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RailRoads in Minnesota, Part 1.5

RailRoads in Minnesota, Part 1.5

Assembled by

Lawrence A. Martin

Webpage creation: April 28, 2010

Eastern Railway Company of Minnesota/Eastern Minnesota Railway Company: The railroad initially was a Wisconsin corporation, was incorporated in 1887 in Minnesota to construct and operate a rail line between Hinckley, Minnesota, and the St. Louis River, was organized in 1888, consolidated with the Lake Superior & Southwestern Railway Company of Minnesota, organized by General John H. Hammond, and was the successor to the Minneapolis & St. Cloud RailRoad. In 1888, the officers of the railroad were Henry D. Minot, president and general manager, Edward T. Nichols, vice president, Frank E. Ward, secretary, and Howard James, treasurer, the members of the board of directors of the railroad were Howard James, Henry D. Minot, William A. Stephens, Frank E. Ward, and Moses Williams, operated 69.8 miles of rail trackage (a 68.3 mile main line from Hinckley, Minnesota, and a 1.5 mile branch line from Sandstone, Minnesota, to Kettle River, Minnesota, owned 14 locomotives, 500 box cars, 250 platform cars, 250 coal cars, 12 cabooses, and two other rail cars, and the principal place of business of the railroad was in St. Paul. In 1888, the railroad contracted with Dear & Hayes to build a double track elevated rail line from West Superior, Wisconsin, to the heart of Duluth, Minnesota. Also in 1888, the railroad acquired land for the construction of a Union depot in Duluth, Minnesota. In 1893, the officers of the railroad were W. S. Alexander, president, M. D. Grover, first vice president, E. Sawyer, secretary-treasurer, James Spencer, general counsel, and C. H. Warren, comptroller, and the members of the board of directors were W. S. Alexander, W. P. Clough, M. D. Grover, James J. Hill, and E. Sawyer. In 1893, the railroad had $5,000,000 in capital stock, had 72.39 miles of railway trackage, owned four bridges and 84 trestles, had 164 employees, owned 18 locomotives, 13 passenger cars, 1,253 freight cars, and 21 company cars. The railroad obtained some of the rights and property of the Minneapolis & St. Cloud RailRoad Company, was consolidated with the Lake Superior & SouthWestern Railway Company of Wisconsin, operated until 1907, and was succeeded by the Great Northern RailRoad. The railroad laid tracks from the Eastern boundary of the State four miles East of Wrenshall, Carlton County, Minnesota, to Cloquet, Minnesota, in 1898 and from Deer River, Minnesota to Fosston, Minnesota, during the period 1899-1900. According to Poor's Manual of the RailRoads of the United States, Volume 33 by Henry Varnum Poor in 1901, as of 1899, the railroad operated 353.15 miles of rail trackage, had all of its capital stock owned by the Great Northern RailRoad, was controlled by the Great Northern RailRoad, operated independently of the Great Northern Railroad, owned 81 locomotives, 16 passenger cars, 23 parlor, tourist and sleeper cars, four baggage, mail and express cars, 3,248 box cars, 322 flat and coal cars, ten refrigerator cars, 910 sand and ore cars, and 83 service cars, had as its officers Samuel Hill, president, Louis W. Hill, vice president, D. M. Philbin, second vice president, E. Sawyer, treasurer and secretary, and R. I. Farrington, comptroller, and had its general offices in St. Paul. Samuel Hill, a son-in-law of James J. Hill, was the president of the railroad before 1900 and Louis W. Hill, a son of James J. Hill and the vice president of the railroad, became the president of the railroad in 1900. In 1902, the Great Northern RailRoad leased all lines of the Eastern Railway Company for 99 years. The railroad was operated by the Great Northern RailRoad in 1904. In 1904, the officers of the railroad were Louis W. Hill, president, R. I. Farrington, vice president, E. Sawyer, secretary-treasurer, and R. A. Wilkinson, general counsel, and the members of the board of directors of the railroad were R. I. Farrington, M. D. Grover, Louis W. Hill, D. M. Philbin, and E. Sawyer. In 1904, the railroad had capital stock of $16,000,000, owned 32 bridges, and owned 176 trestles. In 1907, the Great Northern RailRoad purchased all existing property of the Eastern Railway. The corporation continued to exist with no property until 1959, when it was dissolved. [See note on John Henry Hammond for 276 South Exchange Street.] [See note on William Pitt Clough for 500 Summit Avenue.] [See note on James Jerome Hill for 240 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Louis Warren Hill for 260 Summit Avenue.] [See note for Samuel Hill for 240 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Edward Sawyer for 461 Holly Avenue.] [See note on Robert I. Farrington, Thayer B. Farrington, and John D. Farrington for 457-459 Portland Avenue.]

Electric Short Line Railway: The railroad was organized in 1908, and was a Minnesota corporation. In 1914, the railroad had as its officers W. L. Luce, president and treasurer, E. D. Luce, vice president, S. J. Solverson, secretary, and DeKoven Hunter, general manager, had as its board of directors E. L. Luce, W. L. Luce, and S. Solverson, had $7,500,000 in capital stock, had 17.78 miles of railway trackage, had 22 passenger cars, had eight freight cars, had 11 work cars, had one caboose, and had 23 employees with annual total salaries of $178,585. In 1917, the railroad had as its officers W. D. Luce, president and treasurer, E. D. Luce, vice president and general manager, S. Solverson, secretary, and S. A. Webster, auditor, operated 60 miles of rail trackage, owned ten locomotives, and had its general offices in Minneapolis. The railroad had 63.064 miles of track, three steam locomotives, 180 freight cars, 24 passenger cars, and 20 company cars in 1920. The railroad was controlled by the Minnesota Construction Company, and operated a rail line Westerly from the Luce Line Junction via Parkers Lake, Minnesota, Stubb's Bay, Minnesota, and Winsted, Minnesota, to Hutchinson, Minnesota, until 1924. The railroad was initially succeeded by the Minnesota Western RailRoad in 1924 and was subsequently succeeded by the Chicago & NorthWestern RailRoad. Although the rail line utilized gasoline rolling stock, it considered itself to be an electric rail line.

Electric Short Line RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1908, had 3.336 miles of track, and operated until 1915, when it was renamed the Electric Short Line Terminal Company.

Electric Short Line Terminal Company: The railroad was organized in 1913, was controlled by J. E. Luce of Minneapolis, was operated for benefit of the Electric Short Line Railway and the Minneapolis, Northfield & Southern RailRoad, had 10.551 miles of track and no equipment in 1920, operated until 1955, and was succeeded by purchase by the Minneapolis, Northfield & Southern RailRoad after having leased the line for several years. (per Richard S. Steele and the 1915-1920 Interstate Commerce Commission valuation and Twilight rails: the final era of railroad building in the Midwest by H. Roger Grant)

Empire Lumber Company RailRoad: The railroad, known as the "Flemming Road" for its woods' superintendent, was constructed in 1894 to connect timber stands on Crooked Creek, Minnesota, and Sand Creek, Minnesota, with the landing on the St. Croix River at Yellow Banks, Minnesota. At the Yellow Banks, Minnesota, landing, logs were floated down the St. Croix River and the Mississippi River to a mill at Winona, Minnesota. It operated eight miles of rail trackage. The railroad functioned until 1899.

Enos Electric Railway Company of St. Paul: The railroad was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1888, had capital stock of $2,000,000, and had its principal place of business in St. Paul. In 1888, the St. Paul Board of Aldermen considered the franchise of the railroad. A company formed by Arthur E. Clark, C. H. Macidie, and other Dakota County, Minnesota, businessmen sought a franchise from St. Paul in 1887 to build an overhead monorail railroad to Minneapolis based on an 1826 plan developed in Englan, using cars obtained from the Enos Electric Railway Company of Boston, Massachusetts, using four electric motors from the Thomson-Houston Company of Boston, Massachusetts, and using electricity supplied by the Eureka Improvement Company. A 1,260 foot demonstration line was built in South Park, Dakota County, Minnesota, in 1888. The franchise was granted in 1888 with the support of the St. Paul Chamber of Commerce and the St. Paul Pioneer Press and despite protests from property owners affected by the proposed project and the discovery of an attempted bribe of a St. Paul city council member by a member of the investor group. The investor group never formally accepted the franchise and the company appears to have disbanded by 1889. J. H. Lawrence was the general manager of the proposed railroad. The Enos Electric Railway was the first suspended monorail, with a remarkable likeness to the Wuppertal Schwebebahn designed by Eugen Langen in Germany, and was tested and demonstrated on the grounds of the Daft Electric Company in Greenville, New Jersey, in 1886.

Erie Mining Company RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1954, operated from 1957 until 1986, and was succeeded by the LTV Steel Mining Company RailRoad. The railroad connected the Erie Mining Company taconite plant at Hoyt Lakes, Minnesota, and its port facilities at Taconite Harbor, Minnesota.

