan, moved with his parents to Jefferson County, Wisconsin, in 1839, attended school in Whitewater, Wisconsin, and Palmyra, Wisconsin, was reared on a farm, occasionally clerked in a store until 1855, moved to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, was employed as clerk in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, until 1858, returned to Jefferson County, Wisconsin, went to California in 1859, resided in Sacremento, California, resided in San Francisco, California, was rejected for enlistment because of a disability during the American Civil War, was engaged in the clothing business until 1865, moved to Chicago, Illinois, was in the clothing business in Chicago, Illinois, moved to Sauk Rapids, Minnesota, in 1871, married Eva A. Coburn of Galena, Illinois, in 1872, managed the Russell House Hotel in Sauk Rapids, Minnesota, for nine years, was the sheriff of Benton County, Minnesota, from 1874 until 1877, resided in Benton County, Minnesota, in 1875, served as clerk of the district court for Benton County, Minnesota, was county registrar for Benton County, Minnesota, was chairman of the Republican county committee for Benton County, Minnesota, in 1879, was a Unitarian, was a Mason, resided in Sauk Rapids, Minnesota, in 1886, moved to Superior, Douglas County, Wisconsin, in 1891, and was secretary of the police department for Superior, Wisconsin, from 1894 until 1910. Joseph L. Cater (1828-1903) was born in Strafford County, New Hampshire, married Eliza Hall, the daughter of Gilman Hall ( -1870) and Eliza Tuttle Hall, came to Princeton, Minnesota Territory, in 1858, was a member of the board of township superivisors of Princeton Township, Minnesota, in 1859, took an active part in securing the organization of Mille Lacs County, Minnesota, in the Winter of 1859-1860, was a member of the board of county commissioners of Mille Lacs County, Minnesota, in 1860, resided in Mille Lacs County, Minnesota, in 1875, and served on a special committee with Leonard Pratt and Benjamin Soule to oversee the construction of a bridge over the Rum River financed by Mille Lacs County, Minnesota, bonds under Special Laws of Minnesota 1875, Chapter 179. Charles H. “C. H.” Chadbourne (1801-1909) was born at Lexington, Massachusetts, initially was a seaman, married Deborah/Sarah Crowell ( -1906) in 1852, moved to Minnesota Territory in 1855, first resided in Mille Lacs County, Minnesota, located on a farm near Princeton, Minnesota Territory, in 1856, raised Holstein-Friesian cattle, served in the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Benton County, Minnesota, Crow Wing County, Minnesota, Mille Lacs County, Minnesota, Morrison County, Minnesota, and Sherburne County, Minnesota (District 30) from 1874 until 1876, resided in Princeton, Sherburne County, Minnesota, in 1875, served as the Baldwin Township, Minnesota, assessor, justice of the peace, and collector, served as a Sherburne County, Minnesota, county commissioner, was an incorporator of the Minneapolis, Mille Lacs & Northern RailRoad in 1884, wasa a member of the Minnesota State Agricultural Society in 1888, was the receiver for the Single Men’s Endowment Association in 1889, was a dairy and creamery expert on the State Dairy & Food Commission, was the manager of the Princeton, Minnesota, dairy in 1890, had sold the farm and had moved back into Princeton, Minnesota, in 1891, was a Mason, was a member of the Terriotrial Pioneers Association, remarried, and moved to Oregon. Philip Sneade Harris (1834-1919) was born in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, was educated in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, engaged in the mercantile business in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, until 1867, married Cecelia S. Stephenson of Maryland, moved to St. Paul in 1867, was the private secretary to the president of the Lake Superior & Mississippi RailRoad Company, William L. Banning, was a member of the Minnesota State Horticultural Society representing St. Paul in 1874, resided in Ramsey County in 1875, was the manager of the land department of the St. Paul & Duluth RailRoad in 1879, was the secretary-treasurer of the St. Paul & Duluth RailRoad in 1881, was an incorporator of the Duluth, Twin Cities & Southwestern RailRoad, was an incorporator of the Duluth Short Line RailRoad in 1886, was the secretary-treasurer of the St. Cloud, Grantsburg, & Ashland RailRoad Company in 1888, retired in 1890, traveled extensively throughout the United States, Mexico and the West Indies after 1890, was a Republican, was a Mason, resided at 117 W College Avenue in St. Paul in 1907, and died in Ramsey County. George W. Sweet (1823-1898) was born in Hartford, Connecticut, came to Minnesota in 1848 or 1849, was a carpenter, later studied law, was admitted to the practice of law in Minnesota Territory, married Eliza V. Oakes (1826-1903,) the daughter of Charles H. Oakes, an Indian trader, and an Indian mother, was the registrar in the U. S. Land Office at Sauk Rapids, Minnesota Territory, was responsible for the first settlement at Sauk Rapids, Minnesota Territory, served in the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Benton County, Minnesota, Meeker County, Minnesota, and Stearns County, Minnesota (District 20,) from 1859 until 1861, was a messenger from Anishinabe Chief Hole-in-the-Day to U. S. Indian Commissioner William P. Dole in 1862, was an attorney for the Lake Superior & Puget Sound Land Company, the land acquisition division of the Northern Pacific RailRoad, came to Dakota Territory in 1872 to obtain land needed by the Northern Pacific RailRoad near the Missouri River, was the original claimant of the site of Bismarck, Dakota Territory, resided in Benton County, Minnesota, in 1875, moved to Havre, Montana, in 1890, and died in Havre, Montana. a href ="http://www.msparchhistory.info/IrvineTNH.html" [See note for William L. Banning for 57 Wilkin Street.]

Sauk Rapids RailRoad was incorporated in 1883 by Clarence B. Buchanan, Joseph Coates, Alphonse Demeules, Joseph H. Moody, Willis F. Street, George W. Sweet, and Joseph P. Wilson to build a street railway in Sauk Rapids, Minnesota, in its suburbs, and in the adjoining Minnesota counties. It had initial capital stock of $60,000 and its principal place of business was Sauk Rapids, Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1883. Clarence B. Buchanan was a resident of Morrison County, Minnesota, in 1883. Joseph Coates (1847-1929,) the son of Joseph Coates, Sr. ( -1849,) was born in Lincolnshire, England, and emigrated with his family for America in 1849, settled on a farm near Davenport, Iowa, in 1850 with his widowed mother, came to Fillmore County, Minnesota, in 1854 or 1857, moved to Benton County, Minnesota, in 1861, was associated in business with J. M. Wood, the Sauk Rapids, Minnesota, city attorney, moved to Arkansas, returned to Sauk Rapids, Minnesota, studied law, was admitted to the practice of law in 1873, was the sheriff of Benton County, Minnesota, from 1872 until 1873 and from 1878 until 1879, married Mary E. Cross ( -1895) in 1878, was a farmer, was a Benton County, Minnesota, deputy sheriff under Sheriff Samuel Carpenter (1835-1909) from 1874 until 1877, was a judge of probate for Benton County, Minnesota, in the 1870’s and the 1880’s, owned and operated many farms, was a member of the Minnesota House of Representatives, representing Benton County, Minnesota (District 45,) from 1890 until 1893, married Julia A. Russell, the daughter of Jeremiah Russell (1809-1885) and Sophia Oakes Russell, in 1897, was the clerk of the Benton County, Minnesota, district court from 1903 until 1906, was associated with the Northwestern Products Company, was the vice president of the Benton County, Minnesota, Old Settlers Association in 1910 and 1911, was a member of the Minnesota House of Representatives, representing Benton County, Minnesota (District 47,) from 1912 until 1915, was a Mason, was a justice of the peace of Sauk Rapids, Minnesota, in 1929, died in St. Cloud, Minnesota, and was buried at the Sauk Rapids, Minnesota, Cemetery. Alphonse John “A. J.” Demeules (1854-1901,) the son of Louis Demueles (1832-1885) and Sophie Guerin Demueles (1824- ,) was born in St. Paul, was initially educated in public schools of St. Paul, graduated from the Terra Bonna Commercial College of Canada in 1874, returned to St. Paul, was the clerk of the Ramsey County probate court, became the partner of __?__ Linnemann in the mercantile firm of Linnemann & Demueles in Sauk Rapids, Minnesota, resided in Sauk Rapids, Benton County, Minnesota, became the sole proprietor of the mercantile firm, resided in Brainerd, Crow Wing County, Minnesota, married Catherine Anna/Anna Katarina Linnemann (1853- ,) the daughter of Joan Heinrich Linneman (1825- ) and Margareta Angela Haan Linneman (1833- ,) of Lafayette, Indiana, in St. Joseph, Buchanan County, Missouri, in 1874, was a merchant in 1882, served in the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Benton County, Minnesota, Crow Wing County, Minnesota, Mille Lacs County, Minnesota, Morrison County, Minnesota, and Todd County, Minnesota (District 39,) from 1882 until 1885, was the treasurer of the St. John’s University Alumni Association in 1883, had his store destroyed by a cyclone in 1886, was the chairman of the Benton County board of commissioners, resided in Mankato, Blue Earth County, Minnesota, in 1890, died in Mankato, Minnesota, and was buried in Rochester, Olmsted County, Minnesota. Joseph H. Moody (1814- ) was born in Vershire, Vermont, married Cordelia M. Town (1818- ,) the daughter of Seth Town and Azubah Loomis Town, in 1837 in Waterbury, Orange County, Vermont, was a member of the Vermont State Senate in 1853, initially moved to St. Joseph, Minnesota, then moved to Sauk Rapids, Minnesota, and died in Sauk Rapids, Minnesota. Willis F. Street was admitted to the practice of law in Minnesota in 1879, was a lawyer in Sauk Rapids, Minnesota, in 1882, married Mary Greely (1858- ,) resided in Sauk Rapids, Minnesota in 1882, unsuccessfully appealed to the U. S. Department of the Interior his application to enter certain tracts of land in the Saint Cloud, Minnesota, land district which were denied because they were covered by issued Chippewa Half-breed scrip in 1884, was an incorporator of the Mississippi Improvement Company in 1884, owned and edited the Inter-Oceanin Duluth, Minnesota, in 1890, and was a resident of St. Cloud, Stearns County, Minnesota, in 1893. Joseph P. Wilson was a resident of St. Cloud, Stearns County, Minnesota, in 1893.

Sault Ste. Marie & Minnesota RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1888 and was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1888 by K. G. Foster, N. C. Foster, M. Griffin, James McIntire, W. P. Pearse, and W. H. Yale to construct a railroad from a point on the Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sault Ste. Marie RailRoad at or near Rhinelander, Wisconsin, to cross the Mississippi River at Alma, Wisconsin, to continue South in Minesota to Winona, Minnesota, and to reach a point on the Missouri River at or near Council Bluffs, Nebraska. The railroad had capital stock of $16,000,000. Its principal place of business was Winona, Minnesota. K. G. Foster was a politician in Douglas County, Wisconsin, in 1902. N. C. Foster resided in Fairchild, Wisconsin. James McIntire resided in Eau Claire, Wisconsin. Michael Griffin (1842-1899) was born in County Clare, Ireland, immigrated with his parents to Canada in 1847, moved with his family to Hudson, Summit County, Ohio in 1851, moved with his family to Wisconsin in 1856, settled in Newport, Sauk County, Wisconsin, attended common schools in Ohio and Wisconsin, enlisted in the Union Army in 1861, was a private in Company E of the 12th Regiment of the Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, was wounded at the battle of Bald Hill, Atlanta, Georgia, in 1864, participated in the siege of Vicksburg, Mississippi, Sherman's Atlanta campaign and march to the sea, and Sherman's campaign north through the Carolinas, served until the close of the American Civil War, moved to Kilbourn City, Wisconsin, in 1865. read the law in the law office of Jonathan Bowman, was admitted to the practice of law in 1868, practiced law in Kilbourn City, Wisconsin, was the cashier of the Bank of Kilbourn, Wisconsin, from 1871 until 1876, served as a member of the county board of Columbia County, Wisconsin, from 1874 until 1875, served as member of the Wisconsin State Assembly in 1876, moved to Eau Claire, Wisconsin, in 1876, was the city attorney of Eau Claire, Wisconsin, from 1878 until 1879, served in the Wisconsin State Senate from 1880 until 1881, was a law partner of Horace B. Walmsley in the Eau Claire, Wisconsin, law firm of Griffin & Walmsley, was the president of the Eau Claire, Wisconsin, Gas Company in 1884, and resided in Eau Claire, Wisconsin, in 1888, was the department commander of the Grand Army of the Republic from 1887 until 1888, was the Wisconsin quartermaster general in 1889, was a Republican, served in the U. S. Congress representing Wisconsin's Seventh congressional district from 1894 until 1899, invested in the Lea Ingram Lumber Company of Iron River, Wisconsin, the Eau Claire Grocery Company, and the Eau Claire National Bank, was the chairman of the Wisconsin Tax Commission in 1899, was a member of the Wisconsin Commandery in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States (MOLLUS,) was a Mason, was a member of the Knights of Pythias, was a member of the Royal Arcanum, died in Eau Claire, Wisconsin, and was interred in Forest Hill Cemetery in Eau Claire, Wisconsin. W. P. Pearse resided in Winona, Minnesota. W. H. Yale resided in Winona, Minnesota. a href= "http:// www.msparchhistory.info/tnhrail2.html" [See note on Nathaniel Caldwell Foster for the Soo & SouthWestern RailRoad.] a href= "http:// www.msparchhistory.info/tnhrail2.html" [See note on James McIntire for the Soo & SouthWestern RailRoad.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/SumEPortTNH.html"> [See the note for William Hall Yale for 875 Summit Avenue.]

Scanlon-Gipson Lumber Company RailRoad: The railroad was constructed in 1895 by the Scanlon-Gipson Lumber Company and became the Minnesota & North Wisconsin RailRoad. The Scanlon-Gipson Lumber Company was formed by Marion Jerome Scanlon, H. E. Gipson, Dwight F. Brooks, Lester Ranney Brooks, and Anson S. Brooks in 1894 from the former Scanlon, Gipson & Company, formed in the 1860's, acquired a large tract of timber land in the vicinity of Nickerson, Minnesota, after 1894, purchased the lumber business of H. F. Brown of Minneapolis, had a double band lumber mill at Cass Lake, Minnesota, and was replaced by the Brooks-Scanlon Lumber Company. The Scanlon-Gipson Lumber Company incorporated seven miles of logging railroad as the Minnesota & North Wisconsin Railroad in 1898. Sam Blakely was a longterm employee of the Scanlon-Gipson Lumber Company. Sam Blakely was initially employed by the Scanlon-Gipson Lumber Company in 1899 at Nickerson, Minnesota, and moved to the company’s operation at Bend, Oregon, in 1906. Dwight Frederick Brooks, M. D. (1849–1930,) the son of Sheldon Brooks (1811-1883,) in the grain and grain elevator business, and Jeanette Ranney Brooks (1811-1894,) was born at Redfield, New York, moved to Beaver, Winona County, Minnesota, in 1856, moved to Minneiska, Minnesota, in 1862, attended the Medical School of the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, Michigan, married Anna Genevieve Keyes, the daughter of John Keyes and Angelina Pease Keyes, of Winona, Minnesota, in 1875, graduated in medicine from the Long Island College Hospital in 1876, was a delegate to attend the American Medical Association at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1876, was a member of the Minnesota State Medical Society, was a member of the Wabasha County Medical Society, left the grain business in 1900, subsequently organized the Brooks-Scanlon Lumber Company with Joe Scanlon, Minnesota, and was the the principal builder of a family-owned forest products companies in Minnesota, Louisiana, Florida, Oregon, and British Columbia, Canada. Henry E. Gipson (1863- ,) the son of William Henry Gipson, a lumberman operating in Aurora, Indiana, and Decatur, Illinois, and Fannie M. Decker Gipson, was born in Aurora, Indiana, was educated in Decatur, Illinois, married Mary E. Smith of Decatur, Illinois, in 1885, moved to Minneapolis in 1888, was initially employed by the C. H. Ruddock Lumber Company, became a partner of M. J. Scanlon in the Scanlon-Gipson Lumber Company in 1892, organized the Gipson Lumber Company in 1905, resided at Minnetonka Beach, Minnesota, in 1907, was a stockholder in the Brooks-Scanlon Lumber Company, was the president of the Twin City Hardwood Lumber Company, was the vice president of the Kentwood & Eastern Railway Company of Louisiana, was the treasurer and a member of the board of directors of the Bend Company of Bend, Oregon, was a member of the board of directors of the F. W. Buswell Lumber Company, was a member of the Minneapolis Club, was a member of the Lafayette Club of Minneapolis, was a member of the Automobile Club of Minneapolis, was a member of the Interlachen Club of Minneapolis, and was a member of the Town and Country Club of St. Paul. Michael Joseph Scanlon (1861-1930,) the son of M. J. Scanlon (1828-1900) and Mary E. McDonnell Scanlon (1835–1886,) was born at Seven Mile Creek, Juneau County, Wisconsin, near Lyndon, Wisconsin, was educated in the district schools and in the high school at Mauston, Wisconsin, graduated from the Mauston, Wisconsin, High School in 1879, became a law student in the University of Wisconsin at Madison, Wisconsin, in 1881, studied at a business college at Omaha, Nebraska, in 1881, was a bookkeeper for the K. S. Newcomb Lumber Company, one of the subsidiary interests of the S. K. Martin Lumber Company, in 1885, became the secretary of the C. H. Ruddock Lumber Company of Minneapolis in 1889, married Mrs. Sarah W. Henkle, nee Plummer, of Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin,in 1890, then became the secretary of the Ruddock Cypress Company of New Orleans, Louisiana, resided in New Orleans, Louisiana, until 1892, returned to Minneapolis in 1892, organized Scanlon, Gipson & Company to conduct a jobbing business, buying lumber in Minnesota and Wisconsin and selling in Minneapolis, renamed the company the Scanlon-Gipson Lumber Company, commenced purchasing timber near Bend, Oregon, in 1899, purchased the lumber business of H. F. Brown of Minneapolis, organized and became the vice president of the Powell River Company, Limited, in 1909, organized the Brooks-Scanlon Corporation with associates in 1917, was the vice president of the Bahamas Cuban Company, Limited, of Normans Castle, Abaco Island, the Bahamas, was the vice president of the Brooks-Scanlon-O'Brien Company, Limited, of Vancouver, British Columbia, organized the M. J. Scanlon Lumber Company in 1922, was the president of the Central Florida Lumber Company, was the president of the Brooks-Robertson Timber Company, was the president of the Oregon Timber Company, was the president of the American Timber Holding Company, was the president of the North American Timber Holding Company, was the president of the Johnson Straits Lumber Company, was the president of the Brooks Timber Company, was a Roman Catholic, was a Democrat, was a member of the Minneapolis Club, was a member of the Minikahda Club of Minneapolis, and was a member of the Lafayette Club of Minneapolis. [See note for Anson Brooks for 2535 Park Avenue South.] [See note for Lester Ranney Brooks for 2535 Park Avenue South.]

Seventh Avenue Incline Railway/Incline Plane RailRoad/Duluth Skyride: The railroad was built in 1890 by Highland Improvement Company, was operated initially under contract by the the Duluth Street Railway Company, was in operation from 1891 until 1939, was acquired by the Duluth Street Railway in 1897, and had its tracks scrapped for a World War II war-effort metal recycling program. W. K. Rogers, who designed the park system for Duluth, Minnesota, and first envisioned the Skyline Parkway, was an investor in the incline railroad. The Seventh Avenue Incline Railway had two separate tracks that ran a half-mile up the hill, rising to more than 500 feet above Lake Superior and the original incline cars were large enough to hold four teams of horses with wagons or large groups of people. The incline was a funicular with two large counterbalanced cars. The incline railroad served the Hilltop Amusement Hall/Incline Pavilion/Beacon Hill Pavilion, with a restaurant, dance hall, hot air balloon rides, and other attractions, built in 1892 and destroyed by fire in 1901, when a fire started in a coal bin in the engine room of the powerhouse of the Incline and wind carried the fire to the pavilion at the top of the Incline and also released one of the two offset incline cars when the heat of the fire melted the tram cables and the incline car crashed into the ticket house on Superior Street below. From 1901 until 1911, the incline railroad used only one counter-weighted incline car and, in 1911, the use of two cars resumed. William King Rogers was an investor in the railroad. Charles Patton Craig was the vice president of the Highland Improvement Company. Charles E. Shannon was the general manager of the Highland Improvement Company in 1891. Charles Patton Craig (1858-1935,) the son of William-J. Thompson Craig and Katherine Patton Craig, was born in the town of Greenville, Clarion County, Pennsylvania, studied at Elders' Ridge Academy, Indiana County, Pennsylvania, in 1877, graduated from La Fayette College in 1883, read the law in the offices of Benjamin Harris Brewster, Attorney-General of the United States under President Chester Arthur, graduated from the Law School of the of the University of Pennsylvania in 1886, was admitted to the practice of law in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, moved to Duluth, Minnesota in 1886, formed a law firm with Samuel Frisby Snively, eventually shifted from the practice of law to business, married Florence Cameron, the daughter of William Hector Cameron, of Inverness, Scotland, of the Lochiel Clan, in 1890, was a member of the board of directors of the Duluth, Minnesota, Chamber of Commerce, was the secretary, treasurer, and a member of the board of directors of the PennLand & Loan Company, was involved in the establishment of the Jean Duluth Experimental Farm, was the vice-president and a member of the board of directors of the National Bank of Commerce of Duluth, was the president and a member of the board of directors of the Clyde Iron Company, was the vice-president and a member of the board of directors of the Highland Improvement Company, capital $2,000,000, was one of the proprietors of the Duluth Evening Herald, was the president of the St. Louis County Farmers Mutual Fire Insurance Company in 1909, was a member of the Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity in 1910, was a member of the Minnesota State Fair board of managers in 1910, was a member of the Presbyterian Church, was a Republican, established the Duluth Port Terminal, was the chairman of the Minnesota Efficiency & Economy Commission, was the founder and the executive director of the St. Lawrence Tidewater Association, headed the Joint Committee of Civic Organizations for Steel in Duluth, Minnesota, in 1922, was the secretary of the United States St. Lawrence Commission in 1922, and died of a heart attack in the Pacific Northwest. William King Rogers (1828-1893) was born in Circleville, Ohio/Columbus, Ohio, attended an Ohio grammar school, attended Kenyon College in Gambier, Ohio, studied theology, was an ordained minister, received a law degree from Harvard University, was a lawyer, was an early law partner of Rutherford Birchard Hayes (1822-1893,) moved to Minnesota in 1856, was elected a Hastings, Minnesota, alderman in 1858, married Mary Lord Andrews in 1862, was the land commissioner of the Hastings & Dakota Railroad, was involved in the development of Hastings, Minnesota, and Duluth, Minnesota, resided in Chicago, Illinois, in 1865, was the designer of Duluth, Minnesota’s park system, invested in railroads, invested in a canal across Costa Rica and Panama, and invested in mining interests in northern Mexico, advocated the construction of an incline railway to reach his land holdings along the Skyline Drive in Duluth, Minnesota, was the personal White House secretary to President Rutherford B. Hayes, was a member of the Duluth, Minnesota, park board until 1891, returned to Columbus, Ohio, in 1891, and died in Columbus, Ohio. Charles E. Shannon married Martha D. __?__, was a lawyer, was an incorporator of the Duluth Terminal Railway Company in 1887, was the vice president of the American Loan & Trust Company of Duluth, Minnesota, in 1888, was the Prohibition Party of Minnesota candidate for Minnesota attorney general in 1888 and in 1896, was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, was the vice president of the Northwestern Aid Association, was the vice president of the Crown Point Mining Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Crescent Iron Mining Company in 1890, was a member of the board of directors of the Macomber Mining Company in 1890, was appointed railroad commissioner of Duluth, Minnesota, in 1890, was a member of the board of directors of the Vermillion Range Iron Company in 1890, was the secretary and treasurer of the Sheridan Mining Company in 1892, was a member of the board of directors of Suffel & Company in Duluth, Minnesota, and was the vice president of the National Bank of Commerce of Duluth, Minnesota, in 1892.

N. B. Shank Company RailRoad: The N. B. Shank Company incorporated under Minnesota law in 1906 with $50,000 in capital stock and with its principal office in Biwabik, Minnesota. The N. B. Shank Company was located in Biwabik, Minnesota, and operated an 18 mile logging railroad after 1909, connecting with the Duluth & Iron Range RailRoad and extending to Silver Lake, Minnesota, to Lost Lake, Minnesota, and to the St. Louis River. Construction of the rail line began in 1909 and the branches to Lost Lake, Minnesota, and to the St. Louis River in Minnesota were completed by 1912. The company acquired two saddle-tanked four wheel switchers from the Biwabik Mining Company. All of the railroad’s rolling stock was supplied by the Duluth & Iron Range RailRoad. The N. B. Shank Company employed 150 loggers and other employees. In 1915, the company was still operating lumber camps. In 1915, the company sold the rail line to Jack Saari. The Saari Brothers were a lumber company in St. Louis County, Minnesota, before 1920, the lumber company operated a railroad, and Jacob Saari was associated with the company. Nicholas Bower Shank (1860-1940,) the son of Joseph Shank (1821-1906) and Sarah Crow Shank (1827-1899,) was born in Allegan County, Michigan, resided in Hersey, Osceola County, Michigan, in 1880, was the chairman of the board of supervisors of Mesaba Township, Minnesota, in 1892, married Mary Wigham/Mary Elizabeth Weedmark (1864-1911,) the daughter of Nathan Weedmark (1831-1911) and Elizabeth Lane Weedmark (1834-1866,) in 1895, was the Deputy Clerk of District Court, Eleventhl Judicial District in 1901, was a cement dealer in Biwabik, Minnesota, in 1906, was the vice president of the First National Bank of Biwabik, Minnesota, in 1907, was the president of the Biwabik Municipal Electrical Light Company in 1913, married Beda Karolina/Albertina Holst (1883/1893- ,) the daughter of Ben Andreasson Holst and Katherine “Katerina” Matilda Olafsdotter Holst, in 1915, resided in Highland, Osceola County, Michigan, in 1920, resided in Biwabik, St. Louis County, Minnesota, in 1930, and died in Biwabik, St. Louis County, Minnesota.

Shenango Furnace Company RailRoad The company was headquartered in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and had operations on the Minnesota Iron Range. The company's primary operation was located at Hibbing, Minnesota, where it operated the Webb Mine. The Shenango Furnace Company also had operations in Chisholm, Minnesota, where it operated the Shenango Mine and a mining railroad. The Shenango Furnace Company also operated the Whiteside Mine. The Shenango Furnace Company also was a partner with the Snyder Mining Company in operating the Kosmerl Mine. William Penn Snyder (1860/1861- ) of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, bought the Douglas Furnace, the Mabel Furnace, and the Spearman Furnaces in Sharpsville, Pennsylvania, in 1901 and later incorporated them into the Shenango Furnace Company in 1906. Throughout the years following 1906, a number of furnaces operated under the Shenango Furnace Company name at the various Sharpsville, Pennsylvania, sites. The company railroad owned six Shay geared steam locomotives. A Lima Shay geared steam locomotive (#3) was built for the Shenango Furnace Company in Hibbing, Minnesota, in 1907. Shenango Furnace Company #3 eventually was sold to the MacArthur Brothers Company, Altapass, North Carolina, then to the Alabama Power Company, American Junction, Alabama, then to the Georgia Car & Locomotive Company, Atlanta, Georgia, then to the Davidson, Hicks & Greene Company, Cowan, Tennessee, and then to the Battle Creek Coal & Coke Company, Orme, Tennessee, before being scrapped in 1940 in Orme, Tennessee. A Lima Shay geared steam locomotive, Shenango Furnace Co. #6, was built in 1907, was sold to the Alabama Power Company, Birmingham, Alabama, then was sold to the Birmingham Rail & Locomotive Company, then was sold to the Brookhaven Lumber & Manufacturing Company, Brookhaven, Lincoln County, Mississippi, in 1915, then was leased to the Hattiesburg Saw Mill Company, Dreyfus Spur, Forrest County, Mississippi, in 1923, then was traded to the Georgia Car & Locomotive Company in 1924, then was sold to the Ray Lumber Company, Atmore, Alabama, in 1924. In 1908, the Shenango Furnace Company had branch offices in Hibbing, Minnesota, and in Duluth, Minnesota, and owned the Shenango, Webb, Whiteside, and two unopened mines on the Mesabi Iron Range of Minnesota, totaling 400 acres of land, and also owned nine Great Lakes iron ore carriers. In 1908, the officers of the Shenango Furnace Company were William Penn Snyder, president, H. H. Brown, vice president, C. D. Dyer, secretary, and Henry Irwin, Jr., treasurer. Hiram Smith was the superintendent of the Webb Mine in 1921. Edward J. Maney was the general manager of the Shenango Furnace Company in 1922. Anton Tancig was the mechanical superintendent of the Shenango Furnace Company in Chisholm, Minnesota, in 1925. Lea Perrin was the secretary of the Shenango Iron Company in 1939 after previously having been the assistant to William Penn Snyder, Jr. Fayette Brown, Jr. ( -2006) was a vice president and a director of the Shenango Furnace Company after 1958 and was the senior vice president and executive vice president and secretary of Shenango Inc. in 1986. The "Shenango II," an iron ore carrier, was built for the Shenango Furnace Company in 1959, was sold in 1967 to Pickands Mather's Cleveland based Interlake Steamship Company and renamed the "Charles M. Beeghly," and was renamed in 2007 as the "Hon. James A. Oberstar." The Shenango Furnace Company also owned a straight deck iron ore steamer, the William P. Snyder, Jr., in 1912. The Shenango Furnace Company obtained its Chisholm, Minnesota, mine from the Pittsburgh Trust Company and was located on land owned by Mary E. Cahill. Harvey H. Brown (1848-1923,) the son of Fayette Brown, the president of the Brown Hoisting Machine Company and owner of the Jackson Iron Company, and Cornelia Curtiss Brown, resided in Cleveland, Ohio, in 1898, married Elizabeth F. __?__ (1851-1912,) was the treasurer of the Stewart Iron Company in 1898, was the president of the Brown Hoisting Machine Company, succeeding his father, owned Brown Hoisting & Conveying Machine Company, invested in the the Northwestern Transport Company, was an agent for the Jackson Iron Company, served on the board of the Bank of Commerce in Cleveland, Ohio, was a partner in H. H. Brown & Company of Cleveland, Ohio, was a member of the Cleveland, Ohio, Chamber of Commerce in 1908, was a member of the the Union Club of Cleveland, Ohio, and was buried in Lake View Cemetery, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, Ohio. Fayette Brown, Jr. (1882- ,) was a son of Harvey H. Brown. Charles Dickey Dyer (1859- ,) the son of Samuel Dyer (1825-1892,) a merchant, and Elizabeth Brodie Dyer ( -1904,) was born in Allegheny, Pennsylvania, was educated at the common schools of Allegheny, Pennsylvania, attended the Willard Academy, was initially employed by the Pennsylvania Company in 1880, married Belle Smith in 1882, became the freight agent of the Pennsylvania RailRoad at Allegheny, Pennsylvania, in 1892, became the traffic manager of W. P. Snyder & Company, the Clairton Steel Company, and the Shenango Furnace Company in 1902, became the vice president and a member of the board of directors of the Shenango Furnace Company in 1906, was the secretary and and a member of the board of directors of the Shenango Steamship Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Lake Erie Limestone Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Great Lakes Towing Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Lake Carriers’ Association, and was the president of the American Pig Iron Association. Edward J. Maney was a member of the board of directors of the Sierra Consolidated Mine Company in 1909, was the secretary of the American-Saginaw Mining Company in 1913, was the treasurer and a member of the board of directors of the Butte & Ely Company in 1915, was an incorporator, with William W. Watson, Jr., and John D. Clarke, of the Lafayette Iron Mining Company in 1912, was an incorporator, with William W. Watson, Jr., and John D. Clarke, of the Agawam Iron Mining Company in 1912, was an incorporator incorporator, with William W. Watson, Jr., and John D. Clarke, of the Ambridge Iron Mining Company in 1912, was the assistant treasurer and a member of the board of directors of the North Butte Mining Company in 1912, was the assistant treasurer of the Green Cananea Copper Company in 1912, was the treasurer and a member of the board of directors of the Giroux Consolidated Mines Company in 1918, and was the general manager of the Shenango Furnace Company and the Shenango Mine in Balkan Township, Minnesota, the Shenango Mine in Chisholm Village, Minnesota, the South Tener Mine in Chisholm, Minnesota, the Virginia Mine in Eveleth, Minnesota, the Webb Mine in Hibbing, Minnesota, and the Whiteside Mine in Buhl, Minnesota, on the Minnesota’s Mesabi Iron Range in 1922. Lea Baker Perrin (1887-1956,) the son of Florus Romulus Cassius Perrin and Jennie Maxwell Perrin, was born at Crafton, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, married Helen Rae Wentz, the daughter of Louis F. Wentz ( -1935) and Alberta Beck Wentz, in 1914, married Marion Hutchinson (1903-1949,) the daughter of George Hunt Hutchinson (1861-1948) and Ida Lincoln Westervelt Hutchinson (1863-1940,) at Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, in 1934, and was employed by the Shenango Furnace Company from 1909 until 1956. William Penn Snyder (1860-1921,) the son of Edmund Bowman Snyder, a Methodist-Episcopal minister, and Mary McCoy Snyder, was born in Hollidaysburg, Pennsylvania, began his business career as a 16 year old office boy with Pittsburgh iron merchant, Shoenberger & Company, quit Shoenberger & Company in 1880, partnered with John G. A. Leishman as Leishman & Snyder in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in 1880, and was one of the most successful Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, iron brokerage firm by the year 1885, married Mary C. Black, the daughter of Dr. Alexander Wylie Black and Margaret Watson Black, in 1887, changed the firm’s name to W. P. Snyder & Company when Leishman sold his partnership holdings to him in 1888, was the vice president of the McClure Coke Company in 1894, became a protégé of Henry W. Oliver, the founder of the Oliver Iron Mining Company, obtained portions of Oliver’s options on iron ore bearing land in Minnesota's Cayuna and Mesabi ranges, bought or leveraged holdings to acquire interests in iron ore sites, blast furnaces, coke ovens and coal mines, became the president of the Clairton Steel Company in 1904 and built a large steel plant at Clairton, Pennsylvania, was the president of the Antoine Ore Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Pittsburgh Trust Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Union Trust Company of Clairton, Pennsylvania, and formed the Shenango Furnace Company, giving him all of the holdings necessary to control the creation of steel from the raw ore to finished product, in 1905, was a member of the American Iron & Steel Institute, was a member of the Pennsylvania Society of the Sons of the American Revolution, was a member of the Duquesne Club, was a member of the Pittsburgh Club, was a member of the Kitchi Gammi Club of Duluth, Minnesota, was a member of the Union Club of Cleveland, Ohio, was a member of the Lawyers’ Club of New York, New York, was a member of the board of trustees of the University of Pittsburgh, and was a member of the board of governors of the Allegheny General Hospital in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. William P. Snyder, Jr. (1888-1967,) the son of William Penn Snyder and Mary C. Black, was born in Sewickley, Pennsylvania, attended the Shadyside Academy of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, graduated from the Sheffield Scientific School at Yale University in 1910, was employed by the Shenango Furnace Company, first in the production departments and subsequently in the executive offices in 1913, married Marie Elsie Whitney in New Orleans, Louisiana, in 1917, took control of the Shenango Furnace Company upon the death of his father, was the vice president of the Shenango Steamship Company, was the vice president of the Antoine Ore Company, was the vice president of the Lake Erie Limestone Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Pittsburgh Trust Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Lake Erie Carriers’ Association, was a member of the American Iron & Steel Institute, was a member of the American Institute of Mining & Metallurgical Engineers, was a member of the American Pig Iron Association, was a member of the Yale Engineering Association, was a member of the Pittsburgh Chamber of Commerce, was a member of the board of trustees of the University of Pittsburgh, was the secretary of the Associated Western Yale Clubs, was a member of the Duquesne Club, was a member of the Pittsburgh Club, was a member of the University Club of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, was a member of the Allegheny Country Club, was a member of the Kitchi Gammi Club of Duluth, Minnesota, was a member of the Pittsburgh Athletic Association, and was a member of the Yale Club of New York City, New York.

Sioux City & Northern RailRoad: The railroad was organized by J. E. Booge, A. S. Garretson, Ed. Haakinson, D. T. Hedges, and John Hornick in 1889, was promoted by Thomas P. Gere and Frederick C. Hills, was intended to construct and operate a rail line from Sioux City, Iowa, to Duluth, Minnesota, was built by the Sioux City & Northern Contracting Company, operated until 1900, and was succeeded by the Willmar & Sioux Falls RailRoad. In 1893, the officers of the railroad were F. C. Hills, president and general manager, James E. Booge, vice president, A. S. Garretson, treasurer, Dixon S. Elliott, secretary, C. L. Wright, solicitor, George Hills, auditor, and Lester F. Wakefield, chief engineer, and the members of the board of directors were James E. Booge, A. S. Garretson, Edward Haakinson, D. T. Hedges, F. C. Hills, John Hornick, James P. Wall, and C. L. Wright. Arthur S. Garretson was the treasurer for the Sioux City & Northern Railroad. The railroad ran from Sioux City, Iowa, to the Iowa-Minnesota state line South of Hills, Minnesota, by way of Merrill, Iowa, Struble, Iowa, Sioux Center, Iowa, and Doon, Iowa, then crossed Rock County, Minnesota, and Minnehaha County, South Dakota, to the junction with the Willmar & Sioux Falls RailRoad at Garretson, South Dakota. In 1897, A. F. Hall became the vice president of the railroad, replacing Edward Haakinson, and Howard S. Baker became the treasurer of the railroad, replacing George W. Oakley. A. S. Garretson and G. W. Wickersham were the trustees of the railroad when it was reorganized as the Sioux City, O'Neill & Western Railway Company. The railroad was eventually succeeded by the Burlington Northern Sante Fe RailRoad. James E. Booge (1833-1911,) the son of Harris Booge, was born in Pittsford, Rutland County, Vermont, lived for a while in Brighton, Ontario, Canada, with his family, moved to Indiana, where he helped on his father's farm, went to California to work in the mining industry in 1854, moved to St. Louis, Missouri, in 1858, where he worked for the Wabash RailRoad, married Anna M. Hubbel ( -1861) of Connecticut, moved to Sioux City, Iowa, in 1858, opened a wholesale and retail grocery, was joined in a partnership by his brother, John B. Booge, in J. D. Booge & Company in 1859, married Lncy B. Robinson ( -1900) in St. Louis, Missouri, in 1866, sold the grocery business in 1878, was the first meat packer in Sioux City, Iowa, constructed a three-story building and was slaughtering 123,000 hogs per year in 1873, became involved in the Union Stockyards Company, built a plant in the stockyards area that began to slaughter 1,600 hogs a day in 1881, invested in Sioux City, Iowa, real estate, was associated with the National Bank of Sioux City, Iowa, was associated with the Sioux City & Northern RailRoad, was associated with the Sioux City, Iowa, elevated railroad, was a Mason, was a Knight Templar, was involved in many other ventures, moved to the Yukon River in Alaska from 1897 until 1901, operated the Yukon Hotel in Dawson City, Yukon Territory, Canada, from 1898 to 1902, moved to Los Angeles, California, in 1901, moved to Wyoming in 1901, returned to Sioux City, Iowa, in 1902, was the president of Booge, Coe & Booge, was the manager of the Weare Grain Company, and was buried in Floyd Cemetery, Sioux City, Woodbury County, Iowa. Arthur Samuelson Garretson resided in Sioux City, Iowa, after 1874, was the cashier of the Sioux City Savings Bank before 1880, was the cashier of the Sioux National Bank in 1881, was the owner of a 3,000 acre cattle ranch, was a millionaire railroad investor from Sioux City, Iowa, was a Democrat, was an unsuccessful Democratic candidate for the U. S. House of Representatives in 1896, built the Garretson Hotel in Sioux City, Iowa, in 1910, was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, was the treasurer of the University of the Northwest/Morningside College was the author of Primitive Christianity And Early Criticisms A Work Of Negation, published by Sherman, French & Company in 1912, was a member of the American Hampshire Swine Record Association in 1919. Thomas Parke Gere (1842-1912) was born in Wellsburg, Chemung County, New York, enlisted in the Fifth Minnesota Volunteer Infantry Regiment in 1862, was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor in 1865 for actions at the Battle of Nashville, Tennessee, in 1864 duiring the American Civil War, was the chief engineer of the Sioux City & St. Paul RailRoad and of the St. Paul & Sioux City RailRoad in 1873, was employed as a division superintendent of the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis, & Omaha RailRoad, founded, with partner Rensselaer D. Hubbard of Mankato, Minnesota, the Sioux City Linseed Oil Company/American Linseed Oil Company in 1883, was the president of the Sioux City & Northern RailRoad Company in 1889, was member of the board of directors of the Corn Exchange National Bank of Sioux City, Iowa, and was buried in Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Virginia. Edward Haakinson was a member of the board of county supervisors of Woodbury County, Iowa, in 1876, was the principal of the Edward Haakinson & Company, which was established in 1888 and which was built a complex of buildings that included a five-story packing house in Sioux City, Iowa, was an incorporator of the Union Stock Yards Company in 1884, was the treasurer of Woodbury County, Iowa, from 1885 until 1887, was the president of the Sioux City Stockyards Company, resided in Sloan, Woodbury County, Iowa, was granted in 1890 authority by the City of Sioux City, Iowa, to operate a street railway in the city, was a Methodist, was a founder of the University of the Northwest/Morningside College, was associated with the Union Loan & Trust Company, and was sued in Sioux City, Iowa, on a promissory note by the Credits Commutation Company for $461,500 in 1898. Daniel T. Hedges (1835/1838- ,) the son of Nathaniel Gates Hedges (1811- ,) moved to Sioux City, Iowa, in 1857, was a Sioux City, Iowa, alderman in 1868 and 1869, married Mary C. Van Dyke, was the mayor of Sioux City, Iowa, in 1870, partnered with Charles E. Hedges (1834-1877) in seeking authority from the City of Sioux City, Iowa, to build a grain elevator in the city in 1870, was a miller, raised live stock, was the partner of Charles E. Hedges in a meat market in Sioux City, Iowa, in 1872, was a partner of Charles E. Hedges and James D. Spalding in Hedges & Spalding, lumber dealers in 1872, was a real estate developer, built the first Woodbury County, Iowa, courthouse in 1878, was the secretary of the Sioux City Cable Railway Company in 1893, and was a member of the board of directors of the Washington Park & Spring Grove Railway Company in 1893. Frederick C. Hills (1842- ) was born in Berthersden, Kent, England, emigrated to the United States with his family in 1849, settled with his family in Oneida County, New York, worked on the family farm until 1857, apprenticed in the carriage trimming trade, enrolled in a business college at Rome, New York, served in the Union Army during the American Civil War, was discharged after suffering a disability, moved to Sioux City, Iowa, in 1864, moved to Marshalltown, Iowa, was employed by the Sioux City & Pacific RailRoad until 1881, returned to Sioux City, Iowa, was engaged in the hardware business in Sioux City, Iowa, until 1888, was the assistant general manager of the Wyoming Pacific Improvement Company, was the receiver for the Pacific Short Line RailRoad/Sioux City, O’Neil & Western RailRoad, and was the general manager of the Sioux City & Northern RailRoad. John Hornick (1843-1911,) the son of Peter Hornick (1788-1854) and Anna Jekyll Hornick( -1888,) was born in Old Ross, County Wexford, Ireland, immigrated to America with his family in 1851, initially located as early settlers near Ottawa, La Salle County, Illinois, worked at farm labor until 1861, enlisted in Company E of the 26th Illinois Infantry during the American Civil War, was wounded twice and participated in 26 battles, engaged in business at Memphis, Tennessee, until 1867, came to Sioux City, Iowa, in 1867, engaged in the Deadwood, Dakota Territory, freight conveyance business, became president of the famous Corn Palace in Sioux City, Iowa, was president of the Sioux City Jobbers' & Manufacturers' Association, married Sarah Jennie/Jennie Humbert (1858- ) of Richland Center, Wisconsin, in 1873, was a wholesale druggist in the firm of Hornick, Hess & Moor, sold "John Hornick" cigars, resided in Sioux City, Iowa, in 1893, owned the Sioux City, Iowa, gas company, was a Knight Templar, and had a brother, Richard J. Hornick, who resided in Ottawa, Illinois, and who was a banker in 1893 who was adversely affected by John Hornick’s financial entanglements. Craig L. Wright (1846-1915,) the son of George G. Wright (1820-1896,) an Iowa Supreme Court justice, and Hannah M. Dibble Wright, was born in Keosauqua, Iowa, attended the public schools of Keosauqua, Iowa, graduated from Iowa State University, graduated from the Law School at the Iowa State University, was a law student in the office of Withrow & Wright at Des Moines, Iowa, was admitted to the practice of law in Iowa in 1868, moved to Sioux City, Iowa, was the law partner of William L. Joy in the law firm of Joy & Wright from 1868 until 1884, married Kate P. Van Dyke in Keokuk, Iowa, in 1873, was the president of the Woodbury County, Iowa, Agricultural Society in 1882, was a brother-in-law of Frank H. Peavey of Minneapolis, was the law partner of A. L. Hudson from 1884 until 1887, was the city attorney of Sioux City, Iowa, was a member of the Sioux City, Iowa, city council, practiced law solo after 1887, represented the Sioux City Street Railway Company on appeal before the Iowa Supreme Court, Sioux City Street R. Co. v. Sioux City, 78 Iowa 742, in 1889, was a law partner of Senator E. H. Hubbard, George A. Yeoman and T. W. Bevington from 1890 until 1896, was a notary public in Iowa in 1892, was a Republican, was the lawyer for the Republican Party in Iowa, was an organizer of the Sioux City Cable RailRoad Company, was a member of the executive committee and the law reform committee of the Iowa State Bar Association in 1896 and 1897, was an organizer of the the Sioux City Rapid Transit Company, the Union Stockyards Company, the Terminal RailRoad & Warehouse Company, the Pacific Short Line RailRoad, and the Northern Land Company, was the legal counsel for the Sioux City & Northern RailRoad in 1900, was the secretary of the Sioux City Street Railway, was an unsuccessful candidate for appointment to a district court judgeship, was a member of the board of directors of Sioux City & Northern RailRoad in 1901 and in 1904, was the auditor of the Interurban Railway Company of Des Moines, Iowa, in 1904, moved to Los Angeles, California, in 1908, and died of a stroke of paralysis in Los Angeles, California. Lester Fish Wakefield (1852- ,) the son of Jonathan Wakefield (1810- ) and Calista Carpenter Wakefield (1816- ,) was born at LeClaire, lowa, resided in Sioux City, Iowa, was a civil engineer, married Mary Alice/Allice Newbern (1860-1888,) the daughter of Samuel C. Newbern (1839-1933) and Margaret Henthorne Newbern (,) in 1880, was the chief engineer of the Omaha, Decatur & Northern Railway Company, married Jennie Wilson in 1889, was the city engineer of Sioux City, Iowa, in 1894-1897, was an incorporator, a member of the board of directors, the vice president, and the chief engineer of the Sioux City & Western RailRoad in 1897, was employed by the Chicago, St. Paul, & Minneapolis RailRoad, was the first person who surveyed the locality that became Wakefield, Dixon County, Nebraska, was a Mormon, and eventually settled in Seattle, Washington. James P. Wall (1839- ,) the son of Thomas Wall and Mary Sullivan Wall, was born in Lowell, Massachusetts, married Mary Brady in Pekin, Illinois, in 1864, came to Sioux City, Iowa, in 1866, was a bricklayer, contractor and builder, was a real estate investor, was the chief of the Sioux City, Iowa, fire department in 1882, was a member of the board of directors of the Sioux City & Northern Railway Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Northern Land Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Rathbun Wheel Scraper Manufacturing Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Home Savings Bank, was a Roman Catholic, was a member of the Ancient Order of Hibernians, was a Republican, and was a Sioux City, Iowa, alderman in 1894. George Woodward Wickersham (1858-1938,) was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, attended Lehigh University from 1873 to 1875, received a law degree from the University of Pennsylvania in 1880, practiced law in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, until 1882, moved to New York City, New York, joined the law firm of Strong & Cadwalader, was a member of the board of directors of the Chicago Railways Company in 1906, was the Attorney General of the United States during the William Howard Taft administration from 1909 until 1913, concentrated his efforts on prosecuting monopolistic corporations for antitrust violations under the Sherman Act, helped draft the 16th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, served on the War Trade Board to Cuba during World War I, served on the National Commission on Law Observance and Enforcement, attended the New York Constitutional Convention and chaired its Judiciary Committee in 1915, was President of the Council on Foreign Relations from 1933 until 1936, died in New York City, New York, and was interred in Brookside Cemetery in Englewood, New Jersey. a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/SumEPortTNH.html"> [See note on Dixon S. Elliott for 438 Portland Avenue.]

Sioux City & St. Paul RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in 1864 as the Minnesota Valley RailRoad. The railroad was incorporated under Iowa law in 1866 and was organized in 1871. The railroad contracted with the Sioux City & St. Paul RailRoad to handle the building of the rail line beyond St. James, Minnesota. In 1871, the St. Paul and Sioux City RailRoad was completed to St. James, Minnesota, and made a contract with the Sioux City & St. Paul RailRoad Company under which that company assumed the construction and operation of the rail road from St. James, Minnesota, to Sioux City, Iowa, and acquired all the lands granted to the St. Paul & Sioux City RailRoad Company and not then earned in Minnesota and all the lands granted in aid of the railroad in Iowa. The railroad constructed 122.59 miles of rail trackage from St. James, Minnesota, to Le Mars, Iowa, from 1871 until 1872. The railroad made an agreement with the Illinois Central RailRoad to use 20 miles of the Illinois Central RailRoad rail lne from Le Mars, Iowa, to Sioux City, Iowa. In 1872, the railroad operated 122.37 miles of rail trackage, owned nine locomotives, owned six passenger cars, owned 131 freight cars, and owned three company cars. In 1872, the members of the board of directors of the railroad were S. T. Davis, E. F. Drake, B. M. Goldschmidt, Adrian C. Iselin, George H. MacKay, D. S. Miller, Alexander H. Rice, George I. Seney, and Horace Thompson. In 1874, the officers of the railroad were E. F. Drake, president, A. H. Wilder, vice president, W. H. Brown, secretary, Horace Thompson, treasurer, J. W. Bishop, general manager, John F. Lincoln, superintendent, T. P. Gere, chief engineer, Edward Berreau, land commisisoner, and Stephen Miller, solicitor, the members of the board of directors of the railroad were E. F. Drake, B. M. Goldschmidt, Adrian Iselin, George H. Mackay, J. L. Merriam, Alexander H. Rice, George I. Seney, Horace Thompson, and A. H. Wilder, the railroad had its general offices in St. Paul, the railroad operated a 147.5 mile rail line, of which 66.25 miles were located in Minnesota, the railroad owned five wooden bridges and seven wooden trestles, the railroad owned 11 locomotives, six first class passenger cars, eight cabooses, three express and baggage cars, 285 box, freight and stock rail cars, 93 flat and coal rail cars, 23 hand rail cars, and one-half other rail car, and employed 296 personnel. In 1878, the officers of the railroad were A. H. Wilder, vice president, W. H. Brown, secretary, and G. A. Hamilton, auditor, and the members of the board of directors of the railroad were W. H. Brown, E. F. Drake, Adrian Iselin, J. L. Merriam, Alex. H. Rice, George I. Seney, G. W. Simons, Horace Thompson, and A. H. Wilder. In 1878, the railroad had $4,500,000 capital stock, operated 147.5 miles of rail trackage (66.25 miles in Minnesota,) owned seven stations, owned five bridges, owned 79 trestles, owned 13 locomotives, owned 11 passenger cars, owns 395 freight cars, and owned 49 company cars. The railroad operated until 1881, was succeeded through an 1879 consolidation by the St. Paul & Sioux City RailRoad, and was ultimately succeeded by the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha RailRoad. In 1882, the railroad owned 3,721.69 acres of land in Minnesota. Elias F. Drake and Amherst H. Wilder were trustees of the railroad in 1881. Horace Thompson, Russell Blakeley, and E. F. Warner all invested in the railroad. In 1893, the officers of the railroad were F. C. Hills, president and general manager, James E. Booge, vice president, A. S. Garretson, treasurer, D. S. Elliott, secretary, C. L. Wright, general solicitor, George Hills, auditor, and L. F. Wakefield, chief engineer, and the members of the board of directors of the railroad were James E. Booge, A. S. Garretson, Ed. Haakinson, D. T. Hedges, F. C. Hills, John Hornick, James P. Wall, and C. L. Wright. In 1895, in Sioux City and St. Paul R. Co. v. United States 159 U.S. 349, the U. S. Supreme Court decided that the railroad failed to complete the entire railway from Sioux City, Iowa, to the Minnesota line, as contemplated by the Act of Congress of May 12, 1864, c. 84, 13 Stat. 72, and received 2,004.89 acres in federal government land grants in excess of what it could rightfully claim. The Sioux City & St. Paul RailRoad platted Heron Lake, Minnesota, in 1872. Adrian Georg Iselin (1818-1905,) the son of Isaac Iselin ( -1841) and Aimee Jeanne Susanne Emilie Roulet Iselin, was born in New York, New York, was educated privately, was initially employed by the New York dry goods company of Messers, Cattenet, Barbey & Company, worked with his brother-in-law, Henri Barney, in Cottenet, Barbey & Company, founded the company of Moran & Iselin, initially an imported dry goods merchant and subsequently a private bank, was a New York investment banker, married Eleanora O'Donnell (1822-1897,) the daughter of General Christopher Columbus O'Donnell (1792-1873) and Eleanora/Eleanor C. Pascault O’Donnell (1799-1870,) in Baltimore, Maryland, in 1845, founded A. Iselin & Company in 1864, was a member of the board of directors of the Sioux City & St. Paul Railroad Company, controlled the Buffalo, Rochester & Pittsburgh Railway Company, formed the Pittsburgh & State Line Railroad Company, was a member of the board of directors of the New York Guaranty & Indemnity Company in 1870, was a stockholder in the Metropolitan Opera & Real Estate Company, was one of the incorporators of the Museum of Natural History, was one of the incorporators of the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, was chief investor in the Rochester & Pittsburgh Coal & Iron Company, promoted the New Rochelle Water Works, and died in New York, New York. Samuel Tait Davis (1828- ,) the son of George Davis and Eliza Reichard Davis, was born in Meadville, Pennsylvania, moved to Mercer County, Pennsylvania, in 1838, was educated in Mercer County, Pennsylvania, schools, the preparatory department of Allegheny College at Meadville, Pennsylvania, was the principal of Greenville Academy, read the law with David Derrickson in Meadville, Pennsylvania, was admitted to the practice of law in Pennsylvania in 1855, moved to Sioux City, Iowa, in 1856, opened a law office and a real estate office, Parker, Gray & Davis, in Sioux City, Iowa, in 1856, was the Sioux City, Iowa, prosecuting attorney for several years after 1856, married Jane A. Putnam in 1859, was an Episcopalian, was a Democrat until 1861, was a Republican after 1861, was the register of the United States Land Office at Sioux City, Iowa, under President Lincoln's administration, helped found the Sioux City, Iowa, Journal in 1864, served in the Iowa State Senate in 1868, was the mayor of Sioux City, Iowa, in 1871, was the agent and attorney for the Sioux City & Pembina RailRoad in 1872, was the president and a member of the board of directors of the Sioux City & Columbus RailRoad in 1872, was an incorporator of the Nebraska & Dakota Southern RailRoad, and was the second vice-president of the Sioux City, Iowa, Citizens Association in 1873. George Henry MacKay (1843- ,) the son of Robert Caldwell MacKay (1800-1887,) a Boston, Massachusetts, merchant, and Charlotte Langdon Lodge MacKay, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, worked in the East India trade firm of Mackay & Coolidge, married Maria Mitchell Starbuck (1850-1920,) the daughter of Matthew Starbuck and Catharine Wyer Starbuck, in 1874, and was a member of the Nantucket Historical Association. David S. Miller was a member of the board of directors of the Leggetts Gap RailRoad in 1850, was a trustee of the Chester Valley RailRoad in 1852, resided in New York, New York, in 1872, was a member of the board of directors of the Hannibal & St. Joseph RailRoad in 1893, and was associated with the Poughkeepsie Transportation Company in 1893. Alexander Hamilton Rice (1818-1895,) the son of Thomas Rice and Lydia Smith Rice, was born in Newton, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, received a business training in his father's paper mill at Newton, Massachusetts, apprenticed in a mercantile house in Boston, Massachusetts, graduated from Union College in Schenectady, New York, in 1844, became a paper manufacturer and dealer with Wilkins, Carter & Company in Boston,Massachusetts, was a member of the Boston,Massachusetts, Board of Trade, was a Republican, was a founder of the Republican Party in Massachusetts, was elected a member of the Boston, Massachusetts, Common Council in 1853, became the President of the Boston, Massachusetts, Common Council in 1854, was Mayor of Boston, Massachusetts, in 1856 and 1857, was Governor of Massachusetts in 1876, 1877, and 1878, was a member of Congress from Massachusetts from 1859 until 1867, was a member of the board of visitors at the U. S. Naval Academy at Annapolis, Maryland, was a president of the Boston,Massachusetts, Board of Trade, was a member of the Protestant Episcopal Church, died of a stroke and paralysis at the Langwood Hotel in Melrose, Massachusetts, and was buried at the Newton Cemetery & Crematory, Newton, Middlesex County, Massachusetts. George Ingraham Seney (1826-1893,) the son of Robert Seney (1795- ) and Jane Ingraham Seney (1800- ,) was born in Astoria, Queens, New York, was educated at Wesleyan University at Middleton, Connecticut, graduated from the University of the City of New York in 1847, married Phoebe Moser (1832- ,) was a teller at the Metropolitan National Bank, was associated with a number of financial institutions, was a member of the board of trustees of the Atlantic State Bank, was a member of the board of trustees of the Phenix Insurance Company of Brooklyn, was associated with the Ohio Central RailRoad, the Peoria, Evansville & Decatur RailRoad, the Erie & Western RailRoad, the New York, Chicago, & St. Louis RailRoad, and the East Tennessee, Virginia, & Georgia RailRoad, was a major financial supporter of the Methodist Episcopal Hospital of Brooklyn, New York, was the president of the Metropolitan Bank from 1877 until 1884, was an art collector, was a philanthropist, was a Methodist, and died of a heart attack in New York, New York. a href="http://www.angelfire.com/mn/thursdaynighthikes/stalb1_arch.html" [See note on Judson Wade Bishop and Mary Libania Axtell Bishop for 720 Fairmount Avenue.] [See the note for Elias Franklin Drake for 324 Bates Avenue.] [See note on John L. Merriam for 4 Crocus Hill.] [See note on Horace E. Thompson for 808 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Amherst H. Wilder for 255 Summit Avenue.]