Fargo-Moorhead Streetcar Company/Fargo & Moorhead Street Railway Company : The Fargo & Moorhead Street Railway Company was formed in 1902, began construction in 1904, and opened in 1904. It served Fargo, North Dakota, via the North Side Loop, the South Side Loop, and the Oak Grove line and Moorhead, Minnesota, by way of a line from Fargo, North Dakota, to the Moorhead Normal College/Minnesota State University -Moorhead. The system opened with seven single-truck closed streetcars and a single-truck, double-end, arch-roofed wedge plow. Additional lines were built in Fargo, North Dakota, to the State Fairgrounds and the North Dakota Agricultural College/North Dakota State University. Additional cars were acquired for new lines, including a number of second-hand streetcars purchased from the Twin City Rapid Transit Company as it replaced its first generation with the TCRT standard streetcar. By 1912, the system was at its zenith. A short 1923 extension to Concordia College in Moorhead, Minnesota, when the system reached its peak mileage of 15.81 miles. From 1923 to 1925, the system employed 29 motor cars, 16 trailers, four service motor cars, and two service trailers. But by 1933, the system was all-Birney safety cars, except for one passenger trailer and the work fleet. In 1916, Northern States Power, the Minneapolis-based power company, acquired the Consumers Power Company and, with it, its streetcar line. The 16-car Birney safety car fleet was part of NSP's modernization of the line. In addition to the usual duties of a small-town trolley, the street railroad served North Dakota State University and the North Dakota State Fairgrounds in Fargo, North Dakota, and Concordia College and Moorhead State University in Moorhead, Minnesota. The system shut down in stages in 1937. The Moorhead local lines closed first, the "interurban" line from Fargo, North Dakota, to Dilworth, Minnesota (the location of a major Northern Pacific RailRoad facility) second, and the last Fargo line, the South Side Loop, third. Fargo-Moorhead Streetcar Company converted it's operations from street cars to buses in 1937.

Fargo, Moorhead & Northern RailRoad/Fargo, Moorhead & NorthEastern Railway Company: The railroad was organized in 1885 and was incorporated in 1885 by A. H. Baker, D. H. Fisk, Albert Gilmour, Otto Kankel, John M. Martin, Fred Puhler, and R. A. Wilkinson to locate, build and maintain a railway or railways from a point in or near Moorhead, Minnesota, by way of Ada, Minnesota, northerly to a point on the Red River of the North in Polk County, Minnesota. It had initial capital stock of $1,000,000 and its principal place of business was Ada, Minnesota.

Fargo & St. Louis Airline RailRoad/Fargo & Fort Louis Airline RailRoad was incorporated in 1883 by Richard A. Costello, S. W. Edwards, John E. Haggart, William A. Kindred, Cornelius R. Orton, Charles Sweet, and Richard S. Tyler to build a railway from some point in Wilkin County, Minnesota, or Traverse County, Minnesota, southerly to the Southern boundary of the State. It had initial capital stock of $1,000,000 and its principal place of business was Ortonville, Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1883. John E. Haggart was a wagon train driver, operated a ferry boat business across the Red River, fought in the American Civil War, was a farmer in the northern Dakota Territory, was employed by the Northern Pacific RailRoad as a construction worker, was a deputy U.S. marshal for the Dakota Territory, was a member of the North Dakota Legislature, and was the first police chief and fire marshal of Fargo, North Dakota.

Fargo & Southern RailRoad: The railroad was chartered in 1881, was organized in 1884, and had $1,250,000 in capital stock. The railroad ran from Ortonville, Minnesota, to Fargo, Dakota Territory. In 1885, the railroad had 118 miles of rail trackage (45 miles in Minnesota,) owned 13 total stations (four stations in Minnesota,) owned 60 bridges, owned six locomotives, owned nine passenger cars, owned 101 freight cars, owned 19 company cars, and had 152 total employees (45 employees in Minnesota.) In 1885, the officers of the railroad were H. E. Sargent, president, W. A. Kindred, vice president, A. W. Edwards, secretary, T. W. Wadsworth, treasurer, D. R. Taylor, general superintendent, L. H. Lewis, auditor, and George P. Wilson, attorney, and the members of the board of directors were J. W. Cary, J. C. Easton, A. W. Edwards, D. C. Green, John E. Haggart, E. K. Hubbard, W. A. Kindred, J. B. Raymond, H. E. Sargent, Philip Wadsworth, T. W. Wadsworth, and E. Walker. The railroad operated until 1885, was acquired by the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad in 1885, and was subsequently succeeded by the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad.

Faribault Transfer Railway Company: The railroad was incorporated in 1886 and had its general office in Faribault, Minnesota.

Farmers Cooperative Elevator Company: The Farmers Cooperative Elevator Company of Cottonwood, Minnesota, Ghent, Minnesota, Granite Falls, Minnesota, Hanley Falls, Minnesota, Minneota, Minnesota, Minnesota Falls, Minnesota, and Taunton, Minnesota, a grain elevator cooperative, owned two locomotives, one, the former Texas & Pacific RailRoad #1036, purchased in 1989 and sold in 1997 and the other, the former St. Louis Brownsville & Mexico RailRoad #9187, purchased after 1988. In 2005, Mark Vandelanotte was the president of the company,Gerard Peterson was the vice president, Wes Cole was the secretary-treasurer of the company, and Steve Doom, Paul Enstad, Dennis Heggesteth, Stan Knutson, Paul Kvistad, and Dan Stevens were members of the board of directors of the company.

Fayal Mine Narrow Gauge RailRoad: David T. Adams first explored in the Fayal Township, Minnesota, for a mining interest, acting for A. E. Humphreys. The first test pits were sunk in 1892 at the Adams mine, Number 1. In this early operation, Neil McInnis was pay master and purchasing agent. With the Panic of 1893, Adams and McInnis did more testing, and the result was the opening of the Fayal mine. The owner of the Fayal Mine at Eveleth sold out in 1893 for a mine that later yielded $10,000,000. In 1901, the Fayal Mine produced the largest quantity of iron ore of any iron ore mine. In 1901, the Fayal Mine and Fayal Mine Railroad were owned by the United States Steel Corporation and shipped 1,500,000 tons of iron ore for the year. The Fayal mine was an underground mine and an open pit mine. In 1904, a model of the Fayal mine was exhibited in the Minnesota booth at the 1904 St. Louis World's Fair. In 1904, the Drake & Stratton Company had the contract for doing stripping at the mine and its 600 employees struck for increased pay. In 1911, the population of Fayal Township, Minnesota, was 1,141. In 1918, the Fayal mine and Genoa mine consolidated with the Adams mine and became the Eveleth District mine. The Fayal underground mine closed in 1951. A total of 33,000,000 tons of iron ore was taken out of the Fayal Mine.

Fergus Falls & Southern RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in 1887 by Jacob Austin, F. G. Barrows, James A. Brown, R. E. Corliss, G. O. Dahl, C. H. Graves, Carroll E. Gray, W. J. Holmes, R. S. Munger, C. Page, M. R. Viler, and C. O. Wheeler.

Foley Brothers Construction Company: Foley Brothers, Inc., was a Northern Pacific RailRoad contractor. The Foley Brothers were born in Lanark, Ontario, Canada, moved to Minnesota, in 1881, and started their contracting company when they acquired free land in in Minnesota, including timber, through the Homestead Act, cleared the land of timber, converted it primarily into railroad ties for J. J. Hill'S Great Northern RailRoad, and sold off the cleared land for farming. There were five Foley brothers, Timothy Foley, who married Mary Louise Guthrie, Thomas Foley, who married Jessie Craig, John Foley, Jr., who was single, Michael Foley, who married __?__ __?__, and George Richard Foley, who married Octavie Joassin. Eventually, they laid over 25,000 miles of railroad track in the United States, in Canada, and in Saudi Arabia from 1887 until the 1920's for the Canadian Pacific RailRoad, the Canadian National RailRoad, the Great Northern RailRoad, the Northern Pacific RailRoad, the St. Paul Union Depot Company, the the B.C. Southern RailRoad, the Soo Line RailRoad, and other railroads. The cities of Foleyabob, Saudi Arabia, and Foleyet, Ontario, Canada, were named after them. The company also owned and operated wholesale grocery operations in both St. Paul and in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, and had their own bakery. Foley Brothers became general contractors, opened offices in New York and in St. Paul, built the Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada ocean terminal, the St. Paul Cathedral, the St. Paul cathedral rectory, the St. Paul chancery building, the St. Paul Catholic Orphanage, Nazareth Hall at the the St. Paul Seminary, participated in the construction of the Shasta Dam in California, and built docks in New York City, New York. Timothy Foley (1838-1920,) Thomas Foley (1840-1907,) John Foley (1842-1907/1908,) and Michael H. Foley (1845-1920) all were involved in the company. The City of Foley, Benton County, Minnesota, also is named after the Foley brothers, who were lumber barons originally from Lanark, Eastern Ontario, Canada, where their father, John Foley, an Irish immigrant, had settled. In 1912, the Foley Brothers of St. Paul built a large bakery building in downtown St. Paul at Twelfth Street and Minnesota Street, which operated as the St. Paul Bread Company, which became the Purity Baking Company in 1914. The Colstrip Strip Mine in Montana, originally Northern Pacific RailRoad land grant land, was operated by the Foley Brothers from 1923 until at least 1953. There also was a Foley Realty and Securities Company in operation from 1917 until 1954. Mann, Foley Brothers & Larson was a firm of railway contractors active in the Kootenay Mountains in British Columbia, Canada, in the 1890s. Foley, Welch & Stewart, formerly Foley Brothers & Larsen & Company, was the roadbed grading and leveling contractor that built the Grand Trunk Pacific RailRoad in British Columbia, Canada, around 1904. Foley Brothers & Muir were railroad contractors for the San Joaquin Valley RailRoad in California in 1898. The firm operated from 1887 until 1961. [See note on the Purity Bakeries Corporation for 938 Wakefield Avenue.]

Fort Dodge & Fort Ridgely RailRoad & Telegraph Company/Fort Dodge & Fort Ridgely RailRoad: The railroad was an Iowa corporation, was incorporated in 1876 as the Fort Dodge & Fort Ridgely RailRoad & Telegraph Company by a group that included John Francis Duncombe, had as its officers W. H. Brown, president, George W. Bassett, vice president, and Gus T. Peterson, secretary, was renamed the Fort Dodge & Fort Ridgely RailRoad in 1878, built a 16.38 mile rail line from, Livermore, Iowa, to Humboldt, Iowa, in 1879 and a 12.62 mile rail line from Fort Dodge, Webster County, Iowa, to Livermore, Humboldt County, Iowa, also in 1879. In 1878, the railroad operated 12 miles of rail trackage, owned one locomotive, owned eight pieces of rolling stock, and owned one handcar. The railroad received a $35,000 grant from Humboldt County, Iowa, and a $38,000 grant from Webster County, Iowa. In 1879, the property of the railroad was acquired by Angus McBane of Fort Dodge, Iowa, and then was backed financially by Cadwallader Washburn and William Drew Washburn, who completed the connection between the Humboldt County, Iowa-Webster County, Iowa, county line and Albert Lea, Minnesota. George B. Pearson (1829-1904) was the railroad builder contracted by the railroad. Thereafter, the Minneapolis & St. Louis RailRoad leased the railroad and purchased the railroad property. The railroad was succeeded by the Minneapolis & St. Louis RailRoad by virtue of a merger of the Fort Dodge & Fort Ridgely RailRoad, the Minnesota & Iowa Railroad Company, the Minnesota & Iowa Southern RailRoad, the Minnesota & Duluth RailRoad, and the Minneapolis & St. Louis RailRoad in 1881.

General Logging Company RailRoad The railroad was established in 1926 and hauled logs between 1927 and 1930 for the General Logging Company, a contract logger working for the Cloquet Lumber Company and the Northern Lumber Company. The railroad operated an extension from Cascade Junction, Minnesota, on the Duluth & Northern Minnesota RailRoad, into Lake County, Minnesota, and Cook County, Minnesota, to Clearwater Lake, Minnesota, and Rose Lake, Minnesota. Duluth & Northeastern RailRoad crews conducted the road work between Cloquet, Minnesota, and Cascade, Minnesota. The railroad also reached the Gunflint Lake area. The company railroad owned three Shay geared steam locomotives and six other locomotives, including two Mikados, the largest locomotives used by any Minnesota logging railroad. The railroad was located at Cascade, Minnesota. The railroad was operated by the Northwest Paper Company in 1929. The General Logging Company's abandoned railroad grade just east of Poplar Lake (now the Lima Mountain Grade) became part of the Finn Lake logging road in the late l950's and was incorporated into the Banadad Ski Trail in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area, a rare snowmobile-groomed cross country ski trail in the BWCA.

Grand Forks, Crookston & Lake Superior RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in Minnesota in 1884 by Louis Berthaume, William Box, W. H. Brown, J. R. Clements, W. F. Collins, J. S. Eshelman, E. F. Masterson, Paul C. Sletten, E. M. Walsh, and John Zerfoss, Jr., to build and operate a railway from the West bank of the Red River of the North in Polk County, Minnesota, by way of Crookston, Minnesota, Easterly to Lake Superior, with a branch line Southwesterly to the West bank of the Red River of the North in Norman County, Minnesota. The railroad was intended to connect with the Northern Pacific RailRoad, either at Lake Superior or at Bismarck, Dakota Territory. The officers of the railroad in 1884 were J. S. Eshelman, president, Paul C. Sletten, vice president, E. M. Walsh, secretary, and E. B. Clements, treasurer. The railroad had capital stock of $2,000,000 and the principal place of business was in Crookston, Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1884. The proposed route was from the Red River of the North to Lake Superior by way of Fisher's Landing, Minnesota, Crookston, Minnesota, the Red Lake Indian Reservation, the White Earth Indian Reservation, and South Leach Lake, Minnesota. Grand Forks County, Dakota Territory, and Polk County, Minnesota, both sought authorization to provide a grant to the proposed railroad.

Grand Marais & North Shore RailRoad was organized in 1898 to build a 185 mile railway line from Grand Marais, Minnesota, to Port Arthur, Ontario, Canada, with a branch line to Gunflint Lake, Minnesota.

Grand Marais & Northwestern RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in Minnesota in 1913 and was intended to build a rail line from the Canadian border down the North Shore and to Duluth, Minnesota, through a connection with the Duluth & Northern RailRoad. The railroad expected to receive a $100,000 investment or grant from Cook County, Minnesota. In 1914, a route for the railroad was surveyed, contracts were let for the construction of the railroad, and building on a 75 mile route from Grand Marais, Cook County, Minnesota, to Ely, St. Louis County, Minnesota, by John Bergman of Duluth, Minnesota, began. Initially, the maximum grades for the rail line were intended to be one percent and the maximum curvature on any portion of the rail line was intended to be four percent, but by late 1914, the maximum grades for the rail line were revised to be 2.72 percent and the maximum curvature on any portion of the rail line was intended to be eight percent on a temporary basis, to be replaced by a four percent maximum rail line curvature. The officers of the railroad were Arthur Mitchell, president, and John Jenswold, secretary. The railroad was about 25 percent completed, from Grand Marais, Minnesota, to Cascade Junction, Minnesota, but the full rail line was never built.

Grand Marais & Vermillion RailRoad Company was incorporated in 1883 by Samuel L. Bayless, Hazael Mayhew, Thomas W. Mayhew, John M. Miller, and William W. Spaulding to build a railway from Grand Marais, Cook County, Minnesota, northwesterly to Lake Vermillion in St. Louis County, Minnesota, and to build a branch line to the national boundary with Canada. It had initial capital stock of $4,000,000 and its principal place of business was Grand Marais, Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1883. It amended its articles of incorporation in 1886.

Grand Marais & Vermillion Range RailRoad was organized in 1887 and was incorporated in 1887 by J. F. Burke, A. A. Hathaway, Chester J. Kennan, Charles E. Monroe, and E. H. Wilson to build a railway from Grand Marais, Minnesota, to Lake Vermillion, Minnesota. It had initial capital stock of $2,000,000 and its principal place of business was Grand Marais, Minnesota.

Granite City RailRoad: Albert G. Whitney repurchased the St. Cloud City Street Car Company in 1900 to form the Light, Heat, Transit, & Public Service Company. The Granite City Railway was incorporated in 1906 and took over the street railway system of eight miles of track, two car houses, 15 closed passenger cars, and two snow plows. The McGraw electric railway manual: the red book of American street railway, published in 1914, indicates that the railroad succeeded the Benton Power & Traction Company, operated nine miles of electric rail trackage from St. Coud, Minnesota, by way of Waite Park, Minnesota, to Sauk Rapids, Minnesota, owned 19 rail cars, had $100,000 in capital stock, had as its officers A. G. Whitney, president, R. L. Gale, vice president, E. G. Howard, secretary, treasurer and general manager, and W. N. Bethel, superintendent, and had its general office in St. Cloud, Minnesota. In 1924, the Northern States Power Company acquired the Granite City Railway Company. By 1925, the street car system was operating at a deficit, but the Northern States Power Company continued service at a loss after its franchise expired in 1928. The Sauk Rapids, Minnesota, portion of the line was abandoned in 1933, and track mileage was reduced to 4.9 miles and four cars by 1935.

Grant & Dakota RailRoad was incorporated in 1879 by Alfred C. Earsley, Sven Frogner, Charles H. Goodsell, Charles A. Smith, and Charles F. Washburn to build a railway from Logan, Grant County, Minnesota, westerly to a point on or near the easterly boundary of the Dakota Territory. It had initial capital stock of $200,000 and its principal place of business was Herman, Grant County, Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1879 and operated until 1883.

Grant, Smith & Company RailRoad: Grant, Smith & Company was a national engineering, pipeline, railroad and mining contractor in the early 20th Century. The company had an office in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, in 1911, in Seattle, Washington, in 1914, 1919, 1924, and 1926, in St. Paul in 1923, and in Spokane, Washington, in 1929. A 1910 Grant, Smith & Company steam locomotive, built by the Vulcan Iron Works, is located at Creston, British Columbia, Canada. A 1928 Climax engine built for the Grant, Smith & Company for a construction project at Edgar, Montana, currently is owned by the East Broad Top RailRoad in Rockhill Furnace, Pennsylvania.

Grantsburgh, Rush City & St. Cloud RailRoad/Grantsburg, Rush City & St. Cloud RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated under Minnesota law by a group composed primarily of Rush City, Minnesota, residents in 1878 as the Grantsburgh, Rush City & St. Cloud RailRoad to build a rail line from a point on the St. Cloud, Grantsburg & Ashland Railroad to St. Cloud by way of Rush City, Minnesota, Cambridge, Minnesota, and Princeton, Minnesota, was organized in 1878 or 1884, and operated until 1899. The rail line was surveyed, local railroad bonds were authorized and issued, and some materials were purchased, but the rail line was not constructed. The railroad was initially succeeded by the St. Paul & Duluth RailRoad in 1899, and was ultimately succeeded by the Northern Pacific RailRoad.