Sioux City, St. Paul & Lake Superior RailRoad: The railroad was authorized by the State of Minnesota shortly after statehood in 1857. The railroad was incorporated in 1863 by W. L. Banning, Charles H. Oakes, Parker Paine and others to build a railway from Lake Superior to Spirit Lake, Iowa. The railroad had capital stock of $6,000,000 at incorporation. The railroad was organized in 1871. Charles Henry Oakes (1803-1879,) the son of David Owen Oakes, the sheriff of Windham County, Michigan, and a judge of St. Clair County, Michigan, and Sarah "Sally" Marsh Oakes, was born in Rockingham, Windam County, Vermont, received a common school education, clerked in a store from 1815 until 1821, came to Chicago, Illinois Territory, in 1821 and was employed in the sutler's, moved to Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan Territory in 1822, initially married Tee-Gau-Shau in 1822, engaged in the mercantile business until 1824, commenced trading with the Indians, became connected with the American Fur Company, and continued in this business up to 1834, subsequently married Julia R. Beaulieu (1812-1911) in 1831 in Michigan, was in Michigan engaged in speculating from 1834 up to 1838, resumed his connection with the American Fur Company and continued with them up to 1850, moved to St. Paul in 1850, opened a bank in company with his brother-in-law, Charles W. Borup ( -1859) in 1853, was a colonel on the staff of Gen. H. H. Sibley in 1862 during the U. S.-Dakota War, was a member of the Protestant Episcopal church, died in St. Paul, and was buried in Oakland Cemetery in Saint Paul. Parker Paine (1808-1875) was born in Anson, Maine, married Rosalie Eliza Grant (1838- ,) the daughter of Randolph Grant (1808-1885) and Nancy Grant Grant (1811-1886,) came to St. Paul in 1853, formed a bank, Parker Paine & Company in 1853, was a member of the St. Paul Board of Education from 1856 until 1874, partnered with Horace Thompson, Norman B. Thompson, and James Egbert Thompson in Thompson, Paine & Company, eventually the First National Bank of St. Paul, in 1860, was a member of the St. Paul City Council from 1862 until 1865, was a broker in 1865, resided in St. Paul in 1865, served in the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Ramsey County (District 1,) from 1865 until 1867, was a trustee for the St. Paul Methodist Church, died in St Paul, and was buried in Oakland Cemetery in Saint Paul. [See note for William L. Banning for 6 Irvine Park.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/SumEPortTNH.html"> [See note on Horace E. Thompson for 808 Summit Avenue.] a href= "http:// www.msparchhistory.info/SAlbTNH.html " [See note on James Egbert Thompson for 682 Fairmount Avenue.]

Sioux & SouthWestern RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1889. The failure of legislation authorizing the railroad to build a bridge over the Mississippi River by the U. S. House of Representatives by virtue of a lack of a quorum was reported in the Ann Arbor Argus on October 12, 1888.

Sleepy Eye Lake & Minnesota River RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated under Minnesota law by W. L. Brackenridge, C. T. Brown, J. H. Jenkins, J. C. Rudolph, J. H. Stewart, and W. G. Ward in 1873 to build and operate a rail line from Sleepy Eye Lake, Minnesota, to a point at or near the head of Big Stone Lake, Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1873, had $3,000,000 in capital stock, and had its general office at Sleepy Eye Lake, Minnesota. Walter Lowry Brackenridge (1825-1899) was born in Pennsylvania, was a lawyer, was the county clerk of Crawford County, Pennsylvania, from 1851 until 1854, came to Rochester, Minnesota, in 1856, was a notary public for Olmsted County, Minnesota, in 1869, resided at Rochester, Minnesota, in 1871 and 1874, was an incorporator of the New Ulm, Redwood & Big Stone Lake Railway Company in 1871, was a lay delegate representing Calvary Episcopal Church in Rochester, Minnesota, at the 21st Annual Convention of the Episcopal Diocese of Minnesota in 1872, was an incorporator of the Sleepy Eye Lake & Minnesota Railway Company in 1873, platted Nicollet Township, Nicollet County, Minnesota, in 1874, was the attorney for the Winona & St. Peter RailRoad for 12 years, died in Rochester, Minnesota, and was buried in Oakwood Cemetery, Rochester, Olmsted County, Minnesota. William Logan Brackenridge (1856-1905,) the son of Walter Lowry Brackenridge and Margaret McClintick Logan Brackenridge (1830-1914,) graduated from the University of Michigan in 1879, was a lawyer, practiced law in Rochester, Minnesota, was the city attorney of Rochester, Minnesota, from 1881 until 1887 and from 1888 until 1889, was a member of the board of directors in the Union National Bank of Rochester, Minnesota, in 1883, was a member of the board of county commissioners of Olmsted County, Minnesota, in 1891, and was the secretary of the Guarranty Savings & Loan Association of Rochester, Minnesota, in 1901. Charles T. “C. T.” Brown (1827-1879) was born in Wilton, Franklin County, Maine, came to Minnesota in 1860, farmed in Le Sueur County, Minnesota, for 18 months, then went into the real estate business in St. Peter, Minnesota, was a charter member of the Masons in St. Peter, Minnesota, in 1865, was a Republican, served in the Minnesota Senate representing Brown County, Minnesota, Davis County, Minnesota, Nicollet County, Minnesota, Pierce County, Minnesota, Renville County, Minnesota, Sibley County, Minnesota, and Watonwan County, Minnesota (District 19) from 1865 until 1867, served in the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Brown County, Minnesota, Davis County, Minnesota, Nicollet County, Minnesota, Pierce County, Minnesota, Pope County, Minnesota, Redwood County, Minnesota, Renville County, Minnesota, and Sibley County, Minnesota, (District 19) from 1866 until 1868, was a delegate from Minnesota to the Republican National Convention in 1868, served in the Minnesota Senate representing Brown County, Minnesota, Davis County, Minnesota, Nicollet County, Minnesota, Pierce County, Minnesota, Pope County, Minnesota, Redwood County, Minnesota, Renville County, Minnesota, and Sibley County, Minnesota (District ) from 1867 until 1870, was a notary public in Nicollet County, Minnesota, in 1868, resided in St. Peter, Nicollet County, Minnesota, in 1868, was the federal agent for the Anishinabe Indians in 1869, before they were placed under War Department supervision, was the United States Surveyor General for Minnesota from 1871 until 1873, and was the president of the board of trustees of the Minnesota Hospital for the Insane in St. Peter, Minnesota, in 1875 and until 1879. Joseph H. Jenkins was a surveyor in Wisconsin in 1863, was the assistant superintendent of the Winona & St. Peter Railroad, was a partner in the company that platted Marshall, Lyon County, Minnesota, and was awarded the contract to resurvey the Nebraska-South Dakota border in 1893. John C. Rudolph was th quartermaster of a New Ulm, Minnesota, militia unit organized by Colonel Charles E. Flandrau in 1862 during the U. S.-Dakota War, was a receiver at the federal land office at St. Peter, Nicollet County, Minnesota, in 1873, and was the president of the city council of New Ulm, Minnesota, in 1887. James H. Stewart (1827-1896) was born at Rochester, New York, was a well-known railroad builder and manager, began railway work in 1848 on the Rochester & Niagara Falls RailRoad, was the superintendent of construction for the Wabash RailRoad from 1853 to 1858, was the roadmaster of the Lafayette & Indianapolis RailRoad in 1856, was the general superintendent of the Sandusky, Mansfield & Newark RailRoad from 1858 until 1867, was the general superintendent of the Winona & St. Peter RailRoad from 1867 until 1874, was an incorporator of the Winona, Mankato & New Ulm RailRoad Company in 1870, was provided with the proceeds of a bond sale by Mankato, Minnesota, in 1873 to build a street railway in Mankato, Minnesota, that was ratified by the Minnesota Legislature in Special Laws of Minnesota 1871, Chapter 59, platted Nicollet Township, Minnesota, with Walter L. Brackenridge in 1874, built the Midland RailRoad of Ohio, was long connected with the Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern RailRoad, was the general manager of the Cincinnati, Lafayette & Chicago RailRoad from 1875 until 1879, was the general manager of the Marietta & Cincinnati RailRoad from 1879 until 1881, was the general manager of the Cincinnati, Washington & Baltimore RailRoad in 1883, was a projector of the Sandusky & Columbus Short Line Railway, was active in the construction of and was a member of the board of directors of the Sandusky & Hocking RailRoad, and died asphyxiated by natural gas in Sandusky, Ohio. William Grosvenor “W. G.” Ward (1827/1828/1830-1892,) the son of James Ward (1795-1885) and Ann Banta Ward (1800-1886,) was born in Boonville, Oneida County, New York, was educated in New York common schools, attended Union College in New York, was a civil engineer, was the assistant engineer of the New York State Canal, initially married Martha L. Dodge (1833–1865) in 1852, worked on the Utica & Black River RailRoad, moved to Madison, Wisconsin, engaged in railroad work in Wisconsin, read the law initially with Blake & Wood and subsequently with Matthew Baldwin and George B. Smith in Madison, Wisconsin, was admitted to the practice of law in Wisconsin in 1860, served in a Wisconsin regiment during the American Civil War, married Ella Corbin Trowbridge (1851-1925,) the daughter of Ira Cooke Trowbridge and Judith Church Trowbridge, was a lawyer, came to Minnesota in 1866, was the chief engineer for the Winona & St. Peter RailRoad, was a farmer, was initially a Liberal Republican, served in the Minnesota Senate representing Waseca County, Minnesota (Districts 13 and 11,) from 1872 until 1875 and from 1886 until 1891, subsequently was a Republican, was an unsuccessful Republican candidate for the U. S. Congress from Minnesota in 1880, was a candidate to be a delegate from Minnesota to the Republican National Convention in 1884, and resided in Waseca, Minnesota, in 1884.

Soo Line RailRoad: The Soo Line Railroad Company was incorporated in 1949 in Minnesota as the Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic RailRoad, as part of the plan for reorganizing the Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic Railway and the subsidiary Mineral Range RailRoad. When the Canadian Pacific Railway consolidated several subsidiaries in 1961, it used the Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic RailRoad to merge the Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sault Ste. Marie RailRoad and Wisconsin Central RailRoad into, and renamed it the Soo Line Railroad. The Soo Line gained control of the Minneapolis, Northfield and Southern Railway (MN&S), a Twin Cities-area short line, in 1982. In 1950, the corporate name of the Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sault Ste. Marie RailRoad was dropped except for legal matters, the trade name "Soo Line Railroad" was adopted, and the initials “MStP&SSMRR,” in small type, were used under the railroad’s trade mark. R. R. Galligan was a vice president of the railroad in the 1950’s. The railroad was organized in 1960. In 1961, the Wisconsin Central Railway, operated by the Soo Line RailRoad for over 50 years, was consolidated with the Soo Line, along with the Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic Railway, a wholly owned subsidiary of the Canadian Pacific Railway, and was reorganized as the Soo Line RailRoad Company. The railroad operated until 1995, and was succeeded by the Canadian Pacific RailRoad. The predecessor of the Soo Line RailRoad was formed by a group of Minneapolis grain milling operators in 1883 as the Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sault Ste. Marie RailRoad. It expanded North and West from the Twin Cities through the Dakotas and East across Wisconsin to the Canadian border, where it connected with the Canadian Pacific RailRoad at Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan. The objective of the Soo Line RailRoad was to open an entirely new route for transporting flour and grain to the Eastern Seaboard and break the stranglehold on rates by rail carriers operating through Chicago. The new rail route to the East through the Canadian Pacific RailRoad connection at Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, was 200 miles shorter to Boston than transit through Chicago and it brought new competition for business and helped ease transportation costs for grain companies. In 1961, the Soo Line RailRoad, the Wisconsin Central RailRoad, and the Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic RailRoad, which was formed in 1855, were merged into the Soo Line RailRoad Company. The Canadian Pacific RailRoad had previously acquired ownership interests in all three companies and, after the merger, the Canadian Pacific RailRoad was the majority owner of the new Soo Line RailRoad. Leonard H. Murray was a member of the board of directors of the railroad in 1977 and 1978. Harold J. Ness was a vice president of the Soo Line RailRoad in 1976. The Soo Line RailRoad purchased the Minneapolis, Northfield & Southern Railway in 1981 and the Milwaukee Road in 1985. Following 1985, unable to manage the capital and manpower needs of the expanded railroad, the Soo Line RailRoad pared down its operations. Dennis Cavanaugh was the president of the Soo Line RailRoad in the 1980’s. Robert C. Gilmore was the president of the Soo Line RailRoad in 1986. In 1990, the Canadian Pacific RailRoad acquired 100 percent of the common stock of the Soo Line RailRoad, making it a wholly owned subsidiary. Herman Robert Diercks (1913-2005) was born in Hennepin County, graduated from the Minneapolis Washburn High School in 1931, graduated from the University College at the University of Minnesota in 1937, joined Cargill, Inc. as a trainee in 1937, married Elizabeth Anne Christofferson (1916-1998,) was the youngest president of the St. Louis Merchants Exchange in 1947, was a member of the board of directors of the Soo Line RailRoad in 1947, was a member of the board of directors of the Midland National Bank of Minneapolis, became vice president in charge of Cargill's Grain Division in 1954, was elected as a member of the board of directors of the Cargill Corporation in 1959, became Executive Vice President and member of the Executive Committee at Cargill in 1960, was a member of the board of directors of the Chicago Board of Trade, was a member of the board of directors of the United States Chamber of Commerce, was named vice chairman and member of the finance committee at Cargill in 1971, retired in 1979, was a member of the Minneapolis Club, was a member of the Minikahda Club, was a member of the Royal Poinciana Club of Naples, Florida, was a member of Minneapolis Westminster Presbyterian Church, died in Naples, Collier County, Florida, and was buried at Lakewood Cemetery in Minneapolis. R. R. Galligan was associated with the Wisconsin Central Railroad Company in 1957. Leonard H. Murray (1913-2001) graduated from the University of Minnesota Law School, later worked for a firm that specialized in railroad bankruptcy and reorganization, was elected in 1954 to be the vice president and a member of the board of directors of the Wisconsin Central Railroad Company, was the president of the Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic RailRoad in 1958, became the president and chief executive officer of the Soo Line RailRoad in 1961, resided in Edina, Minnesota, was elected chairman and chief executive officer of the Soo Line RailRoad in 1978, and died of heart failure at Abbott Northwestern Hospital in Minneapolis. Donald F. Swanson was a 1945 graduate of the Minneapolis Washburn High School, was the chief financial officer of General Mills from 1977 to 1979, was actively involved with the board in Soo's 1985 acquisition of the Milwaukee Road, was vice chairman of General Mills Inc. until he retired in 1984, was a member of the board of directors of the railroad in 1989. Ed Dodge was the chief executive officer of the railroad in 1992. __?__ McNamara was the chairman of the board of the railroad and Leonard Murray was the president of the railroad in 1961. In 2013, the officers of the railroad were Edwin V. Dodge, president , Robert J. Ritchie, chairman of the board, M. J. Patava, vice-president, and John C. Miller, vice-president.

Soo & SouthWestern RailRoad/Sault Ste. Marie & Southwestern Railway Company: Initially, the railroad was the Fairchild & Mississippi Railway Company. The railroad was incorporated under Michigan law in 1885 to own a 250 mile rail line from Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan, to the Wisconsin-Michigan state line, was incorporated under Wisconsin law (Law of Wisconsin 1887, Chapter 394) in 1888 to build a line from Fairchild, Wisconsin, to some point on the line of the Burlington & Northern Railroad, in Buffalo County, Wisconsin, with a branch line from Fairchild, Wisconsin, to some point on the line of the Wisconsin Central Railroad in Clark County, Wisconsin, or Marathon County, Wisconsin, and was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1889 by R. M. Forsman, E. J. Foster, N. C. Foster, James McIntire, and W. A. Reist to build a railway from some point in Buffalo County, Wisconsin, to some point in Wabasha County, Minnesota. It had initial capital stock of $1,000,000 and its principal place of business was Eau Claire, Wisconsin. In 1888, the officers of the railroad were N. C. Foster, president, R. M. Forsman, vice president, G. A. Foster, treasurer, and C. M. Wilson, secretary, the members of the board of directors were William Carson, R. M. Forsman, A. C. Foster, C. M. Foster, G. A. Foster, J. L. Linderman, and C. H. Shores, the railroad had five employees (one clerk, one engineer, one conductor, one fireman, and one brakeman,) and the railroad owned one locomotive, owned one combination rail car, and owned ten freight cars. Sumner Township, Trempealeau County, Wisconsin, issued bonds that provided a $10,000 grant to the railroad. The railroad under N. C. Foster, a lumberman, built a 45 mile rail line from Fairchild, Wisconsin, to Mondovi, Wisconsin between 1887 and 1890. The railroad was purchased by the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha RailRoad in 1893. George Titus Baker was the chief engineer of the railroad from 1888 until 1889. George Titus Baker (1857-1940,) the son of Albert W. Baker and Freelove M. Kenyon Baker, was born in Iowa County, Iowa, attended McClain's Academy in Iowa, attended Hall’s School for Boys in Ellington, Connecticut, studied civil engineering at the University of Iowa, graduated from Cornell University in Ithica, New York, in 1879, married Clara I. Poole of Ithaca, New York, in 1879, was a member of the Civil Engineer's Corps from 1879 until 1889, was the division engineer for the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific RailRoad from 1880 until 1885, was the locating and construction engineer for the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe RailRoad from 1886 until 1888, was the chief engineer of the Soo & SouthWestern Railway from 1888 until 1889, was the builder of the high bridges at Muscatine, Iowa, Clinton, Iowa, and Winona, Iowa, for the Soo & SouthWestern Railway, was a Democrat, served as a representative of Scott County, Iowa, in the Iowa House of Representatives from 1895 until 1897, was the mayor of Davenport, Iowa, from 1898 until 1900, was a delegate at large to the Democratic National Convention in Kansas City, Missouri, in 1900, was the head of the Davenport, Iowa, park system, was the chief engineer and manager of the Tri-City Construction Company of Davenport, Iowa, from 1893 until 1911, was an organizer and the president of the West Davenport Improvement Company in 1907, was a member of the Iowa State Board of Education from 1909 until 1940, was an organizer and a member of the board of directors of the Clinton Street Railway Company, and diedin El Paso, Texas. Charles M. Foster (1826- ,) the son of Willard Foster (1794-1881) and Lovicea Pickering Foster (1795-1873,) was born in Owego, Tioga County, New York, learned the trade of a carpenter and a joiner, came to Wisconsin in 1854, settled at Fort Howard, Wisconsin, near Green Bay, Wisconsin, settled in Fairchild, Wisconsin, was a farmer, married Mary Hemstrought (1816- ,) the daughter of Richard Hemstrought and Sarah Hemstrought, was a Democrat, and served on the Fairchild, Wisconsin, township board. Edward J. Foster, the son of Nathaniel Caldwell Foster (1834-1923) and Esther Stearn Foster, was the vice president of the N. C. Foster Lumber Company. Gilbert A. Foster (1861- ,) the son of Nathaniel Caldwell Foster (1834-1923) and Esther Stearn Foster, was born in Brown county, near Green Bay, Wisconsin, was reared in Fort Howard, Wisconsin, received a business education, came to Fairchild, Wisconsin, in 1877, and assisted him in his store, married Clara E. Badley, the daughter of C. C. Bradley and Margaret Mayher Bradley, in 1884, and was the secretary and treasurer of the N. C. Foster Lumber Company. Nathaniel Caldwell Foster (1834-1923,) the son of Willard Foster (1794-1881) and Lovicea Pickering Foster (1795-1873,) was born in Owego, Tioga County, New York, came to Wisconsin in 1854, settled at Fort Howard, Wisconsin, near Green Bay, Wisconsin, became interested in saw mills, married Esther Stearn in 1858, moved to Fairchild, Wisconsin, in 1876, bought large tracts of woodland near Fairchild, Wisconsin, built a saw mill which employed 250 men in 1877, organized the N. C. Foster Lumber Company at Fairchild, Wisconsin, in 1891, started the bank, a store, an opera house, and a hotel in Fairchild, Wisconsin, was also senior member in the firm of N. C. & E. J. Foster, millers, invested in California businesses, constructed the Fairchild & Northwestern RailRoad in 1913, and died in Fairchild, Wisconsin. Foster's mill at Fairchild, Wisconsin, closed in 1905. Robert M. Forsman (1836-1889,) the son of D. Watson Forsman, was born in Washington Township, Lycoming County, Pennsylvania, moved with his parents to Montour County, Pennsylvania, in 1844, subsequently moved to Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, and thence moved to Williamsport, Pennsylvania, in 1854, received a common school education in Pennsylvania, served in Wondersly Independent Cavalry in 1862 and 1863 during the American Civil War, married Anna Turner Nichols (1841-1907) of Fitchburg, Massachusetts, in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, in 1859, engaged in the lumber business, first in Pennsylvania, and, after 1877, in Wisconsin, was the principal in R. M. Forsman & Company, a lumber company headquartered in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, was secretary and treasurer of the Williamsport Steam Company, was a member of the Williamsport, Pennsylvania, common council, was a member of the National Association of Lumbermen in 1874, resided in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, in 1888, was a Republican, was a member of Reno Post of the Grand Army of the Republic, died in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, and buried in Wildwood Cemetery, Williamsport, Lycoming County, Pennsylvania. James L. Linderman (1827- ,) the son of Isaac Linderman (1793-1880) and Elizabeth Landon Linderman (1797-1839,) was born at Ithaca, New York, had a New York common-school education, married Abigail Williams (1825- ,) the daughter of Ansel Williams and Elizabeth Williams, in 1849, moved to Pennsylvania and remained there until 1855, returned to Allegany County, New York, engaged in the lumber trade, moved to Rockford, Illinois, in 1859, was the managing agent for Iowa, Minnesota and Wisconsin for the Manny Reaper Manufacturing Company until 1868, moved to Eau Claire, Wisconsin, from 1868 until 1872, moved to Trempealeau County, Wisconsin, in 1872, was a farmer, erected the Sumner Merchants mills near Osseo, Wisconsin, was a Republican, served in the Wisconsin General Assembly in 1877, was a delegate to the 1888 Republican National Convention that nominated President Benjamin Harrison, was a federal census district supervisor in 1890, and was the president and a member of the board of directors of the Citizens State Bank of Osseo, Wisconsin, in 1905. James McIntire/McIntyre (1847- ) was born in Canada, married Jessie V. Carson (1848- ,) the daughter of William Carson (1819- ,) the pioneer lumberman of Eau Claire, Wisconsin, and Mary Edmonds Smith Carson (1827- ,) resided in St. Paul in 1880, was a railroad conductor in 1880, was the vice president of the Eau Claire Pulp & Paper Company located in Eau Claire, Wisconsin, was a member of the board of directors of the Soo & SouthWestern RailRoad in 1889, was a member of the board of directors of the Soo Railway Construction Company in 1889, and was the president of the Eau Claire Water Power Company located in Eau Claire, Wisconsin. C. H. Shores (1850- ,) the son of Curtis Shores (1818-1858) and Sarah Duncan Shores (1820-1889,) was born in Berkshire County, Massachusetts, moved to Wisconsin in 1855, settled in Dane County, Wisconsin, moved to Trempealeau County, Wisconsin, in 1862, clerked for Gay & Thomas, purchased the interest of Mr. Gay in 1875, was a partner in the renamed W. H. Thomas & Company until 1876, then was a partner in the renamed C. H. Shores & Company, in the general merchandise business, married Julia E. Thomas (1854- ,) the daughter of W. H. Thomas and Rhoda Coates Thomas, in 1876, was the postmaster of Osseo, Wisconsin, was the treasurer of Osseo Township, was a Republican, and was a Mason.

South St. Paul Belt RailRoad: The railroad was chartered in 1889, was incorporated under Minnesota law, and was organized in 1895. It was prompted, in part, by a $75,000 bond issue by the City of South St. Paul, Minnesota, to build the bridge between Newport, Minnesota, and South St. Paul, Minnesota, in 1891, augmented by a $20,000 bond issue by Newport, Minnesota, and a $5,000 bond issue by Cottage Grove, Minnesota, in 1894. The railroad had 3.58 miles of rail trackage between South St. Paul, Minnesota, and Newport, Minnesota, in 1895. In 1895, it completed a 3.5 mile rail line from St. Paul Park, Minnesota, to South St. Paul, Minnesota. In 1897, the officers of the railroad were officers T. M. Nelson, president, W. W. Curtis, vice president and engineer, M. D. Flower, secretary and general manager, and J. C. Munn, treasurer. In 1901, the railroad built a 12 mile rail line from Newport, Minnesota, to Rosemount, Minnesota, by way of Inver Grove, Minnesota, and built a three mile rail line from South St. Paul, Minnesota, to Inver Grove, Minnesota. The railroad operated until 1901 and was initially controlled by A. B. Stickney. According to Poor's Manual of the RailRoads of the United States, Volume 33 by Henry Varnum Poor in 1901, the railroad owned 3.85 miles of rail trackage and operated 5.9 miles of rail trackage from St. Paul Park, Minnesota, and South St. Paul, Minnesota, was a switching line connecting the South St. Paul, Minnesota, Union Stock Yards and the Chicago Great Western RailRoad with the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy RailRoad and the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad, had $250,000 in capital stock, had as its officers T. M. Nelson, president, W. W. Curtis, vice president and chief engineer, M. D. Flower, secretary and general manager, and J. C. Munn, treasurer, had as its board of directors W. W. Curtis, Hugh Ferguson, M. D. Flower, J. C. Michael, J. C. Munn, T. M. Nelson, and J. H. Sawyer, and had its general office at South St. Paul, Minnesota. The railroad also built a 442 foot double deck (railroad upper and highway lower) Pratt-type truss swing bridge (Bridge #5600) over the Mississippi River from South St. Paul, Minnesota, to Newport, Minnesota, in 1894-1895. Initially, the bridge was used solely for wagon and foot travel. Rails were added to the bridge in 1896. The swing bridge used a steam engine to power its turntable. The highway portion of the bridge was funded by a grant from South St. Paul, Minnesota, and Newport, Minnesota. The bridge was designed by Charles F. Loweth and was built by the Pittsburgh Bridge Company. The bridge was authorized by Congress by legislation enacted in 1890, 1891, 1892, 1893, and 1894. Walter Whaley Curtis was the president of the railroad from 1895 until 1896 and was the vice president and chief engineer of the railroad after 1896. In 1901, John R. Hastings and others purchased the railroad as part of a plan to complete a belt line completely around the Twin Cities. The railroad was sold to Minneapolis & St. Paul Terminal Railway Company in 1903. The railroad was succeeded by the Burlington, Cedar Rapids & Northern RailRoad and ultimately by the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railway in 1904. Walter Whaley Curtis (1863- ) was born in Elkton, Maryland, graduated from Dartmouth College in engineering in 1886, was a civil engineer, resided in Fort Madison, Iowa, in 1888, was the resident bridge engineer of the Mississippi River bridge at Fort Madison, Iowa, in 1888, was a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers in 1888, resided in St. Paul in 1890, was the author of a paper on the use of zinc as an artificial preservative of railroad ties in 1899, resided in Colorado Springs, Colorado, in 1918, was the president and treasurer of the Rapson Coal Mining Company in 1918, and was the president and treasurer of the Curtis Coal Company in 1918. Charles Frederick Loweth (1857-1935,) the son of Daniel Loweth and Lady Mary Pennington Brown Loweth, was born in Ohio, married Carrie Toine Curtiss (1857- ,) was a civil engineer, worked in St. Paul as a bridge engineer and an agent for bridge companies in the 1880’s, was a foreman for H. E. Horton in the late 1880’s, moved to Chicago, Illinois, was employed by the Chicago Bridge & Iron Works, was a partner of Louis D. Wolf in a bridge engineering firm in 1901, was a vice president of the American Society of Civil Engineers in 1915 and 1916, was a member of the United Engineering Society, was the chief engineer of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad in 1915, was the recipient of an honary engineering degree from the University of Wisconsin in 1915, and was a vice president of the American Society of Civil Engineers in 1923, died in Chicago, Illinois. John C. Munn (1870- ) was born in Allegheny, Pennsylvania, was educated in the public schools of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, initially was employed by the Westinghouse Machine Company, was employed in the contracting office of the Globe Fast Freight Line, married Florence Faulkner Totten, was the secretary and the general manager of the Pittsburgh Bridge Company, moved to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in 1900, was the manager of the Milwaukee Bridge & Iron Company in 1900, moved to Detroit, Michigan, in 1907, was the general manager of the works of the American Bridge Company in 1907, resided in Detroit, Michigan, in 1911, was a Mason, was a member of the Detroit Athletic Club, was the president of the Detroit Exchange Club, was a member of the Detroit Credit Men’s Club, was the vice president of the Detroit Builders & Traders Exchange, was a member of the Detroit Engineering Society, and was a member of the Noontide Club of the Knights Templar . Thomas McDowell Nelson (1849-1919,) the son of Rev. Alexander K. Nelson and Mary McDowell Nelson, was educated at the schools of St. Thomas, Pennsylvania, Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, at the Chambersburg Academy, and at Lafayette College, worked in civil engineering with Walling & Gray of Boston, Massachusetts, for the Mont Alto RailRoad, Cumberland Valley RailRoad, Pennsylvania RailRoad, and New York Central RailRoad from 1870 until 1875, married Esther Anne Hollinger, the daughterof Jacob S. Hollinger and Sarah Diehl Hollinger, in 1871, was a justice of the peace at Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, in 1875, was the clerk of the Board of County Commissioners of Franklin County, Pennsylvania, in 1876, was the partner of J. W. Craig in a lumber business in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, from 1879 until 1887, was a partner of A. Buchanan in bridge building, was an incorporator of the Chicago Tunnel RailRoad in 1888, resided in Chicago, Illinois, in 1888, resided in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in 1897, was the president of the Pittsburgh Bridge Company, was the president of the Chambersburg Shoe Manufacturing Company, was the president of the Chambersburg Hosiery Company, and was the president of the Chambersburg Trust Company of Chambersburg, Franklin County, Pennsylvania. a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/tnhrail2.html" [See note on Walter Whaley Curtis for the South St. Paul Rapid Transit Company.] a href ="http://www.msparchhistory.info/IrvineTNH.html" [See note for Mark Deloss Flower for 194 McBoal Street.] [See note on Alpheus Beede Stickney for 846 Lincoln Avenue.]

South St. Paul Rapid Transit Company/South Saint Paul Rapid Transit Elevated Railway Company: The railroad was incorporated under Minnesota law with $500,000 in capital stock by Norman L. Bryant, Arthur Elliott Clark, Charles W. Clark, James W. Imeson, A. M. Lawton, C. H. Lienau, D. D. Merrill, Thomas T. Smith, and George H. Staples in 1887. C. H. Macidie reportedly also was associated with the railroad. The railroad received a franchise from South St. Paul, Minnesota, in 1887 and subsequently built a demonstration line under the patents of the Enos Electric Supply Company. A 1,260 foot sample track ran from Concord Avenue up the Bryant Avenue Hill to 16th, then south to the top of Central Avenue ravine. A test was run in 1888, but the full route was never completed because of a dispute over the routes to Saint Paul. The railroad intended to connect South St. Paul, Minnesota, to St. Paul, and then was planned to radiate out in various lines throughout St. Paul. The St. Paul franchise was granted in 1888, with the support of the St. Paul Chamber of Commerce and the St. Paul Pioneer Press and despite protests from property owners affected by the proposed project and the discovery of an attempted bribe of a St. Paul city council member by a member of the investor group. In 1888, J. H. Lawrence was the general manager of the railroad according to the Electrical Engineer, Volume 7. In 1889, the railroad operated eight miles of rail line from St. Paul to South St. Paul, Minnesota, by way of West St. Paul, Minnesota, had ten electric Thomson-Houston/Daft motor cars, and had as its officers Arthur E. Clark, president, and A. E. Lawrence, secretary and general manager. The general offices of the railroad were in the German Bank Building in St. Paul. The company either was associated with or was a successor to the Enos Electric Railway Company of Boston, Massachusetts. The investor group never formally accepted the St. Paul franchise and the company reportedly was disbanded by 1889. The Enos Electric Railway operated the first suspended monorail. The Enos monorail had a remarkable likeness to the Wuppertal Schwebebahn monorail that was designed by Eugene Langen in Germany and that was tested and demonstrated on the grounds of the Daft Electric Company in Greenville, New Jersey, in 1886. Arthur Elliott Clark (1839-1913) served in the First Battery of Light Artillery of the Connecticut Volunteers from 1862 until 1865 during the American Civil War, married Mary Bronson (1842-1924,) was a partner with Dr. John Henry Bryant in an elevated electric railway company with a proposed rail line constructed between Pasadena, California, and the Pacific Ocean via Los Angeles, California, in 1877, was a St. Paul realtor as a principal of A.E. Clark & Company, invested in the Duluth, St. Cloud, Mankato and Southern Railway Company, and was associated with the Robbins Copper Mining Company, the St. Paul Sulphuret Consolidated Mining Company, the C.C. Samson Land Company, the Clark-Bryant Improvement Company, the Clark Cottage Company, Eureka Improvement Company, and the Kluane Gold Mining Company. Dr. John Henry Bryant (1825/1835-1903,) the son of John Norman Bryant (1807-1886) and Jane Webber Bryant (1815-1877,) was born in Halifax, Halifax County, Nova Scotia, Canada, married Mary Louisa Dunn (1839-1878,) the daughter of Lorenzo Dunn and Crelda Fowler Dunn, in 1859 in Woodstock, Oxford County, Ontario, Canada, was either was a medical doctor or a dentist, came to Los Angeles, California, from New York State or from Saint Paul in 1883, was a mining entrepreneur, was the president of the Los Angeles Petroleum Smelting and Mining Company, and was a member of the Los Angeles, California, governing body, the Common Council, in 1888 and 1889. Norman L. Bryant, the son of Dr. John Henry Bryant, married Anna/Annie A. __?__, was a realtor and the partner of Charles W. Clark in the real estate firm of Clark & Bryant in St. Paul in 1887, resided in St. Paul in 1892, suffered injuries from a defective embankment slide during the Page Street disaster in 1892, was subsequently paid damages for those injuries by the City of St. Paul, and resided in Los Angeles, California, in 1903. Charles W. Clark (1853- ,) the son of William F. Clark, a carriagemaker and American Civil War veteran, and Mary P. Clark, was born in Baraboo, Sauk County, Wisconsin, moved with his family to Hammond, Wisconsin, in 1857, was educated in Hammond, Wisconsin, moved to St. Paul in 1869, attended the Franklin School in St. Paul, graduated from the St. Paul Business College in 1871, was a bookkeeper employed successively by Corning & Depew, W. A. Van Slyke & Company, Lindeke, Warner & Schurmeier, and Commodore Davidson from 1871 until 1883, also was in the real-estate business, married Aliss Emma L. Day ( -1888) in 1885, was associated with Clark & Company and with J. A. Sandquist & Company, moved to South St. Paul, Minnesota, in 1891, was a real estate investor, was a manufacturing executive, was associated with Clark & Bryant, founded the South Park Community Church (renamed the Clark Memorial United Church of Christ) in South St. Paul, Minnesota, in 1887 and donated land for the church building in 1931, married Lucy Larcom Spaulding, a daughter of Rev. George Spaulding, in 1893, was a Republican, was the South St. Paul, Minnesota, recorder, was a the South St. Paul, Minnesota, alderman, was the mayor of South St. Paul, Minnesota, from 1911 until 1916, was a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, was a member of the Sons of the American Revolution, was a member of the Modern Woodmen, and was a member of the Ancient Order of United Workmen. James William Imeson (1841-1890) was a member of Company "F" of the First Minnesota Regiment in 1861 during the American Civil War, was a prisoner of war captured at the Battle of Bull Run, was in Confederate prisons in Richmond, Virginia, and New Orleans, Louisiana, was paroled, served in Company B of the First Minnesota Battalion in 1864, married Cynthia A. __?__, was a member of a St Paul Grand Army of the Republic Post, resided in South St. Paul, Minnesota, in 1890, died as a result of a collision between the Imeson carriage and a Chicago, St. Paul, Kansas RailRoad, was originally buried in Oakland Cemetery in St. Paul, and was reinterred at South Park Cemetery in Wyoming in 1966. A. M. Lawton was a realtor with Bristol & Loomis in 1887, was a member of the board of directors of the St. Paul Chamber of Commerce in 1889, was the vice president and a member of the board of directors of the West Side Bank of St. Paul in 1889, was a partner of Charles L. Covell (1870- ) as a realtor in 1898. Charles H. “C. H.” Lienau (1835-1906) was born in Monckhagen, Holstein, Germany, graduated from the Schwartau High School, Germany, attended college, came to the United States in 1854, lived in New York, Illinois, Iowa, Wisconsin, and Minnesota, married Mathilde Speck of Germany in 1857, moved to St. Paul in 1858, was a Democrat, served as an alderman in St. Paul in 1862, was the St. Paul City Comptroller in 1863, was a delegate to the National Democratic Convention at Chicago in 1864, which nominated General George B. McClellan for president, in 1864, served in the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Ramsey County (District 1) from 1867 until 1869, resided in Waterton, Carver County, Minnesota, in 1871, served in the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Carver County, Minnesota (District 33,) from 1871 until 1873, was an incorporator of the revived St. Paul & St. Anthony RailRoad in 1872, was a probate court judge in 1873, served in the Minnesota Senate representing Carver County, Minnesota (District 33,) from 1874 until 1879, resided in St. Paul in 1879, was the president of the stock company that owned Die Volkszeitung , a consolidation of the Zeitung and Minnesota Volksblatt, from 1877 until 1897, when F. W. Bergmeier purchased the paper, was the president of the St. Paul Board of Education in 1879, was the St. Paul Recorder of Deeds in 1882 and 1883, served in the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Ramsey County (District 27) from 1884 until 1887, was an incorporator of the Globe Building and Loan Society in 1887, was a member of the Citizen's-Democratic Party, served in the Minnesota Senate representing Ramsey County (District 26,) from 1890 until 1895, retired to an orange ranch in Redlands, California, sometime after 1890, and was the secretary of the Redlands Horticultural Club. Thomas T. Smith resided in Mendota Township, Dakota County, Minnesota, in 1873, was the secretary of the Executive Committee of the State Granges of the Mississippi Valley in 1873, and was assigned as its largest stockholder the Eureka Improvement Company, a firm dealing in land and electric motor enterprises in South St. Paul, Minnesota, in 1887. George Howard Staples (1858-1944,) the son of Samuel Cole Staples (1831-1911) and Katherine McDonough Staples ( -1862,) was born in Mendota Township, Dakota County, Minnesota, married Carrie Gertrude Rogers (1864-1955,) the daughter of Ezekiel Gable Rogers (1833-1918) and Arabella Rogers (1828-1901,) in St. Paul in 1887, surveyed the Northern Pacific Railway route through Montana in the 1880s, and was an inspector employed by the Minnesota State Dairy & Food Department in St. Paul in 1902 and 1903, when there were over 140 dairies in St. Paul and nearby suburbs, and died in Mendota, Dakota County, Minnesota. a href="http:// www.msparchhistory.info/DayBluffTNH.html" [See the note on Frederic William Bergmeier and Clara Linz Bergmeier for 614 North Fountain Place.] a href="http:// www.msparchhistory.info/WestSideTNH.html" [See note for Albert M. Lawton for 225 Prescott Street.] a href="http:// www.msparchhistory.info/WestSideTNH.html" [See note on Theodore A. Lienau, Charles H. Lienau, and the Lienau family for 139 Congress Street East.] a href ="http://www.msparchhistory.info/IrvineTNH.html" [See note on Daniel David Merrill for 330 South Exchange Street.]

Southern Minnesota RailRoad Company: The railroad was renamed and succeeded the Root River Valley & Southern Minnesota RailRoad established under First Extra Session Territorial Laws of 1857, Chapter 65, went bankrupt in 1860, was acquired by the State of Minnesota, was acquired by T. B. Stoddard and associates in 1864, was incorporated in 1866, and was organized in 1871. The company received aid from various municipalities. The railroad was completed to Rushford, Minnesota, in 1867, to Lanesboro, Minnesota, in 1868, from Ramsey, Minnesota, to Wells, Minnesota, in 1869, from Lanesboro, Minnesota, to Ramsey, Minnesota, and from Wells, Minnesota, to Winnebago, Minnesota, and to Ramsey, Mower County, Minnesota, in 1870. In 1871, the railroad had capital stock of $3,825,000, owned 177 miles of rail trackage, owned 12 bridges, owned 17 locomotives, owned eight passenger cars, owned 255 freight cars, owned three company service cars, and had 278 employees. In 1871, the officers of the railroad were C. W. Thompson, president, P. M. Myers, vice president, B. G. Lennox, secretary, treasurer and auditor, and H. W. Holley, general manager, and the members of the board of directors of the railroad were Aug. Armstrong, Charles Bard, H. W. Holley, M. K. Jesup, J. W. Losey, A. P. Man, P. M. Myers, T. B. Stoddard, and C. W. Thompson. In 1873, the officers of the railroad were C. W. Thompson, president, B. G. Lennox, secretary, treasurer and auditor, and H. W. Holley, superintendent, the members of the board of directors were Augustus Armstrong, H. W. Holley, J. W. Lasey, B. G. Lennox, A. P. Mann, P.M. Myers, J. W. Polley, T. B. Stoddard, and C. W. Thompson, the railroad employed 344 personnel, the railroad owned 48,182.75 acres of Congressional Grant land, the railroad owned 170 miles of telegraph line between La Crosse, Wisconsin, and Winnebago, Minnesota, the railroad owned 12 locomotives, five first class passenger cars, three baggage, mail and express cars, 170 box cars, 71 flat cars, and two emigrant rail cars, and the railroad owned 12 bridges and 85 trestles. In 1876, the Southern Minnesota RailRoad planned to build a mainline rail line along the Minnesota and Iowa border from Wisconsin to the Dakota Territory, running through Worthington, Minnesota, and ending in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, but gave up on its plan to build the mainline due to the swift progress of the rival Worthington & Dakota RailRoad. In 1878, the reorganized railroad had general offices at Lanesboro, Minnesota, and La Crosse, Wisconsin, had not yet issued any capital stock, owned 179 miles of rail trackage from Grand Crossing, Minnesota, to Winnebago City, Minnesota, owned 26 stations, owned 12 bridges, owned 85 wooden trestles, owned 14 locomotives, owned six passenger cars, owned three mail and express cars, owned 197 freight cars, owned 83 flat and coal cars, and owned nine company service cars. The railroad purchased the property of the Root River & Southern Minnesota RailRoad in a foreclosure sale in 1878. In 1878, the officers of the railroad were Cornelius P. Gold, president, P. M. Myers, vice president, P. M. Meyers, secretary, Walter Ferguson, treasurer, H. G. Haugan, auditor, J. W. Losey, solicitor, and W. C. Van Horne, general manager, and the members of the board of directors of the railroad were George P. Bissell, H. H. Cammann, F. W. Downer, Jason C. Easton, Walter Ferguson, C. P. Gold, Charles Johnson, Henry C. Kingsley, and P. M. Meyers. The railroad operated until 1880, and was succeeded by the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad. In 1882, the railroad owned 76,467.57 acres of land in Minnesota. Augustus L. Armstrong (1834-1873) was born in Milan, Ohio, was a lawyer, came to Freeborn County, Minnesota in 1857, was a Republican, served in the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Freeborn County, Minnesota, Steele County, Minnesota, and Waseca County, Minnesota (District 16,) from 1865 until 1867, served in the Minnesota Senate representing Freeborn County, Minnesota, Steele County, Minnesota, and Waseca County, Minnesota (District 16,) from 1866 until 1869, served in the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Freeborn County, Minnesota, Steele County, Minnesota, and Waseca County, Minnesota (District 16,) from 1868 until 1870, resided in Albert Lea, Freeborn County, Minnesota, in 1870, was the U. S. marshal for Minnesota from 1869 until 1873, and died in Delavan, Wisconsin. Morris Ketchum Jesup (1830-1908,) the son of Charles Jesup and Abigail Sherwood Jesup, was born in Westport, Connecticut, initially was a clerk in a locomotive manufacturing company, then established his own railroad financing business, established a banking house in 1852, organized the banking firm of M. K. Jesup & Company in 1856, which after two reorganizations became Cuyler, Morgan & Jesup, was president of the Five Points House of Industry in New York, New York , in 1860, was one of the organizers of the United States Christian Commission during the American Civil War, was one of the founders of the Young Men's Christian Association, was the president of the New York City Mission and Tract Society, was treasurer of the John F. Slater Fund for the Education of Freedmen, was the president of the American Museum of Natural History, retired from business in 1884, was the president of the Peary Arctic Club in 1899, was president of the New York Chamber of Commerce from 1899 until 1907, and died in New York City, New York. Charles Johnson (1806-1879,) the son of John Johnson (1774- ,) was born in Jewett City, Connecticut, worked in the cotton-mill in Jewett City, Connecticut, in 1820, then worked in the factory-store and office of the cotton mill, was employed as accountant by the Hopkins & Morse Machine Company, of Norwich, Connecticut, in 1824, then was employed as a book-keeper in the Griswold Woolen Company, then was employed as a book-keeper by Trumbull, Breed & Company from 1824 to 1827, was a partner of his father in a mercantile enterprise, then conducted a store at Norwich Falls, Connecticut, under the name of Cobb & Johnson,was the cashier of the Jewett City Bank in 1831, was the cashier of the Norwich, Connecticut, Bank in 1835, was the president of the Norwich Fire Insurance Company from 1845 until 1851, was the president of the Norwich Bank from 1847 until 1879, was a member of the board of directors of the Norwich and Worcester RailRoad from 1848 to 1869, was the president and a member of the board of directors of the Norwich Savings Society, conducted extensive brokerage operations for many years, was the treasurer of the Otis Library, engaged in reorganizing the affairs of the Southern Minnesota RailRoad, was an originator and a member of the board of directors of the Norwich City Gas Company, was an incorporator of the Free Academy, and was a member of the Second Congregational Church. Peter Michael Myers (1833- ,) the son of Peter J. H. Myers and Lucy Kirtland Myers, was a banker and a broker in New York City, New York, married Mary Ann Ward Partridge (1835- ,) the daughter of Samuel Dwight Partridge and Lucretia A. Warner Partridge, in 1858, resided in Orange, New Jersey, in 1873, and was the principal of P. M. Myers & Company. a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/MinnrrsTNH.html" [See note on George Perkins Bissell for the Southern Minnesota RailRoad Company.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/MinnrrsTNH.html" [See note on Herman H. Camman for the Southern Minnesota RailRoad Extension Company.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/TNHrail2.html" [See note on Fred W. Downer for the Southern Minnesota Railway Extension Company.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/MinnrrsTNH.html" [See note on Jason C. Easton for the Southern Minnesota RailRoad Extension Company.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/TNHrail2.html" [See note on Walton Ferguson for the Southern Minnesota Railway Extension Company.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/MinnrrsTNH.html" [See note on Cornelius B. Gold for the Southern Minnesota RailRoad Company.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/tnhrail2.html" [See note on Hauman G. “H. G.” Haugan for the Southern Minnesota RailRoad Extension Company.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/TNHrail2.html" [See note on Henry W. Holley for the Southwestern Railway Company.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/TNHrail2.html" [See note on George B. Kingsley for the Southwestern Railway Company.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/tnhrail2.html" [See note on Joseph Walton Losey for the South St. Paul Rapid Transit Company.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/MinnrrsTNH.html" [See note on Albon Platt Man for the Southern Minnesota RailRoad Company.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/MinnrrsTNH.html" [See note on Colonel Thomas Benton Stoddard for the Southern Minnesota RailRoad.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/MinnrrsTNH.html" [See note on Clark Wallace Thompson for the Southern Minnesota RailRoad Company.]

Southern Minnesota RailRoad: The Root River Valley & Southern Minnesota RailRoad, renamed as the Southern Minnesota Railroad in 1857, was sold in 1860 to State of Minnesota for nonpayment of interest on State aid bonds and was renamed and reincorporated in 1864 as the Minnesota Valley Railroad Company. In 1865, officers of the company were E. F. Drake, president, J. L. Merriam, vice-president, G. A. Hamilton, secretary, and Horace Thompson, treasurer, and the principal stockholders and the first board of directors were C. H. Bigelow, Russell Blakeley, J. C. Burbank, George Culver, W. F. Davidson, E. F. Drake, John Farrington, T. A. Harrison, R. H. Hawthorne, H. M. Rice, J. L. Merriam, John S. Prince, H. H. Sibley, Franklin Steele, Horace Thompson, J. E. Thompson, and W. D. Washburn. Initially, the railroad constructed no rail line. In 1865, the railroad was located and constructed from Mendota, Minnesota, to Shakopee, Minnesota, 22 miles, and, in 1866, it was expended Eastward from Mendota, Minnesota, to West St. Paul, Minnesota, six miles, terminating at South Wabasha Street in St. Paul, near where a freight yard and depot were re-established in 1902, and was extended Westward from Shakopee, Minnesota, to Belle Plaine, Minnesota, 19 miles, for a total of 47 miles of completed rail line. The railroad underwent an amicable foreclosure, by the agreement of its bond holders and floating debt holders, of its property and assets in 1874, with Charles McIlrath as the receiver of the railroad. In 1875, Charles McIlrath was the receiver of the railroad, W. C. Van Horne was the superintendent and general manager of the railroad, and H. G. Haugan was the treasurer and auditor of the railroad. Wells, Minnesota, was the location of the general offices of the railroad, which operated a rail line from La Crosse, Wisconsin, to Winnebago, Minnesota, in 1875. In 1880, the railroad merged with the St. Paul & Sioux City RailRoad and its subsidiary lines, with the West Wisconsin RailRoad, St. Paul, Stillwater & Taylor's Falls RailRoad, and North Wisconsin RailRoad, into the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railway Company. Russell Blakeley (1815-1901) was born in North Adams, Massachusetts, was a partner of J. C. Burbank and John L. Merriam in the staging and expressing business, captained various steamboats cruising from St. Paul to Galena, Illinois, after 1847, was the captain of the steamboat Dr. Franklin in 1852, came to St. Paul in 1862, was the author of the Opening of the Red River of the North to Commerce and Civilization, was the author of the History of the discovery of the Mississippi River and the advent of commerce in Minnesota, and had numerous interests in banking, insurance and railways. Colonel George Culver (1818-1879,) the son of Sylvester Culver (1791-1864) and Polly Greenleaf Culver, was born in Genoa, Cayuga County, New York, moved to Michigan in 1834, then moved to Iowa Territory and remained at Fort Atkinson, Iowa Territory, until 1848, married Margaret Ellen Riddle (1828-1902,) the daughter of John Thomas Riddle (1803-1887) and Elizabeth Wilson Stewart Riddle (1808–1878,) at the Latter-Day Saints settlement at Winter Quarters in Indian Country (subsequently Nebraska Territory,) a temporary headquarters of the Mormon Church during the great migration to the Great Salt Lake in 1846, came to Minnesota in 1848, settled at Long Prairie, Minnesota, and engaged in business trading with the Indians with Charles Rice and Henry M. Rice, came to St. Paul in 1853, partnered for 22 years with John Farrington in Culver & Farrington, carried on an extensive Indian trade with the Northwest, eventually opened a pork-packing department, was the father-in-law of Horace P. Rugg, husband of daughter Mary Eleanor Culver (1847-1885,) was a member of the board of directors of the St. Paul Street Railway Company in 1872, dealt extensively in real estate, became part owner, with Farrington and William J. Cullen, of the Metropolitan Hotel in 1870, became the proprietor of the Metropolitan Hotel in 1875, and died in St. Paul. George A. Hamilton was a notary public in Ramsey County in 1872, was a member of the board of directors of the St. Paul & Sioux City RailRoad in 1876, was the president of the Minnesota Historical Society in 1869, was the secretary of the Minnesota & Black Hills RailRoad in 1879, was a member of the board of the Minnesota Historical Society in 1885, was the secretary of the St. Paul & Sioux City RailRoad in 1897, was the secretary of the Worthington & Sioux Falls RailRoad Company in 1898, and was the secretary of the Worthington & Sioux Falls RailRoad of Iowa in 1898. Thomas A. Harrison (1811-1887) was born in St. Clair County, Illinois, farmed until 1827, moved to Bellville, Illinois, in 1827, worked in his father’s flour mill in Bellville, Illinois, from 1827 until 1860, married Rebecca Green in 1840, moved to Minneapolis in 1860, was a partner in J. Dean & Company, a lumber company, in 1860, was a member of the board of directors of the Minneapolis & Cedar Valley Railroad in 1861, was a member of the board of directors of the Minnesota Valley RailRoad in 1868, was the president of the Security Bank in Minneapolis, a merger of the former Merchants National Bank, the former Union National Bank, and the former Flour City National Bank, was a member of the board of directors of the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha RailRoad in 1880, and died in Minneapolis. Robert Harwood Hawthorne, Jr. (1834-1910,) the son of Robert Harwood Hawthorne, Sr. (1805-1880,) and Mary Elizabeth Post (1808- ,) resided in New York, New York, married Augusta Elizabeth Ludlow (1837- ,) the daughter of Gabriel Augustus Ludlow ( -1838) and Fanney Glover Ludlow, was a member of the first board of directors of the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha RailRoad in 1865, and was a member of the first board of directors of the Minnesota Valley RailRoad Company in 1865. Charles McIlrath (1829-1910,) the son of Michael McIlrath and Sophia Watkins McIlrath, was born in Euclid/Collamar, Cuyahoga County, Ohio, was a farmer, was educated at the Shaw Academy located at East Cleveland, Ohio, was a clerk at his father’s store, was a conductor employed by the Delaware Division of the New York & Erie RailRoad from 1854 until 1855, moved to Minnesota in 1855, was a real estate and exchange broker located at Brownsville, Houston County, Minnesota, in 1855, was a real estate and exchange broker located at Chatfield, Fillmore County, Minnesota, from 1856 until 1858, moved to Faribault, Minnesota, in 1858, was a real estate and exchange broker located at St. Peter, Nicollet County, Minnesota, in 1859, was an abolitionist, was a Republican, once resided in St. Peter, Minnesota, was the Minnesota State Auditor from 1861 to 1873, married Lucretia Spalding, the daughter of Judge Rufus Paine Spalding (1798- ,) an Ohio Congressman, and Lucretia A. Swift Spalding (1801- ,) in 1866, later resided in St. Paul, was a staunch political supporter of Alexander Ramsey, served on a special three person board, with Matthew Donohue and Clinton Reynolds, that was established by the Legislature to settle claims of private persons for compensation for services rendered during the U. S.-Dakota War in 1862, was appointed by the U. S. District Court as receiver of the Southern Minnesota RailRoad from 1873 until 1878, was indicted 26 times by a Ramsey County Grand Jury for a felonious entry upon the duties of office before giving the required bonds and sureties and for malfeasance in office in 1874, was the subject of the work of a special Minnesota Senate Committee that was appointed in 1875 to investigate the pre-1873 management of the Office of State Auditor, was the partner of Luman A. Gilbert in McIlrath & Gilbert, a grain and commission merchant business in St. Paul, was a Mason, and died in California. a href="http:// www.msparchhistory.info/CapCathTNH.html" [See note for Charles Henry Bigelow for 415 Laurel Avenue.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/tnhrail2.html" [See note for Russell Blakeley for the Southern Minnesota RailRoad.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/SumEPortTNH.html"> [See note on James Burbank for 432 Summit Avenue.] a href="http:// www.msparchhistory.info/DayBluffTNH.html" [See note on Commodore W. F. "Fuse" Davidson for 908 Mound Street.] a href="http:// www.msparchhistory.info/DayBluffTNH.html" [See the note for Elias Franklin Drake for 324 Bates Avenue.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/SumEPortTNH.html"> [See note on John D. Farrington for 457-459 Portland Avenue.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/TNHrail2.html" [See note on George A. Hamilton for the Southern Minnesota RailRoad.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/MinnrrsTNH.html" [See note on Hauman G. “H. G.” Haugan for the Southern Minnesota RailRoad Extension Company.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/tnhrail2.html" [See note on Charles McIlrath for the Southern Minnesota RailRoad.] a href= "www.msparchhistory.info/SAlbTNH.html" [See note on John L. Merriam for 4 Crocus Hill.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/SAlbTNH.html" [See note on Henry Mower Rice for 4 Crocus Hill.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/SumEPortTNH.html"> [See note on John S. Prince for 339 Summit Avenue.] a href="http:// www.msparchhistory.info/DayBluffTNH.html" [See the note on Henry Hastings Sibley for 614 North Fountain Place.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/MinnrrsTNH.html" [See note for Franklin Steele for the Minneapolis & St. Cloud RailRoad.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/SumEPortTNH.html"> [See note on Horace E. Thompson for 808 Summit Avenue.] a href= "http:// www.msparchhistory.info/SAlbTNH.html " [See note on James Egbert Thompson for 682 Fairmount Avenue.] a href="http:// www.msparchhistory.info/FairOaksTNH.html" [See note for William Drew Washburn for 2119 Third Avenue South.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/MinnrrsTNH.html" [See note on William Cornelius Van Horne for the Southern Minnesota RailRoad Extension Company.]