Great Lakes Coal & Dock Company: The company unloaded coal from barges that came up the Mississippi River. It had one switcher locomotive, #320, which was built by Electromotive in 1939 and formerly was Minneapolis St Paul & Sault Ste Marie/SOO #320. The locomotive was acquired in 1977, was redesignated as Great Western Dock & Terminal #320, and worked the dock area of the Mississippi River south of downtown St. Paul. In the mid 2000's, the main grain terminal was razed and is currently a scrap metal sorting yard. The locomotive was sold as Independent Locomotive Works #320.

Great Northern RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1889, succeeding a railroad incorporated in 1856. In 1879, the St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad was merged by George Stephen, Norman Kittson, Donald A. Smith, and James J. Hill into the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba Railroad Company, known popularly as the "Manitoba." The St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba Railroad Company became the Great Northern RailRoad. From 1890 until 1891, John N. Abbott was assistant to the president of the Great Northern RailRoad. In 1893, the officials of the railroad were James J. Hill, president, W. P. Clough, vice president, E. T. Nichols, secretary-assistant treasurer, E. Sawyer, treasurer-assistant secretary, M. D. Grover, general counsel, and C. H. Warren, comptroller, and the members of the board of directors were George Bliss, W. P. Clough, M. D. Grover, James J. Hill, Samuel Hill, E. Sawyer, Sir Donald A. Smith, Lord Mount Stephen, and J. Kennedy Tod. In 1893, the railroad had capital stock of $20,000,000, had 2,872.54 miles of railway trackage (1,258.93 miles in Minnesota,) owned 51 bridges and 1,490 trestles, had 5,007 employees, had 289 locomotives, 245 passenger cars, 9,418 freight cars, and 408 company service cars. In 1893, the railroad owned stock in railroads, the Eastern Railway of Minnesota, the Montana Central Railway, the Willmar & Sioux Falls Railway, the Duluth, Watertown & Pacific Railway, the Minneapolis Union Railway, the St. Paul Union Depot Company, the Minnesota Transfer Railway Company, the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba Railway, Minneapolis Western Railway, and the Lake Superior Transfer & Terminal Railway Company. According to the Manual of the RailRoads of the United States, Volume 27 by Henry Varnum Poor in 1895, the railroad operated 3,709.09 miles of rail trackage, owned the Eastern Railway of Minnesota, the Montana Central Railway, the Willmar & Sioux Falls Railway, the Duluth, Watertown & Pacific Railway, and the Minneapolis Union Railway, was chartered in 1889 as the successor of the Minneapolis & St. Cloud Railway Company, leased the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba Railway Company for 999 years in 1890, owned 361 locomotives, owned 263 passenger train cars, owned 7,638 box cars, owned 1,650 flat and coal freight cars, owned 364 ore and ballast freight cars, owned 478 stock freight cars, owned 679 furniture freight cars, owned 103 refrigerator cars, owned six hay cars, owned 192 cabooses, owned 182 miscellaneous rail cars, had $20,000,000 in capital stock, had as its officers James J. Hill, president, W. P. Clough, vice president, E. Sawyer, treasurer, R. T. Nichols, secretary, C. H. Warren, comptroller, and C. W. Case, general manager, had as its board of directors W. P. Clough, M. D. Grover, James J. Hill, Samuel Hill, Edward T. Nichols, Edward Sawyer, Jacob H. Schiff, Donald A. Smith, and J. Kennedy Tod, and had its general office in St. Paul. In 1904, the officers of the railroad were James J. Hill, president, Louis W. Hill, first vice president, E. T. Nichols, secretary, E. Sawyer, treasurer, R. A. Wilkinson, general solicitor, M. D. Grover, general counsel, John G. Drew, comptroller, George R. Martin, auditor, George T. Slade, general superintendent, and A. H. Hogeland, chief engineer, and the members of the board of directors were Henry W. Cannon, William B. Dean, R. I. Farrington, M. D. Grover, James J. Hill, James N. Hill, Louis W. Hill, E. Sawyer, and Frederick Weyerhaeuser. In 1904, the railroad had capital stock of $124,129,250, had 12,796 employees in Minnesota, owned 656 locomotives, owned 491 passenger cars, owned 28,271 freight cars, owned 1,149 company service cars, owned 110 bridges, owned 1,232 trestles, and operated 4,888.53 total miles of railway trackage (1,845.65 miles in Minnesota.) In 1913, the railroad had total capital stock of $222,949,296, had 2,099.93 miles of track in Minnesota, had 1,282 locomotives, had 1,014 passenger cars, had 53,594 freight cars, and had 40,532 total employees. A. Guthrie & Company was a regular contractor for the railroad before World War I. The Great Northern RailRoad was chartered as a corporation by the Minnesota Territorial Legislature in 1856, initially named the Minneapolis & St. Cloud RailRoad, and was renamed the Great Northern RailRoad in 1889. The Great Northern RailRoad leased the St. Paul, Minneapolis and Manitoba RailRoad for 999 years in 1890. In 1905, the railroad added a 50 mile extension from Thief River Falls, Minnesota, to Roseau, Minnesota, and a 70 mile extension from Pelican Rapids, Minnesota, to Macintosh, Minnesota. In 1907, owned the Willmar & Sioux Falls RailRoad, the Duluth, Watertown & Pacific RailRoad, the Montana Central RailRoad, the Minneapolis Union RailRoad, the Sioux City & Northern RailRoad, the Sioux City & Western RailRoad, and the Minneapolis Western RailRoad, leased the Eastern RailRoad of Minnesota, the Duluth Terminal RailRoad, the Dakota & Great Northern RailRoad, the Minnesota & Great Northern RailRoad, the Park Rapids & Leech Lake RailRoad, the Seattle & Montana RailRoad, the Montana & Great Northern RailRoad, the Crow's Nest Southern RailRoad, and the Duluth, Superior & West Terminal RailRoad, and controlled the Spokane Falls & Northern RailRoad. In 1907, the Great Northern RailRoad had 786 locomotives, 600 passenger cars, 33,296 freight cars, and 1,658 service cars, had its main headquarters at Third Street and Rosabel Street in St. Paul, and had issued $149.6 million in stock. The officers of the Great Northern RailRoad in 1907 were James J. Hill, president, Louis W. Hill, vice president, Robert I. Farrington, second vice president, E. T. Nichols, third vice president and assistant treasurer, Benjamin Campbell, fourth vice president, Edward Sawyer, treasurer and assistant secretary, Nicholas Terhune, assistant secretary and assistant treasurer, J. G. Drew, controller, and Henry W. Cannon, William B. Dean, Robert I. Farrington, James J. Hill, Louis W. Hill, Edward Sawyer, Samuel Thorne, Frederick Weyerhaeuser, and Frank E. Ward, members of the board of directors. The Great Northern Railway, created by the 19th century railroad tycoon James J. Hill out of the prior St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad, ran from St. Paul to Seattle, Washington, with more than 1,700 miles of track. The Great Northern RailRoad was the most northern transcontinental railroad in the United States and ran north of the Northern Pacific RailRoad. The Great Northern RailRoad was a privately funded transcontinental railroad, refusing federal government subsidies for construction (although some of its predecessor railroads received land grants.) The Great Northern RailRoad was the single transcontinental railroad avoiding receivership during the 1893-1897 depression. The Great Northern RailRoad also controlled the Northern Steamship Company, but divested itself of the freight steamships and the Buffalo, New York, port facilities in 1903, while retaining the passenger steamships. The Great Northern RailRoad also instituted a trans-Pacific Ocean steamship operation between Puget Sound, Washington, and China and Japan in 1897. The railroad operated until 1970 and was succeeded by the Burlington Northern RailRoad. [See note on William Blake Dean for 353 Summit Avenue] [See note on William Pitt Clough for 500 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Robert I. Farrington, Thayer B. Farrington, and John D. Farrington for 457-459 Portland Avenue.] [See note on James Jerome Hill for 240 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Louis Warren Hill for 260 Summit Avenue.] [See note for Samuel Hill for 240 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Edward Sawyer for 461 Holly Avenue.] [See note on Frederick Weyerhaeuser for 266 Summit Avenue.] [See note on the Great Northern RailRoad for 280 Maple Street.]

Great Northern Terminal Railway Company: In 1917, the railroad was granted permission to have at grade railroad crossings at Grove Street, Olive Street, Woodward Avenue, 14th Street, Olmstead Street, Pine Street, and Somerset Street and to have an under-crossing at Pennsylvania Avenue and Williams Street under city ordinance 3928. The railroad was organized in 1918, was a subsidiary of the Great Northern RailRoad, and operated until 1928. The railroad was succeeded by the Great Northern RailRoad. The railroad was disestablished in 1928 by the Great Northern RailRoad along with the Great Falls & Teton County Railway, the Minneapolis Belt Line Company, the Minneapolis Western Railway, the Montana Eastern Railway, and the Watertown & Sioux Falls Railway.

Green Bay & Lake Pepin RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1871, extended from Fort Howard, Wisconsin, to the Mississippi River opposite Winona, Minnesota, operated until 1873, and was succeeded by the Green Bay & Minnesota RailRoad, which in turn became the Green Bay, Winona, & St. Paul RailRoad, and then became the Green Bay & Western RailRoad. In 1881, Henry Ketchum was the president of the railroad and D. M. Kelly was the general manager. In 1870, the railroad sought federal authorization to build a rail line across the Oneida Indian Reservation, which was supported by the tribe so long as the authorization was limited to construction of the rail line and did not extend to the construction of depots or any other associated use.

Green Bay & Minnesota RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in 1873, was organized in 1877, succeeded the Green Bay & Lake Pepin Railway, built 69 miles of rail line (60 miles of rail line from Merillan, Wisconsin, to Marshland, Wisconsin, in 1873, three miles of rail line from Marshland, Wisconsin, to East Winona, Wisconsin, in 1874, and six miles of rail line from Onalaska, Wisconsin, to LaCrosse, Wisconsin, in 1876,) connected with Winona, Minnesota, by way of the leased Winona & St. Peter RailRoad bridge over the Mississippi River and terminal facilities in Winona, Minnesota, operated until 1881, was initially succeeded by the Green Bay, Winona & St. Paul RailRoad, and was ultimately succeeded by the Green Bay & Western RailRoad. In 1874, docks on the Wisconsin side of the Mississippi River opposite Winona, Minnesota, were completed for ferrying freight across the river.

Green Bay, Wabasha & Faribault RailRoad: The railroad was renamed from the Mississippi River Branch RailRoad under Laws of Minnesota 1869, Chapter 58. Portions of the 1856 Territorial Law authorizing the Minneapolis & Cedar Valley RailRoad were incorporated into Laws of Minnesota 1869, Chapter 58. The railroad was incorporated under a territorial charter in 1871. The Green Bay, Wabasha & Faribault Railroad Company was projected to be built in 1871, but was never actually built. In 1874, the board of directors of the railroad decided to solicit financial support from the cities and towns along the proposed route of the rail line, with those cities and towns to constitute the ownership of the railroad. In 1874, Wabasha, Minnesota, invested $75,000 in railroad stock.

Green Bay & Western RailRoad: The railroad was the successor of the Green Bay & Lake Pepin RailRoad, chartered in 1866, the Green Bay & Minnesota RailRoad, reorganized in 1873, the Green Bay, Winona & St. Paul RailRoad, sold in a mortgage foreclosure and reorganized under Wisconsin law in 1881, was reorganized under Wisconsin law in 1896, and was succeeded by the Wisconsin Central Limited. According to Poor's Manual of the RailRoads of the United States, Volume 33 by Henry Varnum Poor in 1901, as of 1899, the railroad operated 225.00 miles of rail trackage, owned 25 locomotives, 12 passenger cars, 10 baggage cars, 384 box cars, 67 flat freight cars, and 25 service cars, had capital stock of $2,500,000, had as its officers S. S. Palmer, president, J. A. Jordan, vice president, Mark T. Cox, secretary and treasurer, and J. C. Thurman, general manager, had as its board of directors C. Ledyard Blair, Mark T. Cox, William Jay Hunt, J. A. Jordan, and S. S. Palmer, and had its principal office in New York, New York. In 1904, the officers of the railroad were S. S. Palmer, president, J. A. Jordan, vice president, M. T. Cox, secretary-treasurer, J. C. Thurman, general auditor and general manager, and F. B. Seymour, superintendent, and the members of the board of directors were S. S. Palmer, Mark T. Cox, C. L. Blair, William J. Hunt, and J. A. Jordan. In 1904, the railroad had capital stock of $2,500,000, had three employees in Minnesota, owned 22 locomotives, owned 23 passenger cars, owned 465 freight cars, owned 92 company service cars, and operated 225.00 total miles of railway trackage, but no mileage in Minnesota. In 1913, the railroad had as its officers J. A. Jordan, president, Edgar Palmer, vice president, Charles W. Cox, secretary and treasurer, J. C. Thurman, auditor, and F. B. Seymour, general manager, had as its board of directors C. L. Blair, Charles W. Cox, J. A. Jordan, Edgar Palmer, F. B. Seymour, Henry R. Taylor, and William J. Wilson, had as its principal place of business Green Bay, Wisconsin, and had total capital stock of $10,100,000. In 1916, the railroad operated 269.291 miles of rail trackage, owned 28 locomotives, owned 954 freight cars, owned 31 passenger cars, owned 24 work rail cars, controlled the Keuwanee, Green Bay & Western RailRoad, the Ahnapee & Western RailRoad, the Iola & Northern RailRoad, and the Winona Bridge Company, and was controlled by Blair & Company and by Robert Winthrop & Company.

Green Bay, Winona & St. Paul RailRoad: The railroad was reorganized under Wisconsin law in 1881, was incorporated under Wisconsin law in 1881, built three miles of rail line from Grand Rapids, Wisconsin, to Biron, Wisconsin, in 1895, succeeded the Green Bay & Minnesota RailRoad, operated until 1896, and was succeeded by the Green Bay & Western RailRoad. The Poor's Directory of RailRoad Officials, published by the Poor's RailRoad Manual Company in 1898, indicates that the officers of the railroad were Samuel Sloan, president, Gavin Campbell, general manager, Theodore Sturges, secretary and treasurer, F. W. Froemke, auditor, that the railroad general office was in Green Bay, Wisconsin, and that the railroad operated 225 miles of rail trackage.

Greer Contracting Company RailRoad The company railroad owned one Shay geared steam locomotive. The railroad was located at Buhl, Minnesota.

Gulf & Manitoba RailRoad: The railroad was initially intended to operate a 167 mile rail line from the Iowa state line to Sauk Centre, Minnesota, by way of Jackson, Minnesota, and ultimately from Duluth, Minnesota, to Kansas City, Missouri. Three miles of the rail line were graded in 1899, from the Minneapolis & St. Louis RailRoad junction to Beaver Falls, Minnesota. The officers of the railroad in 1901 were F. T. Campbell, a former Iowa governor, president, and E. E. Carpenter, vice president. In 1901, construction commenced on the leg of the rail line from Des Moines, Iowa, to Kansas City, Missouri. Joseph B. Moore was the treasurer of the railroad in 1901. C. H. Lawrence of Detroit, Michigan, a contractor, was awarded a $12.2 contract to build 800 miles of the railroad.

Gull Lake & Northern RailRoad: Although some accounts indicate that the railroad was organized in Crow Wing County, Minnesota, in 1885, the Gull Lake & Northern RailRoad appears to have actually only began construction during the second half of 1889. It was incorporated in 1889. The charter of the Gull Lake & Northern Railway Company provided for extending railway trackage to the Canadian Border. From Gilpatrick Lake/Margaret Lake, Minnesota, the railroad laid narrow gauge tracks with 30 pound rail to into the area to the West to access available timber. By 1892, tracks had been laid through Moose Lake, Minnesota, and on into the Spyder Lake, Minnesota, area North of Gull Lake, Minnesota, although apparently several miles short of actually reaching Spyder Lake. By 1890, the railroad had 12 miles of track and three locomotives. The railroad operated until 1894, was leased by the Northern Mill Company, which also had leased the Gull River Lumber Company, and was succeeded by the Brainerd & Northern Minnesota RailRoad. It wasn't until the Brainerd & Northern Minnesota Railway incorporated and was constructed, in 1892, that a railway extended as far North as Spider Lake. Some newspaper accounts suggest that the rails of the Brainerd & Northern Minnesota RailRoad did not reach Spider Lake until early 1893. All of the assets of the Gull Lake & Northern RailRoad were absorbed into the Brainerd & Northern Minnesota RailRoad, when the latter was formed in 1892, and some of the existing narrow gauge grades were converted to standard gauge at that time and at least two of the three Gull Lake & Northern RailRoad locomotives were converted to standard gauge.

Gunflint & Lake Superior RailRoad was constructed by the Pigeon River Lumber Company. The Pigeon River Lumber Company was organized in 1897 in Wisconsin by Daniel J. Arpin. The railroad was built in 1902 to haul timber cut from the eastern end of Gunflint Lake, Minnesota, and to Crab Lake, Minnesota, to sawmills in Fort William, Ontario, Canada, and Port Arthur, Ontario, Canada. It crossed the narrows between Gunflint Lake, Minnesota, and Little Gunflint Lake, Minnesota. In 1904, the Pigeon River Lumber Company purchased their own special Lima locomotive to haul harvested logs to the railway terminus at North Lake, Ontario, Canada. The railroad operated for six years, when a forest fire swept across the area and destroyed the one thousand-foot trestle on the North Lake, and the Pigeon River Lumber Company logged out most of the stands of red and white pine around Gunflint Lake, Minnesota.

A. Guthrie & Company RailRoad/Alexander Guthrie & Company RailRoad: A. Guthrie & Company was a contractor from St. Paul in the late 1920's, had offices in Oregon, and built bridges in Michigan in 1929 and 1930. Alexander Guthrie was one of the major Midwestern railroad contractors, with its main office in St. Paul, and contracts with the James J. Hill railroads that lasted for years. A. Guthrie & Company equipment included railroad locomotives, lumber loaders, and maintenance-of-way cars. [See note on James Jerome Hill for 240 Summit Avenue.]

Hallett Dock Company: The company was located at Duluth, Minnesota. It had one locomotive, a former Minnesota Western Railway #51, built by Fairbanks Morse in 1946, and acquired in 1977.