Southern Minnesota RailRoad Company: The railroad was formed in 1855 by the consolidation of the Southern Minnesota RailRoad Company with the Root River Valley RailRoad Company/Root River Valley & Southern Minnesota RailRoad Company, was reorganized in 1877 as the Southern Minnesota Railway Company, and was purchased in 1880 by Chicago, Milwaukee, & St. Paul Railway Company. In 1869, the officers of the railroad were Thomas B. Stoddard, president, Luke Miller, vice president and treasurer, Cyrus G. Wolkoff, secretary, Henry W. Holley, general engineer, and the law firm of Man & Parsons of New York, general counsel, and the members of the board of directors were Luke Miller, Lawrence Myers, Jr., B. D. Sprague, Thomas B. Stoddard, Clark Wallace Thompson, Edward Thompson, Hiram Walker, and Cyrus G. Wykoff. In 1869, Samuel Bulkley Ruggles and Albon P. Man were the trustees for the railroad. In 1880, the officers of the railroad were Cornelius B. Gold, president, H. C. Kingsley, vice president, P.Myers, secretary, J. W. Losey, solicitor, Walton Ferguson, treasurer, J. M. Egan, superintendent and chief engineer, and H. G. Haugan, auditor, and the members of the board of directors were George P. Bissell, H. H. Camman, F. W. Downer, J. B. Dumont, J. C. Easton, W. Ferguson, C. B. Gold, H. C. Kingsley, and H. F. Rudd. In 1880, the railroad operated 337.25 from the boundary with the Dakota Territory to the Grand Crossing and from Wells, Minnesota, to Mankato, Minnesota, owned 29 wooden bridges, three combination wood and iron bridges, one iron bridge, and 294 wooden trestles, owned 19 locomotives, five first class passenger cars, three combination passenger and baggage cars, one combination passenger, baggage and mail car, three express and mail cars, 206 box freight and stock cars, 93 flat and coal cars, 11 other rail cars, and 64 hand cars, and had received 373,212.90 acres in federal and state land grants. The officers of the railroad were W. C. Van Horne, president, H. C. Kingsley, vice president, P. M. Meyers, secretary and general manager, Walter Ferguson, treasurer, J. W. Losey, solicitor, and H. G. Haugan, auditor, the members of the board of directors of the railroad were George P. Bissell, Herman H. Camman, F. W. Downer, J. B. Dumont, J. C. Easton, C. B. Gold, Henry C. Kingsley, H. F. Rudd, and W. C. Van Horne, the railroad owned 167.5 miles of rail trackage, the railroad operated 43 miles of rail trackage owned by the Southern Minnesota RailRoad Extension Company, the railroad owned 11 wooden bridges, one combination wood and iron bridge, one iron bridge, and 91 wooden trestles, the railroad operated one combination wood and iron bridge and 31 wooden trestles owned by the Southern Minnesota RailRoad Extension Company, the railroad owned 14 locomotives, the railroad owned three passenger cars, the railroad owned three passenger and baggage cars, the railroad owned three express and mail rail cars, the railroad owned 206 box, freight, or stock rail cars, the railroad owned 83 flat or coal cars, the railroad owned 58 hand rail cars, the railroad owned 11 other rail cars, the railroad received 337,970.61 acres of Congressional grant lands, the railroad received 35,242.29 acres of state and swamp land grants, and the railroad had its general offices in LaCrosse, Wisconsin. In 1880, an extension of the railroad was completed to Flandrau, Dakota Territory, a futher extension mof the rail line to Sioux Falls, Dakota Territory was graded, and the Centra RailRoad, with a rail line from Wells, Minnesota, to Mankato, Minnesota, was acquired by purchase. In 1880, the officers of the railroad were Cornelius B. Gold, president, H. C. Kingsley, vice president, Walton Ferguson, treasurer, and P. M. Myers, secretary and general manager, and the members of the board of directors of the railroad were George P. Bissell, H. H. Cammann, F. W. Downer, J. B. Dumot, J. C. Easton, Walton Ferguson, Cornelius B. Gold, Henry C. Kingsley, and H. F. Rudd. George Perkins Bissell (1827-1881,) the son of Josiah Bissell, Jr. ( -1831,) and Henrietta Perkins Bissell (1792- ,) was born in Rochester, Monroe County, New York, married Julia Seymour Bay (1828-1915,) the daughter of Calvin Bay and Catherine Seymour, was a colonel in the 25th Connecticut Regiment during the American Civil War and fought at the Battle of Irish Bend, Louisiana, was one of the authors of The Twenty-fifth Regiment Connecticut Volunteers in the War of the Rebellion, was the owner of George P. Bissell & Company of Hartford, Connecticut, in 1873, died in New York City, New York County, New York, and was buried in the Cedar Hill Cemetery, Hartford, Hartford County, Connecticut. Frederick Wheeler Downer, Sr. (1825- ,) the son of Samuel Downer and Eliza DeForest Downer, graduated from the New York University, was a lawyer, married Sarah Wheaton Downer ( -1926,) the daughter of Silas Potter Downer (1801-1857) and Sophia Waterbury Downer, in 1856, was a member of the board of directors of W. W. De Forest & Company, was an official of the New York House of Refuge from 1854 until 1857, was a Presbyterian, was a member of the board of managers of the Society for the Reformation of Juvenile Delinquents from 1851 until 1897, was a member of the board of trustees of the New York Marble Cemetery in 1865, was a member of the board of managers of the DeMilt Dispensary in New York City, New York, in 1868, was a real estate developer of Mantoloking, New Jersey, in 1875, was the president of and a member of the board of directors of the Harlem & New York Navigation Company in 1883, was the vice president of and a member of the board of directors of the American Fire Insurance Company in 1897, and was the vice president of and a member of the board of directors of the New Jersey & New York Extension RailRoad Company in 1906. John Myers Egan (1848-1923,) the son of Michael Egan and Ellen Egan, was born in Springfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts, moved to Amboy, Illinois, with his family in 1855, was a boy apprentice in the Illinois Central Railroad railroad shops at Amboy, Illinois, was the assistant chief engineer of the Northern Missouri RailRoad, married Suzanna/Susanna Gallagher (1850-1925) in 1873, was employed by the St. Louis, Kansas City & Northern RailRoad in 1876, was the superintendent and chief engineer of the Southern Minnesota RailRoad Company in 1880, was the general superintendent of the Canadian Pacific Railway in 1882, was the general superintendent of the St. Paul, Minneapolis and Manitoba Railway from 1886 to 1888, was the general manager of the Chicago, St. Paul & Kansas City RailRoad in 1888, was the president of the Chicago Great Western RailRoad in 1889, was a member of the board of directors of the Chicago Great Western RailRoad in 1892, was associated with the Rock Island RailRoad in 1894, represented the General Managers Association during the Chicago Railroad Strike of 1894, was the receiver of the Oregon Short Line RailRoad in 1895, and was the receiver of the Utah Northern Railroad in 1895, was assistant to the president of the Lake Superior & Ishpeming Railway at Marquette, Michigan in 1896, was the vice-president of the Central of Georgia Railway from 1896 until 1900, was the president of the Central of Georgia Railway from 1900 until 1903, was the president of the Union Depot Bridge & Terminal Railway Company of Kansas City, Missouri in 1904, was the vice-president of the Trans-Brazilian Railway from 1907 until 1909, was the president and general manager of the Metropolitan Street Railway from 1910 until 1916, was the president and general manager of the Kansas City Light & Power Company from 1910 until 1916, served on the Lee County, Illinois, Exemption Board during World War I, was president of the Amboy Milk Products Company, was president of the Amboy Public Hospital Board, was president of the Lee County Tuberculosis Sanitarium Board, died in Amboy, Lee County, Illinois, and was buried in Calvary Cemetery in St. Paul. Cornelius Boudinot Gold (1839-1921) the son of Job Swift Gold (1810-1844) and Catharine/Catherine B. Gold, was a student of Frederick W. Gunn, attended the Gunnery, an abolitionist school, in 1854, was a recruit in Company B of the Sixth Regiment of the Connecticut Volunteer Infantry in 1863, served as an officer during the American Civil War, was the acting assistant paymaster of the U. S. Navy in 1864, married Margaret Shedd (1846-1915,) was president of the Southern Minnesota Railway, was a member of the board of directors of the Texas Central Railway, was a trustee of the Toledo Peoria & Western Railway, was an investor in the Toledo, Peoria & Western Railway Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Duluth & Manitoba Railway, was an honorary member of the Correctional Association of New York in 1886, was an incorporator of the Texas Central Railroad Company in 1892, was a member of the bondholders committee investigating the Omaha & St. Louis RailRoad in 1893, was appointed receiver of the Peoria Water Company in 1894, was a trustee of the Colorado Coal & Iron Development Company in 1896, and was the treasurer of the Prison Association of New York before 1902. Henry Coit “H. C.” Kingsley (1815-1886,) the son of James Luce Kingsley (1778-1862) and Lydia Coit Kingsley (1789-1861,) was born in New Haven, Connecticut, graduated from Yale College in 1834, attended the Yale College Law School, was admitted to the practice of law at Cleveland, Ohio, in 1837, was a lawyer, married Cornelia H. Day ( -1843) in 1841, married Mrs. Jane Thomas Handy, the daughter Briggs W. Thomas, of Utica, New York, in 1846, moved to New Haven, Connecticut, in 1853, was a member of the board of directors of the Cleveland & Pittsburgh RailRoad in 1854, was the treasurer of Yale College from 1862 until 1886, was the author of Leonard Bacon: Pastor of the First Church in New Haven in 1882, and died of injuries from a cart-carriage accident in New Haven, Connecticut. Joseph Walton Losey (1834-1901) was born in Honesdale, Wayne County, Pennsylvania, attended Amherst College, came to La Crosse, Wisconsin, in 1856, read the law with the La Crosse, Wisconsin, law office of Dennison & Lyndes, was admitted to the practice of law in Wisconsin in 1857, developed a private law practice in La Crosse, Wisconsin, married Florence Lehmann (1842-1909) in 1859, was a law partner of James I. Lyndes, was elected the La Crosse, Wisconsin, District Attorney in 1859, was elected the La Crosse, Wisconsin, City Attorney in 1860, then was a law partner of Angus Cameron from 1861 until 1886, then was the law partner of G. M. Woodward, was a long-time member of the La Crosse, Wisconsin, City Council, helped establish a water system for fire protection in La Crosse, Wisconsin, was also an early supporter of the development of Myrick Park in La Crosse, Wisconsin, was a charter member of the Royal Arcanum of La Crosse, Wisconsin, in 1879, was the president of the board of trustees of the Oak Grove Cemetery in La Crosse, Wisconsin, in the 1880’s, died in La Crosse, Wisconsin, and was buried in the Oak Grove Cemetery in La Crosse, Wisconsin. Albon Platt Man (1811-1891,) the son of Dr. Albon Man and Maria Platt, was born in Constable, Franklin County, New York, was educated at Constable, New York, Plattsburg, New York, and Fort Covington, New York, read the law with Judge Parkhurst in Plattsburg, New York, in 1830, then read the law with Judge William Kent in in New York City, New York, was admitted to the practice of law in New York at Poughkeepsie, New York, in 1832, was a law partner with Stephen C. Williams, married Mary L. Brower of Wilkes Barre, Pennsylvania, later was a law partner with Walter Edwards, and even later was a law partner of John E. Parsons, was a wealthy lawyer, real estate developer, and successful banker in New York City, New York, doing mostly estate, probate and trust work, was a principal backer of the Southern Minnesota RailRoad and of the Central RailRoad of Minnesota, married Mary Elizabeth Hubbell, the daughter of Aldrick/Alrick Hubbell and Laura Eliza Squire Hubbell, founded, with his partner, landscape architect Edward Richmond, Richmond Hill in Queens, New York, in 1868-1869, developed Kew Gardens in New York City, New York, was the president of the New York City Bar Association from 1870 until 1871, was a member of the Urban League Club, was a member of the New England Society, was a member of the New York City Board of Education in 1875, was a member of the Madison Square Presbyterian Church, gave Resurrection Church the land for its church building and rectory at Richmond Hill, New York, and died of the grip combined with pleurisy. Luke Miller (1815-1881,) the son of Andrew Miller, was born in Peterboro, New Hampshire, graduated from Vermont University in 1841, graduated from the Woodstock Medical College in Vermont in 1844, was a physician, practiced in Troy, New Hampshire, moved to Minnesota in 1851, came to Chatfield, Minnesota, in 1857, was an instructor at the Chatfield Academy in 1858, moved to Lanesboro, Minnesota, in 1869, was a Republican, served in the Minnesota Senate representing Faribault County, Minnesota, Fillmore County, Minnesota, and Freeborn County, Minnesota (District 14,) from 1861 until 1869, was the state agent for the care of wounded and ill soldiers during the American Civil War from 1864 until 1866, was the president of the governing board of Lanesboro, Minnesota, from 1870 until 1873 and in 1876, was a founder and a member of the board of trustees of the Minnesota Asylum for the Insane, was the vice-president of the Southern Minnesota RailRoad Company, was a member of the Old Settlers’ Association of the Southern Tier of Counties in Minnesota in 1878, and died in Lanesboro, Minnesota. Lawrence Myers, Jr. (1799-1872,) the son of Joseph Myers, was born in Herkimer, New York, , married Delia Maria Kirtland (1802- ,) the daughter of John Kirtland and Lucy Burbank Kirtland in 1827, first engaged in mercantile business at Whitehall, New York, with his brother, Peter J. H. Myers, moved to Plattsburgh, New York, in 1828, and opened a general storelater engaged in the lumber and iron business on the Saranac River, was a member of the board of directors of the Whitehall & Plattsburgh RailRoad Company in 1850, was a major and a brigadier inspector on the staff of the New York Adjutant General in 1855, was a resident of Plattsburgh, Clinton County, New York, in 1855, was a partner in 1863, with Peter M. Myers and Joseph M. Myers, and was a partner in the banking and New York Stock Exchange firm of P. M. Myers & Company in 1871. Hezekiah F. Rudd was a member of the board of directors of the Norwich Bank when it was reorganized in 1865 and in 1882, and was an incorporator of the Norwich Park Association in 1871. Samuel Bulkley Ruggles (1800-1881,) the son of Philo Ruggles, a Surrogate and District Attorney of Dutchess County, New York, was born in New Milford, Litchfield County, Connecticut, moved at an early age to Poughkeepsie, New York, graduated from Yale College in 1814, read for the law, was admitted to the practice of law in New York State in 1821, was an American lawyer and politician from New York, was a large landholder in New York City, New York, created Gramercy Park landholder in New York City, New York, was a member of the board of directors of the Erie RailRoad from 1833 until 1839, was a member of the board of directors and promoter of the Bank of Commerce in 1839, was a commissioner of the Croton aqueduct in 1842, was a member of the board of trustees of the Astor library, was a Whig, was a member of the New York State Assembly in 1838, was a Canal Commissioner from 1839 to 1842 and in 1858, was a commissioner concerning the enlargement of canals for national purposes who was appointed by the governor of New York in 1869, was a member of the General convention of the Protestant Episcopal church, was a member of the New York City, New York, Chamber of Commerce, was a trustee of Columbia College, was selected as a United States delegate and representative to several European assemblies, including the International Statistics Congress in Berlin in 1863, the Paris Exposition of 1867, and the 1869 International Statistics Conference at The Hague, the Netherlands, Wintered at the Westminster Hotel in New York City, New York, and died at his Summer residence at the Surf Hotel on Fire Island, New York. Benjamin D. “B. D.”/“D. B.” Sprague (1827/1828-1898,) the son of Eli Sprague (1791-1875) and Polly Pulsifer Sprague (1787-1860,) was born in Vanburen, Onondaga County, New York/New Hampshire, married Cordelia S. Brink (1840-1918,) the daughter of David Brink (1810-1881) and Lydia Fisher Brink (1809-1885,) in 1862, resided in Lansing, Minnesota, in 1862, was a farmer in 1862, served in the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Dodge County, Minnesota, and Mower County, Minnesota (District 15,) from 1862 until 1863, served in the Minnesota Senate representing Dodge County, Minnesota, Fillmore County, Minnesota, and Mower County, Minnesota (Districts 14 and 15,) from 1863 until 1866 and from 1868 until 1871, resided in Rushford, Minnesota, in 1869, was a member of the Minnesota Millers’ Association in 1879, was a miller in Rushford, Minnesota, in 1882, and died in Lysander, Onondaga County, New York. Colonel Thomas Benton Stoddard (1800-1876) was born in Canandaigua, Genesee County, New York, graduated from Columbia University in 1819, graduated from Yale University in 1820, studied law under Aaron Burr, was admitted to the practice of law in New York, moved to Wisconsin in 1850, settled in La Crosse, Wisconsin, in 1851, practiced law and was active in numerous railroad ventures in La Crosse, Wisconsin, promoted the establishment of the La Crosse & Milwaukee RailRoad Company in 1852, formed a partnership with C. A. Stevens in publishing the Democrat, established the La Crosse Independent Republican in 1854 with the financial aid and help of Samuel T. Smith, George Farnam, A. W. Barron, F. M. Rublee, D. D. Cameron, H. Wedge, S. Kellogg, Joel Marsh, A. Overbaugh, Tallmadge and Gridley, B. S. Rippy, Peter Burns, James Gallagher, E. Childs, N. R. Smith, and Joseph K. French, was the first mayor of La Crosse, Wisconsin, in 1856, winning by one vote over John M. Levy, was a Democrat in 1856, was a Union/Republican in 1862, was Wisconsin State assemblyman in 1862, was instrumental in organizing the Southern Minnesota RailRoad Company, was president of the Southern Minnesota RailRoad Company from 1864 until 1871, was active in several unsuccessful railroad schemes designed to make La Crosse, Wisconsin, the railroad center for the Upper Mississippi Valley, and retired in 1871. Clark Wallace “C. W.” Thompson (1825-1885) was born in Canada, came to Minnesota in 1853, resided in Hokah, Minnesota, in 1855, was a miller, served in the Minnesota Territorial House of Representatives representing Ramsey County, Wabasha County, Minnesota, and Washington County, Minnesota (District 4,) in 1854 served in the Minnesota Territorial Council representing Fillmore County, Minnesota, Houston County, Minnesota, and Mower County, Minnesota (District 8,) from 1855 until 1857, served in the Minnesota Territorial Republican Constitutional Convention representing the 8th Council District in 1857, was the Northern Superintendent of Indain Affairs for the federal government from 1861 until 1865, served in the Minnesota Senate, after successfully challenging the election of George W. Whallon, representing Cottonwood County, Minnesota, Faribault County, Minnesota, Jackson County, Minnesota, Martin County, Minnesota, Murray County, Minnesota, Pipestone County, Minnesota, and Rock County, Minnesota (District 20,) from 1870 until 1872, was a railroad president, and died on his farm in Wells, Minnesota. Edward Thompson (1827-1909) was born in Niagara, Ontario, Canada, moved to London, Middlesex County, Ontario, Canada, as a child, moved with his family to Winnebago County, Illinois, in 1842, married Susan M. Jenks( -1862) in 1849, moved to Minnesota in 1851, arrived in Houston County, Minnesota, in the Spring of 1851, founded Hokah, Minnesota, built a sawmill in 1852, built a flour mill in 1853, was the president of the first Republican Party meeting in Minnesota in 1854, married Orierdo __?__/Orinda Hulburt (1836- ,) was the county treasurer of Houston County, Minnesota, was the first postmaster of Hokah, Minnesota, was the master mechanic of the Southern Minnesota RailRoad from 1865 until 1870, was a justice of the peace, built a dam in 1866 across the Root River in anticipation of the arrival of the Southern Minnesota RailRoad, served in the Minnesota Senate representing Houston County, Minnesota (District 1,) from 1872 until 1875, was a Mason, resided in Minneapolis in 1909, and died in Minneapolis. Hiram Andrew Walker (1825-1892,) the son of Tyler Walker (1794-1884) and Polly Rowe (1795-1880,) was born in Croydon, Sullivan County, New Hampshire, married Celeste/Celestia Nims (1831- ) in Fond du Lac County, Wisconsin, in 1849, came to Minnesota in 1854, was an original settler at Rushford, Minnesota, was a milling entrepreneur, operated the Rushford City Mill from 1858 until 1876, when D. J. Tews took over the mill, was elected Rushford, Minnesota, township assessor and justice of the peace in 1858, served in the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Fillmore County, Minnesota (Districts 9 and 14,) from 1859 until 1864, and from 1867 until 1869, moved with his family to Valley City, Dakota Territory, in 1879, died in Valley City, Barnes County, North Dakota, and was buried in Valley City, Barnes County, North Dakota. a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/MinnrrsTNH.html" [See note on Herman H. Camman for the Southern Minnesota RailRoad Extension Company.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/TNHrail2.html" [See note on Fred W. Downer for the Southern Minnesota Railway Extension Company.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/MinnrrsTNH.html" [See note on John Brokaw Dumont for the Southern Minnesota RailRoad Extension Company.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/MinnrrsTNH.html" [See note on Jason C. Easton for the Southern Minnesota RailRoad Extension Company.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/MinnrrsTNH.html" [See note on Hauman G. “H. G.” Haugan for the Southern Minnesota RailRoad Extension Company.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/TNHrail2.html" [See note on Clark W. Thompson for the Wells & SouthEastern RailRoad.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/MinnrrsTNH.html" [See note on William Cornelius Van Horne for the Southern Minnesota RailRoad Extension Company.]

Southern Minnesota RailRoad Extension Company: The Southern Minnesota Railway Company organized the Southern Minnesota Railway Extension Company in 1878 as a legally separate company, but it was not a secret that it was a part of the parent firm. The railroad was incorporated under Minnesota state law in 1878. William Cornelius Van Horne was the president of the railroad in 1877. A state legislation grant of land that was about to be forfeited by the Southern Minnesota RailRoad, was organized in 1866, was conditioned on the completion of a rail line from Winnebago City, Minnesota, to Fairmont, Minnesota, by September 1, 1878, and to Jackson, Minnesota, by the end of 1879. The railroad reached Jackson, Minnesota, in 1878 and was extended Northwesterly in 1879. The route for the rail line was mapped from Winnebago City, Minnesota, Section 35, Township 104 Range 28, to the Western state line, Section 3 Township 106, Range 47, in 1879. In 1879, the officers of the railroad were Walton Ferguson, president, Fred W. Downer, vice president and secretary, and H. G. Haugan, treasurer, the member of the board of directors of the railroad were T. J. Barbour, Herman H. Camman, J. B. Dumont, J. C. Easton, Walton Ferguson, H. C. Swords, and W. C. Van Horne, and the rail line in the progress of construction was expected to be operated by the Southern Minnesota RailRoad Company. The railroad was succeeded by the Southern Minnesota Railroad Company. In 1882, the railroad owned 2,933.28 acres of land in Minnesota. Thomas Johnston Barbour (1852- ,) the son of William Barbour and Elizabeth Johnston Barbour, married Fannie Cooley Williams (1854-1908,) the daughter of Edgar Williams and Eliza Cooley Spelman Williams and the author of the Spelman Genealogy: The English Ancestry and American Descendants of Richard Spelman of Middletown, Connecticut, 1700, the manager of the Brooklyn Home for Destitute Children, and the manager of the Wayside Home in Brooklytn, New York, in 1880, was a partner with Cornelius B. Gold, William D. Barbour, and Henry C. Swords in Gold, Barbour & Swords, a member of the New York Stock Exchange, in 1887, resided in New York in 1887, was a partner with Christian M. Hansen in Barbour & Hansen, manufacturers of white brass in San Francisco, California, and a manager of the machinery depot of Risdon I. & L. Works in San Francisco, California, in 1894, was a member of the board of directors of the Bohemian Club of San Francisco, California, in 1905, was the vice president of the Balakalala Consolidated Copper Company of Nevada in 1908, resided in San Francisco, California, in 1911, and was the vice president of the First National Copper Company of Nevada in 1911 and 1913. Herman H. Camman (1840- ) married Ella Cornelia Crary, the daughter of Edward Charles Crary (1805-1848) and Cornelia Livingston Fulton Crary (1812-1893,) was the treasurer of the Episcopalian Home for Old Men and Aged Couples in New York City, New York, in 1880, was the president of the New York Real Estate Exchange in 1892, was a member of the New York City, New York, Chamber of Commerce in 1894, was a member of the board of trustees of the Real Estate Trust of New York City in 1896, was a financial supporter of Columbia University in 1896, was an Episcopalian, was the principal in H. H. Camman & Company in New York City, New York, in 1904, resided for the season in Lakewood, New Jersey, in 1909, and was associated with Colonel William Jay and the Trinity Church Corporation in a controversy over the disposition of St, John’s Chapel in New York City, New York, in 1914. Frederick Wheeler Downer (1825-1905,) the son of Samuel Downer (1792-1846) and Eliza De Forest Downer (1801- ,) was a New York real estate promoter, married Sarah Wheaton in 1856, was a member of the board of trustees of the Marble Cemetery in New York City, New York, from 1865 until 1897, was active in the Society for the Reformation of Juvenile Delinquents in New York City, New York, in 1869, leased the reorganized New Jersey Southern RailRoad to the New York & Long Branch RailRoad, and was the president and a member of the board of directors of the American Fire Insurance Company in 1896. John Brokaw Dumont (1842-1928,) the son of Peter P. Dumont (1816-1902) and Auletta M. Brokaw Dumont ( -1903,) married Elizabeth Stewart Cook ( -1901) in 1867, was a New York businessman, became a resident of Plainfield, New Jersey, in 1869, was the treasurer of the Dubuque & Sioux City RailRoad in 1878, was a bond holder of the Baltimore & Ohio RailRoad in 1880, was the secretary-treasurer of the board of trustees of the missionary fund and of the board of trustees of the church property of the diocese of the New Jersey Diocese of the Protestant Episcopal Church in 1887, was the president of the Plainfield, New Jersey, city council in 1901, was a member of the New York Stock Exchange from 1879 until suspended in 1893 and again in 1901, was the treasurer of the first board of directors of the Plainfield Public Library, was a member of the Grace Church vestry, and married Annie Wright Mason in 1903. Hauman G. “H. G.” Haugan (1840- ,) the son of Helge A. Hauman and Anna Haugan, was born in Christiana, Norway, emigrated to Canada with his mother and siblings to meet his father in 1859, moved to Chicago, Illinois, in 1863, moved to LaCrosse, Wisconsin, in 1864, was employed as a bookkeeper, was the cashier at the Batavian Bank, from 1864 until 1870, was the paymaster of the Southern Minnesota Railway Company in 1870, was the auditor of the Southern Minnesota Railway Company until1880, married Emma Peterson ( -1905) in Rockdell, Minnesota, in 1879, then was an assistant to W. C. Van Horne, the general superintendent of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad, from 1880 until 1883, was the land commissioner of the the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad from 1883 until 1901, was a partner in Haugan & Lindgren, private bankers, in chicago, Illinois, in 1884, was comptroller of the the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad from 1901 until 1910, was a member of the English Lutheran Church of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, was a member of the Union League, was a member of the Evanston Golf club of Chicago, Illinois, was a member of the Milwaukee Club of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and was a Republican. Walton Ferguson (1842-1922,) the son of John W. Ferguson (1803-1874) and Helen Grace Morewood Ferguson (1806-1863,) was born in Stamford, Fairfield County, Connecticut, graduated from a Baltimore private school, graduated from Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut, went into business with his father’s private banking firm, J. & S. Ferguson in New York City, New York, moved to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, went into partnership with his brother, Edmund Morewood Ferguson (1839-1877,) and with Henry Clay Frick in the H.C. Frick Coke Company, married Julia Lee White (1846-1933,) the daughter of John Trumbull White and Sarah Grace Carroll White, in 1869, was active in railroads, gas companies and electric light companies, was instrumental in establishing Union Carbide Company, helped organize, founded or served as a member of the board of directors in the Brooklyn Edison Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Kings County Electric Light Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Peoples Gas in Chicago, Illinois, was a member of the board of directors of the Virginia Iron, Coal & Coke Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Virginia & Southwestern Railway, was the president of the Stamford Trust Company, was a member of the board of directors of the First National Bank of Stamford, Connecticut, was a member of the board of directors of the Stamford Gas & Electric Company, was the president of the Ferguson Library, was an Episcopalian, and died in Stamford, Fairfield County, Connecticut. Henry Cotheal Swords (1854-1924) was born in New York City, New York, attended the public schools of New York City, New York, attended the City College of New York, was a clerk with D. Appleton & Company before 1877, was a member of the brokerage firm of Barbour, Swords & Company in 1877, joined the Real Estate Trust Company in 1891, was a member of the Real Estate Exchange Honest Government Club of New York City, New York, in 1894, was a steward of the St. Nicholas Society of New York in 1895 and 1896, was the president of and was a member of the board of trustees of the Real Estate Trust of New York City in 1896, married Elizabeth Clarkson, the daughter of Samuel Clarkson, in 1896, was a member of the board of directors of the Bank of New York in 1897, 1900, and 1902, sponsored the publication of Trade and Trade Centers of History, a catalogue of his collection of engravings, mezzotints and woodcuts of merchants, bankers and financiers of former times and the biographies of these men by W. Hamilton Benham in 1907, was a member of the board of trustees of the New York Society Library in 1910, was the treasurer of the New York Stock Exchange in 1912, was the president of and a member of the board of directors of the Fulton Trust Company of New York in 1916, and died in Atlantic City, New Jersey. William Cornelius Van Horne (1843-1915,) the son of Cornelius Covenhoven Van Horne and Mary Minier Richards Van Horne, was born in Will County, Illinois, moved with his family to Joliet, Illinois in 1851, began working on railroads in 1857, serving in various capacities on the Michigan Central Railway until 1864, was the general manager of the Southern Minnesota RailRoad in 1874, then was the general superintendent for the Chicago & Alton Railway from 1878-1879, was appointed general manager of the Canadian Pacific Railway in 1882, became vice-president of the Canadian Pacific Railway in 1884, became the president of the Canadian Pacific Railway in 1888, was a member of the board of governors of McGill University from 1895 until 1915, died in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, and was buried in Oakwood Cemetery in Joliet, Illinois. The railroad was incorporated in 1878. The railroad was organized in 1878. In 1879, the railroad was granted land previously granted to the Southern Minnesota Railway Company in 1866 by the Minnesota Legislature in Laws of Minnesota 1879, Chapter 95, amending Special Laws of Minnesota 1878, Chapter 257. The railroad, although legally a separate company, was established by the Southern Minnesota Railway Company. Henry J. Horn was the lawyer representing the railroad in applying to the governor of Minnesota for the rededication of the 1866 land grant to the Southern Minnesota Railway Company to the railroad in 1879. In 1879, the officers of the railroad were Walton Ferguson, president, Fred W. Downer, vice president and secretary, A. G. Haugan, treasurer, the members of the board of directors of the railroad were Herman H. Camman, F. W. Downer, J. B. Dumont, J. C. Easton, Walton Ferguson, Henry C. Swords, and W. C. Van Horne, had $150,000 in common stock wholly owned by the Southern Minnesota Railway Company, owned no rolling stock or other property, was in the process of completing a rail line to the Western Minnesota border, and was operated by the Southern Minnesota Railway Company as soon as completed. In 1880, the railroad was conveyed to the Southern Minnesota Railway Company. Fred W. Downer was a member of the board of managers of the New York Society for the Reformation of Juvenile Deliquents in 1855, was a member of the board of managers of the Demilt Dispensary in 1867, was a patron of the Farrand’s Collegiate Academy in New York in 1870, and resided in New York, New York, in 1880. Jason C. Easton (1823- ,) the son of Giles Easton and Olive Green Easton, was a native New Yorker and a banker/loan broker, was born in Lowville, Lewis County, New York, attended Yale University in 1847, owned the Northern Journal, a Whig newspaper, in New York in 1848 and again in 1853, married Sarah J. Johnson, the daughter of Abner A. Johnson, of Deer River, Lewis County, New York, moved to Minnesota in 1856, partnered with New York Congressman William A. Gilbert to open the Root River State Bank in Chatfield, Minnesota, dealt in military bounty land warrants, terminated the partnership with Gilbert during the Panic of 1857, arranged through a family friend in Washington, D. C., to win the job of opening a land office for the partitioning and sale of properties throughout the area of southeast Minnesota around Chatfield, Minnesota, was able to convince the Southern Minnesota Railway Company to run a spur to Chatfield, Minnesota, from Winnebago, Minnesota, eventually owned two banks, the original bank at Chatfield, Minnesota, and a private one at Lanesboro, Minnesota, had an interest in five other banks, the firms of Smith, Wilkins & Easton in Austin, Minnesota, Farmer & Easton in Spring Valley, Minnesota, Easton & Armstrong in Winnebago City, Minnesota, Sprague & Easton in Caledonia, Minnesota, Lovell & Easton in Grand Meadow, Minnesota, and First National Bank in Owatonna, Minnesota, was for several years a partner in the grain commission business in Chicago, Illinois, and Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and became the president of the Southern Minnesota Railway Extension Company before he moved to Minneapolis. Walton Ferguson (1842-1922,) the son of John W. Ferguson (1803-1874) and Helen Grace Morewood Ferguson (1806-1863,) was schooled at private schools and Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut, went into business with his father’s private banking firm, J & S Ferguson, in New York City, married Julia Lee White (1846- ) in Stamford, Fairfield County, Connecticut, in 1869, went into partnership with his brother, Edmund Morewood Ferguson, and Henry Clay Frick in the H.C. Frick Coke Company in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, resided in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in 1880, became active in railroads, gas companies and electric light companies, was instrumental in establishing Union Carbide Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Union Carbide Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Brooklyn Edison Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Kings County Electric Light Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Peoples Gas in Chicago, Illinois, was a member of the board of directors of the Virginia Iron, Coal & Coke Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Virginia & Southwestern Railway, was the president of the Stamford Trust Company, was a member of the board of directors of the First National Bank of Stamford, Connecticut, was a member of the board of directors of the Stamford Gas & Electric Company, was a real estate developer, was a friend of the Connetquot Park in Connecticut, was a member of the South Side Sportsmen's Club in Connecticut, purchased almost all of Fishers Island in New York, was the president of the Ferguson Library, and died at Strawberry Hill, Stamford, Connecticut. a href ="http://www.msparchhistory.info/IrvineTNH.html" [See note for Henry J. Horn for 50 Irvine Park.]

Southwestern Railway Company: The railroad was incorporated by J. A. Armstrong, W. R. Bennett, J. W. Cowing, Andrew C. Dunn, F. Jervis Edwards, Henry W. Holley, R. B. Johnson, George B. Kingsley, Eric Olson, M. B. Soule, and George Thorne, in 1877 to build and operate a railway line from Winnebago City, Minnesota, by way of Fairmount, Minnesota, Jackson, Minnesota, and Worthington, Minnesota, to the Western boundary of the State, with the principal place of business at Winnebago City, Minnesota, with capital stock of $300,000, and was organized in 1877. William R. Bennett was a founder of Hersey, Nobles County, Minnesota, in 1872, resided in Hersey, Minnesota, in 1872, was the station master of the Sioux City & St. Paul RailRoad in Hersey, Minnesota, in 1872, was an election official in Hersey, Minnesota, in 1872, was a member of the Nobles County, Minnesota, petit jury in 1873, resided in Worthington, Minnesota, in 1874, was a member of the board of trustees of the City of Worthington, Minnesota, in 1874, and was the owner of the printing plant that printed the Claim Shanty Vindicator, the second newspaper established in Nobles County, Minnesota, in 1874. Hersey, Minnesota, was renamed Brewster, Minnesota, in 1880. John W. Cowling was a financial supporter of the county courthouse in Jackson, Minnesota, in 1872, was a county commissioner in Jackson County, Minnesota, in 1886 and in 1894, was the secretary of the Jackson Southern RailRoad in 1893, and was the Jackson County, Minnesota, register of deeds in 1908. F. Jervis Edwards was an incorporator of the Martin County Railroad in 1877, was an incorporator of the Southwestern RailRoad in 1877, and was an incorporator of the Saint James and Fort Dodga RailRoad in 1877. Henry W. “H. W.” Holley (1828-1898) was born in Pierrepont Manor, Jefferson County, New York, graduated as an engineer from Norwich University in Vermont in 1849, was a civil engineer for seven years in Ohio, Indiana, and Wisconsin, was the assistant engineer on the Cleveland & Pittsburgh RailRoad, was the assistant engineer on the Parkersburgh & Cincinnati RailRoad, was the assistant engineer on the Crawsfordsville & Fort Wayne RailRoad, married Eliza J. Christie in 1855, came to Minnesota in 1856, joined Twilford & Company, was an editor of the Chatfield Republican, purchased the Faribault, Minnesota, Herald with Oville Brown in 1858, transformed the weekly newspaper, the Central Republican, was a Republican, served in the Republican Minnesota Constitutional Convention representing the Eighth Council District of the Minnesota Territory in 1857, served in the Minnesota Senate (representing Fillmore County, Minnesota, Districts 8 and 14) from 1858 until 1862, after successfully contesting the election of Orlando B. Bryant, resided in Chatfield, Minnesota, in 1859, was appointed as Receiver of Public Moneys at Chatsfield, Minnesota, in 1861, was the receiver in the U. S. Land Office in Winnebago, Minnesota, from 1861 until 1869, resided in Winnebago City, Minnesota, in 1862, was a captain of a militia company during the U. S.-Dakota War on 1862, was an incorporator of the Southern Minnesota RailRoad, was the chief engineer of the Southern Minnesota RailRoad in 1872, wrote several volumes of poems, including Moods and Emotion in Rhyme, The Politicians and Other Poems, and What I Think, successfully appealed a judgment of libel against Constans C. Hemphill in the Minnesota Supreme Court in Hemphill v. Holley, 4 Minn. 233 (1872,) was the general manager and superintendent of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad in 1874, moved West in 1891, resided in Spokane, Washington, from 1891 until 1893, resided in Everett, Washington, after 1893, and died in Everett, Washington. Rial B. “R. B.” Johnson (1827-1902) was born in New Hampshire, came to Minnesota in 1858, was a real estate dealer, was the administrator of the estate of Edwin 0. Johnson, was the county treasurer of Faribault County, Minnesota, in 1873, 1874, and 1876, resided at Blue Earth City, Minnesota, in 1878, served in the Minnesota Senate representing Faribault County, Minnesota (District 6,) fromm1878 until 1883, and was a dealer in shoe, boots and leather in Winnebago City, Minnesota, in 1880. George B. Kingsley (1832-1894) married Adelaide Delia Nichols (1844-1928,) the daughter of Barber Nichols (1788-1880) and Lucy Parshall Nichols (1800-1893) and a poet, in New York City, was an original settler of Blue Earth, Minnesota, was appointed by Territorial Governor W. A. Gorman as a justice of the peace, was part of the survey crew that laid out the townsite of Blue Earth, Minnesota, served in the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Faribault County, Minnesota, and Freeborn County, Minnesota (District 14,) from 1857 until 1858, after successfully contesting the election of William Dunham based on the votes cast in one precict, and was the postmaster of Blue Earth City, Minnesota. Eric Olson (1841-1928) was a county commissioner in Martin County, Minnesota, in 1878, sued for a writ of mandamus against the town board of Lake Fremont, Martin County, Minnesota, to make the public roads in his portion of the township passable to the public in 1915, which was ultimately reversed by the Minnesota Supreme Court in Olson v. Honett, 133 Minn. 160 (1916,) and was buried in Lake Fremont, Minnesota. Martin Bradford Soule (1838- ,) the son of Daniel Soule (1792-1881,) a veteran of the War of 1812, and Mary Hayden Soule (1800-1857,) was born in Waterville, Maine, attended the Waterville, Maine, Academy, attended Waterville College/Colby College, enlisted in Company E of the 16th Maine Infantry in 1862 during the American Civil War, fought at the battles of Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, and Gettysburg, was wounded, read the law with Reuben Foster in Waterville, Maine, in 1865 and 1866, attended the Albany Law School, Albany, New York, was admitted to the practice of law in Waterville, Maine, in 1866, married Annie/Ann E. Mitchell (1844-1874,) the daughter of Benjamin G. Mitchell and Betsey L. Combs Mitchell, in 1869, moved to Minnesota in 1870, resided in Worthington, Minnesota, from 1870 until 1880, was the adjutant of the Worthington, Minnesota, Grand Army of the Republic post in 1872, was a Republican, was the county attorney of Nobles County, Minnesota, in 1874, was a charter member of the Worthington, Minnesota, Masons in 1874, was a member of the board of directors of the Worthington, Minnesota, public school from 1878 until 1880, was the postmaster of Worthington, Minnesota, from 1875 until 1881, was a notary public in Worthington, Minnesota, in the 1870’s, was a lawyer in Worthington, Minnesota, in the 1870’s, married Barbary/Barbara Cosler (1848- ,) of Worthington, Minnesota, in 1878, moved to Knoxville, Tennessee, in 1880, moved to Kansas in 1882, resided and practiced law in Cherryvale, Montgomery County, Kansas, in 1882, was a Mason, was a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, married Hatie/Hattie Harvey (1855- ,) the daughter of James Harvey, in 1885, became a Kansas probate court judge in 1900, was a member of the Cherryvale, Kansas, city council, was the mayor of Cherryvale, Kansas, and was a member of the school board of Cherryvale, Kansas. a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/TNHrail2.html" [See note on John A. Armstrong for the Winnebago & St. Paul RailRoad/Winnebago City & St. Paul Railway Company.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/TNHrail2.html" [See note on Andrew Clarkson Dunn for the Winnebago & St. Paul RailRoad/Winnebago City & St. Paul Railway Company.]

Spirit Lake Transfer RailRoad: The railroad was formed as a Minnesota corporation by the Duluth, Missabe & Northern RailRoad for the purpose of acquiring and operating a railroad in St. Louis County, Minnesota, and in Douglas County, Wisconsin, with branches and to serve the steel plant in West Duluth, Minnesota, in 1907. The a single-track rail line railroad was constructed between 1907 and 1913 and between 1915 and 1916, operated 14.675 miles of rail trackage, formed a link between the Duluth, Missabe & Northern RailRoad at Adolph, Minnesota, just West of Proctor, Minnesota, and the U. S. Steel Corporation Duluth Works at Steelton, Minnesota, and included a bridge over the St. Louis River and a submarine cable between Oliver, Wisconsin, and Steelton, Minnesota. The railroad was named for a wide spot in the St. Louis River known as Spirit Lake and the railroad connected the St. Louis Bay drawbridge between Minnesota and Wisconsin. The railroad was controlled by the Federal Steel Company, which was a subsidiary of the United States Steel Corporation. The U.S. Steel Corporation Duluth Works in the southern portion of Duluth, Minnesota, was an integrated steel mill consisting of coke production, iron and steel making, casting, primary rolling and roughing, hot and cold finishing, and galvanizing. The steel mill and coke production facility operated from 1915 until 1979, making steel products such as nails, wire, and steel sign posts. In 1979, the blast furnaces, open hearth furnaces, fuel oil storage tanks, and a portion of the rolling mill were demolished. By 1988, the material storage area and most of the remaining building were demolished. The site adjoined the residential and light-industrial neighborhood of Morgan Park to the north, the Spirit Lake portion of the St. Louis River and the Duluth, Missabe & Northern RailRoad property. The railroad had no operating equipment and was leased to and operated by the Duluth, Missabe & Northern RailRoad in 1915. The United States Steel Corporation also owned the Interstate Transfer Railway Company in 1915, when there was an amendment to federal legislation to require the the Interstate Transfer Railway Company to build an approach in Minnesota to the Oliver Bridge on property owned by the Spirit Lake Transfer RailRoad. In 1916, the railroad had $500,000 in capital stock. In 1919, the railroad operated 28.206 miles of single-track rail trackage, with 14.675 miles of main rail line from Adolph, Minnesota, just West of Proctor, Minnesota, to the St. Louis River Bridge near Duluth, Minnesota, built in 1916, and 13.531 miles of yard tracks and sidings. In 1920, the railroad was planned to double its rail trackage and rail yard facilities, but were hampered by a labor shorage in Duluth, Minnesota. In 1926, there was federal legislation to legalize the submarine cable laid in the St. Louis River at the Spirit Lake Transfer Railway drawbridge between Minnesota and Wisconsin. The railroad operated until 1937 and was succeeded by the Duluth, Missabe & Iron Range RailRoad. In 1937, the Duluth, Missabe & Norhtern RailRoad and Spirit Lake Transfer Railway were consolidated to form the Duluth, Missabe & Iron Range Railway, which absorbed the Duluth & Iron Range RailRoad and Interstate Transfer Railway in 1938. John Pierpoint Morgan and Elbert H. Gary, an attorney, founded U.S. Steel in 1901 by combining Andrew Carnegie's Carnegie Steel Company with Gary's Federal Steel Company and with William Henry "Judge" Moore's National Steel Company for $492 million, was capitalized at $1.4 billion, the world's first billion-dollar corporation, and, at one time, the largest steel producer and the largest corporation in the world.

Split Rock Lumber Company: The Split Rock Lumber Company, a subsidiary of the Merrill & Ring Lumber Company, which had acquired logging rights to the nearby pine forests from the Gratwick, Smith, and Fryer interests, owned the harbor formed by the Split Rock River, the coal dock, the tug boat Gladiator, and the combination store-post office as well as the Split Rock & Northern RailRoad. The company also owned the assets of the former Split Rock Improvement & Boom Company. The company, located at Split Rock, Minnesota, owned two 1900 Climax geared locomotives. In 1903, the logging company employed 350 lumberjacks, with about 50 lumberjacks residing at the settlement at the Split Rock River harbor. In 1904, the Board of Engineers for Rivers and Harbors of the War Department recommended against any federal government expenditures to develop the Split Rock River harbor for commercial traffic because of the limited commerce between Duluth, Minnesota, and Grand Marais, Minnesota, the likely exhaustion of the timber stands adjoining the Split Rock River outlet within a few years, and the absence of firm plans to develop any iron ore processing facilities at the Split Rock River outlet.

Split Rock & Northern RailRoad: The railroad was organized by the Merrill & Ring Cranberry Lumber Company in 1899 or 1900, was incorporated in 1900 by William J. Chisholm, Edwin H. Eddy, William H. Gratwick, Charles R. Little, T. D. Merrill, Thomas Merrill, Clark W. Ring, M. H. Stanford, and Pendennis White to build and operate a rail line from the mouth of the Split Rock River, Minnesota, North and NorthEast to the Minnesota-Ontario border and to build and operate spur lines to connect with docks on the lake shore, was owned by the Split Rock Lumber Company, and had 1.9 miles of trackage from the Split Rock River to Mattson’s Bridge in 1899 and in 1904. The railroad, although it had a very short length and never connected to any other rail lines, was formed as a common carrier in order to exempt its log dump trestle, terminal and shop buildings from property taxation by the State of Minnesota. In 1890, the Cranberry Lumber Company moved its offices from Ashland, Wisconsin, to Duluth, Minnesota, logged under contract for the Siskiwit Lumber Company, which owned a large tract of land east of the Cranberry Lumber Company holdings, and transported the logs to the huge Merrill & Ring mill in Duluth, Minnesota, along with a large contract of logs by the Cranberry Lumber Company for Merrill & Ring also. The Cranberry Lumber Company did acquire a considerable amount of timber land in northeast Minnesota, but ultimately sold most of it or paid other companies to log it for them. The Cranberry Lumber Company had only two of its own logging operations in Minnesota. In 1900, the officers of the railroad were Pendennis White, president, T. D. Merrill, vice president, Clark W. Ring, treasurer, and E. H. Eddy, secretary and general manager. In 1903, Captain D. D. Gaillard of the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers reported that the railroad, a logging road, utilized about ten miles of main rail trackage, owned three locomotives, owned about 70 rail cars, owned a locomotive roundhouse with three stalls, and built a 184 foot long, 16 foot wide trestle platform warf into Lake Superior. The railroad acquired an 1894 35 ton Brooks Mogul railroad locomotive, the Four Spot, built for the Cranberry Lumber Company, but the engine could not handle the Split Rock & Northern RailRoad’s 4.5 percent grade, replaced the locomotive with a Climax-geared locomotive, and sold the Four Spot Mogul to the Swallow & Hopkins Lumber Company in 1901. In 1904, the officers of the railroad were William H. Gratwick, president, Clark L. Ring, first vice president, Thomas D. Merrill, secretary and general manager, Pendennis White, treasurer, M. H. Stanford, general counsel, Hans Johnson, chief engineer, and W. J. Chisholm, general superintendent, and the members of the board of directors of the railroad were W. H. Gratwick, Thomas D. Merrill, Clark L. Ring, and Pendennis White. In 1904, the railroad had capital stock of $20,000, owned three Westinghouse locomotives, and owned 62 freight cars, and employed railroad workers intermittently due to its distance from any other railroad and any population center. After processing 200 million board feet of timber, the logging company ceased operations on the Split Rock River in 1906 and the railroad operated until 1907, although the 1913 report of Railroad and Warehouse Commission of the State of Minnesota indicated that entire rail line was abandoned in 1906. Thomas Merrill established a series of logging companies in Michigan in the 1860’s and joined Clark Lombard Ring to form the Merrill & Ring Lumber Company in 1886, which was initially headquartered in Saginaw, Michigan. With the thinning of the white pine forests of the Great Lakes states in the 1890’s, and after running out of lumber in Michigan and moving to Duluth, Minnesota, the Merrill & Ring Lumber Company bought timberland near Grays Harbor, on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada, and on the northern Olympic Peninsula in Washington State. In 1902 the company moved its headquarters from Saginaw, Michigan, to Hoquiam, Washington, and centered its logging operations near the Pysht River, west of Port Angeles, Washington. William J. Chisholm (1857- ,) the son of James Chisholm and Harriet Barnum Chisholm, was born in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, acquired his early education in the schools of Canada, moved with his family to Michigan in 1868, was employed in a shingle mill in 1872, began work for the Merrill Ring Company, Incorporated, of Saginaw, Michigan, in 1872, married Mary McPeak,the daughter of Richard McPeak, in 1889, moved to Seattle, Washington, in 1907, was a member of the board of directors of the Puget Sound Scaling Bureau in 1915, was a member of the Market Extension Committee of the West Coast Lumber Manufacturers’ Association in 1915, was the vice president and general manager of the Merrill & Ring Lumber Company of Seattle, Washington, in 1916, was a Republican, was a Presbyterian, was a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, was a member of the Cascade Club of Everett, Washington, was a member of the Metropolitan Club of Seattle, Washington, was a member of the Lumbermen's Club of Seattle, Washington, was a Mason, and was a Shriner. Edwin Herbert Eddy, Sr. ( -1949) once resided in Saginaw, Michigan, married Elizabeth Hunter, subsequently resided in Duluth, Minnesota, and was an incorporator of the Lake Transit Company, a steamship company, in Duluth, Minnesota, in 1905. Edwin Herbert Eddy, Jr. (1906-1981,) the son and sole child of Edwin Herbert Eddy, Sr., and Elizabeth Hunter Eddy, was a millionaire, a virtual hermit because of a stuttering disorder, and left a substantial legacy upon his death to the University of Minnesota-Duluth to fund the study of cures for stuttering. William Henry Gratwick (1839-1899) was born in Albany, New York, was educated in the New York public schools, attended the Albany Academy, entered the office of a lumber firm as a tallyboy, organized the William H. Gratwick & Company in Albany, New York, in 1861, was the leading lumber dealer in Albany, New York, married Martha Weare of of Penn Yan, New York (1839-1916,) moved to Buffalo, New York, in 1877, established the Gratwick-White Lumber Company of North Tonawanda, New York, formed the Gratwick, Smith & Fryer Lumber Company, which owned timber tracts in Wisconsin, Michigan, and Louisiana, was very prominent in the anti-liquor crusade of 1883, the Citizens’ Reform Association, was a member of the board of trustees of the Buffalo, New York, City Cemetery in 1908, began the construction of barges for service on the Great Lakes to move lumber and other raw materials, was the president of Aetna Steamship Line, was the president of the Cleveland Steamship Line, was president of the Buffalo, New York, Y.M.C.A., was the vice-president of the Erie County, New York, Bible Society, was a member of the board of trustees of the Buffalo, New York, Homeopathic Hospital, was a member of the board of trustees of the Buffalo, New York, Orphan Asylum, was a curator at the Buffalo, New York, Fine Arts Academy, was a member of the advisory board of the Women’s Christian Association, was the vice-president of the Buffalo, New York, Liberal Club, and died of colon cancer in Buffalo, New York. Charles R. Little ( -1908) resided in Duluth, Minnesota, and was the assignee of a patent (U. S. #785,318) by Victor R. Method and Alexander W. Stewart for the invention of improvements if a reciprocating engine. Thomas Merrill (1815-1912) was born in Carmel, Maine, was educated in Maine district schools, purchased a farm in 1840, began farming and logging, traded his farm for a saw mill on the Penobscot River in Maine in 1849, sold his saw mill and came to Michigan in 1853, married Marie Benjamin of Newport, Maine, in 1853, returned to Maine intending to settle down on a farm in 1855, moved to Gratiot County, Michigan, commenced lumbering on the Pine River of Michigan in 1856 with his partner, Charles Merrill, of Detroit, Michigan, until 1860, purchased a tract of pine timber and lumbered on the Chippewa River in Michigan until 1860, formed a partnership with Cyrus Woodman of Boston, Massachusetts, and Henry Corwith of Chicago, Illinois, and purchased large tracts of pine on the Tobacco River in Michigan, in 1864, organized the Tittabawassee Boom Company for the economical handling of logs in 1864, became interested in various enterprises in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan and in Wisconsin, partnered with Abel Brockway and purchased large tracts of land in the State of Washington and in British Columbia, in 1882, was initially a Democrat, became a member of the Prohibition Party, was a Presbyterian, and died in Saginaw, Michigan. Thomas Davis Merrill (1855- ,) the son of Thomas Merrill (1815-1912) and Marie Benjamin Merrill, a Maine lumbering family, was born at Carmel, Maine, graduated from Cornell University in 1878, was an engineer, was a member of the Phi Delta Theta fraternity, was the vice-president of the Merrill & Ring Lumber Company, married Elizabeth Musgrove Croswell at Adrian, Michigan, in 1885, resided in Saginaw, Michigan, before 1896, resided in Duluth, Minnesota, after 1896, was a member of the Society of Colonial Wars in the State of Minnesota, and died in Saginaw, Michigan. Clark Lombard Ring (1862-1933,) the son of Eleazar Jesse Ring, married Elizabeth “Lizzie” Palmer Merrill (1862-1912) in 1883, joined Thomas Merrill to begin the Merrill & Ring Lumber Company in 1886, resided in Saginaw, Michigan, was a key negotiator in the consolidation of Saginaw City, Michigan, and East Saginaw, Michigan, resulting in the creation of the present City of Saginaw, Michigan, in 1890, was a partner in Green, Ring & Company, was a partner in Bliss, Merrill & Company, and was a partner in E. J. & C. L. Ring, was a patron of the American Museum of Natural History in 1911, was a member of the board of directors of the Life Insurance Company of New York City in 1908, and paid one-half of the cost of a bird species collection expedition to the Andes Mountains in 1913. Mortimer Hiram Stanford (1848-1912,) the son of Hiram A. Stanford and Phyann Richmond Stanford, was born in Brockport, New York, married Esta Bywater in 1896, was educated in the common schools of Fenton, New York, graduated from high school in Ann Arbor Mich, served in the Second Army Corps during the American Civil War from 1864 until 1865, graduated from the University of Michigan in 1871, was a member of the Beta Theta Pi fraternity, was a Genesee County, Michigan, notary public in 1872, engaged in the practice of law at Midland, Michigan, from 1872 until 1892, was the unsuccessful Democratic candidate for a Michigan House of Representatives in District 28 in 1881, was a Midland County, Michigan, notary public in 1881, was the chairman of the Democratic County Committee of Midland County, Michigan, from 1872 until 1892, was the county attorney of Midland County, Michigan, from 1875 until 1876, engaged in the practice of law at Duluth, Minnesota, after 1892, was a member of the American Bar Association, was a member of the Kitchi Garni Club, was a Mason, resided in Duluth, Minnesota, was a member of the Duluth, Minnesota, Bar Association, and also practiced corporation, real estate, and probate law in Midland, Michigan. Pendennis White (1860-1906,) the son of Alfred White, a railroad man with the Detroit & Milwaukee RailRoad, was born in Albany, New York, was educated in Detroit, Michigan, worked for a hardware store in 1874, moved to Otsego Lake, Michigan, in 1879, was employed by Gratwick, Smith & Fryer Lumber Company as a log scaler and lumber measurer in 1879, moved to Tonanwanda, New York, in 1881, was employed by the Gratwick, Smith & Fryer Lumber Company as the superintendent of a lumber mill and lumber yard from 1881 until 1883, moved to Louisiana in 1883, supervised the interests of the Gratwick, Smith & Fryer Lumber Company in Louisiana from 1883 until 1885, married Virginia Kent, the daughter of Alexander Kent, a lumber merchant, in 1883, became a partner with Laurens P. Rider in White & Rider in New York City, New York, in 1885, reformulated the firm with additional partners William C. Frost, Herbert L. White, and Guy White as White, Rider & Frost, a wholesale lumber company located in Tonawanda, New York, and New York City, New York, in 1890, was the founder and the president of the Lumber Insurance Company, was the president of the Adirondack Fire Insurance Company, was the president of Stevens, Eaton & Company of New York City, New York, was the president of the National Wholesale Lumber Deatlers’ Association, was a president of the Buffalo Club, was a member of the board of governors of the Buffalo Country Club, was a member of the Saturn Club, was a member of the Ellicott Club, was a member of the Liberal Club, resided in North Tonawanda, New York, died in an automobile-trolley car collision in Buffalo, New York, and was buried in the Forest Lawn Cemetery, Buffalo, Erie County, New York. a href="http:// www.msparchhistory.info/CapCathTNH.html" [See note for James Chisholm for 505 Holly Avenue.]