Halvorson Richards & Company RailRoad: Halvorson Richards & Company was an engineering consulting firm. Halvorson, Richards & Company were contractors on the extension of the Brainerd & Northern RailRoad and built the rail line for the Red Lake Transportation Company.

Hanlon & Oakes Company RailRoad: Hanlon & Oakes Company was a paving contractor located at Minneapolis in 1920 and at Sioux Falls, Iowa, in 1916. The company owned one Shay geared steam locomotive and one 1917 narrow gauge Climax locomotive. The railroad apparently was located at Winona, Minnesota.

Hanna Ore Mining Company RailRoad The company railroad owned two Shay geared steam locomotives. The railroad was located at Buhl, Minnesota. The mining company also had a rail operation at the Mississippi Mine at Keewatin, Minnesota.

J. M. Hassett & Company RailRoad: The J. M. Hassett & Company were railroad contractors with a main office located in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The company contracted to build a railroad line from Winchester, Virginia, to Irvine, Virginia. In 1910, the company reconstructed 16.5 miles of the Wisconsin Central RailRoad from Howard, Wisconsin, to Colfax, Wisconsin, using four steam shovels, six 16 ton Vulcan dinky railroad engines, 100 dump cars, and three pile dirvers. The company operated a narrow guage railroad in Minnesota from 1910 until sometime before 1920.

Hastings & Dakota RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1867, operated until 1872/1880, and was succeeded by the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad. The railroad was a line that ran from Hastings, Minnesota, west through Dakota County, Minnesota, and crossing the Milwaukee, St. Paul & Minneapolis RailRoad at Farmington, Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1871. In 1880, the railroad had 75 miles of railway line from Hastings, Minnesota, to Glencoe, Minnesota, operated by the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad as the Hastings & Dakota Division of that railroad, and the railroad had capital stock of $1,598,263.44. In 1881, the officers of the railroad were Selah Chamberlain, president, Russel Sage, vice president and treasurer, and James M. McKinlay, secretary, and the members of the board of directors of the railroad were Selah Chamberlain, N. A. Cowdrey, W. S. Gurnee, Alexander Mitchell, L. P. Morton, E. H. Perkins, Jr., Russell Sage, H. S. Taylor, and Julius Wadsworth. The railroad was initially succeeded by the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad in 1882 and was subsequently succeeded by the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad.

Hastings, Minnesota River & Red River of the North RailRoad: The railroad was chartered by Territorial Laws of Minnesota 1857, Chapter 39, and incorporated by C. P. Adams, Robert P. Allison, J. D. Archibald, F. Baasen, Alexis P. Bailly, J. L. Belden, F. B. Curtis, W. Dodd, A. Farribault, Thomas Foster, W. A. Gorman, W. P. Hillary, W. G. Le Duc, John C. Maloy, Michael Marsh, John J. McVay, J. D. North, H. B. Plant, Alexander Ramsey, James Shields, H. H. Sibley, M. B. Stone, S. L. Wheeler, and G. P. Winslow. The railroad was intended to survey, locate, construct, maintain, and operate a rail line from the levee at the foot of Ramsey Street in Hastings, Dakota County, Minnesota Territory, to a point on the Minnesota River between Henderson, Sibley County, Minnesota Territory, and St. Peter, Nicollet County, Minnesota Territory, thence Westerly and Southwesterly to the Missouri River by way of New Ulm, Brown County, Minnesota Territory, a branch rail line to the head of navigation of the Red River of the North, and a branch line to Stillwater, Washington County, Minnesota Territory. The railroad was organized in 1871. The railroad had initial capital stock of $500,000. The railroad was succeeded by the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad. [See note on Willis Arnold Gorman and the Gorman family for 11 Alice Court.] [See note on Alexander Ramsey for 265 South Exchange Street.] [See the note on Henry Hastings Sibley for 614 North Fountain Place.]

Hastings, St. Paul & Cannon Falls RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1887 and was incorporated in 1887 by George Barbarus, Fred Bursch, L. S. Follet, William Hodgson, R. Lalto, R. C. Libby, J. C. Meloy, Louis Niedere, George W. Noesen, M. V. Seymour, William Sondeman, D. L. Thompson, and Frank Yanz to build a railway from Hastings, Minnesota, to St. Paul and from Hastings, Minnesota, to Cannon Falls, Minnesota. It had initial capital stock of $1,000,000 and its principal place of business was Hastings, Minnesota. In 1887, the railroad’s officers were R. C. Libbey, president, J. C. Meloy, vice president, G. W. Noessen, secretary, and George Barbaras, treasurer. R.C. Libbey, who operated a retail lumber company, was a delegte to the Minnesota State Agricultural Society representing the Hastings Union Industrial Association in 1888 and was an unsuccessful candidate for the Minnesota Senate from District 24 in Dakota County, Minnesota, losing to Ignatius Donnelly of the Alliance Party, in 1890.

Hennepin County Gravity RailRoad was incorporated in 1884 by William F. Giddings, Daniel Jones, Frank C. Nickels, Louis A. Roth, and George E. Whipple to construct, operate, buy and sell, own or lease railways in Hennepin County and in the State of Minnesota. The railroad had initial capital stock of $10,000 and its principal place of business was Minneapolis. The railroad was organized in 1884.

Hiawatha Line: The Hiawatha Line is a 12.3 mile light rail corridor in Hennepin County that extends from downtown Minneapolis to the southern suburb of Bloomington, Minnesota, connecting to the Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport and the Mall of America, among other destinations, including the Metrodome and Target Field in downtown Minneapolis. The Hiawatha Line is operated by Metro Transit and accounts for 12 percent of Metro Transit's total ridership.

Hill City Railway Company: The railroad was organized in 1910, operated until 1935, and was succeeded by the Great Northern RailRoad. The Hill City Railway Company, with Stiles W. Burr of St. Paul as its president, and with Walter A. Eggleston of Minneapolis as its trustee under the foreclosure proceedings, was the successor to the Mississippi, Hill City & Western RailRoad in 1915. In 1917, the officers of the railroad was G. B. Robbins, president, F. W. Ellis, vice president, C. J. Faulkner, Jr., secretary, F. W. Croll, treasurer, J. W. Stull, general auditor, and R. J. Hinkle, general manager, the main office was at Hill City, Minnesota, the miles of rail line operated was 25, and the number of locomotives owned was two. The rail line ran from a junction with the Great Northern RailRoad at Swan River, Minnesota, west to Hill City, Minnesota, in Aitkin County, Minnesota. The Hill City RailRoad was abandoned in 1935. [See note on Stiles W. Burr for 943 Summit Avenue.]

Houston, Hesper & SouthWestern RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in 1876 by E. Baldwin, J. H. Chase, Teman Gilbertson, W. N. Gilmore, P. M. Glathart, Hiram Knox, Charles M. Morgan, J. Phelps, J. Snyder, H. B. Williams, J. B. Williams, and F. Worth to build and operate a railway from Houston, Minnesota, southwesterly through Hesper, Iowa. It had initial capital stock of $200,000 and its principal place of business was Sheldon, Houston County, Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1876. In 1876, the line was intended to run from Houston, Houston County, Minnesota, and an intersection with the Minnesota Southern RailRoad Southwesterly, ascending the Beaver Creek Valley, through Sheldon, Minnesota, Caledonia, Minnesota, and Spring Grove, Minnesota. Dr. Fordyce Worth (1831-1920) was the president of the railroad in 1876. The rail bed was graded, but the narrow gauge railroad was never built.

Hutchinson, Glencoe & Southern RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1885 and was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1885 by D. A. Adams, J. B. Bassett, W. T. Bonniwell, G. K. Gilbert, John Haney, Warren J. Ives, G. M. Nelson, W. W. Pendergast, Mathew J. Peppard, A. H. Reed, and Kee Wakefield to build, maintain and operate a railway and a telegraph line from Hutchinson, McLeod County, Minnesota, easterly to connect with any other rail line, or from Hutchinson, Minnesota, to Glencoe, Minnesota, and from Mankato, Minnesota, by way of Glencoe, Minnesota, and Hutchinson, Minnesota, to the Northern boundary of the State. It had initial capital stock of $500,000 and its principal place of business was Glencoe, Minnesota. W. J. Peppart was the president of the railroad in 1885. Thomas Hoyme was a Canadian railroad contractor who was financially interested in the rail line and was expected to be contracted as the builder. Planning for the railroad was coordinated with officials of the Minneapolis & St. Louis RailRoad and the Minneapolis & St. Louis RailRoad was expected to operate the finished rail line. [See the note for Joel Bean Bassett in the introduction.]

Hutchinson & Western RailRoad: The electric rail line ran West from Hutchinson, Minnesota, through McLeod County, Minnesota, Meeker County, Minnesota, and Kandiyohi County, Minnesota. The railroad was incorporated by William E. Ellis, E. L. McGrory, and Z. A. White in 1904, had capital stock of $50,000 in 1904, and had as its officers L. McGrory, president, William E. Ellis, vice president, Cyrus A. White, secretary, and Edgar H. Bass, treasurer, in 1904.

I & M Rail Link: The railroad was organized in 1997, operated until 2002, and was succeeded by the Iowa, Chicago & Eastern RailRoad. It operated 1,385 miles of trackage in Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, Missouri, and Wisconsin, and was once owned by the Dakota, Minnesota & Eastern RailRoad. It is now owned by the Canadian Pacific Railway.