State Line, Le Roy & Austin RailRoad: The railroad was authorized by the State of Minnesota shortly after statehood in 1857. The railroad was incorporated in 1866 by Ormanzo Allen, J. S. Lowry, Sylvester Smith and others to build a railway from the Southern boundary of Minnesota to Austin, Minnesota. The railroad had capital stock of $500,000 at incorporation. Ormanzo Allen (1826-1910,) the son of Abram Allen (1799-1895) and Dorcus/Dorcas Burdick Allen (1795-1875,) was born in Alfred, Allegany County, New York, resided in Milton, Wisconsin, in 1853, was a member of Delta Upsilon fraternity in 1853, was a Seventh-day Baptist, married Eliza A. Alexander (1827-1891,) the daughter of Howard Alexander, in in Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin, in 1854, moved to Austin, Minnesota Territory, in 1856, was a lawyer, was the first county attorney of Mower County, Minnesota Territory, in 1857, was chair of the county board of commissioners of Mower County, Minnesota, in 1860, was the county auditor of Mowr county, Minnesota, from 1860 until 1865, served as a Major in the Mower County Guards (Company K of the Fourth Minnesota Volunteer Infantry,) in 1863, served as Minnesota Provost Marshal, was a resident of Austin, Minnesota, in 1868, was a notary public in 1868, was a probate court judge, died in Austin, Minnesota, and was buried at the Oakwood Cemetery, Austin, Mower County, Minnesota. J. S. Lowry resided at Austin, Minnesota. Sylvester Smith ( -1882) was born in Canada, emigrated to the United States, settled in Mower County, Minnesota, in 1855, was the county treasurer of Mower County, Minnesota, until 1869, was a member of the committee to draft a constitution for the Mower County, Minnesota, Agricultural, Horticultural & Mechanics’ Society in 1863, was a justice of the peace for Austin, Minnesota, formed the bank “Smith, Wilkin & Easton, Bankers” as a partner of J. C. Easton and W. T. Wilkins in 1869, and was associated with the Mower County Bank in 1869.

Stillwater Electric Railway Company: The railroad was incorporated and organized in 1894. The company had $25,000 in capital stock. The railroad succeeded the Stillwater Street Railway Company. In 1894, Allan Curtis was the president of the railroad and J. C. Nethaway was the secretary of the railroad. a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/MinnrrsTNH.html" [See note on Allen Curtis for the Stillwater Electric Street RailRoad.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/TNHrail2.html" [See note on John C. Nethaway for the Stillwater Electric Street RailRoad.]

Stillwater Electric Street RailRoad: The railroad in Stillwater, Minnesota, was organized in 1889, was the reorganization of a prior street railroad in 1889, owned six rail cars, operated 5.25 miles of rail trackage with heavy grades and a total of 16 curves, and had as its officers Dr. W. L. Allen, president, Thomas O. Swiney/Sweeney, vice-president, E. D. Allen, secretary and treasurer, W. K. Richardson, attorney, and J. S. Bassett, superintendent. In 1890, the management of the railroad, the street railway in Davenport, Iowa, and the street railway in Dubuque, Iowa, was consolidated together, with its general offices in Davenport, Iowa. In 1893, the railroad was placed in the hands of a receiver, W. M. Hewitt. In 1894, the railroad succeeded the Stillwater Street Railway Company, the railroad had 5.25 miles of track between Stillwater, Minnesota, and South Stillwater, Minnesota, the railroad had eight rail cars, the railroad had $75,000 in capital stock, its president was Allan Curtiss, and its superintendent was J. C. Nethaway. In 1897, the Stillwater Electric Railway ceased the operation of streetcars in Stillwater, Minnesota. In 1899, the Twin Cities Rapid Transit Company began operating streetcars in Stillwater, Minnesota. Dr. E. D. Allen was the owner of the Stillwater Street Railway Company, but eventually started to dip into the Stillwater trolley line funds to support the rail line, the Davenport Central Railway Company, in Davenport, Iowa, he owned, and the Stillwater line consequently suffered. Orris E. Lee represented the employees of the street railway in 1894 in a suit against Dr. Allen. In 1894, the sheriff under mortgage foreclosure sold the electric streetcar line for $69,120 to Allen Curtis as a trustee for the Boston, Massachusetts, bondholders. What was left of the first streetcar line was sold in 1897 to Fred Flint of Stillwater, Minnesota, who tore up the tracks, had the wires taken down, and sold everything else. The Stillwater Electric Street RailRoad reportedly was the first electric railroad in Minnesota. Dr. William L. Allen (1858- ,) the son of William Allen ( -1875,) a graduate of Williams College, a banker, and a railroad contractor, and Augusta Seabury Dorrance Allen, was born in Davenport, Iowa, graduated from Griswold College, attended the Pennsylvania Military Academy, studied medicine under Dr. W. F. Peck, graduated from the College of Medicine at the State University of Iowa in 1881, undertook special work and hospital practice in Berlin, Germany, and Vienna, Austria, from 1881 until 1883, managed a large cotton plantation in Arkansas in 1883, was on the associate editorial staff of the Iowa State Medical Reporter in 1883 and 1884, began the practice of medicine in Davenport, Iowa, in 1884, married Alice Van Patten, the daughter of John Pitney Van Patten, the vice president of the First National Bank and the president of the grocery firm of J. P. Van Patten & Company, and Dora Hartzell Van Patten, in 1885, was secretary of Mercy Hospital medical board, 1885 to 1895, was the secretary and a member of the board of trustees of the Iowa Christian Home from 1885 until 1899, was the president of the Scott County, Iowa, Medical Society in 1886, tried to devise means to improve an unsuccessful horse railway in Davenport, Iowa, was president of the Davenport Business Men's Association in 1889, discontinued the practice of medicine in 1890, was chairman of the committee on electric railways for the American Street Railway Association in 1890, was the president of the Dubuque Electric Railway, Light & Power Company in 1890, was the president of the Pres. Davenport Central Railway Company in 1890, was the secretary of the Western Electric Railway Association in 1890, was a Republican, resumed the practice of medicine in 1892, was the president of the Iowa and Illinois Central District Medical Society in 1892, was the president of the Davenport, Iowa, Academy of Natural Sciences in 1894, was a consulting physician at the Iowa Soldiers’ Orphans’ Home in 1894, was the president of the St. Luke's Hospital medical board from 1895 until 1897, was a member of the Contemporary Club of Davenport, Iowa, in 1898, was a member of the Iowa State Medical Society in 1903, was the vice president of the State University of Iowa Medical Alumni Association in 1905, was the vice president of the Tri-City Tubercular Campaign in 1907, was a member of the Committee on Charities & Beneficences of the Episcopal Church of the Diocese of Iowa in 1914, was a delegate from the Iowa State Medical Society to the American Medical Association in 1922, was elected Great Sachem of the Iowa Improved Order of Red Men in 1923, and was a member of the medical staff of St. Luke’s Hospital in Davenport, Iowa, in 1924. Dr. E. D. Allen resided in Pleasant Valley, Iowa, in 1879, and resided in Madison County, Iowa, after 1881. J. S. Bassett of Stillwater, Minnesota, purchased a Kimball piano in 1896. Orris E. Lee was the secretary of the Stillwater, Minnesota Bar Association, was a Captain in the Minnesota National Guard, was the inspector of Small Arms Practice for the First Brigade of the Minnesota National Guard, was a sharpshooter in 1885 1890-1896, and 1899-1900, was the county attorney for Washington County, Minnesota, from 1889 until 1891, was the court commissioner for Washington County, Minnesota, in 1905, and eventually became a judge. W. M. Hewitt was a Stillwater, Minnesota resident and purchased the Oshkosh, Wisconsin, Berlin, Wisconsin, and Omro, Wisconsin, electric line in 1897. W. K. Richardson (1859-1951) was a partner of Frederick P. Fish (1855-1930) in the law firm of Fish & Richardson, was a major investor in the Allen-Swiney Company of Dubuque, Iowa, was the president of the Atlantic Avenue RailRoad in Brooklyn, New York, in 1891, and was a member of the board of trustees of the Suffolk Savings Bank for Seamen and Others of Boston, Massachusetts, in 1911. Thomas Olphert Swiney (1856- ) married Florence D. Van Patten (1860- ) in 1883, was a resident of Davenport, Iowa, was a member of the Davenport, Iowa, Academy of Natural Sciences in 1886, and was the secretary of the Davenport Electric Street RailRoad Company in 1890.

Stillwater & Hastings RailRoad was incorporated and organized in 1880 by James S. Anderson, David Bronson, H. W. Cannon, E. W. Durant, I. H. Elward, R. F. Hersey, John C. Higgins, G. L. Hospes, L. A. Huntoon, Fayette Marsh, Samuel Mathews, E. McKean, John McKusick, Charles N. Nelson, John C. Nelson, S. H. Patterson, D. M. Sabin, Isaac Staples, and J. H. Townshend to build, maintain and operate one or more railways from Stillwater, Washington County, Minnesota, to Hastings, Dakota County, Minnesota. It had initial capital stock of $1,000,000 and its principal place of business was Stillwater, Minnesota. The first board of directors of the railroad were J. S. Anderson, David Bronson, E. W. Durant, R. F. Hersey, John C. Higgins, G. L. Hospes, Fayette Marsh, Samuel Mathews, Charles N. Nelson, D. M. Sabin, and Isaac Staples. The railroad ran from Stillwater, Minnesota, along the banks of Lake St. Croix around Point Douglas, Minnesota, to Hastings, Minnesota, operated until 1882, and was succeeded by the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad. James S. Anderson (1826-1885) was born in at Marshalltown, Virginia, received a common school education in Marshalltown, Virginia, moved with his family to Burlington, Iowa, in 1838, initially worked on his father’s farm, moved to Stillwater, Minnesota, in 1846, worked in the lumber business with Elias McKean from 1846 until 1849, was a partner with James D. McComb and Robert Simpson in building a large stone store in Stillwater, Minnesota, engaged in blacksmithing with Josiah Staples for a period, joined with the lumbering business of McComb, Simpson & Company in 1850, became a partner in the firm of Delano, McKusick & Company, manufacturers of blinds and sashes, in 1850, married Harriet McDonald (1832- ,) the daughter of Alexander McDonald and Mary Ann McDonald, in St. Louis, Missouri, in 1852, was a Methodist, was a Freemason, was a solo heavy logging lumberman from 1857 until 1869, was solely assigned the rights of the Stillwater Ferry Company in 1869 under Special Laws of Minnesota 1869, Chapter 126, formed a partnership with William McKusick, John G. Nelson, and Alex Johnson to create the firm McKusick, Anderson & Company in 1869, constructed a mill on the St. Croix River at Houlton, Wisconsin, was a Stillwater, Minnesota, alderman in 1873, reformulated the firm upon the retirement of William McKusick as James S. Anderson & Company in 1873, was a member of the board of directors of the Lumberman’s National Bank, formed a partnership with James S. O’Brien and John O’Brien as the logging firm Anderson & O’Brien in 1874, resided at Stillwater, Minnesota, in 1876, suffered a traumatic amputation of his right arm in a saw mill accident, and died of pneumonia shortly after the injury in Stillwater, Minnesota. Henry W. Cannon (1850-1930) was born in Delhi, New York, was educated in the private schools at Delhi, New York, attended the Delaware Literary Institute, was the teller of the First National Bank of Delhi, New York, then was employed by the Second National Bank of St. Paul, moved to Stillwater, Minnesota, in 1871, resided in Stillwater, Minnesota, married Jennie O. Curtis (1851- ,) the daughter of Gold T. Curtis( -1862,) a lawyer, and Mary Abigail Anderson Curtis in 1879, was the cashier of the Lumberman’s National Bank of Stillwater, Minnesota, from 1871 until 1884, was the secretary of the Stillwater, Minnesota, Chamber of Commerce, was a member of the board of trustees of the Savings Bank of Stillwater, Minnesota, in 1873, was the general manager and a member of the board of directors of the Stillwater Gaslight Company in 1874, was the president of the Stillwater Building Association in 1878, was the treasurer of the Stillwater Water Company in 1880, was a Presbyterian, was a Republican, was the comptroller of the currency for the U. S. federal government in Washington, D. C. from 1884 until 1886, was a vice president of the National Bank of the Republic of New York City, New York, in 1886, became the president of the Chase National Bank of New York, New York, later in 1886, was appointed to the New York, New York, Aqueduct Commission, was appointed to the U. S. Assay Commission in 1891, subsequently became the chairman of the board of directors of the Chase National Bank of New York, New York, was a member of the Union League, was a member of the Century Club, was a member of the Sons of the Revolution, was a member of the New England Society, and was a Mason. Lucius Addison “L. A.” Huntoon (1827-1881,) the son of David Huntoon (1797-1852) and Abigail M. Smith Huntoon (1797-1830,) was born in Unity, New Hampshire, moved to Vermont in 1843 with his parents, attended elementary school in New Hampshire and Vermont, moved to Indiana in 1852, moved to Illinois in 1853, returned to New Hampshire in 1856, married Ann E. Moulton (1833- ,) the daughter of the Honorable S.C. Moulton, in 1856, moved to Grand Rapids, Michigan, in 1856, then moved to Lakeland, Minnesota, in 1857, was a partner with Carlos Clement, in a general store in Lakeland, Minnesota, and, when the partnership dissolved, was a partner, with Colonel K. A. Huntoon, in a general store in Lakeland, Minnesota, was the postmaster of Lakeland, Minnesota, was the township clerk of Lakeland, Minnesota, for 12 years, was a commissioner of Washington County, Minnesota, was the superintnedent of schools of Lakeland, Minnesota, was a Republican, and served in the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Chisago County, Minnesota, Kanabec County, Minnesota, Pine County, Minnesota, and Washington County, Minnesota (Districts 2 and 22,) from 1864 until 1866 and from 1876 until 1878. Fayette Marsh (1844-1901,) the son of Perley Marsh and Sarah Eames Marsh, was born in Cold Spring, New York, resided at Stillwater, Minnesota, was a lawyer, married Emma Nelson ( -1880,) the daughter of Socrates Nelson, in 1871, was the county attorney of Washington County, Minnesota, in 1871, was the treasurer of the first Stillwater, Minnesota, fire department in 1872, was a partner, with Jasper N. Searles and John Clinton Nethaway, in the law firm of Marsh, Searles & Nethaway, married Kate Greeley (1856- ,) the daughter of Elam A. J. Greeley, in 1884, was a protégé of D. M. Sabin and a political supporter of Loren Fletcher against J. B. Gilfillan for member of the U. S. Congress from the Fourth District of Minnesota in 1884, was a developer of the public levee on Lake St. Croix , was a member of the Minnesota State Board of Medical Examiners in 1889, and was reportedly an alcoholic. Samuel Mathews (1832-1906) was born in the Miramich River area of New Brunswick, Canada, came to Stillwater, Minnesota Territory, in 1856, married Elizabeth “Eliza” Foley/Feeley in 1867, was the proprietor of Samuel Mathews & Company, was a partner with Edward Stewart in a logging company in 1866, paid amounts to settle trespasses on Wisconsin lands owned by the St. Croix & Lake Superior RailRoad in 1866 and 1867, dealt in pine lands, was in the mercantile business, was a partner, with Peter Jourdain, of the firm of Mathews & Jourdain, served 25 years as manager, receiving agent and disbursing agent of the Stillwater fire department, was a county commissioner of Washington County, Minnesota, in 1876, was a Stillwater, Minnesota, city council member in 1880, was the mayor of Stillwater, Minnesota, from 1881 until 1884, was a member of board of directors in the First National Bank of Stillwater, was an incorporator of the Burlington, Stillwater & Duluth RailRoad in 1887, was a member of the Knights Templar, and resided in Stillwater, Minnesota. Charles N. Nelson (1840-1923) was born in Denmark, emigrated to the United States, served as a clerk to the U. S. Army Quartermaster during the American Civil War, moved to Stillwater, Minnesota, in 1865, went into the lumber business in 1877, was the owner of the Charles N. Nelson Lumber Company, pursued lumbering activities in the Duluth, Minnesota-Cloquet, Minnesota area, was an incorporator and the president of the St. Louis River Lumber Company in 1880, became a life member of the Minnesota Historical Society in 1882, was a member of the board of directors of the First National Bank of St. Paul, was president of the First National Bank of Stillwater, Minnesota, in 1906, moved to Port Washington, Long Island, New York, in 1899, and died at his Winter home in Santa Barbara, California. The Charles N. Nelson Lumber Company was subsequently absorbed by the Weyerhaeuser Company. Dr. John C. Nelson (1847- ,) the son of Narcus Nelson and Helen Emilie Nelson, was born in Copenhagen, Denmark, was educated in Copenhagen, Denmark, married Hanrine E. Nelson in 1871, graduated from the College of Physicians and Surgeons in Keokuk, Iowa, in 1879, was a physician and surgeon, was the coroner of Ramsey county for two terms, was a Republican, was the vice president of the Ramsey County Medical Society, was a member of the staff of the City & County Hospital, was appointed the Danish vice-counsul in 1896, officed at the Union Block in 1907, and resided at 1944 Summit Avenue in St. Paul in 1912. Samuel H. Patterson moved to Afton, Minnesota, in 1854, built the first hotel in Afton, Minnesota, in 1856 and operated it until 1859, when the hotel was destroyed by fire, joined the Quartermaster Corps during the American Civil War, started a general store in Afton, Minnesota, with his surviving son, was the secretary of the St. Croix Valley Academy in 1866, was the postmaster of Afton, Minnesota, in 1878, and was an incorporator of the Stillwater & Hastings RailRoad in 1880. Isaac Staples (1816-1898) was born in Maine, arrived in Stillwater, Minnesota, in 1853 as a representative of eastern investors, purchased the mill originally built by Seth M. Sawyer and Alvah Heaton in 1869, was a powerful lumber baron in the St. Croix River Valley during the logging boom of the late 19th century, had massive holdings and operations in timber and sawmills, owned the St. Croix Lumber Mills, built the St. Croix Flouring Mills, became the chief proprietor, with Samuel Hersey, of land in North Peace Township, Kanabec County, Minnesota, in the years 1854 to 1857, was an investor in the St. Croix Boom Company, was also the region's most successful farmer and an important banker, was the president of the Lumbermen’s National Bank in Stillwater, Minnesota, and was bought out by Weyerhaeuser interests in 1887. James H. Townshend was a miller, was a partner in Townshend & Proctor in 1876, was a member of the Stillwater, Minnesota, city council in 1880, was a partner, with D. M. Sabin and George M. Brush, of J. H. Townshend & Company, owned the J.H. Townshend Roller Mills. a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/MinnrrsTNH.html" [See note on David Bronson for the Stillwater & St. Paul RailRoad.] [See the note for Edward W. Durant for 546 Portland Avenue.] [See note on Roscoe Hersey for 467 Portland Avenue.] [See the note for John McKusick for 546 Portland Avenue.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/MinnrrsTNH.html" [See note on Socrates Nelson for the Stillwater & St. Paul RailRoad.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/TNHrail2.html" [See note on John C. Nethaway for the Stillwater Electric Street RailRoad.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/TNHrail2.html" [See note on Dwight May "D. M." Sabin for the Wisconsin, Minnesota & Pacific RailRoad.]

Stillwater, Hastings & Rochester RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1881 by D. E. Eyre, C. H. L. Lange/Langs, J. J. Rhodes, E. Vase/Voss, and J. Yanz to survey, locate and construct a railway from some point in Stillwater, Washington County, Minnesota, Southeasterly by way of Hastings, Dakota County, Minnesota, to some point at or near Rochester, Olmsted County, Minnesota. The railroad had $150,000 in corporate stock. The principal place of business of the railroad was in Hastings, Minnesota. Daniel E. “D. E.” “Dan” Eyre (1831-1934) was born in Northamptonshire, England, emigrated with his parents to America in early youth, located at Galena, Illinois, was reared and acquired his early education at Galena, Illinois, moved to Hastings, Minnesota, in 1857, was in the dry goods trade in Hastings, Minnesota, from 1857 until 1872, was a partner in Eyre & Holmes in Hastings, Minnesota, in 1863, was a boot and shoe merchant in Hastings, Minnesota, in 1868, was a partner in the firm of Fletcher, Loring & Eyre of Minneapolis from 1872 until 1876, operated another store in Ortonville, Big Stone County, Minnesota, in a firm known as Eyre & Yanz, was mayor of Hastings, Minnesota, from 1869 until 1870, served in the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Dakota County, Minnesota (Districts 7 and 20,) from 1870 until 1873, was the treasurer of the Hastings, Minnesota, campaign for the Chicago Relief and Aid Society in 1874, was the executor of the estate of John Kennedy of Faribault, Minnesota, in 1913, and was unmarried. Charles H. L. Lange (1832- ) was born in Germany, emigrated to the United States in 1852, moved to Galena, Illinois, was employed as a book-keeper in a wholesale grocery house until 1858, married Frederica Rehse of Germany in 1853, moved to Bellevue, Iowa, operated in the general merchandise trade until 1861, organized company I of the Fifth Iowa Infantry during the American Civil War, resigned his military commission to attend to his ill wife, moved to Hastings, Minnesota, with his family in 1862, was a colonel in the 23rd Regiment of the Minnesota State Militia in 1864, was a grain dealer, was one of the principals in the firm of Kellogg & Lange, was the general freight and passenger agent employed by the Hastings & Dakota Railway in 1869, was a partner with Philander Van Auken in Van Auken & Lange in St. Paul in 1879, was an incorporator of the Dakota County Building Association in 1881, was an officer in the Masons in 1883 and 1884, and was a Mason high priest in 1885. John J. Rhodes (1837- ) was born in St. Lawrence County, New York, came with his parents to Point Douglas, Minnesota, in 1856, moved to Hastings, Minnesota, in 1857, was for some thne engaged in the merchandise and agricultural machinery business, then speculated in wheat until 1864, then entered the U. S. Army as a commissary clerk during the American Civil War, served in the military for 11 months, returned to Hastings, Minnesota, again began dealing in farm machinery in 1865, was an incorporator of the Dakota County Building Association in 1881, was a Minnesota delegate to the Convention for the Improvement of the Mississippi River and Its Navigable Tributaries in 1884, was a member of the Minnesota State Agricultural Society in 1890, representing the Hastings Union Industrial Society, and was an organizer in 1893 of a combination of coal dealers to maintain and advance the price of coal that was subject to a joint Minnesota legislative investigation. Jacob Yanz (1833- ,) the son of Philip Yantz and Elizabeth Yantz, was born in Germany, emigrated to the United States in 1844, initially settled in Indiana, moved to Minnesota, resided in Hastings, Minnesota, married Carolina Theobald (1844-1911,) established, with __?__ Bronson, a wholesale grocery business in Hastings, Minnesota, in 1865, reformulated the grocery business with his brother, Frank Yanz (1830- ) shortly after 1865, became a sole proprietor in the wholesale grocery business in 1870 when Frank Yanz opened a retail grocery, crockery, and liquor store, was a member of the citizen committee appointed by the Hastings, Minnesota, city council to award a contract to a contractor to build the city’s second firefighting water supply cisterns in 1875, resided at 284 Pleasant Avenue in St. Paul in 1887, and was a partner with Chauncey M. Griggs and Seth K. Howes in the wholesale grocery firm of Yanz, Griggs & Howes in St. Paul in 1889, and resided at 235 Goodrich Avenue in St. Paul in 1908. a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/SumEPortTNH.html"> [See notes for Chauncey Griggs for 365 Summit Avenue, 432 Summit Avenue, and 476 Summit Avenue.]

Stillwater & St. Paul Air Line RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in 1871 by James N. Castle, E. W. Durant, William McKusick, and others, to build a railway from Stillwater, Minnesota, to St. Paul. The railroad had capital stock of $500,000 at incorporation and began operations in 1871. James Nathan Castle (1836-1903) was born in Shefford, Quebec, Canada, was educated in public schools in Canada, came to Afton, Washington County, Minnesota in 1862, taught school in Afton, Minnesota, moved to Stillwater, Washington County, Minnesota in 1865, read the law for four years in the law offices of Smith & Gilman, was admitted to the practice of law in Minnesota in 1865, was a lawyer, was the county attorney for Washington County, Minnesota, in 1866, was the city attorney for Stillwater, Minnesota, in 1868, was a Democrat, served in the Minnesota State Senate representing Chisago County, Minnesota, Kanabec County, Minnesota, Pine County, Minnesota, and Washington County, Minnesota (Districts 2, 22, and 24) from 1868 until 1871 and from 1878 until 1887, represented the railroad in a land right of way condemnation action in Lehmicke v. St. Paul, Stillwater & Taylor’s Falls RailRoad, 19 Minn.464 (1873,) was a delegate to Democratic National Convention from Minnesota in 1876, was a member of the United States House of Representatives representing the Fourth District of Minnesota from 1891 until 1893, was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection to the United States House of Representatives in 1892, married Mrs. Mary Lamb, the sister of New York Congressman John R. Fellows, in 1893, was a Mason, died of heart failure in Stillwater, Minnesota, and was buried in Fairview Cemetery in Stillwater, Minnesota. William McKusick (1825-1904,) the son of Noah McKusick and Mary McKusick, the brother of Jonathan E. McKusick and John McKusick, was born in Cornish, Maine, came to Stillwater, Minnesota, in 1847, engaged in lumbering, was a Republican, served in the Minnesota Territorial House of Representatives representing Chisago County, Minnesota, Itasca County, Minnesota, and Washington County, Minnesota (District 1,) from 1853 until 1855, served in the Minnesota State Senate representing Washington County, Minnesota (Districts 1 and 22,) from 1858 until 1861 and from 1873 until 1876, served as a lieutenant and a captain in Company C of the Eighth Minnesota Infantry Regiment during the American Civil War, built a large saw mill, as part of the firm of McKusick, Anderson & Company, with James Anderson, John G. Nelson, and Alexander Johnson, at Houlton, Wisconsin, opposite Stillwater, Minnesota, in 1870, was the mayor of Stillwater, Minnesota, in 1872, was unmarried, moved to a farm at Big Stone Lake, Minnesota, in 1882, resided at Wilmot, South Dakota, and died in Stillwater, Minnesota. [See the note for Edward W. Durant for 546 Portland Avenue.]

Stillwater & St. Paul RailRoad: The railroad was authorized by the State of Minnesota shortly after statehood in 1857. The railroad was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1867 by Louis Hospes, John M. McKusick, Socrates Nelson, and others to build a railway from Stillwater, Minnesota, to St. Paul, amended its articles of incorporation in 1869 and 1870, and was organized in 1867/1870. By 1872, the Stillwater & St. Paul RailRoad connected White Bear Lake, Minnesota, and Stillwater, Minnesota, with a 12.74 mile rail line. The railroad operated until 1899 and was succeeded by the St. Paul & Dakota RailRoad. The railroad operated from White Bear, Minnesota, to Stillwater, Minnesota, and, by 1878, became an operating subsidiary of the Northern Pacific RailRoad system. In 1878, the officers of the railroad were David Bronson, president, F. V. Comfort, secretary, and E. Q. Sewall, treasurer, and the members of the board of directors of the railroad were David Bronson, Samuel M. Felton, John P. Ilsley, John McKusick, W. G. Moorhead, H. R. Murdock, and James Smith, Jr. In 1881, the officers of the railroad were David Bronson, president, H. R. Murdock, secretary, and E. Q. Sewall, treasurer, and the members of the board of directors were J. Q. Adams, David Bronson, John McKusick, H. H. Murdock, H. H. Porter, and James Smith, Jr. Samuel M. Felton was a co-trustee of the Stillwater & St. Paul RailRoad before 1882 and was replaced by John Dingee, Jr., of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1882. Jay Cooke, Jr., was associated with the railroad in 1882, co-signing issues of shares of common stock in the railroad. In 1893, the officers of the railroad were R. S. Hayes, president, and W. H. Coleman, secretary and treasurer. David Bronson (1834-1919) was born in Anson, Maine, clerked in Boston from 1850 to 1855, came to Stillwater, Minnesota, in 1855, was a sergeant in the Stillwater, Minnesota, Light Guards in 1858, was the Stillwater, Minnesota, city treasurer in 1858, married Ianthe Davis (1841-1905) in 1861, organized the Stillwater, Minnesota, Light Guards at the request of Governor Alexander Ramsey in 1862, was a partner, with Edwin Augustus Folsom and David Cover, of Bronson, Cover & Company in 1866, was a member of the Stillwater, Minnesota, lumbermen’s board of trade in 1867, was the chief engineer of the Stillwater Volunteer Fire Department in 1872, was an incorporator of the Stillwater Saving’s Bank in 1873, was the president of the Stillwater & St. Paul RailRoad in 1880, was an incorporator of the Minnesota Lumber Company in 1887, was an operator of the shoe factory at the Stillwater, Minnesota, State Prison in 1895, was the receiver of the Schulenberg, Boeckeler & Company in 1897, was appointed by Governor John Lind the president of the Stillwater, Minnesota, State Prison board of managers in 1899, was the president of the Lumbermen’s National Bank in Stillwater, Minnesota, in 1908, died in Stillwater, Minnesota, and was buried in the Fairview Cemetery, Stillwater, Washington County, Minnesota. Francis Vivian Comfort (1852-1954,) the son of Amzi W. Comfort (1814-1901) and Eliza Vanorman Comfort (1817-1884,) was born in Mineral Point Wisconsin, was educated in Portage County, Wisconsin, moved to Stillwater, Minnesota, in 1872, read the law with Judge Hollis R. Murdock, was admitted to the practice of law in Minnesota in 1878, practiced law with O. H. Comfort under the firm name of O. H. & F. V. Comfort until 1880, was a member of the law firm of Comfort, Gregory & Comfort from 1880 until 1882, was a member of the law firm of Gregory & Comfort from 1882 until 1885, married Elise T./ Eliza Teresa Hebenstreit (1859-1923) in 1883, practiced law alone from 1885 until 1886, was a member of the law firm of Comfort & Comfort from 1886 until 1887, practiced law alone from 1887 until 1894, was a member of the law firm of Comfort & Wilson from 1894 until 1897, practiced law alone after 1897, was the city attorney of Stillwater, Minnesota, was a member of the Washington Light Guards of Stillwater, Minnesota, from 1879 until 1881, was a member of the American Bar Association, was a member of the Minnesota State Bar Association, was a member of the Washington County, Minnesota, Bar Association, and was a member of the Sons of the American Revolution. John Dingee was the general counsel of the Norfolk Company, developers of Norfolk, Virginia, in 1892. John Henry Dingee was a graduate of the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy in 1829 and briefly was a partner, with his brother Charles Howard Dingee (1806-1875,) an 1826 graduate of the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy, in a firm that developed Dingees Pulmonic Remedy. John H. Dingee ( -1913) was active in the Paoli Town Association, the Tredyffrin School Board, the Great Valley Presbyterian Church, and the Paoli Presbyterian Church and purchased 100 acres of land in Paoli, Pennsylvania, along the Pennsylvania RailRoad rail line, in the late 19th Century. Samuel Morse Felton (1809-1889,) was a civil engineer, was the superintendent and engineer of the Fitchburg RailRoad from 1843 until 1851, was the president of the Philadelphia, Wilmington & Baltimore RailRoad from 1851 until 1865, was a member of the board of directors of the First National Bank of Chester, Pennsylvania, in 1864, was the president of the Pennsylvania Steel Company in 1865, was appointed by President Ulysses S. Grant as a Commissioner to inspect the Pacific railroads in 1869, took, with William G. Moorhead, a trust deed and mortgage from the Stillwater & St. Paul RailRoad in 1870, was a member of the board of directors of the Pennsylvania Canal Railway Company in 1879, was a member of the board of directors of the Philadelphia, Wilmington & Baltimore RailRoad, was a member of the board of directors of the Lehigh Coal & Navigation Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Northern Pacific RailRoad, was a member of the board of directors of the Ogdensburg & Lake Champlain RailRoad, was a member of the board of directors of the Pennsylvania RailRoad, resided in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1881, was a mortgage holder for the Pennsylvania RailRoad in 1881, and resided in New York, New York, in 1891. Louis Hospes (1809-1888) was born in Hesse-Cassel, Germany, attended school in Witzenhausen, Germany, until 1825, was a farmer until 1829, attended the University of Gottingen, Germany, then managed large farm estates, emigrated from Bremen, Germany, to the United States in 1832, moved to St. Louis, Missouri, farmed in St. Charles, Missouri, until 1840, married Eliza T./Elvira Wurdeman (1813-1898,) moved to Green County, Missouri, in 1840 and distilled alcohol, returned to St. Louis, Missouri, in 1848, was a member of the Minnesota Territorial House of Representatives representing Chisago County, Minnesota, Itasca County, Minnesota, and Washington County, Minnesota (District 1) from 1853 until 1855, was a partner with Frederick Schulenberg and A. Boeckeler in the Schulenberg-Boeckeler Lumber Company in 1856, moved to Stillwater, Minnesota, where the Schulenberg-Boeckeler Lumber Company had established a lumber mill in 1854, organized the First National Bank of Stillwater, Minnesota, in 1862, resided in Stillwater, Minnesota, in 1872, and was buried in the Fairview Cemetery, Stillwater, Washington County, Minnesota. John P. Ilsley was the chief engineer employed by the Beloit & Madison RailRoad in 1853, conducted an engineering study for the Galena & Chicago Union RailRoad in 1855, was the treasurer of the Lackawanna & Bloomsburg RailRoad in 1866, married Susan B. __?__, was the president, the land commissioner, and a member of the board of directors of the Lake Superior & Mississippi RailRoad Company in 1877, resided in St. Paul in 1877, was the president and a member of the board of directors of the St. Paul & Duluth RailRoad in 1877, was the superintendent of the Lehigh & Susquehanna RailRoad in 1888, was a member of the Art Club of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1891, was a member of the board of directors of the Philadelphia Rapid Transit Company in 1892, was a member of the board of directors of the Lynn & Boston RailRoad Company in 1892, was the president of the Brooklyn Traction Company in 1895, was the treasurer and a member of the board of directors of the Long Island Electric RailRoad in 1895, resided in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1896, was the president and a member of the board of directors of the Scranton Traction Company in 1896, and was a member of the board of trustees of the Staten Island Association of Arts and Sciences in 1909. John M. McKusick (1815-1900) was born in Cornish, Maine, operated a saw mill by Lake McKusick, was engaged in the lumbering business with McKusick, Anderson & Company of Houlton, Wisconsin, was a delegate to the 1860 Republican Party National Convention in Chicago, Illinois, was the first mayor of Stillwater, Minnesota, from 1871 until 1872, and died in Stillwater, Minnesota. Socrates Nelson (1814-1867) was born in Conway, Franklin County, Massachusetts, attended the Deerfield Academy in Massachusetts, was a merchant in Conway, Massachusetts, was a fur trader along the Illinois River and the Middle Middle Mississippi River to St. Louis, Missouri, from 1839 until 1844, was a fur trader along the Upper Middle Mississippi River up to Stillwater, Minnesota, in 1844, built the first store in Stillwater, Minnesota, in 1844, married Bertha/Betsy/Betsey D. Bartlett (1813-1885,) a widow, in Hennepin, Illinois, in 1844, purchased much of the original property in Stillwater, Minnesota, in 1845, was an original petitioner for the formation of the Minnesota Teritory in 1848, was an incorporator of the St. Croix Boom Company in 1851, was a member of the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota from 1851 until 1859, developed Baytown Township, Minnesota, in 1856, built a steam-driven lumber mill in Bayport, Minnesota, was a Democrat, was the Minnesota Territorial Auditor from 1853 until 1857, was a member of the Minnesota Senate representing Washington County, Minnesota (District 1,) from 1858 until 1861, was a member of the county board of commissioners of Washington County, Minnesota, and died in Stillwater, Minnesota. William G. Moorhead (1811-1883,) the son of William Moorhead and Elizabeth Kennedy Moorhead, was born at Moorhead's Ferry, Halifax, Pennsylvania, was the supervisor of a division for the Juniata Canal in Pennsylvania in 1828, moved to Sandusky, Ohio, returned to Pennsylvania, was the supervisor of the Alleghany Portage Railroad in 1840, founded the Washington Packet Line Company between Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, was the president of Philadelphia & Erie Railroad Company, was the United States consul and naval agent at Valparaiso, Chile, from 1846 until 1851, organized the firm of Moorhead, Whitehead & Waddington in 1848 for the purpose of supplying the California market with Chilean flour, married Sarah Cooke, was the brother-in-law of Jay Cooke, was the president of the Sunbury & Erie RailRoad in 1857, was a partner with Jay Cooke in Jay Cooke & Company, a financial firm, in 1861, was a promoter of the Pennsylvania RailRoad Company in 1864, was a member of the board of directors of the St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad in 1870, was a Presbyterian, was a member of the board of directors of the Northern Pacific RailRoad, was the namesake in 1871 for Moorhead, Minnesota. Hollis Read “H. R.” Murdock (1832-1891,) the son of Hiram Murdock (1797-1866) and Hannah Sabin Murdock (1801-1852,) was born in Gouverneur, St. Lawrence County, New York, graduated from Williams College in Massachusetts in 1854, came to Minnesota Territory in 1855, resided in Stillwater, Washington County, Minnesota, was admitted to practice of law in the Minnesota Territory in 1856, was a lawyer, married Sarah A. Rice (1831-1905) in 1857, was a member of Minnesota House of Representatives representing Washington County, Minnesota (District 22,) from 1871 until 1873, was an incorporator of the Stillwater & St. Paul RailRoad, was the secretary and a member of the board of directors of the St. Paul & Dakota RailRoad, was a member of the board of directors of the First National Bank of Stillwater, Minnesota, was a Minnesota probate court judge, was a mayor of Stillwater, Minnesota, in 1885, was a Minnesota district court judge in the First Judicial District in 1890, was a Mason, was an honorary member of the Minnesota National Guard, died of a cerebral hemorrhage in Stillwater, Minnesota, and was buried at Fairview Cemetery, Stillwater, Minnesota. Henry H. Porter (1835- ,) the son of Rufus King Porter (1794-1856) and Lucy Lee Hedge Porter (1798-1862,) was born in Machias, Washington County, Maine, attended the public schools of Machias, Maine, and the East Machias Academy, attended Phillips Academy in Andover, Massachusetts, was a clerk for the firm of Stevens & Peabody in Eastport, Maine, moved to Chicago, Illinois, in 1853, was a resident of Chicago, Illinois, was a junior clerk, claim agent, paymaster, and general ticket agent employed by the Galena & Chicago Union RailRoad from 1853 until 1859, briefly moved to Havana, Cuba, as a contractor to build a horse railroad, returned to Illinois, then was an accounting agent employed by the Michigan Southern & Northern Indiana Railroad from 1860 until 1865, married Eliza T. French, the daughter of George H. French, in 1864, became associated with an agricultural implement company at Syracuse, New York, from 1865 until 1866, became a partner of Jesse Spalding of Chicago as Spalding & Porter, a lumber company, later incorporated as the Menekaune Lumber Company, was a member of the board of directors of the First National Bank of Chicago in 1868, was a member of the board of directors of the Chicago & Rock Island Railroad in 1869, partnered with Samuel M. Nickerson in 1870 in a Michigan Upper Peninsula lumber business, was a member of the board of directors of the Chicago & North Western Railway in 1871, sold his interest in the company to Philetus Sawyer of Oshkosh, Wisconsin, in 1872, began to buy and reorganize bankrupt railroads in 1873, including the Stillwater & Taylor's Falls RailRoad, the St. Paul & Sioux City RailRoad, and the Sioux City & St. Paul RailRoad, was the president and a member of the board of directors of the Chicago, St. Paul & Minneapolis RailRoad, was a member of the board of directors of the Chicago & Eastern Illinois RailRoad, was a member of the board of directors of the Union Pacific RailRoad, was the president of the Stillwater & St. Paul RailRoad in 1881, was the president of the St. Paul & Duluth RailRoad in 1881, was a director and stockholder of the First National Bank of Chicago, Illinois, in 1884, led the merger of the North Wisconsin Railway, the West Wisconsin RailWay, and the St. Paul & Sioux city RailRoad that formed the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha RailRoad, purchased and developed the Chandler Mine in Minnesota on the Vermillion Range north of Lake Superior, and purchased the Chicago and Southwestern RailRoad and reorganizing it as the Chicago & Indiana Coal Railway in 1893. Edmund Quincy Sewall, Jr. (1828-1908,) was the son of Reverend Edmund Quincy Sewall, Sr. (1796-1866,) and Caroline Ward Sewall (1797- ,) was born in Newburyport, Massachusetts, was educated in a private school in Concord, Massachusetts, operated by Henry David Thoreau, graduated from Harvard College in 1847, was a civil engineer, married Louise Kilham Lovett Sewall (1831-1906,) the daughter of Samuel Porter Lovett and Lucy Chapman Lovett, in 1852, in Beverly, Massachusetts, resided in Germantown, Pennsylvania, in 1853, was the superintnendent of the Delaware RailRoad in 1853, resided at New Orleans, Louisiana, was the superintendent of the New Orleans, Jackson & Great Northern RailRoad,was the general superintendent of the St. Paul & Duluth RailRoad in 1880, was the comptroller of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad in 1906, and died in Lake Geneva, Walworth, Wisconsin. James K. Smith, Jr. (1815-1899,) was born in Mount Vernon, Ohio, was educated in the schools of Mount Vernon, Ohio, read the law in Lancaster, Ohio, for four years, was admitted to the practice of law in Ohio in 1839, came to Minnesota in 1854, moved to St. Paul in 1856, was a lawyer, was a Republican in 1860, served in the Minnesota State Senate representing Ramsey County (Districts 1 and 24) from 1860 until 1864 and from 1875 until 1878, was an unsuccessful Union party candidate for the Minnesota Legislature in the 1864 election, was associated with the U. S. Department of Interior’s Indian Affairs Office in 1872, was a Democrat in 1877, served in the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Ramsey County (Districts 24 and 26) from 1878 until 1885, was an attorney of the St. Paul & Duluth Railway Company, was a resident of St. Paul in 1872 and in 1892, was the president of the St. Paul & Duluth Railway Company in 1881, and was a member of the board of directors of the St. Paul & Duluth Railway Company in 1892. a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/SumEPortTNH.html"> [See note on Jay Cooke for 432 Summit Avenue.] [See note on John Quincy Adams for 3 Crocus Hill.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/MinnrrsTNH.html" [See note on Louis Hospes for the Stillwater & St. Paul Air Line RailRoad.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/SumEPortTNH.html"> [See the note for John McKusick for 546 Portland Avenue.]

Stillwater Street Railway & Transfer Company: The railroad was incorporated in 1878 under the General Laws of Minnesota 1878, was organized in 1878, operated until 1881, and was succeeded by the Union Depot, Street Railway & Transfer Company of Stillwater in 1881. The railroad constructed a 0.62 mile rail line in Stillwater, Minnesota, in 1878. Special Laws of Minnesota 1881, Chapter 101, permitted the railroad to construct piers, embankments, and a roadbed into Lake St. Croix fronted by the City of Stillwater, Minnesota, with city consent. In 1893, the railroad operated 5.5 miles of rail, was an electrified system, had seven rail cars, had as its officers W. L. Allen, president, Thomas O. Swiney, vice president, E. D. Allen, secretary-treasurer, and J. S. Barrett, superintendent, and had its main office at Davenport, Iowa. The railroad was sold to the Stillwater Electric Railway Company in 1895. Thomas O. Swiney was a member of the Davenport, Iowa, Academy of Science in 1883, was a resident of Davenport, Iowa, in 1883, and was a promoter of the Davenport Power & Light Company in 1902. a href="http:// www.msparchhistory.info/DayBluffTNH.html" [See note on William A. Allen for 700 Conway Avenue.]

Stillwater Street Railway Company/Stillwater Street RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1886 by S. Matthews and others, had capital stock of $100,000, and had its principal place of business in Stillwater, Minnesota. In 1889, the railroad, with E. S. Brown as its president, received a 30 year franchise from the City of Stillwater, Minnesota, to operate a rail line. Also in 1889, the railroad mortgaged its property to Allen Curtis of Boston, Massachusetts, in return for a loan of $60,000. In 1889, the Stillwater Street Railway became the first Minnesota electric line to apply the inventions of Frank Sprague in how the electric motors of a rail car drove the wheels. In 1891, W. M. Hewitt was the receiver of the railroad. In 1892, Allen Curtis was the trustee for the interests of the creditors in of the railroad, William M. Hewitt was the receiver of the railroad, and J. C. Nethaway was the solicitor for the receiver of the railroad. The railroad was successfully sued by a vendor with a judgment against the railroad seeking to have a receiver appointed for the railroad in St. Louis Car Company v. Stillwater Street Railway Company, 53 Minn. 129 (1893.) In 1893, W. C. Masterman was appointed the receiver of the Stillwater Street Railway Company. In 1896, the property of the railroad was sold at a sheriff’s sale to discharge debts of $3,502.40 and a $4,000 claim by Alan Curtiss was rejected by the Washington County, Minnesota, district court. The railroad was succeeded by the Stillwater Electric Railway Company in 1894. Allen Curtis (1862- ,) the son of U. S. Supreme Court Justice Benjamin Robbins Curtis (1807-1874) and Maria Malleville Allen Curtis (1831- ,) was born in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, attended Noble’s Private School in Boston, Massacusetts, attended the Polytechnic School of Dresden, Germany, graduated from Harvard University in 1884, was a stockbroker and a bondbroker after 1885, married Evelyn Weston in 1888, was a partner of E. P. Motley in the investment firm of Curtis & Motley, was a member of theboard of directors of the Bank of America in New York, New York, was a member of the board of trustees of the Provident Institution for Savings in Boston, Massachusetts, resided at Boston, Massachusetts, and at Beverley Farms, Massachusetts, in 1922, was a member of the Somerset Club, and was a member of the Exchange Club. William Martin Hewitt (1825-1918) was born in Gallatin, Illinois, moved to Scott County, Iowa, between 1850 and 1860, was a clerk in a store in 1860 and was the Superintendent of a street railway in Iowa by 1870, resided in Muscatine, Iowa, married Selinda Scott (1847- ,) was the Superintendent of the Centre City Railway in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in 1880, was a member of the board of directors of the St. Cloud Motor Line Company in 1889, was a railroad contractor, and was the Superintendent of the Stillwater Street Railway in Stillwater, Minnesota, in 1892. John C. Nethaway was a Democrat, was the Democratic Party nominee for Attorney General in 1892, withdrew as a Democratic candidate for associate justice of the Minnesota Supreme Court in 1900, was a member of the Stillwater, Minnesota, lodge of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks in 1906, was the state president of the Minnesota Elks State Association in 1906, declined to become a candidate for Grand Exalted Ruler of the Elks, was a signatory on a report on the commercial utility of a proposed waterway from Lake Superior to the Mississippi River via the St. Croix River in 1909, was county attorney for Washington County, Minnesota, from 1912 until 1913, was an Assistant Minnesota Attorney General in 1915, was a lawyer in Minnesota in 1917, was a Minnesota district court judge for the tenth district from 1916 until 1917, resided in Stillwater, Minnesota, in 1918, oversaw the distribution of relief supplies in Pine City, Minnesota, following the 1918 forest fires, and was a Minnesota district court judge for the 19th district in 1918. a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/TNHrail2.html" [See note on Edward S. Brown for the Union Depot, Street Railway & Transfer Company of Stillwater.]

Stillwater Union Depot & Transfer Company: The railroad was organized in 1888, was incorporated under the General Laws of Minnesota 1888, was placed into receivership in 1893, was sold at foreclosure to Stephen M. Crosby, trustee, in 1896, was conveyed in 1896 to the Union Depot & Transfer Company of Stillwater, paid railroad taxes to the State of Minnesota in 1897, operated until 1902, and was purchased by the Northern Pacific RailRoad. The railroad had capital stock of $500,000 and had its general office in Stillwater, Minnesota. J. C. O’Gorman was a creditor of the railroad and sued for a collection of debts in the Ramsey County District Court in 1893. E. D. Buffington was discharged as the receiver of the railroad in 1896 upon the sale of the railroad’s property and the conclusion of the receivor’s affairs. Stephen Moody Crosby (1827-1909,) the son of Judge Nathan Crosby (1798-1885) and Rebecca Marquand Crosby, was born in Salisbury, Massachusetts, prepared for college at the Boston Latin School, attended the Lowell High School, graduated from Dartmouth College in 1849, graduated from the Harvard University Law School, was admitted to the practice of law in Massachusetts in 1852, became associated with the Manchester, New Hampshire, Print Works in 1854, married Annie E. Hayden (1831- ,) the daughter of Joel Hayden and Matella Weir Smith Hayden, in 1855, became associated with the Hayden Manufacturing Company in 1857, was a Major and the paymaster in the U. S. Army during the American Civil War, was a brevet Lieutenant Colonel in the U. S. Army, was a member of the Massachusetts House of Representatives in 1869, was a member of the Massachusetts Senate in 1870 and 1871, was the president and treasurer of the Massachusetts Loan & Trust Company in 1870, resided in Haydenville, Massachusetts, in 1871, was a member of the Boston & Albany RailRoad in 1872, became associated with the Massachusetts Trust Company in 1873, was a member of the Hoosac Tunnel Commission, was an incorporator, with Anna H. Crosby and Joel Hayden, of the Hayden Foundry & Machine Company under Laws of Massachusetts 1875, Chapter 75, was a member of the Chicago & Eastern Illinois RailRoad in 1887, was the president of the Butte & Boston Mining Company, was a member of the board of trustees of the Franklin Savings Bank, was the president of the Boston Art Club from 1890 until 1899, was an incorporator of the Kansas City & Atlantic RailRoad in 1893, was the executor of the estate of Nathan Crosby, resided in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1900, was a member of the University Club of Boston, was a member of the Cincinnati Society, was a member of the Unitarian Club, initially was a Whig, subsequently was a Republican, was an incorporator of the University Club of New York, New York, was a member of the board of directors of the Minnesota Thresher Manufacturing Company in 1901, summered at Cohasset, Massachusetts, was the treasurer of the Mexico Consolidated Mining & Smelting Company in 1905, and died at Cohasset, Massachusetts. Joseph C. O’Gorman was a resident of Stillwater, Minnesota, before 1902, was the auditor and treasurer of the North Western Manufacturing & Car Company in 1887, was a founder of the Lumberman’s Association, a Minnesota and Wisconsin forest lands trust, in 1888, and was the receiver of Seymour, Sabin & Company in 1895, and resided in Minneapolis in 1902. Edwin D Buffington (1858-1931,) the son of Elwin E. Buffington and Sarah S. Gray Buffington, was a lawyer in Minnesota, married Sally Kinney (1859- ,) was the assistant secretary of the Minnesota Thresher Company from 1887 until 1888, was the secretary of the Minnesota Thresher Company from 1888 until 1890, was the secretary-treasurer of the Minnesota Thresher Company from 1890 until 1901, was the secretary, the treasurer, and the general manager of the Minnesota Thresher Company in 1901, was a trustee in 1893, with D. B. Dewey and D. N. Morgan, for investors in the North Western Manufacturing & Car Company that exchaged that common stock for common stock in the Minnesota Thresher Company under an 1886 agreement, succeeding R. F. Hersey and James H. Bouve, was the chairman of the board, the president and a member of the board of directors of the Minnesota & Wisconsin RailRoad in 1899, resided in Stillwater, Minnesota, in 1899, moved to Minneapolis in 1905, was a member of the board of governors of the Minnesota State Bar Association for the 19th district in 1916, was the attorney for the Four Lakes Rural Telephone Company in 1919, and assembled a compilation of the charter and compiled ordinances of Stillwater, Minnesota, in 1922. a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/TNHrail2.html" [See note on Dwight May "D. M." Sabin for the Wisconsin, Minnesota & Pacific RailRoad.]

Stockyards Terminal RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in 1907, was organized in 1907, operated in and about the South St. Paul, Minnesota, stock yards until 1909, and was succeeded by the St. Paul Bridge & Terminal RailRoad. The railroad operated 11 miles of rail trackage leased from the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway Company and the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railway Company running from the Southern extremity of the Union Depot Yards near Dayton’s Bluff in St. Paul to the South St. Paul, Minnesota, stockyards.

Stockyards Railway Company: The railroad operated from 1941 until the 1970's, was owned by the Saint Paul Union Stockyards Company of South St. Paul, Minnesota, and became a part of the Chicago & NorthWestern RailRoad. The St. Paul Bridge & Terminal RailRoad was a Chicago Great Western subsidiary, was renamed the Stockyards Railway Company from 1941 to 1962, and both railroads became part of the Chicago & NorthWestern RailRoad in 1968.

Superior, Balsam Lake & Southern RailRoad/Balsam Lake Railway: The railroad was incorporated in 1900 by E. W. Averman, Joseph Crane, R. F. Little, Louis Lund, P. Nelson, J. W. Park, M. C. Pederson, John A. Savage, I. Seery, W. W. Seery, A. E. Skidmore, Warren Tuttle, A. L. Wells, and C. W. Ward, to operate a 165 mile rail line from Superior, Wisconsin, to St. Paul. The railroad was organized by businessmen of Balsam Lake, Wisconsin. In 1900, the railroad had $100,000 in capital stock. J. W. Park of Balsam Lake, Wisconsin, was associated with the railroad in 1901. The organizers of the railroad unsuccessfully sued in equity the Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sault Ste. Marie RailRoad in the Wisconsin Supreme Court for specific performance in Park v. the Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sault Ste. Marie RailRoad, 114 Wis. 347 (1902) when the Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sault Ste. Marie RailRoad failed to fulfill its alleged agreement to build the rail line and absorb the railroad. Joseph Harold Crane (1841-1921,) the son of George Washington Crane and Elizabeth Gray Crane, was born in Morrow, Ohio, was a Union Army soldier during the American Civil War, resided at Green, Mecosta County, Michigan, married Mary Davis (1845-1931) in Grand Rapids, Kent County, Michigan, in 1865, resided in Michigan, moved to Iowa, moved to Ponca, Nebraska, then moved to Georgetown, Polk County, Wisconsin, in 1899, was a farmer, operated a store, was a postmaster, moved to Balsam Lake, Wisconsin, and was an incorporator of the Superior, Balsam Lake & Southern RailRoad. R. F. Little served as a First Lieutenant in Company D of the 18th U. S. Infantry during the American Civil War, was wounded at the skirmish at Hoover's Gap during the Tullahoma Campaign, and subsequently resided in Clayton, Wisconsin. John Wesley “J. W.” Park (1840-1926,) the son of Amos Park, was born in Ohio, married Philora Hamond/Hammond (1842-1901,) came to Balsam Lake, Wisconsin, in 1881, invested in a saw mill, a grist mill, the Pioneer Store with post office, water power, and extensive land in Balsam Lake, Wisconsin, was a miller in Balsam Lake, Wisconsin, was the chairman of the board of supervisors of Balsam Lake Township, Wisconsin, in 1887, in 1888, in 1890, and from 1893 until 1897, was a member of the board of supervisors of Balsam Lake Township, Wisconsin, from 1905 until 1908, and was a member of the board of directors of the Superior, Balsam Lake & Southern RailRoad. M. C. Pederson was a member of th first board of supervisors of Luck, Wisconsin, in 1869, was a member of the Polk County, Wisconsin, board of county supervisors in 1904, and was a member of the building committee for the Polk County, Wisconsin, Training School at St. Croix Falls, Wisconsin, in 1904. I. Seery, a resident of St. Croix Falls, Wisconsin, was a member of the board of directors and an investor in the State Bank of Centuria, Wisconsin, in 1903 and 1906. Seery & Messer, a heading manufacturer at St. Croix Falls, Wisconsin, was established in 1886 and Seery & Company, a lumber manufacturer at St. Croix Falls, Wisconsin, was established in 1894. Willard Wickham “W. W.” Seery (1851- ,) the son of Peter Seery (1818-1907) and Margaret Ann Pennington Seery (1818- ,) was born in Lykens, Crawford County, Ohio, was educated in the public schools of Ohio, farmed until 1886, married Elizabeth E. Burton in Ohio in 1872, moved to St. Croix Falls, Wisconsin, in 1886, moved to Lykens/Balsam Lake, Polk County, Wisconsin, operated a general merchandise store and lumber business in Lykens, Wisconsin, manufactured barrel heads at Frederic, Wisconsin, for the Cooperative Barrel Company of Minneapolis in 1904, established a combined hoop and saw mill at Frederic, Wisconsin, in 1905, was a member of the Frederic, Wisconsin, town board of supervisors, resided in Frederic, Wisconsin, in 1909, was a Republican, and was the mayor of Frederic, Wisconsin, in 1909. A. E. Skidmore was the chairman of Lorain Twonship, Polk County, Wisconsin, from 1899 until 1900. Warren Tuttle married Cynthia Smith (1852-1944,) the daughter of Solomon Philander Smith (1810-1853) and Clorinda Pickell/Pickle/Chloranda Pickel Smith (1818-1912,) resided in Balsam Lake, Wisconsin, was a member of the Mississippi Gun & Rod Club in 1891, and later married Helen __?__. C. W. Ward was a founder, with George Griffin and J. A. Saxton, of the Clear Lake Telephone Company in 1907 and was the vice president of, a member of the board of directors of, and an investor in the Peoples Bank of Clear Lake, Wisconsin, in 1910. A. L. Wells was a medical doctor and health officer in Clear Lake, Wisconsin, in 1903 and was a vice president of the Barron-Polk-Rusk County Medical Society in 1907. The Cooperative Barrel Company of Minneapolis was organized in 1874, expanded to manufacture butter tubs before 1918, had 26 cooper members in 1918, and was purchased by the North Star Barrel Company in 1918, which had 34 cooper members before the purchase.

Superior Belt Line & Terminal Railway Company: The railroad was organized in 1890, was incorporated in Wisconsin as the Superior Terminal & Belt Line Railway Company, and was established for the purpose of constructing a railway line in and around the Superior, Wisconsin. In 1889, the railroad was sold to __?__ Hale and subsequently was conveyed to the Consolidated Land Company. The railroad changed its name in 1891. In 1891, the railroad became the successor to the Duluth, Red Wing & Southern RailRoad to the authority under 1891 Congressional legislation to build a bridge over the St. Louis River 12 miles up river from Superior, Wisconsin. In 1891, the Duluth & Winnipeg RailRoad entered into an agreement with the Superior Belt Line & Terminal Railway Company to use the belt line’s 12 rail line from New Duluth, Minnesota, to Allouez Bay, Wisconsin, where the Duluth & Winnipeg RailRoad built an ore dock. The railroad became insolvent in 1893. In 1893, the Canadian Pacific RailRoad closed a deal to purchase the North Star Construction Company and the Superior Belt Line & Terminal Railway. The railroad had all of its properties sold to the Northwestern Coal Railway Company in 1894, was substantially acquired by the Great Northern RailRoad in 1899, operated until 1900, when its properties were sold to the Eastern Railway Company of Minnesota and to the Duluth, Superior & Western Terminal Company, and was succeeded by the Eastern Railway Company of Minnesota and by the Duluth, Superior & Western Terminal Company. J. H. Gruber was the secretary of the Superior Belt Line & Terminal Railway Company from 1898 until 1900, was a member of the board of directors and the secretary of the Duluth, Mississippi River & Northern RailRoad Company in 1899, was a member of the board of directors and the secretary of the Duluth, Superior & Western Terminal Company in 1902 and 1905, was the land commissioner for the Eastern Minnesota Railway in 1902, was the secretary of the Missabe Land Company, was the secretary of the Great Northern Iron Ore Properties, was the Great Northern Railway Company's secretary for iron ore properties, and was the secretary of the Swan River Logging Company.

Superior & Northwestern RailRoad: The railroad was authorized by the Minnesota Legislature shortly after statehood in 1857. The railroad was incorporated in 1871 by E. W. Anderson, Jr., Edmund Rice, H. S. Walbridge, and others to construct and operate a railway from a point on the Eastern boundary of the State along the rail line of the Superior & St. Croix RailRoad to the junction of the North Pacific RailRoad and the Lake Superior & Mississippi RailRoad rail lines and thence to the outlet of the Lake of the Woods on the Northern State boundary. The railroad had initial capital stock of $5,000,000. The railroad was organized in 1871. The railroad built a nine mile stretch of rail trackage that connected the Superior & St. Croix RailRoad with the Northern Pacific RailRoad, which became owned by the Superior & St. Croix RailRoad in 1873. a href= "http:// www.msparchhistory.info/MinnrrsTNH.html " [See note on E. W. Anderson, Jr, for the Lake Superior & Pacific RailRoad.] [See note for Edmund Rice for 194 McBoal Street.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/MinnrrsTNH.html" [See note on Horace S. Walbridge for the Superior & St. Croix RailRoad.]

Superior & Pacific RailRoad: The railroad was authorized by the Minnesota Legislature shortly after statehood in 1857. The railroad was incorporated in 1870 by E. W. Anderson, George W. Cass, James Stinson, and others to construct and operate a rail line from a point along the line of the Superior & State Line RailRoad in Wisconsin, to a point along the line of the Northern Pacific RailRoad. The railroad was organized in 1871 and had capital stock of $500,000. E. W. Anderson, Jr. (1822-1875,) moved to Superior, Wisconsin, in 1855, was the owner of the Superior, Wisconsin, Times and a real estate developer, was the Superior, Wisconsin, superintendent of schools in 1857, was the town treasurer of Superior, Wisconsin, in 1858, was a corporal in the Superior, Wisconsin, home guard in 1863, operated the Superior Land Agency, married Sarah "Sallie" Buzby Dolby Newton (1827-1906,) the daughter of Samuel Dolby and Sarah Ann Summers Dolby (1804-1880) and the widow of John Milton Newton (1827-1860,) in 1870, was the agent for the Allan Steamship Line in 1874, sold the Times in 1875, was the treasurer of the Nemadji Cemetery Board, died of pneumonia, and is buried in Woodlawn Cemetery, Douglas County, Wisconsin. James Stinson (1828-1917,) the son of Thomas Stinson, was from a banking family from Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, was a Chicago, Illinois, land dealer, millionaire, and horse breeder, was an early investor in the City of Superior, Wisconsin, in the 1850’s, was a member of the board of directors of the Northern Pacific RailRoad in 1865, was heavily involved in real estate in St. Paul, was the largest land owner in Ramsey County in the 19th Century, donated a strip of land in NorthEast Minneapolis to the Minneapolis Park Board in 1885, was engaged in the banking business in Canada, and went insolvent in 1900. a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/TNHrail2.html" [See note on George Washington Cass for the Western RailRoad Company of Minnesota.]

Superior & St. Croix RailRoad: The railroad was organized under Wisconsin Private and Local Laws 1870, Chapter 326, was incorporated by Solon H. Clough, I. W. Gates, and Hiram Hayes, to build and operate a railroad from a point on the Bay of Superior through Douglas County, Wisconsin, Burnett County, Wisconsin, Polk County, Wisconsin, St. Croix County, Wisconsin, and Pierce County, Wisconsin, by way of St. Croix Falls, Wisconsin, and Hudson, Wisconsin, to Prescott, Wisconsin, and thence to Minneapolis or St. Paul, and also along the north side of the Nemadji River to the Minnesota state line, and had initial capital stock of $350,000. William R. Smith was the chair of the first board of trustees, Solon H. Clough was its first vice president, and Hiram Hayes was its first secretary. Walbridge & Sargeant was the original contractor building the rail line. The railroad was embroiled in controversy over a Douglas County, Wisconsin, purchase of $350,000 in capital stock through a county bond issue and the relationship of the railroad with the Ohio railroad contractor Walbridge Brothers & Sargent in 1872. John H. Sargent, Horace S. Walbridge, and Herman D. Walbridge acquired the charter of the railroad in 1870. In 1872-1873, some location, grading, tie acquisition, and preliminary bridge-building activities were undertaken on the part of the railroad, including nine miles located in Minnesota. In subsequent litigation, Douglas County, Wisconsin, recovered $275,000 of the money it contributed to the railroad. In 1873, Hiram Hayes was the secretary and the acting treasurer of the railroad. E. D. Adams acquired the entire capital stock of the railroad in 1895. Laws of Wisconsin 1895, Chapter 244, amended the railroad’s charter and expressly confirmed the power of the railroad to use eminent domain. The railroad's charter was also used in the reorganization/renaming of the Northern Pacific RailRoad in 1896 because the railroad’s charter was more expansive with respect to financing and expenditures than that of the original charter of the Northern Pacific RailRoad. J. P. Morgan bought the Superior & St. Croix RailRoad, renamed the Superior & St. Croix RailRoad as the Northern Pacific Railway Company, and then had the renamed railroad purchase the Northern Pacific RailRoad in 1896. The railroad had its name changed to the Northern Pacific Railway Company in 1896 as part of a foreclosure and reorganization, although it was still operating as the Superior & St. Croix RailRoad in 1900 when it contracted for the construction of a rail line between Superior, Wisconsin, and St, Croix Falls, Wisconsin, to link the Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic RailRoad with the Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sault Ste. Marie RailRoad. Edward Dean Adams (1846-1931,) the son of Adoniram Judson Adams and Harriet Lincoln Norton Adams, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, graduated from the Chauncy Halll School of Boston, Masachusetts, attended the Massachusetts Institute of Technology as a member of the class of 1869, married Frances Amelia Gutterson in 1870 in Boston, Massachusetts, received a bachelors degree, a law degree and a masters degree from Norwich University in Vermont, was a bookkeeper for T. J. Lee & Hill, stockbrokers, in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1866, was a partner in the firm of Richardson, Hill, & Company in Boston, Massachusetts, from 1870 until 1878, was a partner in the firm of Winslow, Lanier & Company in New York, New York, from 1878 until 1893, was a banker, was the vice president of the St. Paul & Northern Pacific RailRoad Company from 1883 until 1887, was the president of the Niagara Junction RailRoad Company from 1892 until 1899, was the president of the Chicago Terminal Transfer RailRoad Company from 1897 until 1901, was the president of the Northern Pacific RailRoad in 1898, was a member of the board of directors of the Edison Companies in 1882, was the president of the Cataract Construction Company from 1890 until 1909, represented Deutsche Bank of Berlin, Germany, in New York from 1893 until 1914, was a member of the board of directors of the Allis-Chalmers Company after 1901, was the president of the Bullock Electric Manufacturing Company after 1904, was a member of the board of directors of the Empire Engineering Company after 1905, was a associate member of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers in 1909, resided at 455 Madison Avenue in New York, New York, in 1909, was a member of the board of directors of the Carolina, Clinchfield & Ohio RailRoad Company from 1911 until 1915, was a member of the board of directors of the Denver & Rio Grande RailRoad Company from 1911 until 1916, was a member of the board of directors of the Western Maryland Railway Company after 1911, was a member of the board of directors of the American Committee for devasted France during World War I, and died of pneumonia following a Florida automobile accident in New York in 1931. Solon Huntington Clough (1828-1910,) the son of Hamilton Clough (1803-1879) and Parmelia Tucker (1809- ,) was born in Madison County, New York, attended New York common schools,attended Fulton Academy, attended Hamilton College, was a member of the Sigma Phi fraternity, taught school in the South from 1847 until 1850, returned to New York in 1850, married Katherine/Catherine Eliza Taylor (1828-1902) in 1851 in Fulton, New York, read the law in Fulton, New York, was admitted to the practice of law in Oswego County, New York, moved to Wisconsin in 1857, settled in Hudson, Wisconsin, was a law partner of Henry C. Baker, moved to Polk County, Wisconsin, in 1864, was a judge of the 11th Circuit Court of Wisconsin from 1862 until 1874 and from 1882 until 1889, moved to Superior, Wisconsin, in 1869, returned to Hudson, Wisconsin,in 1876, was a law partner of Hiram Hayes in Clough & Hayes, returned to Superior, Wisconsin, in 1880, moved to San Diego, California, in 1894, and died at La Mesa, San Diego County, California. Irvin Willard Gates (1822-1898,) the son of Joel Gates and Eliza “Lizia” Whitcomb Gates, was born in Hancock, New Hampshire, attended Neww Hampshire schools, moved to Troy, Ohio, in 1843, was a school teacher, married Abigail Ann “Abby” Buckminster (1820-1854) in 1844, moved to Loganport, Indiana, in the 1850’s, taught at the Loganport, Indiana, Academy, married Lizzie Wilder, married Mary Ellen Wilder ( -1914,) the daughter of Burt Green Wilder and Mary Field Wilder, of Keene, New Hampshire, an 1855 graduate of Mount Holyoke College, in 1857, moved to Superior, Wisconsin, in 1857, was an incorporator of the Bank of Superior, Wisconsin, in 1862, was an elder of the Presbyterian Church, was associated with the Superior, Wisconsin, public schools, taught for 30 years, was the Douglas County, Wisconsin, school district superintendent, was the first president of the Superior, Wisconsin, Free Library Board, was a Republican, was a county probate court judge, was a stockholder in the Bank of Commerce of West Superior, Wisconsin, in 1890, was a shareholder in the Bank of West Superior, Wisconsin, in 1896, and was buried in the Nemadji Cemetery, Superior, Douglas County, Wisconsin. Colonel Hiram Hayes (1831-1918) was born in Maine, graduated from Bowdin College in 1851, moved to Superior, Wisconsin, in 1854, and died in Superior, Wisconsin. John H. Sargent (1814-1893,) the son of Levi Sargent, was born at Carthage, New York, moved with his family to Monroe, Michigan, in 1817, moved with his family to Cleveland, Ohio, in 1818, lived in New Hampshire from 1823 until 1833, returned to Cleveland, Ohio, in 1833, graduated from Norwich University in 1839, was the assistant engineer employed by the Ohio RailRoad from 1839 until 1843, was the resident engineer employed by the Cleveland to Columbus RailRoad from 1845 until 1847, was the division engineer employed by the Michigan, Southern & Northern Indiana RailRoad, was engaged in Cleveland, Ohio, in engineering and works of public utility after 1855, was a Democrat, was a member of the civil engineers’ club of Cleveland, Ohio, and was associated with the Cleveland Loop-Line RailRoad in 1889. Herman/Heman D. Walbridge (1829-1899,) the son of Chester Walbridge (1791-1860) and Mary Walbridge Walbridge, was born in Syracuse, Onondaga County, New York, came to Toledo, Ohio, in 1833, married Lillian Elizabeth Walbridge (1847- ,) was an unsuccessful candidate for commissioner of the common schools of the First Ward of New York, New York, in 1863, was an incorporator, a member of the board of directors, and the vice president of the Electric Brick Company of Washington, D. C., was a principal in the contracting firm of Walbridge Brothers & Sargent, was an owner of the Toledo Newspaper Company, was a trustee of the American & European Crystalized Egg Company of New York, New York, in 1876, was an incorporator of the Drawbaugh Telephone & Electrical Appliance Companyof Washington, D. C., in 1897, was engaged in real estate development in Washington, D. C., and died in Washington, D. C. Horace S. Walbridge (1828-1893,) the son of Chester Walbridge (1791-1860) and Mary Walbridge Walbridge, was born in Syracuse, Onondaga County, New York,moved to Columbus, Ohio, in 1831, moved to Toledo, Ohio, in 1833, attended the Toledo, Ohio, public schools, became a clerk for Stephen Marsh in 1840, then was a clerk with Charles G. McKnight, moved to Palmyra, Michigan, in 1842, was a clerk in the store of Walter A. Titus & Company, superintended the construction of a sawmill at Ottawa Lake, Michigan, in the Winter of 1845-1846, returned to Toledo, Ohio, was an employe of Thomas Watkins in the forwarding and commission business, took charge of the business of P. Buckingham & Company of Toledo, Ohio, from 1852 until 1857, married Isabella Davis Watkins (1831-1909,) the daughter of Thomas W. Watkins and Mary Davis Watkins, in New Bedford, Massachusetts, in 1857, became a partner with Matthew Brown and Frank J. King in the commission house of Brown, Walbridge & King in 1857, which became Brown, Walbridge & Company and still later became H. S. Walbridge & Company, was a principal in the contracting firm of Walbridge Brothers & Sargent, was a Republican, was a member of the Toledo, Ohio, city council, was president of the Lincoln Club of Toledo, Ohio, in 1864, was president of the Grant Club of Toledo, Ohio, in 1868, took part in the construction of the Toledo & Woodville Railroad, was the president of the the Toledo & Woodville Railroad, was an unsuccessful Republican candidate for the Ohio State Senate in 1879, was the manager of the Maumee Rolling Mill in 1882, was the vice president of the Toledo Gas Light & Coke Company, was the president of the Western Electric Light & Power Company, was a shareholder in the Farrel Foundery & Machine Company in 1895, was the president of the Woodlawn Cemetery Association, was a member of the board of directors of the Superior Consolidated Land Company in Superior, Wisconsin, was a member of the Toledo, Ohio, board of elections, was a founder of the Trinity Protestant Episcopal Church of Toledo, Ohio, was prominent in the organization and maintenance of the Protestant Orphans' Home of Toledo, Ohio, was associated with the Home for Friendless Women of Toledo, Ohio, was associated with the Protestant Hospital of Toledo, Ohio, was president of the Toledo, Ohio, Society for the Suppression of Vice, and died in Toledo, Ohio.

Superior Short Line RailRoad: The railroad was was incorporated under Wisconsin law in 1884, had initial capital stock of $250,000, was organized in 1885, constructed a 6.30 mile rail line from the Superior Short Line Junction, Minnesota, to West Superior, Wisconsin, in 1884, the 0.58 mile Superior, Wisconsin, Street line, in 1884, and the 1.59 mile Connors Point, Wisconsin, line, in 1884, and reorganized under an act of consolidation with the Superior Short Line Railway Company of Minnesota in Minnesota and in Wisconsin in 1895. The railroad was succeeded by the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha RailRoad in 1895.

Superior Short Line Railway Company of Minnesota: The railroad was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1885 and was organized in 1886 by H. P. Barlow, C. A. Cross, J. D. Howe, J. M. Whitman, and E. W. Winter to build, maintain and operate a railway from the Eastern boundary of the State on the St. Louis River or on St. Louis Bay near Duluth, Minnesota, northwesterly to the Northern boundary of the State in Kittson County, Minnesota, and various branch lines. It had initial capital stock of $4,500,000 and its principal place of business was in St. Paul. The railroad connected at the Wisconsin-Minnesota border on the St. Louis River bridge with the Superior Short Line Railway Company, incorporated under Wisconsin law in 1884 and operating in Douglas County, Wisconsin, and that railroad, in turn, connected with the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha RailRoad. In 1886, the officers of the railroad were E. W. Winter, president, John D. Howe, vice president, and E. E. Woodman, secretary and treasurer, the members of the board of directors of the railroad were John D. Howe, W. H. Phipps, J. W. Whitman, E. W. Winter, and E. E. Woodman, and the general and principal offices of the railroad were in Hudson, Wisconsin. The railroad constructed a 2.60 mile rail line from Rice's Point, Duluth, Minnesota, to the St. Paul & Duluth RailRoad connection in Duluth, Minnesota, in 1886 and operated until 1895, when it consolidated with the Wisconsin company as the Superior Short Line Railway Company and that company was succeeded by the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha RailRoad. In 1896, the railroad had 10.88 miles of main rail line between Duluth, Minnesota, and Superior, Wisconsin (2.60 miles of track from the former Minnesota Superior Short Line Railway Company and 8.28 miles of track from the former Wisconsin Superior Short Line Railway Company,) and 33 miles of side trackage in and about Superior, Wisconsin. H. P. Barlow resided in Hudson, Wisconsin, in 1886, was a member of the board of directors of the Sault Ste. Marie & South Western Railway Company in 1892, resided in St. Paul in 1908, was the assistant right of way commissioner of the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha RailRoad in 1908, was a member of the general traffic committee of the Shippers’ Association in 1910, was an alderman in Baraboo, Wisconsin, in 1912, resided in St. Paul in 1920, and was employed as the right of way commissioner of the Great Northern RailRoad in 1920. Charles A. Cross was a circuit court reporter in Hudson, Wisconsin, in 1893, in 1905, and in 1909, was a lawyer who resided in Hudson, Wisconsin, in 1917, and was the city attorney for Hudson, Wisconsin, in 1920. John D. Howe read the law with Judge Hitchcock in Winsted, was admitted to the practice of law in 1866 in Winsted, Litchfield County, Connecticut, moved to St. Paul after 1866, was a lawyer, resided at St. Paul in 1886, was the solicitor of the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha RailRoad in 1886, and was a member of the board of directors of the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha RailRoad and of the Menomonie RailRoad in 1886. William Henry Phipps (1846-1924,) the son of William Phipps and Elizabeth Tappan Phipps, was born in Leamington, England, emigrated to the United States in 1855, came to Manitowoc, Wisconsin, with his parents in 1855, remained in Manitowoc, Wisconsin, until 1871, was employed in the state treasurer's office in Madison, Wisconsin, from 1871 until 1874, married Frances E. Van Bergen ( -1935) in 1873, was placed in charge of the land grant in 1875, was subsequently appointed land commissioner of the North Wisconsin Railroad Company, moved to Hudson. Wisconsin, in 1876, was supervisor from Hudson, Wisconsin, on the County Board in 1885 and 1886, was the president of the city council of Hudson, Wisconsin, for three years, was the mayor of Hudson, Wisconsin, after 1889, was the land commissioner of the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis and Omaha RailRoad until 1894, became a member of the board of directors of the First National Bank of Hudson, Wisconsin, served on the Hudson Park Board, served on the Hudson Public Library Board, was a Republican, was elected to the Wisconsin Senate in 1890, was the land commissioner of the Northern Pacific Railway Company from 1894 until 1904, dealt in land and the manufacture and sale of lumber after 1904, was elected president of the First National Bank of Hudson, Wisconsin, in 1907, was a Mason, and was a Presbyterian. John M. Whitman was the treasurer of the Brunswick & Florida RailRoad in 1864, was the receiver and the general manager of the Chicago & Pacific RailRoad, was a member of the board of directors of the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railroad in 1886, was the general superintendent of the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railroad from 1887 until 1899, was the general manager of the Chicago & North-Western Railway in 1889, was the general manager of the Toledo & North-Western Railway in 1889, was a member of the board of directors of the Sioux City & Pacific RailRoad Company in 1898, became the fourth vice president of the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railroad in 1899, and was the vice president and a member of the board of directors of the Lee County Railway Company in 1911. [See note on Edwin Wheeler Winter for 415 Summit Avenue.] a href=" http:// www.msparchhistory.info/SAlbTNH.html " [See note on E. E. Woodman for 772 Lincoln Avenue.]

Superior & Southwestern RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in 1875 by Horace Austin, H. S. Berg, J. W. Blake, N. P. Clark, Charles F. Crosby, C. A. Gilman, Henry Hill, W. Merz, and H. C. Wait to build and operate a railway from a point along the Lake Superior & Mississippi RailRoad Westerly by way of St. Cloud, Minnesota, to the Western boundary of the State. It had initial capital stock of $1,500,000 and its principal place of business was St. Cloud, Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1876. Halvor Sigurson Berg (1843-1919,) the son of Sigurd Halvorsen Moen and Gunhild Olsdatter Houg, was born as Alva B. Alberdt in Saude, Telemark, Norway, immigrated to the United States with his family in 1853, initially resided in Boone County, Illinois, moved to Fillmore County, Minnesota, in 1856, served in Company I of the 11th Minnesota Regiment from 1864 until1865 during the American Civil War, changed his name to Halver S. Berg in 1869, married Thorborg Knudsdatter Rollefson (1852- ,) the daughter of Knud Rollefson Odegaard and Susanne Viveka Syfrestad, at Pilot Mound Township, Fillmore County, Minnesota, in 1872, moved to Stony Run, Yellow Medicine County, Minnesota, later in 1872, was a farmer, was a county commissioner of Yellow Medicine County, Minnesota, in 1873 and 1874, was a member of the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Lac Qui Parle County, Minnesota, Lyon County, Minnesota, Redwood County, Minnesota, and Yellow Medicine County, Minnesota, (Dustrict 37,) from 1874 until 1876, was a Lutheran, helped establish the Bergens Church of the Norwegian Synod in Yellow Medicine County, Minnesota, was a township supervisor for Stony Run, Yellow Medicine County, Minnesota, was the secretary of the Yellow Medicine County, Minnesota, school district, was a judge of probate court in Yellow Medicine County, Minnesota, from 1883 until 1888, applied for an invalid pension based on his military service during the American Civil War in 1887, moved to Granite Falls, Yellow Medicine County, Minnesota, in 1916, and died of heart trouble in Granite Falls, Yellow Medicine County, Minnesota,. John Winslow “J. W.” Blake (1840-1903) was born in Foxcroft, Piscatiquis County, Maine, attended Milton Academy, Wisconsin, from 1855 until 1858, graduated in engineering from the University of Wisconsin, was a civil engineer, served in Company E of the Fourth Wisconsin Cavalry during the American Civil War, married Florence Elsie Emery (1845- ,) the daughter of James Scammon Emery (1813-1868) and Eliza Ann Wing Emery (1811-1899,) in Hampden, Penobscot, Maine, in 1867, returned to Jefferson, Wisconsin, in 1865 and engaged in the lumber business in company with W. G. Ward, came to Minnesota in 1871, moved to Marshall, Minnesota, in 1872, was employed as a civil engineer by the Chicago & Northwestern RailRoad in 1872, was an incorporator of Marshall, Lyon County, Miinnesota, was a Congregationalist, was the Lyon County, Minnesota, surveyor, operated a grist mill with the largest windmill in the state in 1879, was a Republican, was a member of the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Lac Qui Parle County, Minnesota, Lyon County, Minnesota, Redwood County, Minnesota, and Yellow Medicine County, Minnesota, (Dustrict 37,) from 1872 until 1874, was a member of the Minnesota Senate representing Brown County, Minnesota, Lac Qui Parle County, Minnesota, Lyon County, Minnesota, Redwood County, Minnesota, and Yellow Medicine County, Minnesota, (Dustrict 37,) from 1874 until 1877, was a member of the Minnesota Senate representing Lincoln County, Minnesota, Lyon County, Minnesota, and Yellow Medicine County, Minnesota, (Dustrict 16,) from 1882 until 1887, died in Dalton, Georgia and was buried in Marshall, Minnesota. Nehemiah P. Clark (1836- ) was born in Worcester County, Massachusetts, attended school in Kentucky, was a store clerk at Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, in 1853, married Caroline Elizabeth Field (1840- ,) the daughter of Ozias Field and Caroline Elizabeth Whiting Field, in 1860, was a business partner of his brother-in-law, T. C. McClure, in the 1860’s in investing in Minnesota forest land, was a partner of Peter Seims, Russell Blakeley, and Cephas W. Carpenter in the Northwestern Express & Transportation Company, the successor of the Minnesota Western Express Company, in 1877, was an incorporator of the Mankato & St. Cloud RailRoad in 1879, was a banker in St. Cloud, Minnesota, resided in St. Cloud, Minnesota, in 1884 and in 1889, received numerous awards for his short horn cattle from the Wisconsin State Agricultural Society in 1884, was the president of the Minnesota State Agricultural Society in 1886, received numerous awards for his Clydesdale horses at the Minnesota State Fair in 1889, and received numerous awards for his Clydesdale horses from the Iowa State Agricultural Society in 1899. Charles F. Crosby (1847-1889,) the son of Elisha F. Crosby, was born in Waterloo, Jefferson County, Wisconsin, was educated at the Bronson and Kilbourn Institutes, read the law with Jonathan Bowman in Kilbourn City, Wisconsin, was admitted to the practice of law in Wisconsin in 1870, moved with his family to Dell Prairie, Adams County, Wisconsin, in 1871, moved to Minnesota in 1872, was a lawyer, married Adassah C. Spencer in Benton, Kennebec County, Maine, in 1873, was the Rock County, Minnesota, county attorney, was the Rock County, Minnesota, county judge, resided in Luverne, Minnesota, in 1874, served in the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Cottonwood County, Minnesota, Jackson County, Minnesota, Murray County, Minnesota, Nobles County, Minnesota, Pipestone County, Minnesota, and Rock County, Minnesota (District 38,) from 1874 until 1876, moved to Wausau, Wisconsin, in 1875, practiced law in Wausau, Wisconsin, was the Wasau, Wisconsin, District Attorney in 1878, served in the Wisconsin State Senate from 1881 until 1882, later served as a justice of the peace, was a Mason, and died in Wausau, Wisconsin. Henry Hill (1829-1879) was born in Conway, New Hampshire, acquired an academic education, went to Ohio in 1850, taught school and read the law in Ohio, was admitted to the practice of law in Ohio in 1854, came to Minnesota in 1855, began the practice of law at Minneapolis in 1855, married Mary Mills in 1858, moved to the western part of Minnesota in 1862, initially resided at Glencoe, Minnesota, was on the frontier during the U. S.-Dakota War, settled at Granite Falls, Minnesota, in 1871, laid out Granite Falls, Minnesota, built the first dam across the Minnesota River, erected a mill and began manufacturing flour and lumber, was also in real estate business, held numerous local offices, was the receiver at the U. S. Land Office at Greenleaf, Minnesota, was the Chippewa County, Minnesota, county attorney, served in the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Carver County, Minnesota, Kandoyohi County, Minnesota, McLeod County,l Minnesota, Meeker County, Minnesota, Monongalia County, Minnesota, and Wright County, Minnesota (Districts 6 and 40,) from 1864 until 1866 and from 1873 until 1875, died at Lead City, Dakota Territory, and was buried in the Mount Moriah Cemetery, Deadwood, Lawrence County, South Dakota. W. Merz (1835- ) was born in Germany, came to Minnesota Territory in 1856, was a farmer, served in the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Stearns County, Minnesota (Districts 31 and 40,) from 1874 until 1876, and from 1888 until 1891, and was designated a bridge commissioner for the building of a bridge over the Sauk River at Cold Springs, Minnesota, by Special Laws of Minnesota 1885, Chapter 69. Henry Chester “H. C.” Waite/Wait (1830-1912) was born in Rensselaerville, New York, graduated from Union College at Schenectady, New York; in 1851, read the law, was admitted to the practice of law in 1853, came to Minnesota in 1855, settled in St. Cloud, Minnesota, was the first lawyer in St. Cloud, Minnesota, was a Democrat, was a banker, was a member of the Territorial Democratic Constitutional Convention representing the Fifth Council District of the Minnesota Territory in 1857, served in the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Aitkin County, Minnesota, Andy Johnson County, Minnesota, Becker County, Minnesota, Breckenridge County, Minnesota, Buchanan County, Minnesota, Carlton County, Minnesota, Cass County, Minnesota, Crow Wing County, Minnesota, Douglas County, Minnesota, Itasca County, Minnesota, Lake County, Minnesota, Morrison County, Minnesota, Otter Tail County, Minnesota, Pembina County, Minnesota, Polk County, Minnesota, St. Louis County, Minnesota, Stearns County, Minnesota, Todd County, Minnesota, Toombs County, Minnesota, and Wadena County, Minnesota (District 3,) was the register at the U. S. land office at St. Cloud, Minnesota, from 1865 until 1869, served in the Minnesota Senate representing Aitkin County, Minnesota, Becker County, Minnesota, Buchanan County, Minnesota, Carlton County, Minnesota, Cass County, Minnesota, Clay County, Minnesota, Crow Wing County, Minnesota, Douglas County, Minnesota, Itasca County, Minnesota, Lake County, Minnesota, Morrison County, Minnesota, Otter Tail County, Minnesota, Pembina County, Minnesota, Polk County, Minnesota, Pope County, Minnesota, St. Louis County, Minnesota, Stearns County, Minnesota, Todd County, Minnesota, Wadena County, Minnesota, and Wilkin County, Minnesota (District 3,) from 1869 until 1872, was a miller, served in the Minnesota Senate representing Stearns County, Minnesota (District 40,) from 1882 until 1887, and died on his farm near St. Cloud, Minnesota. [See note on Horace Austin for 284 South Exchange Street.] a href= "http:// www.msparchhistory.info/MinnrrsTNH.html" [See note on Charles Andrew Gilman for the Minneapolis, St. Cloud & Sauk Rapids RailRoad.]

Superior & State Line RailRoad: The railroad was authorized by the Minnesota Legislature shortly after statehood in 1857 and was granted a charter by the Wisconsin General Assembly in 1859 under Wisconsin Private and Local Laws 1859, Chapter 32, with its incorporators being Michael S. Bright, Hiram Hayes, Isaac J. Moore, and Hiram Robbins. The railroad was incorporated in 1869 by Richard G. Coburn, James W. Gates, Isaac J. Moore, James Stinson, and others to construct and operate a rail line from a point between the Nemadji River and the St. Louis River to a point on the Lake Superior & Mississippi RailRoad at Thompson Junction, Minnesota. In 1869, Congressman Benjamin Franklin Hopkins (1829-1870,) a Republican representing Wisconsin’s Second Congressional District, introduced legislation in the U. S. House of Representatives to grant land to the Superior & State Line RailRoad. The railroad was organized in 1871 and had capital stock of $150,000. The railroad was intended by Superior, Wisconsin, interests to connect to the Northern Pacific RailRoad junction at Thomson Township, Minnesota, diverting the Northern Pacific RailRoad from Duluth, Minnesota, and Jay Cooke agreed to the diversion if Superior, Wisconsin, paid for it. The city put out a bond referendum that would allow Douglas County, Wisconsin, to purchase $300,000 of stock in the Superior & State Line RailRoad that would build the rail line. When potential investors failed to fulfill their pledges, the railroad ceased surveying the rail route in 1869 or 1870 and Jay Cooke then selected the Lake Superior & Mississippi Railroad as the connector to Duluth, Minnesota. In 1870, the Superior & St. Croix RailRoad was chartered under Wisconsin state law with the same purpose as the Superior & State Line RailRoad. In 1871, in Wisconsin Private and Local Laws 1871, Chapter 289, the prior special laws relating to the Superior & State Line RailRoad were repealed. With the creation of the ship canal across the Minnesota Point/Park Point sandbar, Duluth, Minnesota, became a major shipping and rail center. Michael Steele Bright ( 1830-1868,) the son of Indiana State Senator Michael Graham Bright (1803-1881) and Betsy Brook Bright ( -1895,) was born in Madison, Indiana, graduated from Indiana University in 1849, read the law with his father, married Sarah Irwin Lodge (1829-1891,) practiced law until 1854, was for some time a judge in County Court, Superior, Wisconsin, was an incorporator of the Lake Superior & Crow Wing Air Line RailRoad in 1861, moved to Chicago, Illinois, in 1862, moved to New York City, New York, in 1863 and established the banking house of Bright & Company, and died on the Ohio River in the wreck of the steamers United States and America. Richard Gilbert Coburn (1825-1892) was born in Seneca Falls, Seneca County, New York, moved to Pennsylvania, married Charlotte McManus (1832-1916,) moved to Wisconsin in 1856, resided in Superior, Wisconsin, was a bookkeeper employed by Hiram Rubins, was a forwarding and commission merchant,owned a shipyard at the outlet of the Nemadji River into Lake Superior in the late 1850’s, was the owner of the first warehouse on the Quebec pier in Superior, Wisconsin, owned the first harbor tug, the Agate, at Superior Bay, Wisconsin, was the county treasurer of Douglas county, Wisconsin, in 1861, was an incorporator of the Lake Superior & Crow Wing Air Line RailRoad in 1861, was a member of the board of directors of the Superior, Wisconsin, school district in 1861, was the city treasurer of Superior, Wisconsin, in 1862, was a private in the Superior, Wisconsin, Home Guard in 1863, owned a number of Lake Superior steamers after 1863, was the clerk of the Union School District in Superior, Wisconsin, in 1865, was a grocer, was a dry goods merchant, was a lumber merchant, was a ship owner partner with H. N. Wheeler in 1866, had a sawmill and a sash and door factory with partner Thomas McManus on the Quebec Pier, Superior, Wisconsin, in the late 1860’s, was a ship owner partner with S. S. Vaughn in 1868, was authorized by Wisconsin Private and Local Laws 1868, Chapter 255 to build a dock and pier on Superior Bay, Wisconsin, became bankrupt in 1873, was an unsuccessful candidate for a Douglas County, Wisconsin, judgeship in 1877, moved to Forrestville, New York, in 1877, returned to Superior, Wisconsin, in 1881, and died in Superior, Douglas County, Wisconsin. Hiram Hayes (1831/1832-1918,) the son of Jacob Hayes and Ruth Hobbs Hayes, was born in Industry, Maine, attended the common schools of Industry, Maine, attended the Farmington Academy, graduated from Bowdoin College in Maine in 1851, read the law with Robert Goodenow at Farminton, Maine, was a lawyer, came to Superior, Wisconsin, in 1854, was the clerk of the village of Superior, Wisconsin, in 1855, was admitted to the practice of law in Wisconsin in 1856, was the law partner of Michael Steele Bright in the law firm Bright & Hayes in 1856, was a partner with Michael Steele Bright and Isaac J. Moore in the land development firm of Bright, Moore & Hayes in 1858, was the district attorney as a Democrat for Superior, Wisconsin, in 1860, went to Washington, D. C., in 1860, was employed by the U. S. Senate, later was a clerk in the U. S. Department of the Interior and with the U. S. Department of the Treasury, married Mary E. Newton in 1860, was a colonel and chief quartermaster in the U. S. Army in Virginia in 1864 during the American Civil War, returned to Superior, Wisconsin, in 1866, was the district attorney as a Republican for Superior, Wisconsin, in 1870, petitioned the Wisconsin General Assembly in 1871 protesting against the cutting of a canal by the city of Duluth, Minnesota, across Minnesota Point and destroying the port of Superior, Wisconsin, was an Episcopalian, was a notary public in Douglas County, Wisconsin, in 1872, was a promoter of the St. Croix & Superior RailRoad in 1872, moved to New Mexico in 1874, returned to Wisconsin in 1875, moved to Hudson, Wisconsin, in 1876, returned to Superior, Wisconsin, in 1881, was a principal in the Superior Land Association in 1881, was a founder of the Superior National Bank in 1882, was a member of the Superior, Wisconsin, election board in 1883, was a delegate of the Republican Party of Douglas County, Wisconsin, in 1884, was a member of the board of directors of the Superior, Wisconsin, Chamber of Commerce in 1889, and died in Superior, Wisconsin. Isaac J. Moore ( -1879) petitioned the U. S. Congress for an appropriation for the completion of the harbor at Superior, Wisconsin, in 1871. Hiram Robbins was a member of the Free Will Baptist Church in Superior, Wisconsin, in 1856, petitioned the Wisconsin General Assembly in 1872 protesting against the cutting of a canal by the city of Duluth, Minnesota, across Minnesota Point and destroying the port of Superior, Wisconsin, owned property in Superior, Wisconsin, in 1882, and was an incorporator of the Superior & St. Croix RailRoad in 1896. James Stinson came to Superior, Wisconsin, in 1854.

Swallow & Hopkins Company RailRoad In 1898, the Swallow & Hopkins Lumber Company was formed at Winton, Minnesota, and had its general office at Duluth, Minnesota, in 1920. The company was owned by George C. Swallow of Minneapolis, who was succeeded by his son, Arthur C. Swallow, and Louis J. Hopkins of Duluth, Minnesota. The railroad was a logging railroad that operated between Fall Lake, Minnesota, and Basswood Lake, Minnesota, ten miles East of the Duluth & Iron Range RailRoad's endpoint at Winton, Minnesota, and 20 miles East of Tower, Minnesota. The company railroad owned four Shay geared steam locomotives, which were located at Buhl, Minnesota. G. H. Good was the superintendent of the railroad in 1898. Initially, the railroad utilized a secondhand Shay locomotive, the “3 Spot.” In 1901, the railroad acquired a thirdhand 35 ton 1894 Brooks Mogul locomotive, the “4 Spot,” from the Split Rock Lumber Company. The railroad hauled some 350 million board feet of sawlog lumber from 1901 until 1910. In 1911, most of the railroad was sold to and succeeded by the St. Croix Lumber & Manufacturing Company, controlled by the Edward Hines Lumber Company of Chicago, Illinois. The Swallow & Hopkins Lumber Company did build a rail line from Winton, Minnesota, to Jackfish Bay, Minnesota, in 1912. The Swallow & Hopkins Lumber Company sold the balance of its railroad operations with its mill at Winton, Minnesota, and other property to the Cloquet Lumber Company in 1922. George C. Swallow ( -1917) resided in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in 1890, was a partner, with George Esterly and G. W. Esterly, in and the vice president of the Esterly Harvester Machine Company in 1884, was successfully sued for damages for injuries suffered when a logging railroad platform for loading logs on Basswood Lake, Minnesota, for rail transport to Fall Lake, Minnesota, malfunctioned in 1906, was held liable for the injuries suffered by an adolescent who was riding his bicycle and was struck by the Swallow automobile in 1906, was a member of the board of directors of the Milwaukee Mechanic’s Insurance Company of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in 1914, and died in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Louis J. Hopkins was appointed to the Duluth, Minnesota, city charter commission in 1899 and in 1904. L. J. Hopkins was associated with the Fall Lake Lumber Company of Winton, Minnesota, in 1899. George Herbert Good (1838-1923,) the son of John Good (1801-1873) and Catherine Bateman Good (1808-1895,) was born in Gloucester County, New Brunswick, Canada, married Martha Jennings (1848-1921,) the daughter of Edward Jennings and Ellen Barry Jennings, in 1863 in New Brunswick, Canada, emigrated to the United States before 1871, was a resident of Winton, Minnesota, in 1898, and died in St. Louis County, Minnesota. In 1898, George C. Swallow of Minneapolis and Louis J. Hopkins of Duluth established the Swallow & Hopkins Lumber Company at Fall Lake just inside Lake County and east of the St. Croix mill. Their mill produced 30 to 35 million board feet per year and employed 750-800 lumberjack each Winter in 1898. In 1914, the collection of boarding houses, homes, and businesses clustered around the mills, which were populated by 2,000 residents, was named Winton, Minnesota. The Swallow & Hopkins Company also was heavily engaged in the iron ore trade in 1914. The Swallow & Hopkins Company sold their lumber operation to the Cloquet Lumber Company in 1922.

Swan River Logging Company RailRoad: The Swan River Logging Company was established in 1892 by Ammi W. Wright and Charles H. Davis, of Saginaw, Michigan, along the confluence of the Swan River and the Mississippi River near Jacobson, Minnesota. The Swan River Logging Company, Ltd., was incorporated in 1898 in Michigan to take over assets of the Swan River Logging Company. It owned railroads, terminals and rolling stock that were operated by the Duluth, Mississippi River & Northern Railroad. Though most of the timber near the river had already been cut by 1890, Wright and Davis solved the problem by constructing a railroad up into the high elevation timberlands of the Gardner and Hibbing areas. Spurs went out to various stands of timber. The logs were sent down to Mississippi Landing and dumped off the cars into the river. Mississippi Landing was the main shipping point for the Swan River Logging Company. By 1899, the Swan River Logging Company, Ltd., had sold its timberlands and was acquired by the Great Northern RailRoad through the Eastern Railway Company of Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1899, built a rail line from the Mississippi River to Hibbing, Minnesota, in 1892, the Duluth, Mississippi River & Northern RailRoad, had 15 miles of rail line eastward from Hibbing, Minnesota, across the Mesabi Iron Range into Virginia, Minnesota, operated until 1902, and was succeeded by the Eastern Railway Company of Minnesota. The Swan River Logging Company built a railroad to the Sturgeon Lake, Minnesota, area in 1895. By 1899, the Swan River Logging Company, Ltd., had sold its timberlands, and was acquired by James J. Hill and the Great Northern RailRoad through the Eastern Railway Company of Minnesota. In 1899, the Great Northern Railroad Company has purchased the entire Wright-Davis holdings other than pine lands in Minnesota, consisting of the Duluth, Mississippi River & Northern RailRoad, the Swan River Logging Company, and the Mahoning, Longyear, and Bennet Mines near Hibbing, Minnesota. __?__ Kalorin/John F. Killorin (1850- ) was the president of the Swan River Logging Company in 1904 and was president of the Merchants & Miners State Bank of Duluth, Minnesota, in 1904. James Killorin was the general manager of the Swan River Logging Company in 1904. The Swan River Logging Company also built the Leech Lake & Northern RailRoad in 1904, a 17 mile rail line from Leech Lake, Minnesota, to a point along the Great Northern RailRoad at Cuba, Minnesota, that was owned by the Standard Lumber Company of Dubuque, Iowa. John F. Killorin (1850- ,) the son of Thomas Killorin and Mary Gallagher Killorin, was born in Canada, was educated in the Richmond, Ontario, Canada, emigrated to the United States in 1868, moved to Michigan, was initially a common lumber laborer in Saginaw, Michigan, helped build a logging railroad for the A. W. Wright Lumber Company, married Carrie Wright ( -1894) in 1880, moved to St. Louis County, Minnesota, in 1892, helped build the Swan River Logging Company RailRoad from the Mississippi River to Hibbing, Minnesota, married Mary McHugh in 1898, worked in the lumber business until 1902, helped operate the Swan River Logging Company RailRoad after its acquisition by James J. Hill in 1899 until 1906, acquired interests in lumber, mining, and banking, was associated with thye Kelley-How-Thomson Company, a wholesale hardware company, was a member of the Kitchi Gammi Club, was a member of the Duluth, Minnesota, Curling Club, was a member of the Duluth, Minnesota, Commercial Club, was a member of the Duluth, Minnesota, Country Club, was a Roman Catholic, was a Republican, and pursued the hobby of rowing. a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/TNHrail2.html" [See note on Charles Henry Davis for the Wright & Davis RailRoad.] [See note on James Jerome Hill for 240 Summit Avenue.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/TNHrail2.html" [See note on Ammi Willard Wright for the Wright & Davis RailRoad.]

Taylor's Falls & Lake Superior RailRoad Company: The railroad was authorized by the Minnesota Legislature shortly after statehood in 1857. The railroad was incorporated in 1875 by L. K. Stannard, Joshua L. Taylor, E. D. Whitney, and others to construct and operate a rail line from Taylor's Falls, Minnesota, to the Lake Superior & Mississippi RailRoad Company rail line, was organized in 1876 or 1878, had the formal opening of the rail line to Centre City, Minnesota, in 1880, had capital stock of $200,000, leased its rail route to the Minneapolis & St. Louis RailRoad from 1880 until 1883, leased its rail line to the Saint Paul & Duluth RailRoad after 1883, operated until 1898, and was succeeded by the St. Paul & Duluth RailRoad. The Taylors Falls & Lake Superior Railroad apparently existed solely to acquire the land for the tracks. It built a 10.09 mile rail line from Center City, Minnesota, to Taylors Falls, Minnesota, in 1880. The line ran through the towns of Wyoming, Minnesota, Chisago City, Minnesota, Lindstrom, Minnesota, Center City, Minnesota, Shafer, Minnesota, Franconia, Minnesota, and Taylors Falls, Minnesota. The 20-mile branch line of the Northern Pacific that was built by the St. Paul & Duluth RailRoad and the Minneapolis & St. Louis RailRoad. In 1893, the officers of the railroad were R. S. Hayes, president, A. B. Plough, vice president, W. H. Coleman, treasurer, and George W. Seymour, treasurer. The Northern Pacific RailRoad operated the rail line from 1900 until 1948. a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/MinnrrsTNH.html" [See note for Lucius K. Stannard for the Taylor's Falls & Superior RailRoad RailRoad.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/MinnrrsTNH.html" [See note for Joshua Lovejoy Taylor for the Taylor's Falls & Superior RailRoad RailRoad.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/MinnrrsTNH.html" [See note for E. D. Whiting for the Taylor's Falls & Superior RailRoad RailRoad.]

Taylor's Falls & Sauk Valley RailRoad: The railroad was continued in existence under the direction and control of Smith Ellison, Levi W. Folsom, William H. C. Folsom, Charles A. Gilman, H. L. Gordon, Thomas C. McClure, Wendelin Merz, Samuel Ross, Joshua L. Taylor, N. C. D. Taylor, and E. D. Whiting, as a successor to the St. Paul & Taylor's Falls RailRoad by Special Laws of Minnesota 1868, Chapter X, to build and operate a rail line from Taylor's Falls, Minnesota, to a point along the Lake Superior & Mississippi RailRoad, and then, by way of St. Cloud, Minnesota, to the Western border of the State. The members of its board of directors in 1868 were Smith Ellison, Levi W. Folsom, William H. C. Folsom, Charles A. Gilman, H. L. Gordon, Thomas C. McClure, Wendelin Merz, Samuel Ross, Joshua L. Taylor, N. C. D. Taylor, and E. D. Whiting. The railroad was organized in 1871. Smith Ellison (1823- ) was born in Marine, Madison County, Illinois, came to Marine Mills, Wisconsin Territory, in 1844, was employed by Judd, Walker & Company from 1844 until 1846, resided at Osceola, Wisconsin, from 1846 until 1849, engaged in logging and lumber after 1849, settled on and improved a farm at Sunrise, Minnesota Territory, in 1856, served in the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Chisago County, Minnesota, Kanabec County, Minnesota, Pine County, Minnesota, and Washington County, Minnesota (District 2,) from 1865 until 1867, moved to Taylor's Falls, Minnesota, in 1868, formed a partnership with L. K. Stannard in the mercantile and lumbering business in 1868, served as county commissioner eight years, was interested in a saw, planing and flour mill at Stillwater, Minnesota, was a stockholder and director in the First National Bank at Stillwater, Minnesota, and owns large tracts of pine lands in the St. Croix River Valley. Charles Andrew Gilman (1833-1927) was born in Gilmanton, New Hampshire, was a New Hampshire highway surveyor from 1854 until 1855, married Hester Cronk ( -1910) in 1857, was a lawyer, moved to Sauk Rapids, Benton County, Minnesota, in 1855, was the Benton County, Minnesota, county auditor, was the Benton County, Minnesota, register of deeds, moved to St. Cloud, Minnesota, in 1861, was the United States Land Office register and receiver at St. Cloud, Minnesota, in 1861, was a Republican, served in the Minnesota Senate representing Aitkin County, Minnesota, Andy Johnson County, Minnesota, Becker County, Minnesota, Buchanan County, Minnesota, Carlton County, Minnesota, Cass County, Minnesota, Clay County, Minnesota, Crow Wing County, Minnesota, Douglas County, Minnesota, Itasca County, Minnesota, Lake County, Minnesota, Morrison County, Minnesota, Otter Tail County, Minnesota, Pembina County, Minnesota, Polk County, Minnesota, Pope County, Minnesota, St. Louis County, Minnesota, Stearns County, Minnesota, Todd County, Minnesota, Wadena County, Minnesota, and Wilkin County, Minnesota (District 3,) from 1867 until 1870, served in the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Stearns County, Minnesota (District 31,) from 1874 until 1880, was Speaker of the Minnesota House of Representatives, resided in St. Cloud, Minnesota, in 1878, was an incorporator of the Minneapolis, St. Cloud & Sauk Rapids RailRoad in 1878, was the Minnesota Lieutenant Governor from 1880 until 1887, was an unsuccessful candidate for the Republican Party endorsement for Minnesota Governor in 1886 and 1888, was theState librarian at the Minnesota State Law Library from 1894 until 1899, served in the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Stearns County, Minnesota (District 45,) from 1914 until 1917, and died in St. Cloud, Minnesota. Hanford Lennox “H. L.” Gordon (1836-1920,) the son of William B. Gordon ( -1825,) a lumberman, sawmill operator, and grist mill operator, and Rhoda Douglass Gordon, was a relative of Lord Byron through his mother, was born in Andover/Elm Valley, Alleghany County, New York, moved with his family to Wellsville, Alleghany County, New York, read the law with Samuel Gordon, at Delhi, Delaware County, New York, was appointed to the Naval Academy at Annapolis, Maryland, in 1856, declined on account of ill health, was admitted to the practice of law at Ithaca, New York, in 1857, was a lawyer, practiced law at Scio, New York, married Sylvia Smith ( -1877,) of Ceres, Pennsylvania, in 1859, came to Minnesota in 1859, settled in Clearwater, Minnesota, served in the First Minnesota Regiment and in the Second Minnesota Artillery Battery during the American Civil War, fought at the battle of Bull Run, fought at the battle of Edward's Ferry, was the postmaster in Clearwater, Minnesota, in 1862, was the county attorney for Wright County, Minnesota, in 1863, was in the fur trade in 1864, took a a $500 bribe offered by a Minneapolis colonel in exchange for dropping his support for Ignatius Donnelly for a U. S. Senate seat in 1866, was a Republican, served in the Minnesota State Senate representing Kandiyohi County, Minnesota, McLeod County, Minnesota, Meeker County, Minnesota, Monongalia County, Minnesota, and Wright County, Minnesota (District 6,) from 1866 until 1869, resided at Monticello, Minnesota, in 1867, was the U. S. Land Office register at St. Cloud, Minnesota, in 1873, lived in St. Cloud, Minnesota, was the law partner of L. W. Collins in Gordon & Collins in St. Cloud, Minnesota, married Mary L. Carpenter ( -1929) in 1878, lived in Minneapolis from 1878 until 1888, was the author of Pauline and Other Poems , published in New York by G.P. Putnam's Sons in 1878, ofLegends of the Northwest, published in St Paul by the St. Paul Book and Stationery Company in 1881, of The Feast of the Virgins and Other Poems, published in Chicago, by Laird & Lee in 1891, of Laconics, published in Salem, Massachusetts, by the Salem Press Company in 1910, and of Indian Legends and Other Poems, published by The Salem Press Company in Salem, Massachusetts in 1910, moved to San Jose, California, in 1887, divorced Mary Gordon in 1888, moved to Los Angeles, California, in the 1890’s, was a life member of the Minnesota Historical Society, and was buried at the Angelus Rosedale Cemetery, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California. Thomas Clarendon McClure (1824-1881,) the son of Thomas Archibald McClure (1790-1866) and Elizabeth “Betsy” Armour McClure (1796-1889,) was born in Waldo, Waldo County, Maine, initially was a school teacher in Maine, moved to Millbury, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in 1853, engaged in the leather business in Millbury, Massachusetts, arrived in St. Cloud, Minnesota, in 1857, resided in St. Cloud, Minnesota, was elected to the Minnesota Legislature in 1858, but, due to the protracted legislative session of 1857-1858, the 1858-1859 meeting of the Legislature was unnecessary and those elected in 1858 were never sworn in, ran milling and lumber businesses in Sauk Centre, Minnesota, was appointed the county clerk of Stearns County, Minnesota, in 1858, married Clara E./C. Swan Clarke (1839-1899,) the daughter of Dr. Sheppard Clarke (1794-1852) and Mary Ann Dickinson Clarke ( -1877,) in 1859, was admitted to the practice of law in Stearns County, Minnesota, in 1859, was a partner of Henry Chester Waite in a private banking concern in the late 1850’s, was the deputy clerk of district court in Stearns County, Minnesota, under N. P. Clarke’s clerkship, was the clerk of district court in Stearns County, Minnesota, was the register of the U. S. Land Office at St. Cloud, Minnesota, in 1861, was a lumberman, settled a section of land at Osakis, Dougla County, Minnesota, in 1862, settled a section of land at Lake Mary Township, Douglas County, Minnesota, in 1864, sold a parcel of land to Christen E. Lien of Monongalia County, Minnesota, in 1866, resided in Tumuli Township, Otter Tail County, in 1870, was a member of the prudential committee at the St. Cloud Normal School in 1872, was an incorporator of the Minneapolis, St. Cloud & Sauk Rapids RailRoad in 1878, was a business partner of Dolson Bush Searle in St. Cloud, Minnesota, in 1883, was a partner of N. P. Clarke in the wholesale lumber trade in 1881, and died in St. Cloud, Stearns County, Minnesota. Wendelin/Wendelyn Merz (1824/1834-1894,) the son of Alois Merz and Genevieve Brandel Merz, was born in Ettlingen, Baden, Germany/Wuerttemberg, Germany, emigrated to the United States with his family in 1851/1854, initially moved to Boston, Massachusetts, married Caroline Fielder, the daughter of Martin Fiedler and Barbara Then Fiedler, in 1872, moved to St. Joseph, Minnesota, engaged in real estate speculation in Collegeville, Minnesota, in 1880, purchased the Endelin Brewery in St. Cloud, Minnesota, in 1882 with his partners, M. Schindler and J. H. Eich, as Schindler & Company, bought out the brewery interests of Schindler and Eich by 1891, moved to St. Cloud, Minnesota, in 1891, expanded the brewery in 1893, housed the initial contigent of Benedictine religious women who settled in St. Cloud, Minnesota, and died in Boston, Massachusetts. Samuel Ross (1812-1881) was born in Fairfield, Mercer County, Pennsylvania, was educated in Pensylvania common schools, attended the Western Reserve College in Ohio, moved to Illinois, taught school in Illinois, moved to Marion, Linn County, Iowa, in 1839, married Mary Vaugh ( -1851) in 1841, moved to Hazel Green, Wisconsin, returned to Marion, Iowa, came to Minnesota in 1851, initially resided in St. Anthony, Minnesota, was a member of the survey group that platted the Princeton, Minnesota, townsite in 1855, built a log hotel, the Princeton House, in 1856, built the first blacksmith shop in Princeton, Minnesota, in 1856, was a farmer, built a water-powered saw mill in Princeton, Minnesota, in 1858, married Margaret Justice in 1859, was a promoter of the legislation that created Mille Lacs County, Minnesota, in 1860, was the judge of the Mille Lacs county, Minnesota, probate court in 1860, was a Congregationalist, was an Abolitionist, resided in Princeton, Minnesota, in 1867, was a Prohibitionist, was a Republican, served in the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Anoka County, Minnesota, Benton County, Minnesota, Hennepin County, Isanti County, Minnesota, Manomin County, Minnesota, Mille Lacs County, Minnesota, and Sherburne County, Minnesota (District 4,) from 1867 until 1869, was a member in 1867 of the board of commissioners charged with locating, surveying and establishing a road between Anoka, Anoka County, to Princeton, Mille Lacs County, Minnesota, by way of Spencer Valley, Sherburne County, Minnesota, built the North Star Hotel in Princeton, Minnesota, in 1869, and died of the complications of a stroke. Nathan C. D. Taylor (1810-1887) was born in Sanbornton, Belknap County, New Hampshire, moved to Alton, Illinois in 1832, was employed by Godfrey, Gilman & Company, was the treasurer of the Upper Alton Lyceum in Illinois in 1836, moved to St. Croix Falls, Wisconsin Territory, in 1846, was the first postmaster of Taylor’s Falls, Minnesota Territory, when it was known as Baker’s Falls, Minnesota Territory, was a member of the board of regents of the University of Minnesota from 1852 until 1855, resided in Taylor’s Falls, Minnesota Territory, in 1853, was in the mercantile business with Patrick Fox and the lumber business in 1853, served in the Minnesota Territorial House of Representatives representing Chisago County, Minnesota, Doty County, Minnesota, Itasca County, Minnesota, Superior County, Minnesota, and Washington County, Minnesota (District 1,) from 1853 until 1857, was the speaker of the Territorial House of Representatives in 1854, had a contested election with William Wallace Kingsbury in 1856, was appropriated $2,000 in 1865 to explore the mineral lands in the valley of the St. Croix River for copper, was a founder of the N. C. D. Taylor & F. Mining Company, was the county treasurer of Chisago County, Minnesota, from 1866 until 1876, and was an incorporator of the Taylor's Falls & Sauk Valley RailRoad in 1868. a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/MinnrrsTNH.html" [See note for Levi Woodbury Folsom for the Taylor's Falls & Superior RailRoad RailRoad.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/MinnrrsTNH.html" [See note for William H. C. Folsom for the Taylor's Falls & Superior RailRoad RailRoad.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/MinnrrsTNH.html" [See note for H. H. Newberry for the Taylor's Falls & Superior RailRoad RailRoad.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/MinnrrsTNH.html" [See note for Lucius K. Stannard for the Taylor's Falls & Superior RailRoad RailRoad.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/MinnrrsTNH.html" [See note for Joshua Lovejoy Taylor for the Taylor's Falls & Superior RailRoad RailRoad.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/MinnrrsTNH.html" [See note for E. D. Whiting for the Taylor's Falls & Superior RailRoad RailRoad.]