Illinois Central & Gulf RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1972, operated until 1984, and was succeeded by the Cedar Valley RailRoad.

Illinois Central RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated under a special Illinois law in 1851, was organized in 1867, operated until 1972, and was succeeded by the Illinois Central & Gulf RailRoad. In 1856, the railroad operated rail trackage from Cairo, Illinois, to Galena, Illinois. In 1867, the Illinois Central RailRoad extended its rail trackage into Iowa. Throughout the 1870’s and 1880’s, the Illinois Central RailRoad acquired and expanded railroads throughout the southern United States. The Poor's Directory of RailRoad Officials, published by the Poor's RailRoad Manual Company in 1898, indicates that the officers of the railroad were James C. Clark, president, Stuyvesant Fish, vice president and treasurer, E. T. H. Gibson, secretary, E. T. Jeffery, general manager, B. F. Ayer, general solicitor, and J. C. Welling, general auditor, and that the railroad operated 2,150 miles of rail trackage, including 7.66 miles by the Dubuque & Sioux City RailRoad in Minnesota from the Iowa State Line to Lyle, Minnesota. In 1901, the railroad had as its officers Stuyvesant Fish, president, J. C. Welling, vice president, J. T. Harahan, second vice president, A. G. Hackstaff, secretary, J. M. Dickinson, general counsel, J. F. Wallace, general manager, F. Fairman, auditor, and Edmund T. H. Gibson, treasurer, operated 4,265 miles of rail trackage, owned 986 locomotives, owned 4,950 pieces of rolling stock, and had its general offices at Chicago, Illinois. In 1915, the railroad operated 3,901.687 miles of rail trackage, owned 1,338 locomotives, owned 56,691 freight cars, owned 1,243 passenger rail cars, owned 18 pieces of floating equipment, owned 2,354 work cars, leased 87 locomotives, leased 7,234 freight cars, leased 61 passenger rail cars, leased one piece of floating equipment, leased five work cars, controlled directly 13 other railroads (the Chicago, St. Louis & New Orleans RailRoad, the Dubuque & Sioux City RailRoad, the Canton, Aberdeen & Nashville RailRoad, the South Chicago Railroad, the Chicago & Illinois Southern RailRoad, the St. Louis, Belleville & Southern RailRoad, the Meridan, Brookhaven & Natchez RailRoad, the Bloomington Southern RailRoad, the Omaha Bridge & Terminal RailRoad, the Blue Island Railroad, the Fredonia & Reeds RailRoad, the Johnson City Southern RailRoad, The Mississippi Valley Company, the Yazoo and Mississippi Valley RailRoad, the Central RailRoad of Georgia, the Chicago, Memphis & Gulf RailRoad, the Dunleith & Dubuque Bridge Company, and the Batesville Southern RailRoad,) controlled indirectly through the Yazoo & Mississippi Valley RailRoad five railroads (Louisville, New Orleans & Texas RailRoad of Arkansas, the Sunflower & Eastern RailRoad, the Helm & Northeastern RailRoad, the Minter City Southern & Western RailRoad, and the Baton Rouge, Hammond & Eastern RailRoad,) and jointly controlled the Kensington & Eastern RailRoad with the Chicago, Lake Shore & South Bend RailRoad. In 1972, the Illinois Central Railroad merged with the Gulf, Mobile and Ohio Railroad to form the Illinois Central Gulf Railroad and subsequently merged with the Canadian National RailRoad.

International Bridge & Terminal Company: The railroad was incorporated in 1902, was organized between 1907 and 1910 by the Backus-Brooks Company, operated until 1910, and was succeeded by the Minnesota, Dakota & Western RailRoad. The International Bridge & Terminal Company of International Falls, Minnesota, acquired a nearby railroad with the intention of crossing west across Minnesota and North Dakota and into Montana, became the Minnesota, Dakota & Western Railway, gave up its aspirations by the late 1920's, settled down carrying raw materials and finished products for its owner, the Minnesota & Ontario Paper Company, and was acquired by Boise Cascade Corporation in 1965. [See note for Edward Wellington Backus, the Keewatin Lumber Company, the Great Lakes Paper Company, the Backus-Brooks Company, and the International Lumber Company for 2201 East Lake of Isles Boulevard].

International Lumber Company RailRoad The company railroad owned at least one Shay geared steam locomotive and at least one Heisler geared locomotive. The railroad was located at International Falls, Minnesota.

Interstate Railway: In 1905, the officers of the railroad were Edward C. Steger, president, and A. C. Titus, chief engineer. The railroad was intended to run from Duluth, Minnesota, to Kansas City, Missouri, and, in 1905, let a contract to the Quigley Construction Company of St. Louis, Missouri, to begin construction. A. C. Titus was the president of the Iron River Red Sandstone Company, headquartered in Duluth, Minnesota, in 1897.

Interstate Traction Company: The railroad was a reorganization of the Minnesota Point Street Railway Companyafter a foreclosure sale, was chartered in 1888, had capital stock of $50,000, operated 3.5 miles of rail trackage, owned five motor cars and three trailer cars, purchased electric power, operated the Oatka Beach Amusement Park, had its general office in Duluth, Minnesota, had as its officers Robert R. Dunn, president, and A. W. Hartman, secretary and treasurer, and had as its board of trustees Robert R. Dunn, A. W. Hartman, C. F. Hartman, and O. C. Hartman. According to Poor's Manual of the RailRoads of the United States, Volume 33 by Henry Varnum Poor in 1901, as of 1899, the railroad operated 3.75 miles of rail trackage, operated as an electric railroad with power supplied by the Commercial Light & Power Company in 1899, owned four motor cars and two trail cars, had $50,000 in capital stock, had as its officers Robert R. Dunn, president, Henry O. Underwood, vice president, A. W Hartman, treasurer and manager, and O. C. Hartman, secretary, had as its board of directors Robert R. Dunn, A. W. Hartman, C. F. Hartman, O. C. Hartman, and Henry O. Underwood, and had its general office in Duluth, Minnesota. The railroad operated from 1902 until 1914, when it was liquidated to its bond holders. The Poor's Directory of RailRoad Officials, published by the Poor's RailRoad Manual Company in 1905, indicates that the officers of the railroad were Robert R. Dunn, president, O. C. Hartman, vice president and secretary, A. W Hartman, treasurer and manager, and S. M. Johnson, superintendent.

Interstate Transfer RailRoad/Inter-State Transfer RailRoad: The belt line railroad was incorporated in 1907 under the general laws of the State of Wisconsin for the purpose of acquiring and operating a railroad in Douglas County, Wisconsin, and in St. Louis County, Minnesota, with branches, was organized in 1907, owned 10.284 miles of rail trackage, with construction work that began in 1907, was discontinued in 1913, resumed in 1915, and was completed in 1916, was leased to and operated by the Duluth Missabe & Northern RailRoad in 1930, operated until 1938, and was succeeded by the Duluth, Missabe & Iron Range RailRoad. In 1919, the railroad operated 13.364 miles of rail line, of which 10.284 miles were a main line track from the St. Louis River Bridge to South Itasca, Wisconsin, in 1916. The railroad connected with the Spirit Lake Transfer RailRoad using a double decked bridge over the St. Louis River at Oliver, Wisconsin. The Inter-State Transfer RailRoad connected Oliver, Wisconsin, and Itasca, Wisconsin. The railroad was controlled by the Federal Steel Company, which was a subsidiary of United States Steel Corporation. In 1938, the property and assets of the Duluth & Iron Range RailRoad and the Interstate Transfer Railway Company were both transferred to the Duluth, Missabe & Iron Range RailRoad.

Iowa Central & Northwestern RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1881. The railroad was incorporated in 1881 by Charles Alexander, Isaac M. Cate, and D. N. Pickering to acquire, construct, equip, maintain and operate a railway from a point or points along the line of the Central Iowa Railway westerly and northwesterly. The railroad had $5,000,000 in corporate stock. The principal place of business of the railroad was Marshalltown, Iowa.

Iowa Central Railway Company: The railroad was incorporated in Illinois and was organized in 1888. In 1904, the officers of the railroad were Edwin Hawley, president, L. F. Day, vice president and general manager, A. C. Doan, secretary, F. H. Davis, vice president and treasurer, and George W. Seevers, solicitor, and the members of the board of directors of the railroad were E. C. Bradley, George Crocker, F. H. Davis, L. F. Day, Henry A. Gardner, Edwin Hawley, H. E. Huntington, Edwin Langdon, George R. Morse, Horace J. Morse, Paul Morton, Russell Sage, John E. Searles, T. P. Shonts, and L. C. Weir. In 1904, the railroad had capital stock of $15,096,200, had 148 employees in Minnesota, owned 88 locomotives, owned 46 passenger cars, owned 3,092 freight cars, and owned 224 company service cars. The railroad operated until 1912 and was succeeded by the Minneapolis & St. Louis RailRoad.

Iowa, Chicago & Eastern RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 2002, created by the purchase of the I&M Rail Link. It was a Class II railroad that operated in the North Central United States. It has been controlled by the Canadian Pacific Railway and is operated as a part of the Canadian Pacific RailRoad system since 2008. Formerly, it was jointly owned with the Dakota, Minnesota & Eastern Railroad by Cedar American Rail Holdings.