Taylor's Falls & Superior RailRoad: The railroad either was organized and incorporated for 50 years in 1868 by L. K. Stannard, Joshua L. Taylor, and E. D. Whitney or was incorporated in 1875 by Charles Ayd, E. E. Blanding, Charles F. Clark, William Comer, L. W. Folsom, William H. C. Folsom, A. Glendenning, Casper Hauser, Thomas Lacy, Michael Lisch, H. H. Newberry, J. P. Owens, Oscar Roos, J. Schottmuller, G. W. Seymour, J. L. Taylor, and E. D. Whiting to build and operate a railway from Taylor's Falls, Minnesota, to a junction with the Lake Superior & Mississippi RailRoad. It had initial capital stock of either $200,000 or $1,000,000 and its principal place of business was Taylor's Falls, Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1871, operated until 1899, and was succeeded by the St. Paul & Duluth RailRoad. In 1858, Charles Ayd was a commissioner, with R. R. Hurlbut and O. H. Kelly, to construct a bridge across the Crow River from Hennepin County to Wright County, Minnesota. Charles Ayd (1832- ) was born in Germany, resided in Sherburne County, Minnesota, during the 1857 Minnesota State census, and resided in St. Paul during the 1885 Minnesota State census. Eugene Edward Blanding (1836-1905,) the son of Eluna Martin Blanding (1800-1872)and Eliza/Elizabeth Tuttle Blanding (1808-1887,) was born in Harford/Susquehana, Pennsylvania, moved to St Croix Falls Township, Polk County, Wisconsin, before 1860, moved to Taylors Falls, Chisago County, Minnesota, after 1870, was engaged by the St. Croix & Lake Superior RailRoad Trespass Fund for surveying work in 1870, married Joanna/Johanna Ring in 1871, received compensation from the St. Croix & Lake Superior RailRoad Trespass Fund for surveying and scaling work in 1873, received compensation from the State of Wisconsin for protecting lands in 1874, received compensation from the St. Croix & Lake Superior RailRoad Trespass Fund for settling old trespass suits, examining land trespasses, and estimating hay meadows in 1876, was engaged, with H. H. Newberry, in a preliminary survey of a rail line from White Bear Lake, Minnesota, to Taylors Falls, Minnesota, for an extension of the Minneapolis & St. Louis RailRoad in 1878, was the partner of George W. Seymour in G. W. Seymour & Company, a book, stationery and drug store in Taylor’s Falls, Minnesota, in 1889, died in Taylor’s Falls, Minnesota, and is buried in the Kahbakong Cemetery, Taylors Falls, Chisago County, Minnesota. Charles F. Clark, with his brothers James H. Clark and Rufus W. Clark ( -1889,) built a steam-powered lumber mill in Taylor’s Falls, Minnesota, and the partnership ran it until 1889. William Comer (1812-1896) was born in Cheshire County, married Elizabeth Davis (1816-1906,) emigrated to the United States in 1846, resided in St. Louis, Missouri, from 1846 until 1852, resided in Pike County, Illinois, from 1852 until 1854, resided in St. Croix Falls, Wisconsin, from 1854 until 1855, then resided in Taylor’s Falls, Minnesota Territory after 1855, was the treasurer of Chisago County, Minnesota, for two terms, was the United States land office receiver at Taylor’s Falls, Minnesota, for four years from 1865 until 1869, died in Taylors Falls, Chisago County, Minnesota, and was buried in the Kahbakong Cemetery, Taylors Falls, Chisago County, Minnesota. Andrew Clendenning (1798-1875) was born in Northern Ireland, was a Methodist, emigrated to North America in 1835, initially settled in New Brunswick, Canada, was a logger and lumberman, moved to Michigan in 1855, moved to St. Croix Falls, Wisconsin, in 1859, moved to Taylor’s Falls, Minnesota, in 1870, and died in Taylor’s Falls, Minnesota. Colonel Levi Woodbury “L. W.” Folsom (1821-1912,) the son of Levi Folsom, Jr. (1788-1841,) and Lydia Dodge Folsom, was born in Tamworth, Carroll County, New Hampshire, attended Gilmanton Academy, taught school in Pennsylvania, was a justice of the peace of Tamworth, Carroll County, New Hampshire, in 1847, was a member of the Pennsylvania College Linnaean Association Temperance Society in 1847, graduated from Gettysburg College in 1848, read the law with Caleb R. Ayer in Cornish, Maine, was admitted to the practice of law in Carroll County, New Hampshire, in 1850, moved to Minnesota in 1854, resided in Taylors Falls, Minnesota, was the recorder of the village of Taylor’s Falls, Minnesota, in 1858, married Abbie Shaw (1838-1927) of Salem, Massachusetts, in St. Paul in 1859, was involved in real estate in the 1860's, was a Democrat, was the treasurer of the Taylor’s Falls Copper Mining Company in 1874, was an officer of the Lake Superior Railroad Company from 1875 to 1879, was a local land agent for the railroad in Hinckley, Minnesota, moved to Pine City, Minnesota, in 1903, operated a newspaper, moved to Sandstone, Minnesota, was a partner with his brother, Howard Folsom, in a lumber business, was a Mason, and is buried in the Kahbakong Cemetery, Taylors Falls, Chisago County, Minnesota. William Henry Carman “W. H. C.” Folsom (1817-1900) was born in Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada, was a cook in a Vermont lumber camp, worked as a logger and log driver in Maine until 1836, moved to Wisconsin Territory in 1836, married Mary Jane Wyman (1818-1896,) the daughter of Abraham Wyman and Betsey Mclellan Heywood Wyman, in Bloomfield, Somerset County, Maine, in 1841, moved to Minnesota in 1845, settled in Taylor's Falls, Minnesota, in 1850, was an Indian trader, was a Wisconisn Territory territorial sheriff, was a lumberman, was a merchant, was a spectator, was a manufacturer, was a real estate dealer, was a historian, was a farmer, was a writer, served as Washington County, Minnesota, treasurer, was a founder of the Minnesota Republican Party, served as a member of the Minnesota Republican Constitutional Convention (District 1) in 1857, served as a member of the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Chisago County, Minnesota, Kanabec County, Minnesota, Pine County, Minnesota, and Washington County, Minnesota (District 2,) from 1868 until 1870, served as a member of the Minnesota State Senate representing Aitkin County, Minnesota, Chisago County, Minnesota, Isanti County, Minnesota, Kanabec County, Minnesota, Pine County, Minnesota, and Washington County, Minnesota (Districts 25, 2 and 28,) from 1857 until 1859, from 1866 until 1870, and from 1873 until 1878, helped organize the first District Court held in Minnesota at Stillwater, Minnesota, authored Fifty Years in the Northwest, published in St. Paul by the Pioneer Press Company in 1888, was involved in the navigational development of the Mississippi and St. Croix Rivers, was a dam builder, was involved in railway building, was involved in the Wisconsin-Minnesota boundary dispute, was a member of the special committee that designed the Minnesota State Seal, was involved in the Five Million Dollar RailRoad Loan in 1858, invested the St. Croix Boom Company, invested in the Chippewa Logging Company, was a member of the Kahbakong Cemetery Association, was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church of Taylor's Falls, Minnesota, was a member of the Taylors Falls Agricultural and Driving Park Association, was a member of the board of trustees of the Chisago Seminary, died in Taylor's Falls, Minnesota, and was buried in the Kahbakong Cemetery, Taylors Falls, Chisago County, Minnesota. A. Glendenning was a member of a petit jury in Taylor’s Falls, Minnesota, in 1896. Andrew Glendenning operated a lumber camp in the Taylor’s Falls, Minnesota, area in the 1860’s. Casper/Caspar Hauser was a corporal in Company C of the 11th Minnesota Regiment during the American Civil War, was an incorporator of the Taylor’s Falls Copper Mining Company in 1874, was an incorporator of the Taylor’s Falls & Lake Superior RailRoad in 1875, was the commander of the Sherman Post #6 of the Grand Army of the Republic in Taylor’s Falls, Minnesota, in 1882, and died in Taylor’s Falls, Minnesota. Thomas Lacy (1824-1901) was born in Kennebec County, Maine, apprenticed in the marble cutting trade, married Susan A. Stephenson (1828-1853,) the daughter of James Stephenson and Joanna Weeks Stephenson (1808- ,) in 1848, moved to Minnesota in 1853, moved to Taylor’s Falls, Minnesota, in 1854, was a marble cutter, was the Chisago County, Minnesota, register of deeds from 1855 until 1859, resided at Taylor’s Falls, Minnesota, in 1856, married Helen Mar Wyman (1831-1878,) engaged in the mercantile and lumber business from 1859 until 1869, was a farmer after 1869, was an incorporator of the Taylor's Falls & Superior RailRoad, and was buried in Kahbakong Cemetery, Taylors Falls, Chisago County, Minnesota. Michael Lisch (1827-1895) was born in Germany, served in Company B of the Second Wisconsin Cavalry during the American Civil War, married Johanna Blank (1828-1879,) married Victoria Schloeslin (1864-1905,) was paid relief by the State of Minnesota in 1891, resided in Taylors Falls, Minnesota, in 1895, died in Minnesota, and was buried in the Kahbakong Cemetery, Taylors Falls, Chisago County, Minnesota. Henry H. Newberry/Newbury came to St. Croix Falls, Wisconsin Territory, in 1848 or 1849, resided in St. Croix Falls, Wisconsin Territory, in 1849, was unmarried in 1849, came to Minnesota Territory in 1852, resided in Taylor’s Falls, Minnesota, in 1852, married Sarah Ayres St. Clair, the widow of E. R. St. Clair, subsequently married Fanny Gray Daubney/Dobney, the widow of William Dobney, and was an incorporator of the Young Men’s Literary Association of Taylor’s Falls, Minnesota, authorized by Territorial Laws of Minnesota 1857, Chapter 20. Colonel John Philip/Phillips Owens (1818-1884,) the son of William Owens, was born near Dayton, Ohio, in 1818, worked on a farm with only occasional schooling, attended Woodward College in Cincinnati, Ohio, for two years, married Helen McAllister (1829- ) in Ohio in 1848, learned the printing business, started a newspaper in Cincinnati, Ohio, went bankrupt, was a reporter and assistant editor for newspapers in Cincinnati, Ohio, Louisville, Kentucky, Vicksburg, Mississippi, and New Orleans, Louisiana, joined Dr. A. Randall in a partnership to publish a newspaper in St. Paul, which became McLean & Owens when Dr. Randall sold out to Major Nathaniel McLean, was the editor of The Minnesotian, the organ of the Whig party in St. Paul in 1851, married Frances M. Hobbs in New York, New York, in 1853, was a Republican, was Quartermaster of the Ninth Minnesota Regiment from 1862 until 1865 during the American Civil War, was the registar of the U. S. land office at Taylor's Falls, Minnesota, from 1868 until 1884, was the grand master of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, later was associated with The Chronicle and with The Register, and was buried at the Kahbakong Cemetery, Taylors Falls, Chisago County, Minnesota. Joseph Schottmuller (1829-1902,) the son of Francis Nicolas Schottmuller and Magdeline Weingartner Schottmuller, was born in Pfafenrot, Baden, Germany, married Theresa/Theresia Aydt (1847-1919,) was an incorporator of the Taylor’s Falls Copper Mining Company in 1874, died in Taylor’s Falls, Minnesota, and was buried in the Kahbakong Cemetery, Taylors Falls, Chisago County, Minnesota. According to the Tavern Trove website, Joseph Schottmuller obtained the brewery in Taylor’s Falls, Minnesota, from J. Beyer & Brother, who owned it from1874 until 1877, owned the brewery from 1877 until 1884, when George Zigner operated it from 1884 until 1888, and followed by Schottmuller Brothers from 1888 until 1890, when it closed. George W. Seymour (1828-1881) was born in Susquehanna County, Pennsylvania, came to Taylor's Falls, Minnesota, in 1857, was a druggist, held town office as postmaster and as the justice of the peace, was the secretary of the Taylor's Falls & Lake Superior RailRoad, was a Mason, was a Democrat, married Nancy McCollum (1824-1875,) the daughter of Aaron McCollum (1776-1853) and Sarah White McCollum (1786-1865,) and was an incorporator of the Taylor’s Falls Copper Mining Company in 1874. Lucius Kingsbury "Lucas” “Lukas” “L. K.” Stannard (1824-1914) was born in Franklin County, Vermont, attended the Barkersfield Academic Institution, read the law at St. Albans, was madmitted to the practice of law in 1850, came to Minnesota in 1850 or 1851, resided in Taylors Falls, Minnesota, served in the Minnesota Territorial House of Representatives representing Chisago County, Minnesota, Doty County, Minnesota, Itasca County, Minnesota, Superior County, Minnesota, and Washington County, Minnesota (District 1,) from 1856 until 1857, platted Nashua, Minnesota, in 1857, served in the Minnesota Republican Constitutional Convention of 1857 from District 2, married Harriet N. Stephenson/Stevenson (1832- ,) the daughter of James Stephenson and Joanna Weeks Stephenson (1808- ,) in St. Louis, Missouri, in 1858, served in the Minnesota Senate representing Chisago County, Minnesota, Isanti County, Minnesota, and Pine County, Minnesota, (District 25,) from 1858 until 1861, was a U. S. Department of the Interior land office receiver at Taylors Falls, Minnesota, in 1868, was a law partner of Henry N. Setzer before 1868, was the judge of probate court and surveyor of Chisago County, Minnesota, in 1869 and 1871, served in the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Chisago County, Minnesota, Kanabec County, Minnesota, Pine County, Minnesota, and Washington County, Minnesota, (District 2,) from 1870 until 1872, was the second engineer on the survey crew of the Lake Superior and St. Croix River canal in 1875, and was a Minnesota lawyer in 1895. Joshua Lovejoy Taylor (1816-1901) was born in Sanbornton, Belknap County, New Hampshire, moved to Alton, Illinois, in 1836, was the first permanent settler in Taylor's Falls, Minnesota, in 1840, purchased a portion of the Taylor’s Falls, Minnesota, townsite from Jesse Taylor, for whon the town was named, also purchased the Jesse Taylor & B. F. Baker sawmill site, was an employee of the St. Croix Falls Lumber Company, engaged in logging until 1849, declined appointment as the U. S. marshall for the Territory of Minnesota in 1849, went to California and was fairly successful in his mining ventures in 1849, returned to Taylor's Falls, Minnesota, either in 1852 or in 1856, then settled in Stillwater, Minnesota, was an incorporator of the St. Croix Bridge Company in 1854, married Clarinda Wyman (1820-1860) in 1856 at Skowhegan, Maine, was appointed warden of the penitentiary at Stillwater, Minnesota, in 1868, moved to Ashland, Wisconsin, in 1896, died either in Ashland, Wisconsin, or in Taylors Falls, Chisago County, Minnesota, and was buried at the Kahbakong Cemetery, Taylors Falls, Chisago County, Minnesota. Before 1910, E. D. Whitney was the general agent for the Louisiana Railway & Navigation Company. Erasmus/Erastus Darwin “E. D.” Whiting (1811-1880) was born in Vernon Centre, Massachusetts/New York, was educated in the Vernon Centre, Massachusetts, common schools, attended Westfield Academy, graduated from the Ohio Medical School in 1832, practiced medicine in Ashtabula, Ohio, for three years, practiced medicine in Pike County, Illinois, for 20 years, married Emily B. Bradley (1816-1866,) the daughter of Gurdon Bradley and Phebe Smith, in 1837, was a physician and surgeon, settled at Rockfort, Pike County, Illinois, and moved to Taylors Falls, Minnesota, on the St. Croix River, in 1855 or 1856, retired from the practice of medicine in 1857, engaged in the mercantile and lumbering businesses from 1857 until 1867, was a Republican, served in the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Chisago County, Minnesota, Kanabec County, Minnesota, Pine County, Minnesota, and Washington County, Minnesota (District ,) from 1860 until 1863, married Francis L. “Fannie” Smith (1830-1872,) the widow of Dr. Lucius B.) Smith (1824-1862,) in 1869, visited Europe in 1869, died in Taylor's Falls, Minnesota, and was buried in the Kahbakong Cemetery, Taylors Falls, Chisago County, Minnesota.

Theifman Forest Products Company RailRoad: After 1924, the Theifman Forest Products Company of St. Paul owned a single 1899 Class C 40-3 56,000 lbs. coal-fueled Shay geared locomotive, #6, that was previously owned by the A. A. Bigelow & Company and the Washburn & Northwestern RailRoad in Washburn, Wisconsin, by the Bigelow & Washburn Lumber Company and the Washburn & Northwestern RailRoad in Washburn, Wisconsin, by the Edward Hines Lumber Company and the White River RailRoad in Cusson, Wisconsin, by the Stearns & Culver Lumber Company in L'Anse, Michigan, by the Ford Motor Car Company in L'Anse, Michigan, and by the Michigan Iron, Land & Lumber Company.

Thompson Greer & Company RailRoad The company railroad owned four Shay geared steam locomotives, manufactured by the Lima Locomotive Works in 1906 at Lima, Ohio, a special class of four locomotives (serial numbers 1642, 1643, 1644 and 1645) built for the company, which were located at Buhl, Minnesota. James Robert Thompson ( -1922,) of Ironwood, Michigan, and Howard Greer, Jr., of Chicago, Illinois, were co-inventors in 1904 of an excavator (U. S. Patent #878,460 (1908)) and were the principals of the Chicago, Illinois, mining machinery manufacturing company. Howard Greer, Jr., was the inventor of improved ore chutes (U. S. Patent #743,433) in 1903, an apparatus for mining sulfur (U. S. Patent #977,444) in 1910, and a coke drawing machine (U. S. Patent #977,522) in 1910. Howard Greer was a principal in the Greer Contracting Company and in Thompson, Greer & Company. Thompson, Greer & Company was associated with the J. Neils Lumber Company. The J. Neils Lumber Company was incorporated in 1895 at Sauk Rapids, Minnesota, operated at Sauk Rapids, Minnesota, and Cass Lake, Minnesota, purchased timberlands in Flathead and Lincoln counties, Montana, in 1906-1907, ended operations at Cass Lake, Minnesota, in 1923, expanded into Washington State, merged with the St. Regis Paper Company min 1957, and had most of its remaining assets sold to Stimson Lumber and Plum Creek Timber Company. Howard Greer, Jr. (1865-1915,) the son of Howard Greer, a graduate of Allegheny College at Meadville, Pennsylvania, and Abrilla Ecoff Greer, was born in Cleveland, Ohio, grew up in Rochester, Pennsylvania, Marietta, Ohio, and Chicago, Illinois, received his preparatory training at the Lake View,Illinois, high school, graduated from the Scheffield Scientific School at Yale University in mechanical engineering in 1889, then was a draftsman for Morris Sellers & Company in Chicago, Illinois, and later, traveled to Canada and to England and France to introduce patents controlled by Morris Sellers & Company, married Helen Cossett Lyman, the daughter of Henry Munson Lyman and Sarah Clark Lyman, in 1892 in Chicago, Illinois, became the mechanical superintendent for the Heywood & Merrill Chain Factory of Chicago, Illinois, in 1894, was employed by the National Contracting Company of New York on the work on the Erie Canal after 1895, moved to Syracuse, New York, in 1897, was the superintendent of motive power for the Syracuse Rapid Transit Company for two years, then was the chief engineer of the Lake Shore Engine Works in Marquette, Michigan, afterwards was the general manager of the Thompson-Greer Company in Chicago, Illinois, was the works manager for the Bucyrus Company at Evansville, Indiana, for two years, lived in Detroit, Michigan, after 1914, was connected with the McCord Manufacturing Company as chief engineer, died at the Harper Hospital in Detroit, Michigan, after undergoing an operation for tumor of the brain, and was buried in Rosehill Cemetery in Chicago, Illinois. From 1878 until 1945, 3,354 Shay locomotives, invented by Ephraim Shay (1839-1916,) an Ohio schoolteacher, physician, civil engineer, logger, merchant, railway owner and inventor, were built. Shay locomotives were built in many sizes, configurations, and gauges. The Shay locomotive has a very distinct frontal profile due to the great weight of the two or three vertical steam engines on the right side of the locomotive and the geared drive shaft arrangement and the need to offset the boiler to the opposite side to balance. Shay locomotives were unique in having side-mounted vertical pistons driving wheels that were mounted on bogies via a gearing mechanism. The Shay locomotive was able to negotiate tight corners because of the bogied driving wheels, and to handle steep grades because of the gearing and the positioning of the entire weight of the locomotive to maximize rail adhesion. Shay locomotives were fueled variously by wood, coal, oil, gas and even diesel fuel.

Toledo & Northwestern RailRoad: The railroad was chartered in Iowa by William F. Johnston and Major __?__ Clay in 1869. In 1869, the officers of the railroad were William H. Harrison, president, W. F. Johnston, vice-president, John G. Safely, secretary, H. Galley, treasurer, and V. C. Whitten, general superintendent, and the members of the board of directors were W. F. Johnston, Leander Clark, W. H. Harrison, H. Galley, Stephen Foster, W. H. Stivers, and L. B. Nelson. The railroad operated 11 miles of rail trackage by 1880, was reorganized in 1881, was intended to run from Toledo, Tama County, Iowa, to some point along the course of the Missouri River, was the successor to the Des Moines & Minnesota Railroad, operated until 1890, and was succeeded by the Chicago & North Western RailRoad.

Tower Company/Tower Logging RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1895, was incorporated in 1895, had its general office in Tower, Minnesota, owned one Shay geared steam locomotive, was located at Murray, Minnesota, a railway station five miles east of Tower, Minnesota, initially did contract logging for other companies and transported logs on its railroad, then purchased an old sawmill from Wisconsin, moved it to Bear Head Lake, Minnesota, and began logging on its own behalf in 1899, operated 20 miles of standard rail line from East of Tower, Minnesota, to Bear Head Lake, Minnesota, in 1901, owned three locomotives in 1902, owned 100 logging cars in 1902, owned 400,000,000 feet of standing pine trees in 1902, was purchased for $225,000 by the Tower Lumber Company in 1901, operated 16 miles of rail line in 1902, and operated until 1906.

Tower Lumber Company: The company was organized by __?__ Barker and __?__ Woodard of Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin, in 1899 and was incorporated in 1900. The company constructed a temporary rail line from Pine Lake, Minnesota, to Lake Vermillion, Minnesota, between 1900 and 1910 or 1920. The company purchased the Bear Head Lake lumber mill from __?__ Allen, after the Howe Company burned out about 1899. The Bear Head Lake lumber mill had a narrow guage railroad from the Duluth & lron Range RailRoad at Murray, Minnesota, to the mill, and which the Tower Lumber Company modified into a full width rail line as a three rail rail line. The Tower Lumber Company introduced a steam hauler at Eagle’s Nest Lake, Minnesota, in 1900. Barker and Woodard closed their operation in 1910. The Tower Lumber Company owned two Lima Shay geared locomotive around 1901, Tower Lumber Company No. 1, the disposition of which is unknown, and Tower Lumber Company No. 2, which was sold to an Oregon lumber operator. In State v. Tower Lumber Company, 100 Minn. 42, 110 N. W. 254 (1910,) the Minnesota Supreme Court held that Laws 1905, Chapter 344, providing for the work of the game and fish commission in gathering fish spawn did not impose unreasonable restrictions on the company in their use of a navigable stream. The Alger-Smith Company purchased the Tower Lumber Company mill in 1908 or 1910 and subsequently transferred the property to the Trout Lake Lumber Company, owned by Wirt Cook and W. G. Ketcham, in 1910 or 1911. Jacob Mortenson (1849- ) was the president of the company in 1899. Edmund D. Graff (1846-1912,) the son of Peter Graff (1808-1890) and Susan Lobingier Graff, was born at Worthington, Pennsylvania, had a district school education in Pennsylvania, graduated from the Western University at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania,in 1868, was employed in the office of Graff, McDivitt & Company, manufacturers, at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, succeeded to his father's interests in the woolen mills at Worthington, Pennsylvania, became interested at Duluth, Minnesota, in lumber manufacturing as senior member of the firm of Graff, Little & Company in 1880, was a Democrat, served in the Pennsylvania General Assembly, was a delegate to the Democratic Party National Convention in 1884, incorporated and was president in the business as the Scott-Graff Lumber Company in 1889, was the president of the Howe Lumber Company, of Tower, Minnesota, was the largest stockholder and a member of the board of directors of the Tower Lumber Company in 1900, married Melvina Wolfe in 1901, was also a stockholder in the First National Bank of Duluth, Minnesota, was a member of the board of directors of the First State Bank of Tower, Minnesota, was the senior partner of the firm operating the Buffalo Woolen Mills, and was a member of the board of trustees of the Pennsylvania College, of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. Jacob Mortenson (1849-1924,) the son of a farmer, was born in Aalborg, Denmark in 1849, and was educated in Danish schools, emigrated to the United States in 1866, resided in Manistee, Michigan, began his career in the woods, moved to Uniongrove, Wisconsin, moved to Council Bluffs, Iowa, studied telegraphy at night, worked as a telegraph operator and station agent for some years in Missouri, operated a retail lumber yard in Fayette, Missouri, from 1875 until 1883, bought an interest in the McDonald Lumber Company in Kansas City, Missouri, in 1883, became the manager of the McDonald Lumber Company lumber operation at Wausau, Wisconsin, entered into various partnerships with Charles Winton, Fowler Stone, John Garth, and others, married Ida Ernstine Mueller in 1888 in Wausau, Wisconsin, partnered with Charles Edgar and operated a retail business in Galesburg, Illinois, until 1893, incorporated the Jacob Mortenson Lumber Company in 1893, took over the Leahy & Beebe sawmill, formed the Alexander & Edgar Lumber Company in 1899, purchased the Lea-Ingram Lumber Company at Iron River, Wisconsin, in 1899, expanded business into Minnesota, organized the Tower Lumber Company from the remains of the Howe Lumber Company mills, which had burned,was a shareholder in the Red Cliff Lumber Company of Duluth, Minnesota, left the Wausau, Wisconsin, in 1904, moved to Oak Park, Illinois, was a member of the board of directors of the Wisconsin & Arkansas Lumber Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Pike City Lumber Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Wausau Southern Lumber Company, was a member of the Union Club of Chicago, was a member of the board of directors of the Avenue State Bank of Oak Creek, Illinois, was a member of the board of directors of the Standard Trust & Savings Bank of Chicago, Illinois, was a member of the board of directors of the Security National Bank of Pasadena, California, was the president of the Tower Land & Improvement Company, was the president of the Greenville Lumber Company in Greenville, Illinois, was a member of the board of directors and the vice president of the North Avenue State Bank, was a member of the board of directors of the Colonial Trust & Savings Bank, and died in Pasadena, California, of heart failure.. a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/TNHrail2.html" [See note on Wirt H. Cook for the Virginia & Rainy Lake Company.]

Tower & Soudan Street RailRoad: In 1890, the Tower, Minnesota, common council enacted an ordinance authorizing the Tower-Soudan Street Railway Company the right to construct, operate and maintain a street railway in the city for 20 years if the railway company met certain conditions and the electorate of the City of Tower, Minnesota, voted ion favor if the issuance of $6,000 in bonds for the benefit of the railroad. In 1891, under Special Laws of Minnesota 1891, Chapter 147, the applicable cities were authorized to issue bonds to induce the formation of the street railroad. In 1893, the railroad had 8.5 miles of track, utilized locomotives, had eight rail cars, had capital stock of $40,000, had as its board of directors G. J. Aitkins, Fred Barrett, A. L. Humphreys, John P. Morrow, and Joseph Sellwood, and its officers were G. J. Aitkins, president, John P. Morrow, treasurer, and Fred Barrett, secretary. The railroad operated until early in 1894, when the company abandoned the rail line and went insolvent. Arthur H. Crassweller was named the receiver of the street railway company in 1894. In 1895, Tower, Minnesota, withdrew the railway franchise on account of the abandonment of the rail line. Dr. Fred Barrett ( -1892) resided in Tower, Minnesota, was an Episcopalian, founded in l888 the Vermilion Iron Journal, a continuation of the Tower Press founded by __?__ Bingham in 1884, the first newspaper of the Vermilion and Mesabi iron ranges, in Tower, Minnesota, and was a member of the group that formed the Ohio Mining Company, which developed the Ohio Mine near Virginia, Minnesota, in 1892. Arthur H. Crassweller (1858-1951,) the Christopher Crassweller, a furnishing ironmonger, and Sarah Hallifax Crassweller, was born in London, England, emigrated to Rosseau, Muskoka District, Ontario, Canada, with his parents in 1869, moved to St. Paul in 1885, resided in St. Paul from 1885 until 1887, came to Duluth, Minnesota, in 1887, entered the law office of W. W. Billson in 1887, read the law and was admitted to the practice of law in Minnesota in 1888, was a law partner with C. O. Baldwin from 1890 until 1893, married Nellie A. Seaton ( -1909,) the daughter of David G. Seaton, of Potosi, Wisconsin, in 1891, served as the city attorney for Lakeside, Minnesota, from 1889 to 1892, was the assistant city attorney for Duluth, Minnesota, from 1893 to 1894, formed a law partnership, Crassweller & Crassweller, with his brother, Frank Crassweller, in 1897, was a member of the board of directors and the attorney for the American Exchange National Bank of Duluth, Minnesota, was a member of the Commercial Club of Duluth, Minnesota, was a member of the Duluth Boat Club, was the receiver of the Tower & Soudan Street Railway, and was a member of the Minnesota State Bar Association. John Paul Morrow, the son of Judge John Morrow of Towanda, Pennsylvania, was the first city attorney of Chisholm, Minnesota, in 1901. Captain Joseph Sellwood (1846-1914) was born in Cornwall, England, became a miner in 1855, emigrated to the United States, moved to Michigan in 1865, moved to Ispeming, Michigan, in 1870, married Ophelia __?__ ( -1903,) gained a reputation for mining iron ore cheaply, took many large contracts, was the president of tne Sunday Lake Iron Mine, the Brotherton Mine, and the Chester Mining Company in Michigan, moved to Minnesota, opened a number of important mines on the Minnesota Iron Range, including the Adriatic Mine, the Colby Mine, the Cyprus Mine, the Chandler Mine(1888,) the Morrow Mine, the Pearson Mine, and the Perkins Mine, was the vice president of the Duluth & Iron Range RailRoad, was a member of the Nashwauk, Minnesota, Townsite Company, owned several mines and banking institutions, died in Duluth, St. Louis County, Minnesota, and was buried at the Forest Hill Cemetery, Duluth, St. Louis County, Minnesota.

Transit RailRoad Company: The railroad was first chartered under Territorial Laws of Minnesota 1854, Chapter 33, and was rechartered by Territorial Laws of Minnesota 1855, Chapter 27, as modified by First Extra Session Territorial Laws of Minnesota 1857, Chapter I, Chapter 2, was organized in 1855, and its incorporators were John L. Balcombe, G. Addison Brown, Andrew G. Chatfield, Abram M. Fridley, W. A. Gorman, James Hanna, Robert Helm, Henry D. Huff, Samuel Humbertson, O. M. Lord, Henry McKenty, Martin McLeod, William H. Newton, Alexander Ramsey, J. Travis Rosser, Henry H. Sibley, Lorenzo D. Smith, Orrin Smith, and Benjamin Thompson. The railroad had capital stock of $5,000,000, and the original investors in the railroad were Charles H. Berry, M. K. Drew, John Evans, Royal B. Evans, A. P. Foster, Charles Hamilton, H. J. Hilbert, O. S. Holbrook, Henry D. Huff, J. H. Jacoby, E. H. Johnson, H. H. Johnson, William Ashley Jones, John C. Laird, M. J. Laird, William H. Laird, David Olmsted, M. Wheeler Sargent, Edward S. Smith, L. D. Smith, Orrin Smith, L. H. Springer, and William H. Stevens. The railroad was intended to run from Winona, Minnesota, via Traverse des Sioux, Minnesota/St. Peter, Minnesota, to a point on the Big Sioux River, South of 55 degrees North latitude. The route of the railroad was initially surveyed by an exploration party headed by Robert Pike. Abner Lewis (1801-1879) was associated with the railroad after 1856. In 1856, the officers of the company were H. H. Johnson, president, William Ashley Jones, vice-president, H. J. Hilbert, secretary and engineer, and H. D. Huff, treasurer. In 1858, the officers of the railroad were H. H. Johnson, president, L. D. Smith and N. P. Bemus, secretaries, and William Windom and J. H. Harmon, trustees. In 1857, Congress passed an act granting 1,200,000 acres of public lands for the benefit of the Transit RailRoad. Although the railroad’s board of directors contracted with De Graff & Company, a partnership of Colonel Andrew DeGraff, B. F. Barnard, Hernando Fuller, and William DeGraff, to construct the railroad, because of the impact of the Panic of 1857, an economic recession, the railroad constructed no rail trackage, was sold to the State of Minnesota in 1860, had its property transferred to Orville Clark, Robert Higham, John W. Kirk, B. A. Perkins, W. H. Smith, Nelson P. Stewart, and Abraham Wing, operated as a corporation until 1862, was reorganized as the Winona & St. Peter RailRoad in 1862 under Special Laws of Minnesota 1862, Chapter 19, and was ultimately succeeded by the Chicago & North Western RailRoad. John L. Balcombe (1805-1856) was born in Attleborough, Bristol County, Massachusetts, was a medical doctor, was a postmaster in Massachusetts, married Calista __?__, lived in several other states, was a member of the Michigan House of Representatives from Battle Creek, Calhoun County, Michigan, in 1851, resided in Elgin, Illinois, explored the Winona, Minnesota/Wabasha, Minnesota, prairie area in 1852, moved to Minnesota in 1853, and died in Minnesota. G. Addison Brown was an assessor for Nicollet County, Minnesota, in 1853, was an incorporator of the Transit RailRoad Company in 1854, resided at Traverse des Sioux, Minnesota, was a probate court judge in Nicollet County, Minnesota, in 1864 and 1865, and was indicted for extortion for the receipt of a probate judge fee in excess of the amount allowed by law in Nicollet County, Minnesota, in 1867. Charles Henry “C. H.” Berry (1823-1900,) the son of Samuel Foster Berry and Lucy Stanton Berry, was born in Westerly, Rhode Island, was educated in Caton, New York, was admitted to the practice of law in New York, married Frances Eliza Hubbell at Corning, New York, in 1850, moved to Winona, Minnesota, in 1855, was the first Minnesota Attorney General after statehood, from 1858 to 1860, served in the Minnesota Senate representing Winona County, Minnesota (District 8,) from 1873 until 1876, served on the local school board in Winona, Minnesota, from 1878 until 1888, was instrumental in establishing the state's first teachers' college, the Winona State Normal School/Winona State University, was a member of the Minnesota State Board of Corrections and Charities in 1888, was a member of the Minnesota Historical Society, was a territorial judge in Idaho Territory from 1888 until 1890, and was a U.S. Court Commissioner. Andrew Gould Chatfield (1810-1875,) the son of Enos Chatfield (1782-1858) and Hannah Starr Chatfield (1782-1857,) was born in Butternuts, Otsego County, New York, resided at Addison, Steuben County, NewYork, wass admitted to the practice of law in New York, was a Democrat, married Eunice Electa Clark Beeman (1817-1901) in 1836, was a member of New York state assembly from Steuben County, New York, from 1839 until 1841 and in 1846, moved to Kenosha, Wisconsin, in 1848, resided at Racine, Racine County, Wisconsin, moved to Minnesota in 1853, was appointed a territorial Supreme Court judge in Minnesota by President Franklin Pierce in 1853, returned to the practice of law in Belle Plaine, Scott County, Minnesota, in 1857, was a Freemason, was an unsuccessful candidate for the Minnesota Supreme Court, Minnesota Attorney General, and member of the U. S. House of Representatives, was a judge of the Eighth Minnesota Judicial District in 1875, and died in Belle Plaine, Minnesota. Orville Clark (1800/1801-1862) was born in Mount Holly, Rutland County, Vermont, moved with his family to Ohio in 1815, graduated from the American Literary, Scientific & Military Academy at Norwich, Vermont, moved to Sandy Hill, New York, in 1828, married Delice Marice Martindale (1805–1881), daughter of Congressman Henry C. Martindale (1780–1860,) was a lawyer and a member of the law firm of Weston & Clark, was a politician, was a Democrat, was a member of the New York State Senate (4th District) from 1844 to 1847, was a major general of the New York State Militia, invested in the Saratoga & Whitehall RailRoad, was the president of the Des Moines Navigation & RailRoad Company, was a Presbyterian, and died of congestion of the lungs while on a business trip in Des Moines, Iowa. Colonel Andrew Degraff (1811-1879/1893) married Rachel Pomeroy (1818- ,) the daughter of Joel Pomeroy and Mary Campbell Pomeroy, was a railroad contractor after 1850 who did business with the Cleveland, Columbus, Cincinnati and Indianapolis RailRoad, the Transit RailRoad Company, the Indianapolis & Peru RailRoad, the Bellefontaine & Indiana RailRoad, the First Division of the St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad, and the Great Northern Railway, resided in St. Paul, was a Minnesota pioneer, was associated with Elias Franklin Drake, and died in Dayton, Ohio/St. Paul. John Evans (1800-1856) was born in England, emigrated to the United States, married Abigail __?__, resided in Winona, Minnesota, in 1852, was the father-in-law of Erwin H. Johnson, and died in Winona, Winona County, Minnesota. Royal B. Evans (1832-1904,) the son of John Evans and Abigail Evans, was born in Detroit, Wayne County, Michigan, was one of the builders of the first bridge across the Gilmore Valley creek, married Mary E. Parks in 1857 in Winona, Minnesota, and died in Winona, Winona County, Minnesota. Alonzo Power Foster (1816-1897,) the son of Lemuel Foster (1775-1820) and Cloe Powers Foster (1775-1854,) was born in Orange, Orange County, Vermont, initially farmed the family farm in Vermont, married Harriet Thompson (1820-1851) of Orange County, Vermont, in 1844, was the manager of the Troy Conference Academy of West Poultney, Vermont, in 1854, moved to Minnesota, settled a claim and farmed on the half-breed tract in Plainview, Minnesota, was a deputy United States surveyor of lands, was a Winona County, Minnesota, probate court judge from 1855 until 1856, was the postmaster of Plainview, Minnesota, was a shareholder in the Winona Weekly Republican in 1855, sold his interest in the newspaper to Daniel Sinclair in 1856, served in the Minnesota Territorial House of Representatives representing Olmsted County, Minnesota, Wabasha County, Minnesota, and Winona County, Minnesota (District 9,) from 1856 until 1857, sold the Plainview, Minnesota, farm in 1864, moved to Winona, Minnesota, in 1866, was a Winona, Minnesota, alderman from 1867 until 1869, was a member of the Prudential Committee of the Winona State Normal School from 1867 until 1871, was a partner with W. M. Hurlbert in Foster & Hurlbert, a manufacturer of wood working machinery and steam and gas engines, from 1867 until 1868, was a partner with O. W. Hough and W. M. Hurlbert in the successor Hurlbert & Company from 1868 until 1869, was a partner with W. M. Hurlbert in the successor Hurlbert & Company from 1869 until 1871, was a partner with W. M. Hurlbert and William H. Stevens in the successor Hurlbert, Stevens & Company from 1871 until 1877, returned to Plainview, Minnesota, in 1878, farmed and raised Jersey cattle and Norman-Percheron horses in Plainview, Minnesota, was the president of the Greenwood Prairie Old Settlers' Association in 1884, was chairman of the committee on awards of the Minnesota State Dairyman's Association in 1894, and was buried in the Greenwood Cemetery, Plainview, Wabasha County, Minnesota. Abram McCormick "A. M." Fridley (1817-1892) was born in Painted Post, Steuben County, New York, was a deputy sheriff in New York, came to Long Prairie, Minnesota, in 1851, married Betsey __?__, was a federal government agent for the Winnebago Indians in 1851, was the County Sheriff of Ramsey County from 1854 until 1856, was a member of the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota from 1855 until 1860, was a lawyer, was a farmer, was a Democrat, served in the Minnesota Territorial House of Representatives representing Hennepin County and Ramsey County (District 3) from 1854 until 1856, served in the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Anoka County, Minnesota, Benton County, Minnesota, Hennepin County, Isanti County, Minnesota, Manomin County, Minnesota, Mille Lacs County, Minnesota, and Sherburne County, Minnesota (District 4,) from 1868 until 1872 and representing Benton County, Minnesota, Crow Wing County, Minnesota, Mille Lacs County, Minnesota, Morrison County, Minnesota, and Sherburne County, Minnesota (District 30,) from 1878 until 1881, was the land agent for the St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad from 1879 until 1888, was a Manomin County, Minnesota, County Commissioner, died in Fridley Township, Steele County, Minnesota, and was buried in Lakewood Cemetery. Robert Higham was a civil engineer, was a resident engineer on the Utica & Schenectady RailRoad before 1836, built the Auburn & Rochester RailRoad, was the superintendent of the Auburn & Rochester RailRoad, and then was employed by the Hudson River RailRoad. H. J. Hilbert ( -1914) was born in Luxemburg, Germany, emigrated to the United States, was a surveyor, was a Winona, Minnesota, assessor in 1861, was the chief engineer for the Transit RailRoad Company, was the president of the board of councilors of the City of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in 1870, owned property in Kiel, Manitowoc County, Wisconsin, in 1872, was the president of the Minerva Iron Company of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in 1873, was the chief engineer for the Milwaukee & Northern RailRoad in 1873, was a Democrat, was an unsuccessful candidate for the Wisconsin General Assembly in 1875, was a member of the Greenback Party of Wisconsin, in 1877, was the city engineer of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, from 1878 until 1881, was a member of the public works commission of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in 1879, was the treasurer of the F. Dohmen Company, a pharmacy company, in 1883, resided in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in 1888, was a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers in 1888, was a designer of the Marionette, Wisconsin, water works in 1888, was the designer of the Oconto, Wisconsin, water works in 1890, was a member of the chamber of commerce of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, resided in St. Paul, on Fuller Street near Grotto Street, in 1904, and had his house destroyed by a tornado in 1904. O. S. Holbrook married __?__ Evans, was a Fillmore County election judge in 1853, was a Fillmore County grand juror in 1853, and was an investor in the Winona Weekly Republican in 1855. Henry D. Huff ( -1889) resided in Kenosha, Wisconsin, before 1853, landed at the Winona, Minnesota/Wabasha, Minnesota, prairie area in 1853, bought an interest in the town site of Montezuma, Minnesota, in 1853, renamed the town Winona, Minnesota, built Huff’s Hotel in 1855, led the drive to subdivide Fillmore County, Minnesota, and create a new Winona County, Minnesota, was the owner of the Winona Weekly Express, organized the Winona County Bank in 1858, was a Mason, donated land for the Winona Normal School, moved to Chicago, Illinois, in 1873, died of pneumonia and heart failure in Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, and was buried in the Woodlawn Cemetery, Winona, Winona County, Minnesota. Samuel Humbertson was Welsh, was a founder of the village of South Bend, Minnesota, intended to be a rival to Mankato, Minnesota,in 1853, was a steamboat captain, arrived at St. Paul in 1853 on the Clarion and in 1854 on the Minnesota Belle, but when the Minnesota Belle failed to climb the Little Rapids of the Minnesota River near Carver, Minnesota, in 1854, returned to St. Paul, sold the steamboat, and quit steamboating, reportedly in disgust. James H Jacoby (1820-1875) married Ursula Ann Day ( -1874,) came to Winona, Minnesota, in 1854, was a partner of W. G. Dye in a general merchandise business in Winona, Minnesota, in 1854, was a partner of William H. Harrington in a hardware business in Winons, Minnesota, in 1854, was the secretary and a member of the board of trustees of the Woodlawn Cemetery, Winona, Minnesota, was an investor in the Transit RailRoad Company, was an investor in the Winona Weekly Republican, was the president of the Old Settlers Association of Winona County, Minnesota, purchased insurance from the Mutual Benefit Life Insurance Company, then moved to Claremont, Dodge County, Minnesota, moved to Bismarck, Dakota Territory, in 1874, died in Rockford, Winnebago County, Illinois, and was buried in the Woodlawn Cemetery, Winona, Winona County, Minnesota. Colonel H. H. Johnson (1782- ) resided in Winona, Minnesota, was the president of the Transit RailRoad Company, later resided in Owatonna, Minnesota, and was the city attorney of Owatonna, Minnesota, in 1868 and 1869. William Ashley Jones (1822-1914,) the son of General Theodore Augustus Jones (1796-1887) and Mary Rayburn (1800-1824,) was born in Caledonia, Missouri, married Eliza Jane Wallace Burt (1820- ) in 1841, moved to Minnesota, was a a deputy U.-S. land-surveyor in Minnesota in the 1850’s, was a commissioner in the Bureau of Indian Affairs in the Department of the Interior who compiled a roll of mixed-blood Dakota at the Lake Pepin, Minnesota, reserve in 1853, established the first banking office, Jones, Berry & Smith, with partners Charles H. Berry and E. S. Smith, in Winona, Minnesota, in 1853, founded the Winona Argus newspaper in 1854, was a colonel and engineer in chief of the Minnesota militia in 1859, was the mayor of Winona, Minnesota, was the vice president of the Transit RailRoad Company before 1861, was the vice president of the Winona & St. Peter RailRoad after 1861, moved to Iowa in 1863, resided in Iowa, was a journalist in Iowa, was the president of the Yankton, Okobojo & Fort Buford RailRoad Company in Yankton, Dakota Territory, after 1883, was found destitute in a saloon by a St. Paul relief worker in 1902, and died in St. Peter, Nicollet County, Minnesota. John Chamberlain Laird (1825-1902,) the son of Robert Hoyt Laird (1796-1887) and Maria Nevins Fruit Laird, was born at Lewisburg, Union County, Pennsylvania, moved to Northern Illinois in 1850, moved to La Crosse, Wisconsin, in 1851, founded city of Onalaska, Wisconsin, in 1851, was the deputy register of deeds in La Crosse, Wisconsin, in 1851, arrived in Winona, Minnesota, in 1852, made a land claim in Winona, Minnesota, in 1853, was a member of the board of directors of the Chatfield, Fillmore County, Minnesota Land Company in 1853, was a member of the board of county commissioners of Fillmore County, Minnesota, in 1853, formed, with partners Matthew J. Laird and William H. Laird, the Laird Brothers Lumber Company in 1855, married Charlotte M. Jarvis of Chautauqua County, New York, in 1855, established a 600 acre farm in Olmsted County, Minnesota, in 1856, expanded the partnership to include their cousins, James L. Norton and Matthew G. Norton, forming Laird, Norton & Company, dealing in Chippewa River, Wisconsin, lumber, erected the Laird, Norton & Company saw mill in Winona, Minnesota, in 1857, moved to his Olmsted County, Minnesota, farm in 1860 and farmed there until 1863, was a member of the Congregational Church, was initially a Whig, and later became a Republican. Matthew James Laird (1829-1913,) the son of Robert Hoyt Laird (1796-1887) and Maria Nevins Fruit Laird, was born in East Buffalo, Pennsylvania, formed, with partners James Chamberlain Laird and William H. Laird, the Laird Brothers Lumber Company in 1855, married Lydia Louisa Powers (1839-1920,) the daughter of Warren Powers and Matilda Judson Powers, in 1858, withdrew from Laird Brothers Lumber Company, was a dairy farmer in Winona, Minnesota, before 1900, was employed by the firm of Harvey Moland and Company after 1900, and resided at Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, in 1900. William Harris Laird (1833- ,) the son of Robert Hoyt Laird (1796-1887) and Maria Nevins Fruit Laird, formed, with partners Matthew J. Laird and James Chamberlain Laird, the Laird Brothers Lumber Company in 1855, married Mary J. Watson of Clinton County, Pennsylvania, in 1856, expanded the partnership to include their cousins, James L. Norton and Matthew G. Norton, forming Laird, Norton & Company, dealing in Chippewa River, Wisconsin, lumber, erected the Laird, Norton & Company saw mill in Winona, Minnesota, in 1857, married Della Shawhan of Tiffin, Ohio, in 1895, and resided at at Winona, Winona County, Minnesota, in 1900. Orville Morell “O. M.” Lord (1826-1906,) the son of Stephen Sherman Lord (1778- ) and Caroline Badger Lord (1803- ,) was born in China, Wyoming County, New York, moved with his father's family to Michigan in 1837, was a farmer and a blacksmith, married Martha E. Deming/Caroline __?__ ( -1897) in 1848, was elected town clerk, was an ex-officio school inspector, farmed in Lapeer County, Michigan, was the town clerk of Metamora Township, Michigan, in 1850 and 1851, came to Minnesota in 1852, resided in Minnesota City, Minnesota, in 1853, was appointed coroner for Fillmore County, Minnesota, in 1853, served in the Minnesota Territorial House of Representatives representing Ramsey County, Wabasha County, Minnesota, and Washington County, Minnesota (District 4,)from 1853 until 1855, authored the original charter legislation for the Transit RailRoad, built the first saw-mill in the county at Minnesota City, Minnesota, in 1854, was a notary public in 1857, moved back to Michigan, in 1861, employed a substitute for military service during the American Civil War, resided near Kalamazoo, Michigan, from 1861 to 1864, returned to Minnesota City, Minnesota, in 1864, served in the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Winona County, Minnesota (District 8,)from 1873 until 1875, was the Winona County, Minnesota, superintendent of schools from 1875 until 1883, was a member of the town board of the town of Rolling Stone, Minnesota, was a Mason, became a member of the Minnesota Horticultural Society in 1884, raised apples and plums, was a member of the Minnesota State Forest Reserve Board, and died in Minnesota City, Minnesota. Colonel Henry “Broad Acres” McKenty (1821-1869) was born in Pennsylvania, came to Saint Paul in 1849/1850/1851, married Johanna/Johannah D. Gilfillan, took advantage of the boom in real estate in the 1850’s to buy and sell land in Saint Paul and around Lake Como, renamed Sandy Lake as Lake Como in 1856, operated the Como House Hotel, was the king of the real estate dealers in territorial St. Paul before 1857, reportedly owned 50,000 acres of land statewide at the height of his career, privately funded the Lake Como Road, for which he was posthumously reimbursed by Ramsey County in 1870, moved back to Pennsylvania in 1863, moved to San Francisco, California, in 1867, returned to Minnesota in 1869, never recovered from financial losses suffered during the Panic of 1857, and committed suicide with a pistol after a bout of depression caused by financial difficulties. Abner Lewis (1801-1879 ) was born in Panama, Chautauqua County, New York, attended New York public schools, was a member of the New York State Assembly in 1838 and 1839, was a member of the Whig Party, was a member of the U. S. House of Representatives who represented New York from 1845 until 1847, was a New York county judge from 1847 until 1852, was a law partner of Thomas Simpson and George P. Wilson in Winona, Minnesota, in 1858, was president of the Transit RailRoad Company in 1858, and was an incorporator and the president of the Red River of the North Kittson Company in 1875. Martin McLeod (1813-1860,) the son of John McLeod, was born in L’Orignal, Ontario, Canada/Montreal, Quebec, Canada, was of Scottish ancestry, was well educated, was a clerk in Macnider's store in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, was part of the James Dickson 1836 expedition from Lake Superior to the Red River of the North, arrived at Fort Snelling, Minnesota, from the Red River of the North in 1837 as part of a paramilitary group that had split off from the Dickson expedition, was an adventurer, married an Indian woman, was a fur trader first for Benjamin F. Baker and later for Henry H. Sibley and Chouteau and Company and for the American Fur Company, had a fur trade post at Big Stone Lake, Minnesota, was an Indian trader, resided in Oak Grove/Bloomington, Minnesota, in 1849, was a friend of Gideon Pond, donated land for the Oak Grove Church and for the Bloomington Cemetery, founded Glencoe, Minnesota, was a Democrat, served as a member of the Minnesota Territorial Council representing Dakota County, Minnesota, Wabasha County, Minnesota, and Wahnahta County, Minnesota, from 1849 until 1853, reportedly was the source of the name for Hennepin County in its chartering legislation, advocated that all children in Minnesota receive a free public education, returned to Canada in 1853, returned to Minnesota in 1854, engaged in land development and immigrant settlement efforts, and served as chair of the first Bloomington, Minnesota, town board in 1858. William H. Newton resided at Superior, Wisconsin, in 1854, was the proprietor, with Jessie Ramsey and Thomas Clark, of the townsite of Beaver Bay, Minnesota, in 1855, married Sarah Johnson, and was a member of the board of directors of the the Minnesota & Pacific RailRoad Company in 1858. Joseph Travis “J. Travis” Rosser (1821- ) was born in Petersburg, Virginia, was a customs collector for the federal government at Petersburg, Virginia, came to Minnesota, resided at Mankato, Blue Earth County, Minnesota, married Mary Walker Armistead (1821-1857) in 1843, was a Democrat, was the Secretary of Minnesota Territory from 1853 until 1857, appointed by President Franklin Pierce to replace Alexander Wilkin, resigned his post because of the ill health of his wife, was a delegate to Democratic National Convention from Minnesota in 1860, was a supporter of slavery, returned to the South, and was a Major in the Tenth Regiment of the Virginia Cavalry of the Confederate States of America in 1862 during the American Civil War. Martin Wheeler “M. W.” Sargent/Sargeant (1822-1866,) the son of Christopher Sargent (1791-1880,) a stone mason, and Sarah Wheeler Sargent (1798-1842,) was born in Danville, Caledonia County, Vermont,married Harriet Bingham (1827- ) in 1846, came to Winona, Minnesota, in 1853 as part of a surveying crew employed by William Ashley Jones, was a lawyer, began the practice of law by himself, was the appointed district attorney before Fillmore County, Minnesota, was divided, was elected register of deeds and was appointed the clerk of the district court of Winona County, Minnesota, after Winona County, Minnesota, was created, was the first mayor of Winona, Minnesota, was a member of the law firm of Sargent, Wilson & Windom in 1855, served in the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Winona County, Minnesota (District 11) from 1860 until 1862, was a member of the committee examining the State Normal School at Winona, Minnesota, in 1861, was the Minnesota Militia Commissioner for Winona County, Minnesota, in 1862, served in the Minnesota Senate representing Winona County, Minnesota (District 11) from 1862 until 1864, was a Republican, was an Additional Paymaster I the Minnesota Militia in 1863 and 1864, was a member of the firm of Sargent, Franklin & Keyes in 1866, and died in Winona County, Minnesota. Edward Slade Smith (1827-1885,) the son of Joel Smith and Anna Smith, was born in Chemung County, New York, attended school in New York, moved to Minnesota in 1852, built the first civilian saw mill in St. Anthony, Minnesota, sold the mill when his land ownership was challenged, moved to Winona, Minnesota, purchased 80 acres of land in Winona, Minnesota, with William Ashley Jones, married Mary Frances Burns, the daughter of John Burns, in 1854, was a charter member of the board of directors of the Transit RailRoad Company, constructed a flour mill in Winona, Minnesota, in 1860, built a dam on the low land forming one end of Lake Winona, became a manager of the construction of the Northern Pacific RailRoad to the Pacific Northwest, discovered the Wilkeson coal mine in 1873, moved to Washington State, resided in Tacoma, Washington, was a Democrat, was a financial supporter of the Methodist University of Tacoma, Washington, and died of blood poisoning at San Francisco, California. Lorenzo D. Smith was engaged in the lumber business at Gibson, New York, before 1852, was the land office receiver at Winona, Minnesota, in 1856, and was a major general in the Minnesota militia in 1859. Orrin Smith initially resided in Galena, Illinois, came up the Mississippi River in 1836 as the captain of the Missouri Fulton, was the captain and owner of the steamboat Nominee in 1850, was associated with the Minnesota Packet Company, founded Winona, Minnesota, as Montezuma, Minnesota, on Pike's island 72, the site of "Keoxah," a Dakota Indian village, in 1851 by landing his ship's carpenter, Mr. Erwin Johnson, and two other men with the purpose of claiming title to riverfront and surrounding prairie land, was a shareholder, with ten other investors, in the Galena & Minnesota Packet Company in 1854, was president of the Galena, Dubuque, Dunleith & Minnesota Packet Company in 1858, later was the captain of the steamboat Brazil, and was the captain of the steamboat War Eagle in 1862. Orrin Fruit Smith (1854-1939) the son of Alexander Boyd Smith and Catharine McClure Fruit Goddard Smith (1812-1888,) was born in Winona, Minnesota, received a public school education, worked for ten years at the Second National Bank of Winona, Minnesota, as clerk, bookkeeper, and correspondence clerk, then worked for three years for the First National Bank in Minneapolis, returned to Winona, Minnesota, married Marion P. Beach in 1885, spent four seasons as agent for the Diamond Jo Line, a steamboat company, was the captain and owner of the steamboat Nominee in 1850, moved to Chicago, Illinois, during the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition, remained in Chicago, Illinois, until 1894, returned to Minnesota, was employed as a steamboat line agent in St. Paul, moved back to Winona, Minnesota, was a member of the Central Methodist Church, worked as a spring water salesman and local gas company employee, became connected with the accounting department of the Hayes Lucas Lumber Company in 1905, and was also an avid local historian, writing and publishing numerous articles on early Winona, Minnesota. L. H. Springer came to Wabasha Prairie/Winona, Minnesota, in 1853, participated in the process of separating out Winona County, Minnesota, in 1853, platted and resided in St. Charles, Minnesota, in 1854, was a member of the board of commissioners of Winona County, Minnesota, in 1856, and was an election judge for St. Charles, Minnesota, in 1858. William H. “W. H.” Stevens (1830- ,) the son of Silas Stevens (1799-1854,) was born in Pennsylvania, moved to Lake County, Illinois, farmed in Lake County, Illinois, moved to La Crosse, Wisconsin, came to Minnesota in 1852, married Hetty Houk, was a civil engineer, was a Republican, was a manufacturer, was a agricultural implements dealer, was in the real estate business, was an inventer who received a U. S. patent (#59,475) for improvements in a cheese press, and served in the Minnesota Senate representing Winona County, Minnesota (District 8,) from 1871 until 1874. Nelson P. Stewart was a member of the board of directors of the Detroit & Milwaukee RailRoad in 1856. Benjamin Thompson was an early settler of Superior, Wisconsin, and was one of the settlers who laid out the townsite of of Superior, Wisconsin, in 1853, was an incorporator of the Root River & Southern Minnesota RailRoad Company in 1855, was an incorporator of the Nebraska & Lake Superior RailRoad Company in 1857, was the receiver of the United States Land office in 1860, and was the Indian agent at the Sisseton Agency for the Sisseton and Wahpeton Indians from 1868 until 1872. [See note on Willis Arnold Gorman and the Gorman family for 11 Alice Court.] [See note on Alexander Ramsey for 265 South Exchange Street.] [See the note on Henry Hastings Sibley for 614 North Fountain Place.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/TNHrail2.html" [See note on David Olmsted for the Winona & La Crosse RailRoad.] a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/TNHrail2.html" [See note on William Windom for the Winona & SouthWestern RailRoad Company.]

Trout Lake Lumber Company: The Trout Lake Lumber Company, owned by Wirt Cook (1867- ) and W. G. Ketcham, portaged a steam boat, Ojeda, into Trout Lake, Minnesota, over the narrow gauge railway. In 1917, the company constructed a three mile portage railroad from the north shore of Lake Vermilion, Minnesota, to Elbow Lake, Minnesota, first unsuccessfully attempting to use a 37 ton locomotive and then using a 25 ton locomotive. The Trout Lake Lumber Company cut timber on Lake Vermilion, Minnesota, Trout Lake, Minnesota, and Elbow Lake, Minnesota, until about 1921. The mill for the lumber company was located at Tower, Minnesota. Folklore continues that a logging company locomotive was lost in Trout Lake, Minnesota, and remains sunk somewhere between the Trout Rock and the Five Sisters Islands in the lake. In 1918, the Trout Lake Lumber Company ran out of timber and the mill was dismantled. The mill site was later used by the Minnesota Box Manufacturing Company. Large scale logging operations ended in the Tower area in the 1920s. Wirt H. Cook was the secretary and treasurer of the Trout Lake Lumber Company in 1912. a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/TNHrail2.html" [See note on Wirt H. Cook for the Virginia & Rainy Lake Company.]

Twin City & Lake Superior Railway Company: The railway company was established in 1906 as a a Maine corporation chartered to construct a double track electric railroad between Minneapolis-St. Paul and Superior, Wisconsin, by way of Sunrise, Minnesota, and Grantsburg, Wisconsin, as a subsidiary of the Western Promotion & Improvement Company, a land development firm that handled land promotion for the railroad, and of the Western Surety & Adjustment Company, of Wahpeton, North Dakota, which handled its financial affairs. The length of the railway was intended to be 137 miles. The original members of the board of directors of the railroad were S. O. Carlyle, W. H. Crossland, Peter Eimon, E. W. Farnham, and S. B. Kidder. Portions of the railroad track bed were apparently graded, but the rail line was never completed. In 1907, the railroad was ruled to be ineligible to receive a license in the State of Wisconsin by the Wisconsin Attorney General, F. L. Gilbert, unless it organized under Wisconsin General Statutes of 1898, Chapter 87. The officers of the railroad were E. W. Farnham, president, and J. H. Thomas, chief engineer, in 1907. Louis N. Loomis was the president of the railroad in 1908. In 1908, the State of Wisconsin granted the railroad a certificate of public convenience and necessity to undertake construction. In 1911, the Congress enacted H. 11723 permitting the construction of a bridge over the St. Croix River between Pine County, Minnesota, and Burnett County, Wisconsin. The railroad had 50 miles graded, 30 miles cleared and grubbed, and further construction suspended as of 1917. In 1917, the officers of the railroad were a vacancy in the office of president, J. H. Bradt, vice president, and P. N. Loomis, secretary-treasurer, the members of the board of directors were J. H. Bradt, F. A. Griswold, P. N. Loomis, M. J. Renshaw, E. E. Sidnam, and N. C. Towne, the capital stock of the railroad was $7,000,000, and the general office of the railroad was in Minneapolis. The company was discontinued in 1918. The Western Promotion & Improvement Company went out of business before 1917. James H. Bradt (1847-1930,) the son of James Bradt (1807-1894) and Abby A. Vanderhoof Bradt (1812-1900,) was born in New York, attended the common schools of Oneida County, New York, attended Whitestown Seminary, Whitestown, New York, moved to Iowa in 1870, was a farmer from 1870 until 1880, was the county recorder of Calhoun County, Iowa, from 1880 until 1884, was the mayor of Rockwell City, lowa, was a member of the Rockwell City, lowa, school board, married Kate Sanford (1846-1915,) the daughter of Charles Dibble Sanford (1809-1877) and Susan Hawes Sanford (1812-1893,) in 1899, engaged in real estate and property abstracting, was the president of the First National Bank of Rockwell City, lowa, was a Republican, was a delegate to the Republican Party National Convention in 1900, was a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, was a Mason, was a Knight Templar, operated a summer resort and hotel at Twin Lakes, Iowa, resided in Rockwell City, lowa, in 1917, and was buried in the Rose Hill Cemetery, Rockwell City, Calhoun County, lowa. W. H. Crossland was the brother of E. F. Crossland, the managing director of the Steele, Briggs Seed Company of Toronto, Ontario, Canada, was associated with Northrup, King & Company in 1902, was a member of the Minnesota Crop Improvement Association in 1905, was associated with the Courteen Seed Company, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in 1918, and was the vice president of the Kellogg Seed Company of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in 1922. Peter Eimon (1866-1943,) the son of Ole Eimon (1823-1909) and Siri Thomle/Sarah Thomley Eimon (1831-1886,) was born in Blue Mounds, Dane County, Wisconsin, attended the public schools of Trempealeau County, Wisconsin, and attended the Business College at Whitehall, Wisconsin, was a clerk in a general store at Pigeon Falls, Wisconsin, moved to Osseo, Wisconsin, and in 1889 came to West Superior, Wisconsin, in 1889, opened a retail grocery store, developed a large grocery and provision business, married Josephine Ekern, the daughter of Peter Ekern (1837-1899,) in Pigeon Falls, Wisconsin, in 1892, incorporated the Eimon Mercantile Company in 1895, was the vice-president of the successor business, the Twohy-Eimon Mercantile Company of West Superior, Wisconsin, in 1902, was a director of the Norwegian Lutheran Church of Superior, Wisconsin, owned a large farm near Cooperstown, North Dakota, was the vice president and a member of the board of directors of the Union, Commercial & Savings Bank of Superior, Wisconsin, in 1904 and in 1907, was a Republican, was a Mason, was a Rotarian, was a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, was a member of the Valdris Samband in 1920, and was a member of the board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin in 1921, in 1931, and in 1935. Edward Wilson Farnham was the inventor of the Elevated Electric Railway, U. S. Patent #564369, in 1892, was the inventor of a telegraph key, U. S. Patent #591624, in 1897, was the inventor of the Dynamo-Electric Machine, U. S. Patent #591625, in 1897, was the superintendent of transportation of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy RailRoad before 1904, was an incorporator of the Rapid Traction Construction Company of Custer, South Dakota, in 1901, was associated with the Farnham Company, electrical engineers and railroad contractors in Chicago, Illinois, in 1904, and was the inventor of the protected inverted third rail for street railroads in 1905. Louis N. Loomis (1857-1914,) the son of Horace E. Loomis, was born in Elmira township, Chatfield County, Minnesota, obtained his education in the public schools of Chatfield, Minnesota, was a Republican, was the probate judge of Miner County, South Dakota, in 1882, moved to Jerauld County, South Dakota, in 1883, married Alice A. Nisbet in 1883, was the register of deeds of Jerauld County, South Dakota, from 1884 until 1888, read the law, was admitted to the practice of law in South Dakota in 1886, founded the Bank of Alpena at Alpena, South Dakota, in 1888, was a member of the South Dakota Senate, was the president of the Bank of Alpena, South Dakota, until 1902, was involved in the grain business, was engaged in the operation of several country elevators for 12 years, established in Minneapolis the Loomis-Benson Company in 1904, grain commission dealers, was the president of the Loomis-Benson Company until 1908, was the president of the Twin City & Lake Superior Railway Company in 1908, was a Mason, was a member of the Minneapolis Commercial Club and was a member of the Minneapolis Chamber of Commerce.

Twin City, Pierre & Black Hills RailRoad: The railroad was planned in 1901 as a successor to the Duluth, Pierre & Black Hills RailRoad in an attempt to link the Twin Cities with Denver, Colorado. The 295 mile long railroad was planned by 1906 to run from Aberdeen, South Dakota, to Rapid City, South Dakota and to cross the Missouri River at Pierre, South Dakota. There were hopes to connect the railroad to railroads locted Eastward to the Twin Cities and to extend the rail line Westward to Orrin Junction, Wyoming, where it could connect to the Union Pacific RailRoad. Most of the rail route was graded before 1902. Colonel L. C. Twombly, either of Minneapolis or of Pierre, South Dakota, was a major promoter of the proposed railroad in 1901. The railroad was intended to be a consolidation of the Rapid City & Missouri River RailRoad and the Duluth, Black Hills & Pierre RailRoad. The railroad was never built.

Twin City Rapid Transit Company: The Twin City Rapid Transit Company, a New Jersey corporation, was incorporated in 1891 as a holding company, with the Minneapolis Street Railroad and the Saint Paul City Railroad as wholly-owned operating subsidiaries. The Minneapolis Street Railway Company and the St. Paul City Railway Company began continuous service in the 1870’s as horsecar carriers. In 1886, the two properties began to operate under a single group of owners when Thomas Lowry and his associates gained control of both. Electrification of the horse car lines began in Minneapolis in 1889 and in St. Paul in 1890. In 1893, the railroad operated 205 miles of track, had 651 rail cars, had capital stock of $15,000,000, and its officers were Thomas Lowry, president, W. J. Hield, vice president and general manager, E. H. Center, secretary, and M. B. Koon, treasurer. In 1894, the railroad had 127 miles of track in the Minneapolis division and 120 miles in the St. Paul division, the railroad had 500 rail cars in the Minneapolis division and 343 rail cars in the St. Paul division, the railroad had $5,000,000 in capital stock, its president was Thomas Lowry, its secretary and treasurer was C. G. Goodrich, its general manager was W. J. Hield, and its superintendent was B. M. Martindale. The Twin City Rapid Transit Company operated the streetcar and local bus common carrier system in the Minneapolis-St. Paul metropolitan area from the 1890's until 1970. For many years, the Twin City Rapid Transit Company had four operating subsidiaries which functioned as a unified transportation system, Minneapolis Street Railway Company, the St. Paul City Railway Company, Minneapolis & St. Paul Suburban Railroad Company, and the Twin City Motor Bus Company. Other Twin City Rapid Transit Company subsidiary companies included the Minnetonka & White Bear Navigation Company, the Rapid Transit Real Estate Corporation, and the Transit Supply Company. According to Poor's Manual of the RailRoads of the United States, Volume 33 by Henry Varnum Poor in 1901, as of 1899, the electric railroad operated 250 miles of rail trackage, owned 219 open motor cars, 322 closed motor cars, 129 open trailers, 126 closed trailers, and one private motor car, had $20,000,000 in capital stock, had as its officers Thomas Lowry, president, C. G, Goodrich, vice president, secretary, and treasurer, J. F. Calderwood, auditor, and W. J. Hield, general manager, had as its board of directors R. J. Cross, C. G. Goodrich, John Kean, Thomas Lowry, Clinton Morrison, W. A. Read, and J. Kennedy Tod, and had its general office in Minneapolis. The Poor's Directory of RailRoad Officials, published by the Poor's RailRoad Manual Company in 1905, indicates that the officers of the railroad were Thomas Lowry, president, Calvin G. Goodrich, vice president and managing director, E. A. Crosby, treasurer, E. S. Pattee, secretary and auditor, and Williard J. Hield, general manager. In 1906, the railroad had 317.26 miles of rail trackage, had 650 motor cars, had 300 trailer cars, and had its general offices at the corner of Eleventh Street and Hennepin Avenue. In 1906, the officers of the corporation were Thomas Lowry, president, C. G. Goodrich, vice president & managing director, E. S. Pattee, secretary & treasurer, and W. J. Hield, general manager, and had at its board of directors W. H. Goadby, C. G. Goodrich, Charles Hayden, John Kean, Horace Lowry, Thomas Lowry, Clinton Morrison, M. D. Munn, and W. A. Read. In 1914, Edmund Pennington, the president of the Soo Line RailRoad, and George Partridge became members of the board of directors of the Twin City Rapid Transit Company. The McGraw electric railway manual: the red book of American street railway, published in 1914, indicates that the railroad operated 412.38 miles of rail trackage, owned 900 motor cars, had capital stock of $22,000,000, had as its officers C. G. Goodrich, president, Horace Lowry, first vice president, John R. Mitchell, second vice president, A. M. Robertson, third vice president and secretary, E. A. Crosby, treasurer, D. J. Strouse, auditor, J. J. Caulfield, general superintendent, had as its board of directors A. E. Ames, Frank Bergen, E. W. Decker, W. H. Goadby, C. G. Goodrich, Charles Hayden, Horace Lowry, John R. Mitchell, George Partridge, Sir Henry M. Pellatt, Edmund Pennington, and W. A. Read, had its power plant in Minneapolis, leased the St. Anthony Falls, Minnesota, water power plant, had repair shops in St. Paul, and had its general office in Minneapolis. The McGraw transit directory, published in 1918 by the McGraw-Hill Publishing Company, indicates that the railroad operated 451.4 miles of rail trackage from Lake Minnetonka, Minnesota, in the West Minneapolis, St. Paul, White Bear Lake, Minnesota, and Stillwater, Minnesota, in the East, owned 1102 motor cars, 65 other cars, and nine Lake Minnetonka steamboats, owned the Wildwood Park on White Bear Lake, had a electrical generating plant in Minneapolis, had repair shops in St. Paul, had as its officers Horace Lowry, president, E. W. Decker, first vice president, J. R. Mitchell, second vice president, A. M. Robertson, third vice president and secretary, W. D. Dwyer, general counsel, E. A. Crosby, treasurer, D. J. Strouse, auditor, Foster Hannaford, general manager, and J. J. Caulfield, general superintendent, and had its general office in Minneapolis. The company converted from street cars to buses over a period from the mid-1930’s to 1954, with 715 street cars and 130 buses in 1939, 704 street cars and 203 buses in 1944, 777 street cars and 332 buses in 1949, 295 street cars and 733 buses in 1953, and no street cars and 838 buses in 1954. The Twin City Motor Bus Company initially was the Brown Bus Company, which started in 1919, ran a transit service between St. Paul and Minneapolis on Summit Avenue, and was the first bus service in the Twin Cities to compete with the existing vast streetcar network. The bus service expanded through the years until it was finally purchased in 1925 by Thomas Lowry, the owner of the Twin City Rapid Transit Company. Once purchased by the Twin City Rapid Transit Company, the buses ran express service between St. Paul and Minneapolis over University Avenue. The Twin City Rapid Transit Company was succeeded in 1939 by a new Minnesota corporation of the same name. D. J. Strouse was the president of the company in 1948. A management change in 1949 brought New York financier Charles Green as president of the Twin City Rapid Transit Company, Bigham D. Eblen, a Detroit, Michigan, lawyer, as the chair of the board of directors, Fred A. Ossanna, aprominent criminal lawyer and Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party operative, as general counsel, James A. Gibb, a former Lansing, Michigan, transportation system operator, as general superintendent, and alleged mobsters and alleged mobster associates Isadore “Kid Cann” “Dr. Ferguson” “Fergie the Bull” Blumenfeld, Thomas W. “Tommy” Banks, Harold H. Banks, Archie M. Cary, Jeremiah Murphy, Thomas E. Ewing, Harry H. Clark, Harry Shepard, Max R. Saliterman, Dr. David Ellison, James B. Aune, James H. Towey, Gilbert W. Kitt, William “Weeping Willie” Hecht, Earl A. Jeffords, Charles Holleran, and Phillip “Flippy” Share, as stockholders. The new leadership of the company decided to abandon the streetcar lines and convert to buses as quickly as possible. In 1950, Thomas H. Banks was the president of the company, Harold H. Banks was the vice president of the company, and James Gibb and A. D. Robertson were members of the board of directors of the company. In 1951, Emil B. Aslesen was the president of the company and Fred A. Ossanna was the general counsel of the company. The company's entire streetcar fleet was scrapped and was replaced by buses in an aggressive conversion plan completed in 1954 under Twin City Rapid Transit Company president Fred A. Ossanna, a former associate of Charles Green, who managed to oust Green as chair of the board of directors of the company in 1951. In 1954, Benson “Barney” M. Larrick was the vice president and general manager of the company, Dr. David Ellison was the executive vice president and medical director of the company, Harry Duncan was the comptroller of the company, and James Towy/Towley was the secretary-treasurer of the company. Ossanna, four of his associates, and Minneapolis scrap metal dealer Fred Isaacs were convicted in 1960 of defrauding the Twin City Rapid Transit Company of company assets, including scrap metal and real estate, during the conversion. Twin City Rapid Transit Company changed its name in 1962 to Minnesota Enterprises Incorporated, and, in 1970, this firm became the MEI Corporation. Carl Pohlad was the eventual successor of Fred Ossanna as head of Twin City Lines in the 1960’s and ultimately sold the company in 1970. The MEI Corporation left the transit business in 1970 with the takeover of its Twin City Lines subsidiary by the Twin Cities Area Metropolitan Transit Commission/Metropolitan Transit Commission/Metropolitan Council. In 1889, Edward H. Center was the secretary and auditor of the Minneapolis, Lyndale & Minnetonka Railway Company. Clinton Morrison (1842–1913) was born in Maine, moved to Minnesota in 1855, settled in St. Anthony, Minnesota, attended the Union school in Minneapolis, completed his education in Racine, Wisconsin, entered into a partnership with his brother, George H. Morrison, initially in the business of outfitting lumbermen and ultimately in developing pine lands, mills and lumber operations, married Julia Kellogg Washburn( -1883,) the daughter of Nehemiah Washburn and Martha Parmelee Washburn, owned, with his father , Dorilus Morrison, much of the stock of the Minneapolis Harvester Works, convinced the Minneapolis Harvester Works to adopt the Appleby twine binder, was the president of the Farmers & Mechanics Savings Bank of Minneapolis in 1876, engaged in the construction of the Northern Pacific RailRoad, was the president of the Great Western Elevator Company, was the president of the Northwestern Knitting Company, was the president of the North American Telegraph Company, was the vice president of the North Star Woolen Mills Company, sold the Minneapolis Harvester Works to the Walter A. Wood Harvester Company in 1892, was a member of the Church of the Redeemer, Universalist, donated the Dorilus Morrison mansion to the Minneapolis Society of Fine Arts, and was a member of the Minneapolis Club. Willard James Hield (1863-1947) was born in Janesville, Wisconsin, was educated in the Janesville, Wisconsin, public and high schools, operated a coal, wood and hay press business with his father and his brother George C. in Janesville, Clinton and Monroe, Wisconsin, from 1879 to 1883, was employed by Bassett & Echlin in Janesville from 1883 until 1887, married Robertena Porter Freeman (1863-1939,) the daughter of Reuben G. Freeman and Elizabeth G. Brackett Freeman, of Cambridge, Massachusetts, in 1885 in Minneapolis, returned to Janesville, Wisconsin, moved to Minneapolis in 1887, was employed in a clerical position by the Minneapolis Street Railway Company in 1887, was made superintendent of the Minneapolis Street Railway Company in 1891, became the general manager of the Twin City Rapid Transit Company, a holding company owning both the Minneapolis and the St. Paul Street Railway Companies, in 1891, was elected vice president of the combined companies in 1909, was the vice president of the Minneapolis & St. Paul RailRoad in 1911, became a member of the Minneapolis Club in 1912, resigned his position with the Twin City Rapid Transit Company in 1913, was active in the F.L. Jackson Coal Company of Minneapolis, in which he had a half interest, from 1913 until it was dissolved in 1923, became a member of the Minneapolis Society of Fine Arts in 1914, organized the Willard J. Hield Corporation, a wholesale coal dealer, with Ena Freeman Hield and Clifford C. Hield in 1913, was appointed co-receiver, with E.N. Best ,of the M.W. Savage Company, a Minneapolis mail order house, in 1932, and dissolved the Willard J. Hield Corporation in 1933. Richard J. Cross of New York, New York, was a member of the board of directors of the Canadian Pacific RailRoad in 1888, when it purchased the Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic RailRoad, and in 1891, was a member of the board of directors of the the Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic RailRoad in 1890, was a member of the board of directors of the Manhattan Trust Company in 1892, was a a member of the board of directors of the Elgin, Joliet & Eastern Railway Company in 1898, was associated with Morton, Bliss & Company, a banking house, in 1898, was a a member of the board of trustees of the Manchester Fire Assurance Company of England in 1898, resigned from the board of directors of the Twin City Rapid Transit Company in 1901, was the second vice president of the American Locomotive Company in 1902, was a a member of the board of directors of the Allis-Chalmers Company in 1910, was a member of the board of directors of the the Commercial Union Fire Insurance Company of New York in 1915, and was a member of the board of directors of the the Commercial Union Assurance Company, Limited, of England in 1915. John F. Calderwood (1859-1914) was born in Reford, Michigan, was educated in the public and high schools of Fenton, Michigan, attended the University of Michigan, taught for one year in an Indiana State Normal School, was employed by T. H. McGraw & Company lumber firm at Bay City, Michigan, then moved to Minneapolis and was an accountant and credit manager employed by the Folds & Griffith carpet company, became the Minneapolis City Comptroller in 1888, became the comptroller of the Minneapolis Street Railway in 1889, subsequently became the comptroller of the Twin City Rapid Transit Company, returned to New York, New York, in the late 1890’s to rehabilitate the Third Avenue RailRoad, was the assistant to J. L. Greatsinger with the Brooklyn Rapid Transit Company in 1902, was a founder of the American Electiric Railway Accountants’ Association, was the general manager of the Brooklyn Rapid Transit Company in 1909, was an investor in the Coney Island & Gravesend Railway Company in 1909, was an investor in the Brooklyn, Queens County & Suburban Railway Company in 1909, became the vice president and general manager of the Brooklyn Rapid Transit Company, resigned from his positions with the Brooklyn Rapid Transit Company in 1914, was a member of the board of directors of the Home Trust Company of Brooklyn, New York, was a member of the Union League Club of New York, was a member of the Crescent Athletic Club of Brooklyn, New York, was a member of the Montauk Club of Brooklyn, New York, was a member of the Hamilton Club of Brooklyn, New York, and died in Minneapolis. John Kean (1852–1914) was born at Liberty Hall at Ursino University/Kean University near Elizabeth, New Jersey, studied in private schools, attended Yale College, graduated from the Columbia Law School, New York City, in 1875, was admitted to the practice of law in New Jersey in 1877, did not engage in an extensive practice of law, resided in Elizabeth, New Jersey, worked in banking and manufacturing, entered politics, was a Republican, served as a member of the 48th United States Congress from 1883 until1885 representing New Jersey's Third congressional district, was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1884, served in the 50th United States Congress from 1887 until 1889, was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1888, was the chairman of the New Jersey Republican State Committee in 1891, lost the 1892 gubernatorial race to Democrat George Theodore Werts, was a member of the committee to revise the judiciary system of New Jersey, served in the United States Senate from 1899 until1911, re-engaged in banking in Elizabeth, New Jersey, died in Elizabeth, New Jersey, and was interred in Evergreen Cemetery, in Hillside, New Jersey. William Augustus Read (1858-1916,) the son of George W. Read and Rowland Augusta Read, was born in Brooklyn, New York, graduated from the Brooklyn Polytechnic and the Collegiate Institute, joined Vermilye & Company in 1877, married Caroline Hicks Seaman, the daughter of Samuel H. Seaman and Hannah Husband Seaman, in 1894, became a partner in Vermilye & Company in 1896, was a Wall Street bond broker, was an incorporator of the Rapid Transit Subway Construction Company in 1900, was an incorporator of the Interborough Rapid Transit Company in New York, New York, in 1902, was a member of the reorganization committee for the Baltimore & Ohio RailRoad in 1902, was a member of the reorganization committee for the Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton RailRoad in 1908, was the chairman of the board of directors of the Toledo, St. Louis & Western RailRoad, was a member of the board of trustees of the Alliance Assurance Company of London, was a member of the board of trustees of the Imperial Insurance Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Allis-Chalmers Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Bank of New York, was a member of the board of directors of the Safety Car Heating & Lighting Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Subway Realty Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Twin City Rapid Transit Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Victor Chemical Works, was a member of the board of directors of the Continental Insurance Company, was a member of the board of directors of the International Banking Corporation, was a member of the board of directors of the Pope Manufacturing Company, was an investor in the Kings County Elevated Railroad in New York, New York, formed William A. Read & Company in 1905, when Vermilye & Company broke up into two firms, was a Republican, was an Episcopalian, was a member of the Century Club, was a member of the Union Club, was a member of the Riding Club, was a member of the Metropolitan Club, was a member of the Grolier Club, was a member of the New York Yacht Club, was a member of the Downtown Club, was a member of the Hamilton Club of Brooklyn, New York, was a member of the Apawamis Club of Massachusetts, was a member of the Lennox Club of Lennox, Massachusetts, and died in New York, New York. John Kennedy Tod (1852-1925) was born in Glascow, Scotland, emigrated to the United States, was a wealthy merchant banker and railroad magnate, married Maria Howard Potter (1855-1939,) the daughter of Howard Potter and Mary Louisa Potter, in 1882, inherited J. S. Kennedy & Company, the banking firm of his uncle, John Stewart Kennedy ( -1909,) in 1883, represented Dutch bankers who invested in James J. Hill’s railroads, invested in the Chicago Land Company to develop East Chicago, Indiana, invested in the Kentucky Union RailRoad, invested in the Sioux City & Northern RailRoad Company, invested in the Sioux City, O'Neill & Western Railway Company, bought Greenwich Point Island in Connecticut in 1889, was a member of the reorganization committee of the Richmond & West Point Terminal RailRoad/Southern Railway Company in 1892, was a member of the stockholders’ committee of the Minneapolis & St. Louis RailRoad in 1892, was a member of the reorganization committee of the Philadelphia & Reading RailRoad in 1895, was an incorporator of the Norfolk, Lynchburg & Durham RailRoad Company in 1896, was a member of the board of directors of the Rio Grande Western RailRoad, the reorganized Denver & Rio Grande Western RailRoad, in 1897, was a member of the board of directors of the Norfok & Western RailRoad before 1900, was a member of the reorganization committee of the Birmingham, Sheffield & Tennessee River RailRoad in 1900, resigned from the board of directors of the Great Northern RailRoad in 1901, was the president and a member of the board of directors of the Presbyterian Hospital in New York, New York, in 1908, was a member of the Order of the Founders and Patriots of America, died at Tod's Point, Greenwich, Connecticut, and was buried in the Green-Wood Cemetery in Brooklyn, New York. Edward A. Crosby was a teller in the Minneapolis City Treasurer’s office in 1891, was a member of the board of directors and the treasurer of the Minneapolis & St. Paul Suburban RailRoad Company in 1913, was the treasurer of the Twin City Rapid Transit Company in 1921, and was a member of the board of directors of the Northwestern Bible and Missionary Training School in the mid-1930’s. Daniel J. Strouse (1879- ) was born in Charles City, Iowa, was educated in Charles City, Iowa, and Nora Springs, Iowa, was initially employed by an abstract company, moved to Indianapolis, Indiana, was employed by Fleener & Carnahan, a tax firm, moved to Minneapolis in 1903, was initially the general bookkeeper of the street railway, was promoted to auditor, and then was promoted to comptroller in 1920. Edward Sidney Pattee (1861-1930) married Dora Jewett (1853-1939,) the daughter of Samuel Albert Jewett (1816-1893,) participated in the Klondike gold rush in 1898 and 1899, was a Republican, and was a member of the board of directors and the secretary and comptroller of the Minneapolis & St. Paul Suburban Railway Company in 1911. William H. Goadby (1849-1925,) the son of Thomas Goadby, was a member of the New York Stock Exchange in 1870, was a fellow of the American Geographical Society of New York in 1874, was associated with the New York, New York, brokerage firm W. H. Goadby & Company, founded in 1876, was a member of the board of directors of the Sloss Iron & Steel Company in Birmingham, Alabama, in 1897, was a stockholder of the Richmond & Danville Railroad Company in 1897, was a member of the Richmond Terminal RailRoad Advisory Committee in 1892, was a member of the board of directors of the Evansville & Terre Haute RailRoad in 1900, was a member of the board of directors of the Twin City Rapid Transit Company in 1910, was a member of the board of directors of the the Lanston Monoype Machine Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Sheffield Company of Sheffield, Alabama, was a stockholder in the Kanawha & Michigan RailRoad in 1910, and was a member of the Manhattan Club of New York, New York. Charles Hayden (1846- ,) the son of Sidney Hayden (1813-1890) and Florilla E. Miller Hayden (1814-1869,) was born in Athens, Pennsylvania, moved to Holton, Kansas, opened a law and real estate office, Hopkins & Hayden, ran unsuccessfully for public office, and was a noted railroad lawyer. A. M. Robertson was the general manager of the Minneapolis General Electric Company in 1901, was a member of the board of directors, the third vice president, and the secretary of the Minneapolis & St. Paul Suburban RailRoad Company in 1915, was a member of the board of directors and the president of the Duluth-Superior Traction Company in 1920, and was a member of the board of directors and the president of the Duluth Street RailRoad in 1920. J. J. Caulfield was the vice president of the Cascade Falls Mining Company up the Salmon River in Portland Canal district of British Columbia, Canada, in 1918. Fred Albin Ossanna (1893-1978) attended the University of Minnesota in 1921, was a member of the University of Minnesota debating team, became a lawyer in 1921, was a successful criminal lawyer, was the long-time president of the National Italian-American Civic League, helped found the Sunset Memorial Park and Funeral Chapel in St. Anthony, Minnesota, in 1922, was an unsuccessful candidate for Minneapolis mayor in 1927, was the counsel in the "Bemidji Affair" concerning bidding irregularities on a project for the Bemidji State Teachers College/Bemidji State University in 1938, worked for National City Lines, a company that became infamous for buying up streetcar lines and converting them to bus systems, was convicted of fraud in 1960 for activities of the Twin City Rapid Transit Company during the conversion from streetcars to buses, was disbarred in 1963, and reportedly was later pardoned by President Lyndon Johnson. Sir Henry M. Pellatt (1859-1939), was educated at the Model School of Upper Canada in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, briefly attended Upper Canada College, joined his father's stockbroker's firm, Pellatt & Osler, as a junior accounting clerk, became a full member of the Toronto Stock Exchange in 1882, married his first wife, Mary Dodgson ( -1924,) formed the firm Pellatt & Pellatt with his father in 1883 after his father dissolved his partnership with Osler, was vice-president and was a member of the board of directors of Manufacturer's Life Insurance Company Ltd., was involved in establishing the Toronto Electric Light Company in 1883, was a Major the Queen's Own Rifles in 1895, was also involved in Brazilian power and transportation developments, through Brascan Ltd., was involved in the beet root sugar industry, was involved in the Grand Trunk Pacific Railroad, was involved in the mining industry at Cobalt, established the Kitsumkallum Timber Company, was a member of the board of directors of 23 companies, was knighted in 1905, organized and operated at his expense an entire regiment of the Queen's Own Rifles at the Alderstat manoeuvres in England in 1908, was a funder of the Victorian Order of Nurses, was a funder of Grace Hospital, was a funder of the St. James Cathedral, was a funder of St. Peter's College, was a funder of St. Bartholomew's College, was a funder of St. Simon's College, was a funder of Trinity College, had his wealth decline after 1913, attempted to develop La Paz Oil in 1915, declared bankruptcy in 1923, married Catherine Welland Merritt ( -1929) in 1927, and was the builder of Casa Loma, which became a landmark in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Edward Williams Decker (1869-1956,) the son of Jacob S. Decker and Mary Ann H. Smith Decker, was born in Austin, Minnesota, was educated in the public schools of Austin, Minnesota, moved to Minneapolis in 1887, was a messenger employed by the Northwestern National Bank of Minneapolis, was the assistant cashier of the Metropolitan Bank of Minneapolis from 1895 until 1896, was the assistant cashier of the Metropolitan Bank of Minneapolis from 1896 until 1900, married Susie May Spaulding, the daughter of W. A. Spaulding of Minneapolis, was the cashier of the Northwestern National Bank of Minneapolis from 1900 until 1903, was the vice president and the general manager and a member of the board of directors of the Northwestern National Bank of Minneapolis from 1903 until 1912, was the president and chairman of its board of directors of the Minnesota Loan & Trust Company after 1910, was a member of the board of directors of the Northwestern National Life Insurance Company, was the first vice president and a member of the board of directors of the Twin City Rapid Transit Company, was the president of the Minneapolis Clearing House Association, was a leading member of the Minneapolis Chamber of Commerce, was the president of the Northwestern National Bank of Minneapolis after 1912, was a Congregationalist, was a member of the Minneapolis Club, was a member of the Minikahda Club, was a member of the Automobile Club, was a member of the Chicago Club, was a member of the Minneapolis Society of Fine Arts, was a member of the Minnesota Society of New York, was a Mason, was a member of the citizens staff of the John A. Rawlins Post of the Grand Army of the Republic, and had his summer residence, designed by William Purcell and George Elmslie, at Lake Minnetonka, Minnesota, in 1918. William Dalton Dwyer (1859-1924) was born in Liberty, New York, graduated from Cornell university in 1879, graduated from the Albany, New York, Law School in 1880, practiced law in Liberty, New York, from 1880 until 1883, was the special county judge for Sullivan County, New York, in 1883, moved to West Superior, Wisconsin, in 1885, was a law partner of Frank A. Ross in Superior, Wisconsin, in 1888, married Anna M. Mayer of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in 1890, moved to St. Paul in 1908, was the chief counsel of the St. Paul City Railway Company in 1908, became the general counsel of the Twin City Rapid Transit Company in 1917, was a Roman Catholic, and was a member of the Knights of Columbus in 1921. Charles Green (1908- ) was educated in New York City, New York, public schools, was a member of the Madison Square Boys Club, lost $10,000 during the Crash of 1929, was a coffee salesman, was a furnace salesman, was a salesman of the Gillette Safety Razor Company, was a New York appliance wholesaler, having formed Green Sales Company, wholesaling goods to military post exchanges, in 1934, was a Wall Street speculator, was a New York financier, moved to Minneapolis in 1949, undertook a partially successful proxy war against the management of the Twin City Rapid Transit Company, won an out-of-court settlement of a libel lawsuit against Colliers magazine for a published story entitled ”How Mobsters Grabbed a City’s Transit Line”, subsequently went after the management of United Cigar-Whelan Stores, one of the biggest U.S. drug-and cigar-store chains, in 1951, and made an unsuccessful bid to elect outside directors of the 20th Century-Fox Film Corporation and oust President Spyros Skouras in 1953. Thomas W. “Tommy” Banks was a World War I veteran, was a bootlegger from Canada during Prohibition, and was a Minneapolis night club figure and “town fixer” who controlled the Irish gangs of Minneapolis, who had his bootlegging base in the 1920’s in Dayton, Minnesota, who, along with Kid Cann, controlled Minneapolis’ illicit gambling, liquor operations and houses of prostitution, was allegedly connected with the 1933 murder of Conrad Althen, a bookkeeper for the Minneapolis Combination, was a suspect in the killing of newspaperman Arthur Kasherman outside of Hannah’s Café at the corner of 15th Street and Chicago Avenue in Minneapolis in 1945, who was the owner of the Blue Goose Inn on Lake Mille Lacs in the 1940’s, who was an owner of the Casanova Bar in Minneapolis in 1943, and who was convicted of tax evasion in 1954, prosecuted by Assistant U. S. Attorney Miles Lord. Phillip "Flippy" Share (1904-1969) was an alleged hoodulum who was unsuccessfully prosecuted for a 1931 murder of a North Side Minneapolis bootlegger and bookmaker, who was imprisoned for the cigarette torture of a boy, the bombing of a restaurant, and kidnapping, entered the United States Army in 1942, was a part owner of the Horseshoe Club at Gardena , California, with Tommy Banks, left California in 1950, returned to Minneapolis in 1950, and who was buried at Woodlawn Cemetery, Las Vegas, Nevada. Archie Cary was a Minneapolis criminal defense attorney. Benson “Barney” M. Larrick (1901-1995) was a 20-year veteran of National City Lines who was sent to Los Angeles, California, Oakland, California, Pasadena, California, Salt Lake City, Utah, and Tampa, Florida, to dismantle their trolley lines in favor of buses who later went on as an independent do the same at Miami, Florida, and Buffalo, New York, before going on to hold an important office at Twin City Rapid Transit Company and being convicted of fraud in 1960 for those activities. Carl R. Pohlad (1915-2009) was born in Valley Junction, Iowa, grew up in West Des Moines, Iowa, graduated from Valley High School in West Des Moines, Iowa, in 1934, attended and played football for Compton Junior College in Southern California, attended Gonzaga University in Spokane, Washington on a football scholarship, left college after his senior football season, moved to Dubuque, Iowa, got his start in the banking business by foreclosing farms during the Great Depression, was a partner in the Federal Discount Corporation, which operated loan offices in Iowa, Minnesota, Wisconsin and Illinois, was drafted into the U.S. Army in 1942, fought in France, Germany and Austria, was awarded two Bronze Stars and three Purple Hearts, returned to Dubuque, Iowa, married Eloise O'Rourke ( -2003) in 1947, moved to Minneapolis in 1952, and three years later, became the president of Marquette National Bank in 1955, became the president of the Twin City Rapid Transit in 1960, built a banking, bottling, and baseball business empire, was the vice president of Pohlad Companies, which owned Marquette Financial Companies, United Properties, River Road Entertainment, Stanton Group Holdings, Inetium, Arcadia Solutions, KTWN-FM FM Radio Station, JB Hudson's Jewelers, and PepsiAmericas, purchased the Minnesota Twins baseball franchise in 1984, was part owner of the Minnesota Vikings football team from the mid-1980s until 1991, bought deposits from The Midwest Federal Savings & Loan after its collapse in 1989, sold the Marquette Bank to Wells Fargo in 2002, and died in Edina, Minnesota. [See note on Martin B. Koon for 2265 Summit Avenue.] [See note for Calvin G. Goodrich and Calvin Gibson Goodrich for 1827 La Salle Avenue.] [See note on Marcus D. Munn for 607 Goodrich Avenue.] [See note on John R. Mitchell for 251 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Foster Hannaford, Jr. for 393 Marshall Avenue West.] [See note on Thomas Lowry and Horace Lowry for 670 Goodrich Avenue.] a href="http:// www.msparchhistory.info/FairOaksTNH.html" [See the note for George Henry Partridge for 2500 Park Avenue.]

a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/LakeIslesTNH.html" [See note for Fred Isaacs for 2505 East Lake of Isles Boulevard]. a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/LakeIslesTNH.html" [See note related to Isadore "Kid Cann" Blumenfeld for 2505 East Lake of the Isles Parkway.]

Twin City & Western RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1991. The railroad operates the "Ortonville Line," which was originally built in the 1870’s by the Hastings & Dakota Railway, was once part of the Milwaukee Road's Main line to the Pacific Northwest, and then was operated by the Soo Line/Canadian Pacific Railway between the Twin Cities and Milbank, South Dakota. The railroad has its general office in Glencoe, Minnesota, interchanges with the BNSF Railway, the Canadian National Railway, the Canadian Pacific Railway, the Minnesota Prairie Line, the Sisseton Milbank Railroad, the Minnesota Commercial Railway, Progressive Rail, and the Union Pacific Railroad, has 70 employees, has nine Caterpillar Generation II locomotives, has one CF7 slug unit, and has 700 covered hoppers, boxcars, and flat bottom gondolas. Mark Wegner was the senior vice president of the railroad in 2005, was the president of the railroad in 2012, was the president of the Minnesota Prairie Line in 2012, and was the president of the Minnesota Regional Railroads Association in 2012. Bob Suko was the general manager of operations of the railroad in 2012.

Twomey-Williams Company RailRoad: The Twomey-Williams Company owned two former Brainerd & Northern Minnesota Railway locomotives that it purchased in 1926 from the Minnesota & International RailRoad and used gasoline powered locomotives to move logs on the Minnesota & International RailRoad. Curtis Williams was a partner in the Twomey-Williams Lumber Company. Extensive lumbering operations by the Twomey-Williams Company were conducted in the Pine Island Forest in Northern Minnesota during the 1920’s. The company had a dispute with the Canadian National Railway before the Interstate Commerce Commission in Twomey-Williams Company v. Canadian National Railways, 195 ICC 177 (No. 25360, 1933.)

Union Depot & Transfer Company of Stillwater: The railroad was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1896. In 1889, the predecessor railroad operated 5.5 miles of rail line, was in receivership, and had George M. Brush as its receiver. The railroad was organized in 1896 under the General Laws of Minnesota 1896. The Poor's Directory of RailRoad Officials, published by the Poor's RailRoad Manual Company in 1898, indicates that the Union Depot Street Railway & Transfer Company was under receivership, with George M. Brush as receiver, and that the railroad had its general office in Stillwater, Minnesota. In 1889, the predecessor railroad, the Stillwater Union Depot & Transfer Company, operated 5.5 miles of rail line, was in receivership, and had George M. Brush as its receiver. The Lumber Exchange Building/Water Street Inn building in Stillwater, Minnesota, was built by the Union Depot & Transfer Company in 1890. In 1896, E. S. Buffington was the receiver of the railroad. The Union Depot & Transfer Company of Stillwater succeeded the Stillwater Union Depot & Transfer Company, operated until 1902, and was succeeded by the Northern Pacific RailRoad in 1902. George M. Brush was a Minnesota railway pioneer and was associated with the Great Northern RailRoad. In 1888, George M. Brush was an agent for the Chicago, Illinois, firm of James E. Boyd & Brother, with an office located in Minneapolis. Subsequently, George M. Brush became a traveling freight agent for the Great Northern RailRoad.

Union Depot, Street Railway & Transfer Company of Stillwater: The railroad represented a name change for the prior Stillwater Union Depot & Transfer Company in 1881, acquired the Stillwater Street Railway & Transfer Company in 1881, completed a 0.62 mile rail line at Stillwater, Minnesota, in 1882, went into foreclosure in 1888, and was succeeded by the Northern Pacific RailRoad in 1896. In 1885, Edward S. Brown was the president of the railroad. Edward Scott Brown (1830-1899) was born in Orono, Maine, attended Maine elementary schools, initially learned the millwright trade, was a lumberman, went to the Pacific coast and engaged in the building of lumber mills between 1851 and 1853/1855, married Hannah G. Colburn (1830-1906/1908) in Maine in1853, came to Minnesota in 1853/1855, was initially employed by Franklin Steele, was the city treasurer of St. Anthony, Minnesota, for four years, was the mayor of St. Anthony, Minnesota, for two terms, engaged in the manufacturing and millwright businesses, moved to Stillwater, Minnesota, in 1873, was one of the owners of the Hersey Staples/Hersey, Bean & Brown sawmill, resided in Stillwater, Minnesota, was a Democrat, was a Knight Templar, served in the Minnesota Senate, representing Washington County, Minnesota (District 22,) from 1875 until 1878, was an executor, with James N. Castle and William O. Robinson, of the will of Martin Mower of Stillwater, Minnesota, in 1889, died in Stillwater, Minnesota, and is buried in Fairview Cemetery, Stillwater, Washington County, Minnesota. In 1884, a State of Minnesota trial court appointed Edward S. Brown as the receiver of the estate and effects of the insolvent Northwestern Manufacturing & Car Company, and the Minnesota Thresher Manufacturing Company.

Union Pacific RailRoad: The Union Pacific RailRoad is the largest railroad network in the United States, operating 32,012 miles of track with a route map that covers most of the central and western United States west of Chicago, Illinois, and New Orleans, Louisiana. The Union Pacific RailRoad was incorporated in 1862 under the Pacific Railroad Act of 1862 and its dominant stockholder was Dr. Thomas Clark Durant. John Adams Dix was the first president of the Union Pacific RailRoad. The Union Pacific RailRoad joined with the Central Pacific Railroad at Promontory Summit, Utah, in 1869, creating the first transcontinental railroad in North America. The railroad then acquired the Utah Central RailRoad, the Utah Southern RailRoad, the Utah Northern RailRoad, and the Kansas Pacific RailRoad. In 1869, the officers of the railroad were Oliver Ames, president, John Duff, vice president, E. H. Rollins, secretary, and J. M. S. Williams, treasurer, and the members of the board of directors of the railroad were John B. Alley, Oliver Ames, Elisha Atkins, Ezra A. Baker, B. E. Bates, James Brooks, John W. Burson, C. S. Bushnell, Oliver S. Chapman, F. Gordon Dexter, Sidney Dillon, G. M. Dodge, John Duff, John R. Duff, William S. Glidden, D. Harris, Rowland G. Hazard, Charles A. Lambard, C. H. McCormick, Frederick Nickerson, Hiram Price, Benjamin F. Wade, and James F. Wilson. Church of Latter Day Saints Bishop John Sharp was elected to the board of directors for Union Pacific RailRoad in 1875. After the Crédit Mobilier scandal in 1872, involving bribing congressmen and engaging in stock speculations, it became bankrupt and was reorganized as the Union Pacific Railway in 1880, with Jay Gould as its dominant stockholder. In 1880, the Union Pacific RailRoad Company, the Kansas Pacific RailRoad Company, and the Denver & Pacific RailRoad & Telegraph Company were consolidated to form the Union Pacific Railway Company, the officers of the railroad were Sidney Dillon, president, Elisha Atkins, vice president, Sidney Bartlett, general counsel, John F. Dillon, general solicitor, Henry McFarland, secretary-treasurer, and H. B. Wilbur, auditor, the members of the board of directors were F. L. Ames, Elisha Atkins, Ezra H. Baker, R. P. Buckland, S. H. H. Clark, F. G. Dexter, Sidney Dillon, G. M. Dodge, David Dows, Thomas T. Eckert, Jay Gould, C. C. Housel, Solon Humphreys, Judson Kirkpatrick, Russell Sage, Augustus Schell, W. L. Scott, John Sharp, and George B. Smyth, the railroad operated 1,820.9 miles of rail trackage, and the railroad owned 313 locomotives, 34 snow plows, 264 passenger, baggage and sleeping cars, and 5,777 freight cars. The Union Pacific Railway again went bankrupt in 1893. The bankruptcies led to the Missouri Pacific RailRoad and the Missouri Kansas Texas RailRoad splitting off from the railroad. Charles Francis Adams was the president of the Union Pacific RailRoad from 1884 until 1891. In 1896, the railroad had as its officers Alex. E. Orr, chair of the board, S. H. H. Clark, president, Edwin F. Atkins, vice president, Oliver W. Mink, second vice president and comptroller, Alex. Millar, secretary, James G. Harris, treasurer, John F. Dillon, general counsel, W. R. Kelly, general solicitor, and E. Dickinson, general manager, the railroad had as its board of directors Oliver Ames, E. Ellery Anderson, Edwin F. Atkins, S. H. H. Clark, William J. Coombs, Gordon Dexter, John W. Doane, Grenville M. Dodge, George J. Gould, Marvin Hughitt, Henry B. Hyde, Fitzhugh Lee, Joseph H. Millard, Oliver W. Mink, Alex. E. Orr, J. Nelson H. Patrick, S. Endicott Peabody, Sidney Dillon Ripley, Russell Sage, and James Sharp, the railroad operated 1,829.63 miles of rail line, and the railway had 77 auxillary companies, the Atchison, Colorado & Pacific RailRoad Company, the Atchison, Jewell County & Western RailRoad Company, the Atchison Union Depot & RailRoad Company, the Boise City Railway & Terminal Company, the Boulder Valley & Central City Wagon Road Company, the Bozeman Coal Company, the Callaway Improvement Company, the Carbon Cutoff Railway Company, the Cascades RailRoad Company, the Central Branch Union Pacific RailRoad Company, the Colorado Western RailRoad Company, the Colombia & Palouse RailRoad Company, the Denver & Boulder Valley RailRoad Company, the Denver, Leadville & Gunnison Railway Company, the Denver Union Railway & Terminal Company, the Deseret Salt Company, the Echo & Park City Railway Company, the Fort Worth & Denver City Railway Company, the Fort Worth & Denver Terminal Railway Company, the Golden, Boulder & Caribou Railway Company, the Gray’s Peak, Snake River & Leadville RailRoad Company, the Green River Water Works Company, the Junction City & Fort Kearney Railway Company, the Kansas City RailRoad Company, the Kansas City & Omaha RailRoad Company, the Kearney & Black Hills Railway Company, the Laramie, North Park & Pacific Railroad & Telegraph Company, the Lawrence & Emporia Railway Company, the Leavenworth Depot & RailRoad Company, the Leavenworth, Topeka & Southwestern Railway Company, the Loveland Pass Mining & RailRoad Tunnel Company, the Mammoth Mining Company, the Manhattan, Alma & Burlingame Railway Company, the Mill Creek Flume & Manufacturing Company, the Montana Railway Company, the Montana Union Railway Company, the Morrison Stone, Lime & Town Company, the North Park & Grand River Valley RailRoad & Telegraph Company, the Northern Pacific Terminal Company of Oregon, the Occidental & Oriental Steamship Company, the Ogedn Union Raiway & Depot Company, the Omaha & Elkhorn Valley Railway Company, the Omaha & Republican Valley Railway Company, the Omaha Union Depot Company, the Oregon Railway & Navigation Company, the Oregon Railway Extensions Company, the Oregon Shortline & Utah Northern Railway Company, the Pacific Express Company, the Panhandle Railway Company, the Pleasant Valley Coal & Coke Company, the Portland & Puget Sound RailRoad Company, the Pueblo Union Depot & RailRoad Company, the Rattlesnake Creek Water Company, the St. Joseph & Grand Island RailRoad Company, the St. Joseph Terminal RailRoad Company, the St. Joseph Union Depot Company, the Salina & Southwestern Railway Company, the Soloman RailRoad Company, the South Park & Leadville Short Line RailRoad Company, the Tacoma & Lake City RailRoad & Navigation Company, the Union Coal Company, the Union Depot & RailRoad Company of Denver, the Union Depot Company of Kansas City, the Union Depot Company of Spokane Falls, the Union Elevator Company of Council Bluffs, the Union Elevator Company of Omaha, the Union Land Company, the Union Pacific & Western Colorado RailRoad Company, the Union Pacific Coal Company, the Union Pacific, Denver & Gulf Railway Company, the Union Pacific, Lincoln & ColoradoRailway Company, the Utah Lime & Cement Company, the Walla Walla & Columbia River RailRoad Company, the Washington & Idaho RailRoad Company, the Washington Dalles RailRoad Company, the Willamette Transportation & Locks Company, and the Wood River Improvement Company. The Union Pacific Railway was reorganized in 1897 as the Union Pacific RailRoad. In 1897, Edward Henry Harriman (1848-1909) and an investment group assembled by Kuehn, Loeb & Company bought the bankrupt Union Pacific RailRoad for $110 million dollars. According to Poor's Manual of the RailRoads of the United States, Volume 33 by Henry Varnum Poor in 1901, as of 1899, the railroad was incorporated in Utah in 1897 as the successor to the Union Pacific Railway Company, acquired the Kearney & Black Hills RailRoad, the Omaha & Republican Valley RailRoad, and the Union Pacific, Lincoln & Colorado RailRoad in 1898, acquired the Junction City and Fort Kearney RailRoad and the Julesburg branch of the Union Pacific, Denver & Gulf RailRoad in 1899, operated 2,855.42 miles of rail trackage, owns 549 locomotives, 292 passenger train cars, 7,776 box cars, 758 fruit cars, 1,011 furniture cars, 404 refrigerator cars, 362 flat freight cars, 1,892 coal cars, 67 coal dump cars, one side chute oar car, 2,578 stock cars, 17 combination stock cars, 192 cabooses, and 711 road service cars, had as its officers E. H. Harriman, chairman of the board, Horace G. Burt, president, William D. Cornish, vice president, Alex Millar, secretary, F. V. S. Crosby, treasurer, Ed Dickinson, general manager, and Erastus Young, auditor, had as its board of directors Oliver Ames, Horace G. Burt, George Q. Cannon, T. Jeff. Coolidge, Jr., John W. Doane, Louis Fitzgerald, George J. Gould, E. H. Harriman, Marvin Hughitt, James H. Hyde, Otto H. Kahn, Roswell Miller, Winslow S. Pierce, Jacob H. Schiff, and James Stillman, and had its general office in Omaha, Nebraska. From 1901 until a U. S. Supreme Court decision in 1913, the railroad operated the Southern Pacific RailRoad. Harriman was the president of the railroad from 1904-1909. The railroad also has acquired the Western Pacific RailRoad, the Chicago & North Western RailRoad, the Mount Hood RailRoad, and the Denver & Rio Grande Western RailRoad. In the 1980's, the railroad reacquired the Missouri Pacific RailRoad and the Missouri Kansas Texas RailRoad and, in 1996, the Southern Pacific RailRoad was reacquired by the railroad. In 2007, the railroad had more than 50,000 employees, 8,721 locomotives, and 94,284 freight cars. James R. Young is president, CEO and Chairman of the Board of the railroad. The railroad is headquartered in Omaha, Nebraska. Charles Francis Adams, Jr. (1835-1915,) was the son of Charles Francis Adams, Sr., was born in Boston, Massachusetts, graduated from Harvard College in 1856, was a first lieutenant in the First Massachusetts Cavalry during the American Civil War, fought at the Battle of Gettysburg, was the lieutenant colonel of the Fifth Massachusetts Cavalry, an African-American unit, in 1864, married Mary Elizabeth Ogden, the daughter of Abram Ogden of New York City, New York, in 1865, was appointed to the Massachusetts Railroad Commission after the American Civil War, was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1871, authored Railroads, Their Origin and Problems in 1878, and was the president of the Union Pacific RailRoad from 1884 until 1891, was chairman of the Massachusetts Park Commission from 1893 until 1895, was a supporter of the tax reformist Henry George, was the president of the Massachusetts Historical Society in 1895, was the president of the American Historical Association in 1901, and was buried in Mount Wollaston Cemetery in Quincy, Massachusetts. John Bassett Alley, Jr. (1817-1896,) the son of John Bassett Alley and Mercy/ Marcy Buffum Alley, was born in Lynn, Massachusetts, attended the common schools of Lynn, Massachusetts, attended the Phillips Academy in Andover, Massachusetts, was apprenticed to work for a shoemaker in 1831, was released from his apprenticeship in 1836, moved to Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1836, engaged in the business of shipping merchandise up and down the Mississippi River, was a Quaker, returned to Lynn, Massachusetts, in 1838, entered the shoe manufacturing business, married Hannah Marie Rhodes II, the daughter of William Rhodes and Hannah Breed, in 1841 in Lynn, Massachusetts, established a hide and leather house in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1847, served as member of the Massachusetts Governor's council 1847-1851, served as member of the first Board of Aldermen of Lynn, Massachusetts in 1850, served in the Massachusetts Senate in 1852, served as a member of the Massachusetts constitutional convention of 1853, was a founder of the Free Soil Party, was a Free Soil Party candidate for the United States Congress in 1852, became a Republican, was elected as a member of the United States Congress from 1859 until 1867, was not a candidate for renomination in 1866, acted as a management consultant for one year for the Union Pacific RailRoad at the company's founding, was a member of theboard of trustees of the Union Pacific RailRoad, was involved in a protracted lawsuit known as the Snow-Alley case which damaged both his health and his fortune, abandoned active business pursuits in 1886, died at West Newton, Massachusetts, and was interred in the Pine Grove Cemetery at Lynn, Massachusetts. Frederick Lothrop Ames (1835-1893,) the son of Oliver Ames and Sarah Lothrop Ames, was born in Easton, Massachusetts, was educated at Concord and at Phillips Exeter Academy, graduated from Harvard University in 1854, began work in 1854 in his father’s company, reorganized as the Oliver Ames & Sons Corporation in 1862, was the vice president and a member of the board of directors of the Old Colony RailRoad, was the vice president of the Fall River Steamboat Line, was a member of the board of directors of the Union Pacific RailRoad, was a member of the board of directors of the Western Union Telegraph Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Wabash, St. Louis & Pacific RailRoad, was a member of the board of directors of the Missouri, Kansas & Texas RailRoad, was a member of the board of directors of the Denver, South Park & Pacific RailRoad, was a member of the board of directors of the Oregon Short Line RailRoad, was a member of the board of directors of the Missouri Pacific RailRoad, was a member of the board of directors of the Leavenworth, Topeka & Southwestern RailRoad, was a member of the board of directors of the St. Joseph & Western RailRoad, was a member of the board of directors of the Texas & Pacific RailRoad, was a member of the board of directors of the Utah Central RailRoad, was a member of the board of directors of the Colorado Central RailRoad, was a member of the board of directors of the Cedar Rapids & Missouri RailRoad, was a member of the board of directors of the Sioux City & Pacific RailRoad, was a member of the board of directors of the New England Trust Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Bay State Trust Company, was a member of the board of directors of the American Loan & Trust Company, was a member of the board of directors of the New York Mercantile Trust Company, was the president of the Old Colony Steamboat Company, was the president of the First National Bank of North Easton, Massachusetts, was the president of the North Easton, Massachusetts, Savings Bank, invested in real estate in Boston, Massachusetts, Kansas City, Missouri, and Omaha, Nebraska, was a Republican, served in the Massachusetts State Senate, was a fellow of the Harvard Corporation, was a yachtsman, was an art collector, was a member of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, collected orchids, was a financial supporter of the Massachusetts Home for Incurables, was a financial supporter of the Boston Children's Hospital, was a financial supporter of the McLean Insane Asylum, was a financial supporter of the Arnold Arboretum, was a financial supporter of Harvard University, and died of apoplexy at Fall River, Massachusetts. Oliver Ames (1807-1877,) the son of Oliver Ames, Sr., and Susanna Angier Ames, and a brother of Oakes Ames, was born in Plymouth, Massachusetts, made his fortune making shovels in Oliver Ames & Sons at North Easton, Massachusetts, married Sarah Lothrop in 1833, served in the Massachusetts State Senate in 1852 and 1857, was president of Union Pacific RailRoad from 1866 until 1871, including when the railroad met the Central Pacific Railroad in Utah, contested control of the Union Pacific RailRoad with Thomas Durant, was the president of the Credit Mobilier Company of America in 1873, succeeding Oakes Ames, was a member of the board of directors of a number of railways other than Union Pacific RailRoad, was a member of the board of directors of several banks in Boston, Massachusetts, and in North Easton, Massachusetts, was a vice president of the Massachusetts Total Abstinence Society, was a member of the Unitarian Church, and was the creator of The Ames Free Library. Elisha Atkins (1813-1888,) the son of Joshua Atkins (1783-1858) and Sally Snow Atkins, was born on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, entere the office of Dennis Brigham in the sugar trade, started a business with William Freeman to import molasses and sugar from Cuba in 1838, married Mary Ellen Freeman (1819-1897,) began trading with Cienfuegos, Cuba, as a member of the firm of Atkins & Freeman in 1843, continued to trade with Cuban sugar planters under the firm name E. Atkins & Company after Freeman left the firm in 1849, chartered over four hundred vessels in the sugar trade in 1865, took over the Soledad, Cuba, estate and its sugar-manufacturing business to recover previous loaned funds in 1883, invested in the Union Pacific RailRoad, theLittle Rock & Fort Smith Railroad Company, the Westinghouse Electric Company, the United Fruit Company, and the American Sugar Company, and was a member of the board of directors of the Union Pacific RailRoad. Edwin Farnsworth Atkins (1850-1926,) the son of Elisha Atkins and Mary E. Freeman Atkins, began working with E. Atkins & Company in 1868, became a partner in E. Atkins & Company in 1874, operated the Soledad, Cuba, estate and its sugar-manufacturing business, married Katharine Wrisley (1860-1953) in 1882, was the president of the Trinidad Sugar Company in Trinidad, Cuba, was the president of the Punta Alegre Sugar Company in 1915, was the president of the Bay State Sugar Refinery from 1876 until 1888, was a member of the board of directors of the Union Pacific Railroad from 1888 until 1895; was the president of the Aetna Mills, was the president of the Boston Wharf Company, was the chairman of the board of the American Sugar Refining Company before 1916, and was the president and a member of the board of directors of the Westinghouse Electric before 1915. Ezra H. Baker (1833-1888,) the son of Ezra H. Baker, Sr., a shipmaster, was born in Barnstable, Massachusetts, was initially an employee in his father’s store, was a resident of Boston, Massachusetts, was the treasurer in the Provident Institution for Savings, was a partner, with Alpheus Hardy, of Hardy & Baker, commission merchants and shipping agents, was a partner, with Alpheus Hardy and Charles J. Morrill, in Hardy, Baker & Morrill, was the owner of Baker & Morrill, commission merchants and shipping agents and the successor of Hardy & Baker, was a partner of Charles J. Morrill in Baker & Morrill, which owned a number of ships and operated a shipping business in New England, was a member of the board of trustees of the Boston Lunatic Hospital from 1857 until 1860, was a member of the board of directors of the Central Vermont Railroad Company, was an investor in the Kansas Pacific RailRoad, was an investor in the St. Joseph & Western RailRoad in 1879, was an investor in the Ogden & Syracuse Railway in 1887, was a member of the board of directors of the Tremont National Bank, was the president of the American Loan & Trust Company after 1882, and was the vice president and a member of the board of directors of the Union Pacific RailRoad, and died in Beverly, Massachusetts. Sidney Bartlett (1799-1889,) the son of Zaccheus Bartlett, a physician, and Hannah Jackson Bartlett, was born in Plymouth, Massachusetts, the public schools of Plymouth, Massachusetts, graduated from Harvard University in 1818, taught at Scituate, Massachusetts, read the law in the law offices of Nathaniel Morton Davis of Plymouth, Massachusetts, in 1820, served as a private in the Standish Guards in 1820, was admitted to the practice of law in Massachusetts in 1821, was the law partner of Lemuel Shaw in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1822, married Caroline Louise/Louisa Pratt, the daughter of John Pratt and Mary Tewkesbury Pratt in 1828, was a member of the Massachusetts House of Representatives in 1851, was a delegate to the Massachusetts Constitutional Convention of 1853, argued the first railroad mortgage litigation, Shaw v. Norfolk County RailRoad, in 1855, was a member of the board of directors of the St. Joseph & Council Bluffs RailRoad in 1869, was a member of the board of directors of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy RailRoad in 1877, was a member of the board of directors of the Kansas City, St. Joseph & Council Bluffs RailRoad in 1880, was the general counsel for the Union Pacific RailRoad and was the general counsel for the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy RailRoad and was buried at the Mount Auburn Cemetery in Boston, Massachusetts. Benjamin Edward Bates (1808–1878,) the son of Elkanah Bates, a farmer, cotton manufacturer and merchant, and Sarah Bates, was born in Mansfield, Massachusetts, attended the local schools in Mansfield, Massachusetts, attended the academy in Wrentham, Massachusetts, from 1823 to 1825, moved to Boston, Massachusetts, in 1829, entered the dry goods business with Barnabas T. Loring at age 24, converted to the Christian faith in 1832, was a lifelong Congregationalist and temperance supporter, taught Sunday school at several churches in Boston, Massachusetts, was a resident of Roxbury, Massachusetts, was active in the firm of Davis, Bates & Turner (later Bates & Turner) from 1833 until 1847, was the treasurer of the Bates Manufacturing Company in 1853, was an officer of the Lewiston Water Power Company in Lewiston, Maine, in 1853, invested in the Bates Mill in Lewiston, Maine, in 1854, was a member of the board of directors of the Eastern RailRoad Corporation in 1862, produced uniforms for the Union Army during the American Civil War with cotton he had speculatively purchased prior to the war, was a member of the board of directors of the Boston, Hartford & Erie Railroad Corporation in 1865, was a member of the board of directors of the South Reading Branch RailRoad Corporation in 1865, invested in the Troy, Salem & Rutland RailRoad Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Union Pacific RailRoad, invested in the Indianapolis, Decatur & Springfield RailRoad before 1892, was a member of the board of directors and the treasurer of the Roxbury Carpet Company of Boston, Massachusetts, was the largest of the early donors to the Maine State Seminary, which became Bates College, was the president of the First National Bank of Commerce in Boston, Massachusetts, and was buried at the Mount Auburn Cemetery in Boston, Massachusetts. James Brooks (1810–1873) was born in Portland, Maine, attended the public schools in Portland, Maine, attended the academy at Monmouth, Maine, taught school in Lewiston, Maine, in 1826, worked as an editor for the Portland Advertiser, studied law, graduated from Waterville College/Colby College in 1831, worked as the Washington D. C. correspondent of the Portland Advertiser after 1831, served as a member of the Maine House of Representatives in 1835, was an unsuccessful candidate for the United States House of Representatives from Maine in 1836, moved to New York City, New York, founded and was was editor-in-chief of the New York Daily Express, was a frequent correspondent/contributor to William Lloyd Garrison's abolitionist weekly The Liberator, was a member of the New York State Assembly in 1848, was a Whig, was a member of the United States House of Representatives from New York from 1849 until 1853, was not re-elected in 1852, became a Democrat, was a member of the United States House of Representatives from New York from 1863 until 1873, interrupted by a disputed election with William E. Dodge in 1865, served as member of the New York State constitutional convention in 1867, was a government director of the Union Pacific RailRoad in 1867, was censured by the United States House of Representatives in 1873 for attempted bribery in connection with the Crédit Mobilier of America scandal, died in Washington, D.C., and was interred at Green-Wood Cemetery, in Brooklyn, New York. Ralph Pomeroy Buckland (1812-1892,) the son of Ralph Buckland and Ann Kebnt Buckland, was born in Leyden, Massachusetts, moved with his parents to Ravenna, Ohio, in 1812, attended country schools of Ohio, attended the Tallmadge, Ohio, Academy, attended Kenyon College in Gambier, Ohio, studied law in the law office of Gregory Powers at Akron, Ohio, was admitted to the practice of law in Ohio in 1837, began in the practice of law in Fremont, Ohio, married Charlotte Boughton of Canfield, Ohio, in 1837, served as the mayor of Fremont, Ohio, from 1843 to 1845, was a delegate to the Whig National Convention in 1848, served as a member of the Ohio State Senate from 1855 to 1859, entered the Union Army as the colonel of the 72nd Ohio Infantry in 1862, commanded a brigade under William T. Sherman in the 5th Division of the Army of the Tennessee at the Battle of Shiloh, was commissioned as a brigadier general in 1862, commanded a brigade in Sherman's XV Corps during the Siege of Vicksburg, resigned from the army in 1865, returned to Ohio after winning election to the United States Congress, was a Republican, served in Congress from 1865 until 1869, was the first commander of the Eugene Rawson Post No. 32, Grand Army of the Republic, in Fremont, Ohio, resumed the practice of law, was a delegate to the Philadelphia Loyalists' Convention in 1866, was a delegate to the Pittsburgh Soldiers' Convention, was a delegate to the 1876 Republican National Convention, was a government representative on the board of directors of the Union Pacific Railroad from 1877 to 1880, was the president of the Sandusky County, Ohio, Bar Association in 1879, was a presidential elector in 1884 for the Blaine-Logan ticket, died in Fremont, Ohio, and was interred in Oakwood Cemetery in Fremont, Ohio. John W. Burson (1820- ,) the son of Dr. Edward Burson and Jemima Stroud Burson, was born in Springfield Township, Bucks County, Pennsylvania, moved with his parents to Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania, moved with his parents to Wilmington, Clinton County, Ohio, learned the carpenter's trade, moved to La Porte, Indiana, returned to Wilmington, Ohio, engaged in the mercantile trade, was teller of the Eaton Branch of the old State Bank of Ohio from 1848 until 1852, married Mary E. Wilson, the daughter of Samuel P. Wilson, in 1851, was the cashier of the Cambridge City Bank from 1853 until 1856, moved to Muncie, Indiana, in 1856, was the cashier of the Muncie, Indiana, branch of the Bank of the State of Indiana in 1859, was a Republican, and was a member of the board of directors of the Union Pacific RailRoad from 1869 until 1871, was a member of the board of directors of the La Fayette, Muncie & Bloomington Railway, was amember of the Indiana State Senate in 1871, was a member of the board of directors of the Cleveland, Columbus, Cincinnati & Indianapolis RailRoad 1872, was a Mason, and died in 1872. Cornelius Scranton Bushnell (1828-1896) was born in Madison, Connecticut, became the master and a half-owner of a 60 ton sailing vessel in the New York, New York-New Haven, Connecticut, trade in 1844, established a wholesale grocery business in New Haven, Connecticut, established a shipyard at Fair Haven, Connecticut, invested in real estate in New Haven, Connecticut, was an investor in and a builder of the New London & New Haven RailRoad from 1848 and 1852, married Emilie/Emily Fowler Clark (1829-1869) of New Haven, Connecticut, in 1850, was president of the New Haven & New London RailRoad in 1861, became a friend and supporter of John Ericsson, the developer of the Monitor ironclad warship during the American Civil War, was a member of the board of directors of the Union Pacific RailRoad in 1862, married Mrs. Caroline Mary Paddock Hughston (1835-1887,) a widow, in 1870, was a developer of the Western Pacific RailRoad, married Mrs. __?__ Ford, a widow, in 1889, moved to New York, New York, in 1890, and died in Hotel San Remo, New York City, New York. Oliver Smith Chapman (1811-1877,) the son of Daniel Chapman and Nancy Smith Chapman, was born at Belchertown, Massachusetts, was a wealthy railroad contractor who lived in Canton, Massachusetts, and who, when his first wife, Olivia Cook, died, married Elizabeth Otis, the widow of his close friend William Otis, who invented the steam shovel, and, by 1857, acquired all of the patents on the crane excavator/steam shovel, served in the Massachusetts House of Representatives, was a member of the board of directors of the Neponset National Bank, was a member of the board of directors of the Union Pacific RailRoad, and died in Boston, Massachusetts. Silas H. H. Clark (1832-1900) was born in New Jersey, was a conductor employed by the Central RailRoad of New Jersey in 1864, was the general freight agent of the Union Pacific RailRoad in 1865, resided in Omaha, Nebraska, in 1865, was closely associated with Jay Gould, was the general superintendent of the Union Pacific RailRoad in 1874, was the president of the Omaha & Republican Valley RailRoad Company in 1877, purchased the Utah Northern RailRoad of 1871 acting as trustee for Sidney Dillon and Ernest Richardson in 1878, was a member of the board of directors of the Omaha Electric Company in 1878, invested in the Colorado Central RailRoad Company in 1879, was a member of the board of directors of the Nebraska Telephone Company in 1882, was the first vice president of the Texas & Pacific RailRoad, was the first vice president of the International & Great Northern RailRoad, was a partner in the Omaha Horse Railway Company in 1883, was the vice-president and general manager of Missouri Pacific RailRoad in 1887, resided in St. Loius, Missouri, in 1887, was the president of the Montana Union Railway Company in 1895, was the president of the Bozeman Coal Company in 1895, resided in Salt Lake City, Utah, in 1895, was a receiver of the Union Pacific RailRoad in 1897, died in Asheville, North Carolina, and was buried in the Prospect Hill Cemetery in Omaha, Nebraska. Hoxie Clark was the son of Silas H. H. Clark. Franklin Gordon Dexter (1824-1903,) the son of Franklin Dexter, a lawyer, and Catharine/Catherine Elizabeth Prescott Dexter, was born in Beverly, Massachsuetts, was a junior partner, with William Appleton (1786-1862,) James Amory Appleton, Samuel Hooper (1808-1875,) and John H. Reed, in the East Indies merchant shipping firm William Appleton & Company in 1851, married Harriet Henrietta Cutler Appleton (1828-1857,) the daughter of William Appleton and Mary Ann Cutler Appleton, at Boston, Massachusetts, in 1851, married Susan Greene Amory (1840-1925,) the daughter of Charles Amory (1808-1898) and Martha Babcock Greene Amory(1812-1880,) in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1863, was a partner in the successor business, Samuel Hooper & Company, in 1875, resided in Boston, Massachusetts, was a shipping merchant, was the executor of the will of William M. King of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1883, was an investor in the Benzinger Coal & Iron Company of St. Mary's, Pennsylvania, was an investor in real estate in Washington, was an investor in the Little Rock, Mississippi River & Texas Railway, owned, with Warren Fisher and Fredrick Ames, large swaths of a puddingstone quarry on Mission Hill in Boston, Massachusetts, was an associate member of the Bunker Hill Monument Association, was a proprietor of the Boston Anthenaeum, and was an early investor in the Union Pacific RailRoad. John Forrest Dillon (1831-1914,) the son of Thomas Dillon and Rosannah Dillon, was born in Washington County, New York/Northampton, Montgomery County, New York, moved with his parents from Herkimer County, New York, to Davenport, Iowa Territory, in 1838, studied medicine under the direction of Egbert S. Barrows, M.D., in Davenport, Iowa, in 1848, studied medicine at the Keokuk Medical College/University of Iowa in 1850, suffered from an inguinal hernia, which prevented him riding on horseback and the practice of medicine, then read the law in the law offices of John P. Cook, was admitted to the practice of law in Iowa in 1852, was the prosecuting attorney of Scott County, Iowa, in 1852, married Anna Price ( -1898,) the daughter of Congressman Hiram Price, was elected judge of the Seventh Judicial District of Iowa in 1858, served on the Iowa Supreme Court ifrom 1862 until 1869, served on the United States Circuit Court for the Eighth District from 1869 until 1879, authored Municipal Corporations in 1872, was a professor at Columbia Law School from 1879 until 1882, taught at Yale Law School from 1891 until 1892, was the president of the American Bar Association from 1891 until 1892, was the general counsel of the Union Pacific RailRoad Company, was counsel to the Missouri Pacific RailRoad, was counsel to the Texas Pacific RailRoad, was counsel to the Manhattan Elevated RailRoad, was counsel to the Western Union Telegraph Company, was counsel to the estate of Jay Gould, and engaged in a private practice of law in New York City, New York, after 1892. Sidney Dillon (1812-1892,) the son of Timothy Dillon, was born in Northampton, Fulton County, New York, was a water boy on the Mohawk & Hudson RailRoad, went into business for himself, formed his own construction company, and obtained the construction contract for the Boston and Albany RailRoad in 1840, married Hannah Smith of Amherst, Massachusetts, in 1841, became involved in the Union Pacific RailRoad in 1865 through an equity exchange with the Crédit Mobilier of America corporation, became involved with Jay Gould in 1872, was the president of the Union Pacific RailRoad from 1874 until 1884 and from 1890 until 1892, died in New York City, New York, and is buried in Woodlawn Cemetery in the Bronx, New York. John Adams Dix (1798-1879) was born at Boscawen, New Hampshire, joined the army at an early age, studied law, moved to Albany, New York, was a Democrat, served an unexpired term as United States Senator from New York, was postmaster at New York, engaged in railroad work, was the president of the Chicago and Rock Island, was president of the Mississippi and Missouri Railroad, was the Secretary of the Treasury at Washington, D. C. in 1861, was active in war work during the American Civil War, was appointed Major General in command of New York State troops, was in command of Fortress Monroe in 1862, was in command of the Union Army's Department of the East in 1863, was Minister to France from 1866 until 1869, returned to America in 1872 to serve a term as governor of New York, was defeated for a second term, and was the first president of the Union Pacific RailRoad. John Duff was born in Boston, Massachusetts, owned the railroad contracting company John Duff & Company, was the builder, with partner E. B. Talcott, of the Hannibal & St. Joseph RailRoad, was an incorporator of the Kansas Central RailRoad, was a member of the board of directors of the Union Pacific RailRoad, and was the president of Union Pacific RailRoad from 1873 until 1874. John R. Duff (1844-1891,) the son of John Duff, was born in Boston, was a railroad contractor, was then a successful Wall Street speculator, lost a fortune speculating on the stock of the Hannibal & St. Joseph RailRoad, lost a lawsuit challenging the actions of his broker,William J. Hutchinson, as misappropriation in 1883, and returned to Boston, Massachusetts. Thomas Clark Durant (1820-1885) was born in Lee, Massachusetts, studied medicine at the Albany Medical College, graduated from medical school in 1840, briefly served as an assistant professor of surgery at the Albany Medical College, stopped teaching medicine, married Hannah Heloise Trimble (1826-1901) in 1847, became a member of the board of directors of his uncle's grain exporting company, Durant, Lathrop & Company in New York City, was a broker for the Chicago & Rock Island Railroad, partnered with Henry Farnam to form the contracting company Farnam & Durant, raised capital and managed construction for the Mississippi & Missouri Railroad in 1853, incorporated the Adirondack Railway Company in 1863, was the general agent for the Union Pacific RailRoad–Eastern Division in 1864, made a fortune smuggling contraband cotton from the Confederate States with the help of General Grenville M. Dodge (1831-1916,) was the vice president of the Union Pacific RailRoad, had major financial interests in the companies he used to grade and lay the railroad’s trackage, created Credit Mobilier of America, was dropped from the railroad's directorate in 1869 after charges of defrauding the railroad, was elected a fellow of the American Society of Civil Engineers in 1870, sold almost all of his railroad stock in 1870, lost much of his fortune in the Panic of 1873, was ousted from his position managing Credit Mobilier in 1876, retired to the Adirondacks, died at North Creek, New York, and was buried at the Green-Wood Cemetery in Brooklyn, New York. Jason "Jay" Gould (1836–1892,) the son of Mary More Gould (1798–1841) and John Burr Gould (1792–1866,) was born in Roxbury, Delaware County, New York, studied at local New York schools and the Hobart Academy, was a bookkeeper for a blacksmith, obtained a half interest in the blacksmith shop, sold his interest in the blacksmith shop to his father in 1854, surveyed and created maps of the Ulster County, New York, area in 1854, published History of Delaware County, and Border Wars of New York in 1856, entered into a partnership with Zadock Pratt in a tanning business in Pennsylvania, in 1856, entered into another partnership with Charles Mortimer Leupp as a leather merchant in 1856, gained sole ownership of the the Gouldsboro, Pennsylvania, Tannery after the Panic of 1857, but sold it after allegations were made about cheating Leupp, married Helen Day Miller (1838-1889) in 1863, was appointed the manager of the Rensselaer & Saratoga Railway, invested in the Rutland & Washington RailRoad, became involved with James Fisk and with Tammany Hall, the New York City, New York, political ring, attempted to corner the gold market before speculations in gold resulted in the panic of Black Friday in 1869, became the president of the Erie RailRoad in 1868, attempted to take control of the Erie RailRoad in 1873, was involved in a kidnapping incident concerning a British Erie RailRoad investor in Canada in 1873, was subsequently forced out of the management of the Erie RailRoad, gained control of four western railroads, including the Union Pacific RailRoad and the Missouri Pacific Railroad, in 1879, obtained a controlling interest in the Western Union Telegraph Company in 1880, obtained a controlling interest in the elevated railways in New York City, New York, in 1881, was a president of five railroads and a member of the board of directors of 17 major railroads, controlled 15 percent of the country’s total rail trackage by 1882, withdrew from the management of the Union Pacific RailRoad in 1883 amidst political controversy over its debts to the federal government, was a member of West Presbyterian Church in New York City, New York, died of tuberculosis, consumption and mental strain, and is buried in the Woodlawn Cemetery in The Bronx, New York. Rowland Gibson Hazard (1801–1888,) the son of Rowland Hazard, founder in 1802 of the Peace Dale Manufacturing Company in Peace Dale, Rhode Island, and Mary Peace Hazard, was born in South Kingstown, Rhode Island, grew up in Bristol, Pennsylvania, was educated in a Quaker boarding school in Burlington, New Jersey, returned to Rhode Island in 1819 to join his elder brother, Isaac Hazard, in the management of the Peace Dale Manufacturing Company, married Caroline Newbold of Bucks County, Pennsylvania, in 1828, sold Peace Dale Manufacturing Company/ R.G. Hazard & Company products to plantation owners in Louisiana, Alabama and Mississippi, was the secretary-treasurer of the R.G. Hazard & Company, operated a textile mill in Carolina, Rhode Island, from 1843 until 1863, became involved with abolitionist causes in 1841 and later in the Republican Party, served in the Rhode Island House of Representatives in 1851, 1854 and 1880, was a Rhode Island delegate to the founding convention of the Republican Party in 1856, was a state senator from 1866 to 1867, was a delegate to the Republican National Convention in 1860, retired from the textile business in 1866, invested in the Union Pacific Railroad, and died in Peace Dale, Rhode Island. Charles Allen Lambard (1827-1873,) the son of Allan Lambard, initially resided at Augusta, Maine, married Frances Emily Johnson (1828-1854,) the daughter of Alfred Johnson, Jr., and Nancy Atkinson Johnson, in 1850 in Belfast, Maine, later resided at Boston, Massachusetts, was an investor in railroads, real estate, mining, and manufacturing companies, was an incorporator, with Robert M. Bailey, Joseph Nickerson, and George C. Bosson, of the Arlington Woolen Mills in Lawrence, Massachusetts, in 1865, was the builder of the Chesapeake & Ohio Railway, was associated with the Iowa Land Company, was vice president of the Union Pacific RailRoad, married Abby W. Marble, invested in the Cedar Rapids & Missouri River RailRoad in 1867, was a member of the board of directors of the National Bolivian Navigation Company in 1870, to build a canal around the falls of the Madeira River and the Mamore River and to establish steam navigation on those rivers, and was a member of the executive committee of the Sioux City & Pacific RailRoad Company. Cyrus H. McCormick (1809-1884,) the son of Robert McCormick, was born in Rockbridge County, Virginia, was the inventor of the first commercially successful reaper, a horse-drawn machine to harvest wheat, at Steele's Tavern, Virginia, in 1831, patented the invention in 1834, sold reapers out of his blacksmith shop at Walnut Grove, Virginia, in the 1840’s, moved to Chicago in 1847 and formed the McCormick Harvesting Machine Company, married Nettie Fowler in 1858, became active in Presbyterian causes and Democratic politics, formed a partnership, C.H. McCormick & Brothers, with his brothers, William McCormick and Leander McCormick, in 1859, and was a member of the board of directors of the Union Pacific RailRoad. Henry McFarland (1831- ,) the son of Asa McFarland (1804-1879,) a Congregrational pastor, and Clarissa Jane Chase McFarland (1805-1847,) was born in Lawrence, Massachusetts, married Mary Frances Carter (1831-1912,) the daughter of Eben/Ebenezer Carter and Mary Goodhue, in 1859, was a Major and a paymaster in the Union Army in the American Civil War, was hired in 1871 as a cashier by the Boston, Massachusetts, office of the Union Pacific RailRoad, and was the secretary and the treasurer of the Union Pacific RailRoad, succeeding H. E. Rollins, from 1877 until 1888. Horace B. Wilbur was a Justice of the Peace in Suffolk County, Massachusetts, in 1853, in 1857, in 1859, and in 1864, was a resident of Boston, Massachusetts, was the treasurer of the Boston & Maine RailRoad in 1862, was in London, England, in 1864, was the auditor of the Union Pacific RailRoad from 1871 until 1885, succeeding Benjamin F. Ham of New York, New York, was the auditor of the Boston, Hoosac Tunnel & Western Railway Company in 1882, was a member of the Massachusetts Bicycle Club, and was a member of the board of trustees of the New England Spiritualists’ Association. Frederick Nickerson was associated with Frederick Nickerson & Company of Boston, Massachusetts, the owner of clipper ships in 1849, was an incorporator, with John Adams and Benjamin G. Boardman, Jr., of the Ocean Mutual Insurance Company of Boston, Massachusetts, in 1855, was a shareholder of the Sioux City & Pacific RailRoad in 1868, was a member of the board of directors of the Cedar Rapids & Missouri River RailRoad in 1872 and 1878, was a member of the board of directors of the Union Pacific RailRoad in 1870, 1872, and 1889, and was the treasurer of the National Board of Steam Navigation in 1876. Hiram Price (1814-1901) was born in Washington County, Pennsylvania, attended common schools as a child, engaged in agricultural pursuits on his father’s farm for several years, worked as a bookkeeper for a large commission house near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, married Susan Betts in 1834, moved to Davenport, Iowa, in 1844, engaged in the mercantile business, was initially a Democrat, was the Scott County, Iowa, School Fund Commissioner in 1847, was the Scott County, Iowa, Recorder and Treasurer in 1848, and was elected to the Davenport, Iowa, City Council in 1852, helped establish the newly created Republican Party in Iowa after the passage of the Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854, was president of the State Bank of Iowa from 1859 to 1866, was the paymaster general of Iowa troops during the American Civil War, was a Republican, served Iowa's Second Congressional District in the United States House of Representatives from 1863 to 1869, declined renomination in 1868, the secretary of the Mississippi & Missouri RailRoad after 1869, was a member of the board of directors of the Union Pacific RailRoad in 1870, returned to Iowa, served as president of the First National Bank of Davenport, Iowa, in 1873, was the president of the Davenport & St. Paul RailRoad, again served Iowa's Second Congressional District in the United States House of Representatives from 1877 to 1881, declined renomination in 1880, was appointed the chief clerk of the Bureau of Indian Affairs in 1881, the served as the Commissioner of Indian Affairs from 1881 to 1885, died in Washington, D.C., and was interred in the Oakdale Cemetery in Davenport, Iowa. Edward Henry Rollins was born in Somersworth, New Hampshire, attended the common schools and academy in Dover, New Hampshire, attended the academy in South Berwick, Maine, engaged in the mercantile business at Concord, New Hampshire, was a Republican, was a member and speaker of the New Hampshire House of Representatives from 1855 to 1857, was a member of the United States House of Representatives from New Hampshire from 1861 until 1866, was not a candidate for renomination in 1866, was the secretary and treasurer of the Union Pacific RailRoad, was a United States Senator from New Hampshire from 1876 until 1883, was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection, was president of the Boston, Concord & Montreal Railroad from 1886 until 1889, was founder of the First National Bank of Concord, New Hampshire, was founder of the banking house of E. H. Rollins & Sons, Boston, Massachusetts, died on the Isles of Shoals, New Hampshire, in 1889, and was buried in the Blossom Hill Cemetery in Concord, New Hampshire. John Sharp (1820-1891) was born in Clackmannan, Scotland,. began working in a coal mine in 1828, emigrated to the United States, converted to Mormonism in 1847, led an independent company of Mormons from St. Louis, Missouri, to Salt Lake City, Utah Territory, in 1850, one of the earliest groups of Mormon settlers in Utah, was the the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints bishop of 20th Ward in Salt Lake City, Utah, in the 1856, was a member of the Council of Fifty of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in 1856, was the representative of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in negotiations regarding the construction of the first transcontinental railroad through Utah Territory, represented the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and its president, Brigham Young, at the driving of the final golden spike of the transcontinental railroad in 1869 at Promontory Summit, Utah Territory, was an officer of the Utah Southern RailRoad, was a city councilor in Salt Lake City, Utah, was the territorial chairman of the People's Party, was a member of the board of directors of the Zion's Cooperative Mercantile Institution, was a member of the board of directors of the Deseret Telegraph, was a member of the board of directors of the Deseret National Bank, was prosecuted for practicing plural marriage in 1885, was removed from his Mormon church positions in 1885 when he pled guilty to the bigamy charges, was the Utah Central Railway superintendent in 1887, and died of intestinal cancer in Salt Lake City, Utah. Benjamin Franklin "Bluff" Wade (1800-1878,) the son of Mary Wade and James Wade, was born in Feeding Hills, Massachusetts, was a laborer on the Erie Canal, taught school, studied law in Ohio with Elisha Whittlesey, was admitted to the practice of law in Ohio in 1828, practiced law in Jefferson, Ohio, formed a partnership with Joshua Giddings, a prominent anti-slavery figure, in 1831, was the prosecuting attorney of Ashtabula County, Ohio, in 1836, was a Whig, served in the Ohio State Senate between 1837 and 1842, established a new law practice with Rufus P. Ranney, was elected presiding judge of the third district in Ohio in 1847, was a judge of common pleas in Summit County, Ohio between 1847 and 1851, joined the Republican Party, served in the United States Senate from 1851 until 1868, was the chairman of the Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War from 1861 to 1862, was a Radical Republican, was angry when President Lincoln was slow to recruit African-Americans into the federal armies, actively advocated for legislation that abolished slavery, had a direct hand in the passing of the Homestead Act of 1862 and the Morrill Land Grand Act of 1862, was critical of Pesident Lincoln's Reconstruction Plan, supported the Freedmen's Bureau Bill and Civil Rights Bill, was a strong partisan of the 14th Amendment, was president pro tem of the U. S. Senate during the impeachment trial of President Andrew Johnson, was defeated for reelection to the U. S. Senate in 1868, returned to his Ohio law practice, was an agent of the Northern Pacific Railroad, was a member of the board of directors of the Union Pacific RailRoad, continued Republican party activities, was a member of the commission researching the likelihood of the purchase of the Dominican Republic in 1871, was an elector for Rutherford Hayes in the election of 1876, and died in Jefferson, Ohio. John McKeown Snow Williams (1818-1886) was born in Richmond, Virginia, moved to Boston, Massachusetts, attended the public schools of Boston, Massachusetts, engaged in mercantile pursuits, resided in Boston, Massachusetts, was a shipowner, served as member of the Massachusetts State House of Representatives in 1856, served in the Massachusetts State Senate in 1858, was a member of the Massachusetts Emigrant Aid Company in 1854, was a member of the shipping firm of Glidden & Williams, was a railroad contractor for the Union Pacific RailRoad, acted on behalf of Credit Mobilier, was an investor of the Producers’ Consolidated Land & Petroleum Company, and was treasurer of the Union Pacific RailRoad from 1869 until 1871, was a Republican, was elected to the United States Congress from 1873 until 1875, was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection to Congress in 1874, then resumed his former business pursuits, died in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and was interred in Mount Auburn Cemetery. James Falconer "Jefferson Jim" Wilson (1828-1895) was born in Newark, Ohio, served as a harnessmaker's apprentice, studied law in Newark, Ohio, with William Burnham Woods, was admitted to the practice of law in 1851, practiced law in Newark, Ohio, in 1853, married Mary A. K. Jewett In 1853, moved to Fairfield, Iowa, in 1853, resumed the practice of law, played an important role in the formation of the Iowa Republican Party, was a delegate to Iowa's constitutional convention in 1857, was a Republican, served in the Iowa House of Representatives from 1857 until 1859, served in the Iowa Senate from 1859 until 1861, was the president of the Iowa Senate, was a U.S. Congressman from Iowa's 1st congressional district from 1861 until 1869 during the American Civil War, was a Radical Republican, supported civil rights legislation, and objected to President Andrew Johnson's attempts to veto the Civil Rights Act of 1866 and the Reconstruction Acts, ultimately voted to impeach President Johnson, then was a government director of theUnion Pacific RailRoad for eight years, served in the U.S. Senate from 1882 until 1895, died from paralysis of the brain, and was buried in the Fairfield-Evergreen Cemetery. a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/TNHrail2.html" [See note on David Dows for the Winona & St. Peter RailRoad.]

Union Railway Storage Company: The railroad was incorporated in 1883 by Herbert M. Carpenter, John S. Homan, and James E. Smith to build a storage, forwarding, commission, and transferring business in Minneapolis. The company had capital stock of $25,000 and its principal place of business was Minneapolis. The railroad was organized in 1884. The Union Railway Storage Company constructed the Soap Factory building in Minneapolis in 1883. In 1898, H. M. Carpenter was the president and general manager of the company, H. L. Carpenter was the vice president of the company, H. E. Carpenter was the secretary of the company, and the company dealt in cement, lime plaster, fire brick, sewer pipe, drain tile, and Portland cement. H. E. Carpenter was the secretary of the company in 1898, when the company supplied cement for sewer line construction. Herbert M. Carpenter (1828-1906) was born in Providence, Rhode Island, married Kate Ladd ( -1924) of Providence, Rhode Island, in 1852, came to St. Anthony, Minnesota Territory, in 1854, worked for two years as a clerk for Tufts, Reynolds & Whittemore, engaged in the general merchandise business, with George H. Andrews and Thomas F. Andrews as partners, in Carpenter, Andrews & Company in 1857, operated the same business alone from 1860 until 1864 after the earlier business burned out, bought an interest in a paper mill in St. Anthony, Minnesota Territory, opened the Union Railway Storage Company, opened the Minneapolis Jewelry Manufacturing Company, started the paper store at St. Paul in 1865, partnered in the enterprise with J. T. Averill in 1865, acquired entire control of the paper mill after the withdrawal of Cutler and Secombe, purchased the land that became known as “Carpenter’s Point” on Lake Minnetonka, Minnesota, in 1875, resided at 802 Marquette Avenue in Minneapolis in 1880, and owned land in Itasca County, Minnesota in 1893. In 1877, Herbert M. Carpenter purchased the patent for a portion of the Pipestone, Minnesota, Indian reservation, including the pipestone quarry, from Congressman John Thomas Averill (1825-1889,) who had obtained the patent from August Cluensen/Clausen in 1874, and Carpenter mined quartzite for building stone in 1880 before the patent was revoked by the U. S. government, which was upheld by the U. S. Supreme Court in United States v. Herbert M. Carpenter, 111 U.S. 347 (1884.) Herbert Carpenter (1828-1906) was born in Rhode Island and died in Hennepin County. Henry Carpenter ( -1926,) Henry Ladd Carpenter ( -1933,) and Herbert E. Carpenter ( -1935) all died in Hennepin County. Herbert L. Carpenter ( -1926) died in LeSueur County, Minnesota. John S. Homan was the general manager of the Quincy White Lime& Cement Company of Quincy, Illinois, in 1885, was a member of the John A. Rawlins Post No. 126 of the Grand Army of the Republic in 1890, was an independent cement dealer in Minneapolis in 1898, and was a general contractor in Minneapolis in 1913. John Sullivan Homan ( -1920) died in Hennepin County. a href ="http://www.msparchhistory.info/IrvineTNH.html" [See note on John Thomas Averill for 302 South Exchange Street.]

Union Stockyards-Minnesota Transfer RailRoad: The railroad was organized by the various railroads serving Minneapolis and St. Paul between 1880 and 1883, operated until 1884, and was succeeded by the Minnesota Transfer RailRoad. The Union Stockyards–Minnesota Transfer RailRoad started in 1880 and was an unincorporated association of several railroads. The Union Stockyards–Minnesota Transfer RailRoad built approximately one mile of rail trackage over undeveloped property in the Midway section of St. Paul at the instigation of James J. Hill, who sold the association the land at cost, and was developed with the assistance of the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba RailRoad. Hill oversaw the incorporation of the railroad in 1883. The railroad was acquired by the Minnesota Transfer Railway Company in 1884. a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/SumEPortTNH.html"> [See note on James Jerome Hill for 240 Summit Avenue.]

Verndale, Shell City & Northern RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1881. The railroad was incorporated in 1881 by W. T. Applegate, Charles W. Brown, C. E. Bullard, S. M. Chandler, L. W. Farwell, John B. Kelly, A. S. McMillan, L. Metzger, C. C. Parker, A. C. Seely, E. A. Smith, A. F. Stewart, and F. M. Yoder to construct, equip, and operate a railway from Verndale, Wadena County, Minnesota, by way of Shell City, Wadena County, Minnesota, to the Northern or Western boundary of the State between 94 degrees and 97 degrees longitude. The railroad had $1,000,000 in corporate stock. The principal place of business of the railroad was Verndale, Minnesota. Charles W. Brown was a resident of Rock Falls, Iowa, before moving to Minnesota, and becoming part of the first settler party to move to Verndale, Minnesota, in 1877, and was a business partner of C. C. Parker in the Pioneer Store in Verndale, Minnesota. Colonel Clarence Eugene “C. E.” Bullard (1843- ) was born at Fort Madison, Iowa, was a resident of Eau Claire, Wisconsin, operated a feed store in Eau Claire, Wisconsin, served in Company C of the 36th Wisconsin Infantry during the American Civil War, came to Minnesota in 1864, started an agricultural implement and farm machinery sales company with his business partner, Charles O. Brewster, a lawyer from Chicago, Illinois, married Kate I. __?__ (1848-1891,) was an attorney, was the Clerk of District Court for Wadena County, Minnesota, in Verndale, Minnesota, from 1881 until 1886, died in Wadena, Minnesota, and was buried in the Wadena Cemetery, Wadena, Wadena County, Minnesota. S. M. Chandler (1853-1917) married Eva Caller (1853-1927) and is buried in the Greenlawn Cemetery, Verndale, Wadena County, Minnesota. John B. Kelly was a resident of Rock Falls, Iowa, before moving to Minnesota, and becoming part of the first settler party to move to Verndale, Minnesota, in 1877. Leonard W. Farwell (1823-1921) was born in Vermont, established a lumber yard in Verndale, Minnesota, in 1878, and is buried in Greenlawn Cemetery, Verndale, Wadena County, Minnesota. Albert S. Macmillan established the Verndale Journal in 1879, published it at Verndale, Minnesota, for 14 years, moved the newspaper to Wadena, Minnesota, in 1893, and changed the name of the newspaper to the Wadena Journal. In 1897, the Wadena Journal was absorbed by the Pioneer Journal. Captain Charles C. “C. C.” Parker (1838-1884) was born in Indiana, then resided in Iowa, came to Minnesota in 1860, served in the First Minnesota Volunteer Infantry Regiment, Company G, from 1861 until 1864, served in the First Minnesota Infantry Battalion from 1864 until 1865, married Rachel __?__ ( -1867) in 1865, married Elizabeth "Lizzie" Gilbert in 1869, moved to Verndale, Minnesota, in 1876, was a surveyor, operated the C. C. Parker & Company Pioneer Store, was the postmaster of Verndale, Minnesota, from 1878 until 1884, was an incorporator of Verndale, Minnesota, in 1883, was one of the group of Verndale, Minnesota, residents who built the Verndale Road through the wilderness to the Shell Prairies in Hubbard County, Minnesota, was a member of the Minnesota house of Representatives representing Aitkin County, Minnesota, Carlton County, Minnesota, Cass County, Minnesota, Cook County, Minnesota, Hubbard County, Minnesota, Itasca County, Minnesota, Lake County, Minnesota, St. Louis County, Minnesota, and Wadena County, Minnesota (District 46,) from 1882 until 1884, moved to Forsyth, Montana, in 1884, died in Forsyth, Montana, and was buried in Minnesota. E. A. Smith operated E.A. Smith & Company, a grocery store in Verndale, Minnesota. A. F. Stewart was an incorporator of the Avalanche Mining Company at Verndale, Minnesota, in 1886. F. M. Yoder was in the general merchandise, flour, feed, dry goods, hardware, and patent medicine businesses in 1882 and also owned a saw mill with his son.

Virginia & Rainy Lake Company: The Virginia & Rainy Lake Company was organized in 1905 and was a logging company that operated 143 logging camps in the NorthEastern Minnesota, with five or six camps located in the current Boundary Waters Canoe Area, from 1910 until 1929. In 1905, the officers of the Virginia & Rainy Lake Company were Edward Hines, president, William O’Brien, vice president, H. C. Hornby, secretary, and F. E. Weyerhaeuser, Jr., treasurer, and the company had its main office in Virginia, Minnesota, and a sales office at Duluth, Minnesota. The company had at least three Shay locomotives that were built in 1905. In 1908, the Virginia & Rainy Lake Company was formed from an amalgamation of the Minnesota and Wisconsin holdings of the Edward Hines Company, Weyerhaeuser’s Northern Lumber Company and the Moon & Kerr Lumber Company, the Cook & O’Brien Lumber Company, and the Virginia Lumber Company and had capital stock of $2,000,000. Wirt Cook, of Duluth, Minnesota, and Edward Hines, of Chicago, Illinois, disliked and distrusted each other to such an extent that Hines reportedly always carried a revolver when he dealt with Cook. The railroad was organized in 1908, owned five Shay geared steam locomotive, was located at Cusson, Minnesota, and Virginia, Minnesota, and operated until 1930. In 1918, the Virginia & Rainy Lake Company owned 14 locomotives, 345 logging cars, four box cars, one refrigerator car, ten rail-mounted log loaders, a number of service cars, one Bucyrus steam shovel, and one pile driver. The company also leased locomotives from other railroads during its Winter logging operations. During a Winter, the company employed 3,000-4,000 men in the woods in logging operations. Frank H. Gillmor was the general superintendent of the Virginia & Rainy Lake Company in 1917. A 150- man logging camp was operated by the Virginia & Rainy Lake Lumber Company from 1920 until 1923 at the end of Lost Bay on Namakan Lake, Minnesota. The Virginia & Rainy Lake Company operated a lumber camp in Hoist Bay on Namakan Lake, Minnesota, from 1913 until 1929, with a railroad line that connected to its sawmill at Virginia, Minnesota, came down the Ash River Trail, and extended over a 1000 feet into the bay on Namakan Lake. Logs were floated from camps scattered over the Kabetogama Peninsula to the hoist and loaded onto waiting flatcars, with 224,935,030 board feet of lumber hauled out through Hoist Bay, about one-eighth of the total production of the Virginia & Rainy Lake Company. From their main line in near the Ash River, the Virginia & Rainy Lake Company built the Moose River Branch to Marion Lake, Minnesota, and Johnson Lake, Minnesota, a distance of some 15 miles. It was a ballasted track with loggingspurs leading to several camps, including a branch line to a point on Little Namakan Lake where a log hoist was built. The Virginia & Rainy Lake Company logged two billion feet of timber in 20 years, employed between 2,500 and 4,000 men in the woods each year, owned 900 head of logging horses, operated 156 miles of railroad spurs each year, and built between 115 and 120 miles of sleigh/sledge roads annually. Samuel J. Cusson was the manager of Edward Hines’ logging operations in Northern Wisconsin until 1909, when he became the manager of the Virginia & Rainy Lake Company. Edward Hines was the president of the Virginia & Rainy Lake Company in 1910. Wirt H. Cook was the secretary and a member of the board of directors of the Virginia Lumber Company and was a member of the board of directors of the Virginia & Rainy Lake Company. The Virginia & Rainy Lake Company operated a mill at Grassy Point in Duluth, Minnesota, until 1913. The Virginia & Rainy Lake Company ceased operations in 1929. Most of the Virginia & Rainy Lake Lumber Company rail trackage was removed in 1930. Edward Hines (1863-1931,) the son of Peter Hines, a ship carpenter, and Rose McGarry Hines, was born in Buffalo, New York, was a Roman Catholic, moved to Chicago, Illinois, with his family in 1865, was an office boy employed by S. K. Martin & Company in 1877, was the secretary-treasurer of the S. K. Martin & Company in 1884, raised $200,000 and established the Edward Hines Lumber Company in 1892, bought the T.R. Lyon Lumber Company in 1893, purchased the S. K. Martin & Company in 1895, married Loretta O’Dowd (1873-1938) in 1895, acquired 200 million feet of Wisconsin timber from Weyerhaeuser & Rutledge in 1897, acquired Wisconsin's McCord & Company in 1898, purchased Chatfield & Company in 1900, bought Washburn, Wisconsin-based Bigelow Brothers in 1903, acquired the White River Lumber Company in Wisconsin in 1905, invested $4 million, 72 square miles of lumber permits in Canada, and a second timber mill in Virginia, Minnesota, in the Virginia & Rainy Lake Company in 1905, established the Edward Hines Yellow Pine Company in Mississippi in the 1920’s, acquired timber lands and established the Edward Hines Western Pine Company in Oregon in 1928, acquired the Continental Coal Company of West Virginia, was a leader in uniform grading of lumber, was an organizer of the National Lumber Manufacturers Association, was the president of the Lumbermen's Council of the National Union, was the president of the Lumbermen's Association of Chicago, was a member of the Southern Pine Operators Association, was a board member of the Northern Hemlock & Harwood Manufacturers' Association, suffered a severe heart attack in 1930, died of pneumonia in Evanston, Cook County, Illinois, and was buried at Calvary Cemetery, Evanston, Cook County, llinois. Henry Crook Hornby (1866-1952,) the son of John Hornby and Elizabeth Hornby, was born in Gilbert, Scott County, Iowa, attended Gilbert, Iowa, public schools, moved with his family to Davenport, Iowa, graduated from the Davenport, Iowa, High School in 1883, worked as a delivery man for the M. R. Parkhurst grocery store in Davenport, Iowa, in 1883, then was employed as a billing clerk by the Renwick, Shaw & Crosset Lumber Company later in 1883, moved to Cloquet, Minnesota, in 1884, became a time keeper and grader for the Knife Falls Lumber Company of Cloquet, Minnesota, from 1884 until 1886, after it was purchased by the Renwick, Shaw & Crosset Lumber Company, moved to Clinton, Iowa, in 1886, was employed by W. J. Young & Company, moved to Cloquet, Minnesota, in 1888, was employed by the Cloquet Lumber Company after it acquired the Knife Falls Lumber Company, married Belle McNaughton of St. Paul in 1893, was the assistant manager of the Cloquet Lumber Company from 1897 until 1904, became the manager of the Cloquet Lumber Company in 1904, was the treasurer of the Inland Lumber & Timber Company of Spokane, Washington, was the president of the Cloquet, Minnesota, village council in 1894, was a school board member and treasurer of the Cloquet, Minnesota, Independent School District from 1897 until 1910, was the vice president of the St. Louis River Mercantile Company in 1906, was a trustee of the Cloquet, Minnesota, Presbyterian Church, was the president of the Cloquet Electric Light Company, was the general manager of the Duluth & Northeastern RailRoad, was a life member of the Minnesota Historical Society, was a member of the Davenport, Iowa, Commercial Club, was a member of the Duluth, Minnesota, Commercial Club, was a member of the Kitchi Gammi Club of Duluth, Minnesota, was the president and treasurer of the Eastern Lumber Company of Tonawanda, New York, in 1916, was the president of the Northern Pine Manufacturing Association in 1917, resided in Duluth, Minnesota, in 1928, and was a trustee managing the Virginia & Rainy Lake Company in 1932. Wirt H. Cook (1867- ,) the son of Merritt S. Cook and Viola E. Reynolds Cook, was born in Kent County, Michigan, was educated in the common and high schools of Manistee, Michigan, married Martha L. Walsh in 1888, engaged in surveying and civil engineering from 1886 until 1890, moved to Duluth, Minnesota, and continued in surveying and civil engineering from 1891 until 1892, was the partner of W. G. Ketcham, owned the Trout Lake Lumber Company, engaged in the timber and logging business from 1892 until 1900, organized, was the president and was the general manager of the Duluth, Rainy Lake & Winnipeg RailRoad, was the secretary and a member of the board of directors of the Virginia Lumber Company, was a partner of William O’Brien, organized the Duluth, Virginia & Rainy Lake RailRoad, was a member of the board of directors of the Virginia& Rainy Lake Company, was a member of the Duluth, Minnesota, Commercial Club, and was a member of the Northern Railway Club. Frederick E. Weyerhaeuser, Jr. (1872-1945,) the son of Frederick E. Weyerhaeuser, Sr. ( -1914,) "the Lumber King," became the president of the Weyerhaeuser Timber Company and was a member of the board of directors of the Great Northern Railway. Frank H. Gillmor was the general manager of the Missabe Southern RailRoad from 1902 until 1909 and was the superintendent of logging for the Virginia & Rainy Lake Lumber Company from 1910 until 1928. a href="http://www.msparchhistory.info/SumEPortTNH.html"> [See the note for William J. O'Brien for 1034-1038 Summit Avenue.]

Information about the Port Arthur, Duluth & Western RailRoad was adapted from information presented by Dave Battistel on the Port Arthur, Duluth and Western Railway website.

Information from Interstate Commerce Commission records researched by Richard S. Steele, LaBelle Woodworking, Cheyenne, Wyoming, was used in this website.

With questions about this website, contact Larry Martin at l_a_martin@lycos.com.

Minnesota RailRoads Part I

Minnesota RailRoads, Part II

Minnesota RailRoads Part IV

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This page was last updated on November 1, 2012.