Iowa & Minnesota Railway: The railroad was incorporated under Iowa law in 1866, began construction of a 37 mile narrow guage rail line from Des Moines, Iowa, to Ames, Iowa, and was succeeded by the Des Moines & Minnesota RailRoad in 1873.

Iowa & Minnesota Railway Construction Company: The company was incorporated in 1866. The incorporation of the company was ratified and confirmed by the Minnesota Legislature in Special Laws of Minnesota 1867, Chapter 12, in 1867, even though its articles of incorporation named only three incorporators rather than the five incorporators required by law. The company was organized by 1868 and was actively constructing a link between St. Paul and Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and Chicago, Illinois, by completing an 85 mile rail line from New Oregon, Iowa, to Owatonna, Minnesota in 1868. The rail line was to be owned by the Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad when completed. The company was reorganized in 1871.

Iowa & Minnesota Railroad Company: The railroad was incorporated to construct, operate and maintain a railroad from the North line of Winnebago County, Iowa to or near Fort Dodge and thence in a Southwesterly direction to some point along the Missouri River. The railroad built a 30 mile rail line from Forest City, Iowa, to Belmond, Iowa, by way of Miller, Iowa, Hayfield Junction, Iowa, Garner, Iowa, Klemme, Iowa, and Goodell, Iowa. The railroad was sold to the Cedar Rapids, Iowa Falls & Northwestern Railway Company in 1883.

Iowa & Minnesota Railway Construction Company: The railroad was authorized by the State of Minnesota shortly after statehood in 1857, was incorporated in 1866 by James Buell, Marcellus Hartley, H. S. Taylor, and others to construct, own and operate roads and railroads in Minnesota and Iowa, was organized in 1866, had capital stock of $2,000,000, and was ratified by a special Minnesota legislative enactment in 1867.

Iowa & Minnesota Northern RailRoad was incorporated under Iowa law in 1871 and was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1884 by Philip Brady, Hamilton Brown, William Crooks, G. W. Cross, Andrew De Graff, Harry A. Foster, and James B. Hubbell to construct, maintain, and operate a railway from the Southern State boundary in Jackson County, Minnesota, Northerly to the Northern boundary of the State, with East and West extensions and branches. The railroad had initial capital stock of $2,500,000 and its principal place of business was St. Paul. The railroad was organized in 1884. [See note for William Crooks for 57 Wilkin Street.]

Iowa, Minnesota & Northwestern RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated under Iowa law in 1898, was organized in 1899, and operated until 1900. The railroad operated a 194.16 mile rail line (166.00 miles from Blue Earth, Minnesota, to Belle Plaine, Iowa, constructed in 1899-1900 and 29.00 miles from Blue Earth, Minnesota, to Fox Lake, Minnesota, constructed in 1900,) from Belle Plaine, Iowa, and Mason City, Iowa, to Fox Lake, Minnesota, by way of Fairmont, Minnesota, Blue Earth, Minnesota, and Kiester, Faribault County, Minnesota. The railroad was acquired by the Chicago & NorthWestern RailRoad in 1900 and was succeeded by the Chicago & NorthWestern RailRoad. It became the Iowa & Minnesota Division of the Chicago & NorthWestern RailRoad, with a 195 mile rail line running from Belle Plaine, Iowa, to Fox Lake, Minnesota, by way of Blue Earth, Minnesota.

The Ironhorse Central RailRoad is a railroad museum in Chisago City, Minnesota, which operates various 20 pieces of rolling stock, including a 1914 Baldwin steam engine. The museum, with one mile of rail track, is owned by Richard Thompson, Robert Thompson, and Doug Alexander.

Iron Range Northern RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1887 and was incorporated in 1886 by I. P. Beck, W. B. Dixon, R. H. Lee, George C. Stone, H. F. Thompson, Charlemagne Tower, Charlemagne Tower, Jr., and A. H. Viele to build a railway from a point along the line of the Duluth & Iron Range RailRoad to the Northern boundary of the State. It had initial capital stock of $1,000,000 and its principal place of business was in Duluth, Minnesota.

Ironworld Discovery Center: The Ironworld Discovery Center at Chisholm, Minnesota, a museum devoted to the Iron Range’s mining heritage, has a tourist street railroad.

Itasca Lumber Company RailRoad: In 1892, construction of a 25 mile rail line from Grand Rapids, Minnesota, into the timber lands began. In 1893, the railroad was intended to be operated in connection with the Duluth & Winnipeg RailRoad. The private logging railroad was built by the Itasca Logging Company, an Illinois corporation, in 1895 and 1896 and handled outside passengers and freight as an accommodation to settlers and loggers. In 1900, the company built a 15 mile rail line from Bow String Lake, Minnesota, to Turtle Lake, Minnesota, and planned an a ten mile rail line extension from Turtle Lake, Minnesota, to Big Fork River, Minnesota. In 1904, the officers of the corporation were William T. Joyce, president, H. C. Akeley, vice president, Thomas Hume, secretary, and F. C. Gerhard, treasurer, and the members of the corporate board of directors were H. C. Akeley, F. C. Gerhard, Thomas Hume, and William T. Joyce. In 1904, the railroad owned five locomotives, owned one passenger cars, owned 75 freight cars, owned 22 company service cars, and had 41.00 total miles of railway trackage, all in Minnesota.

Itasca RailRoad: The railroad was the incorporated form, in 1901, of the Bass Brook RailRoad. The logging railroad was organized in 1889, ran from Deer River, Minnesota, North to the Suomi Hills area of Minnesota and the lake areas of Minnesota for the purpose of transporting logs, was renamed the Minneapolis & Rainy River RailRoad in 1901, was nicknamed the "Gut & Liver" RailRoad, extended originally to Smith Lake, Minnesota, and then went to Jessie Junction/Alder, Minnesota, when the Smith Lake, Minnesota, line was removed after the lumber had been cut. By 1911, the rail line reached Craig, Minnesota, north of Bigfork, Minnesota. There was a branch line at the Alder, Minnesota, station that went past Jessie Lake, Minnesota, and terminated north of Wirt, Minnesota. In 1931, a petition was filed by the railroad to abandon the 63 mile rail line. The railroad had one locomotive, and operated as the Minneapolis & Rainy River RailRoad until at least 1904. The Minneapolis & Rainy River RailRoad never started in Minneapolis and never terminated at Rainy River, Minnesota.

Jackson Southern RailRoad was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1886 by Hiram S. Bailey, Paul H. Berge, John K. Brown, John W. Cowing, Alexander Feddes, Wilbur A. Kimball, and Thomas J. Knox to build a railway, telegraph, and one or more express lines from Jackson, Jackson County, Minnesota, to the Southern boundary of Minnesota. It had initial capital stock of $500,000 and its principal place of business was in Jackson, Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1886. In 1893, the railroad completed surveys of the planned 33 mile rail line from Ruthven, Iowa, to Jackson, Minnesota. In 1893, the officers of the railroad were John K. Brown, president, E. E. Carpenter, vice president, J. W. Cowing, secretary, and W. T. Reynolds, treasurer.

Judson Pneumatic Railway Company: The company was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1888, had capital stock of $2,500,000, and had its principal place of business in Minneapolis.

Kenosha & St. Louis RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1872.

Keokuk, Fort Des Moines & Minnesota Rail Road Company: The railroad was organized in 1853 and was incorporated under an 1858 Iowa law to procure the right of way, survey, locate and construct and, during its continuance, to maintain a railroad with a double or single track, from Keokuk, Lee County, Iowa, on the Mississippi River to Fort Des Moines, Polk County, Iowa, and thence to the Northerly boundary of the State of Iowa in the direction of the Southern bend of the Minnesota River, by way of Fairfield, Jefferson County, Iowa, Oskaloosa, Mahaska County, Iowa, and Pella, Marion County, Iowa. The railroad was the successor to the Des Moines River Improvement & RailRoad Company. The railroad built a 39 mile rail line from Keokuk, Iowa, to Bentonsport, Iowa, by way of Buena Vista, Iowa, Sugar Creek, Iowa, Connables, Iowa, Sand Prairie/Vincennes, Iowa, Hinsdale, Iowa, Belfast, Iowa, Croton, Iowa, Farmington, Iowa, and Bonaparte, Iowa, by 1857. The railroad built a 25 mile rail line from Bentonsport, Iowa, to Eddyville, Iowa, by way of Mount Zion, Iowa, Kilbourne/Kilbourn, Iowa, Douds Station/Douds, Iowa, Selma, Iowa, Eldon, Iowa, Cliffland, Iowa, Ottumwa, Iowa, Ottumwa Junction, Iowa, and Kirkville Station/Kirkville, Iowa, by 1861. The railroad was renamed the Des Moines Valley RailRoad Company in 1864. In 1873, the Des Moines Valley RailRoad Company went into bankruptcy and was sold to others and the rail line between Keokuk, Iowa, and Des Moines, Iowa, became the Keokuk & Des Moines RailRoad. The Keokuk & Des Moines Railroad became part of the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific RailRoad system in 1878.

Keokuk, Iowa City & Minnesota RailRoad Company: The railroad was incorporated in 1870 as a consolidation of the Keokuk & Minnesota RailRoad and the Iowa Northern & Central RailRoad, graded a portion of the route between Keokuk, Iowa, and the Northern boundary of Lee County, Iowa, had the graded work sold under a mechanic's lien in 1878, and was deeded to the Keokuk & Northwestern RailRoad in 1880.

Keokuk & Minnesota RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in 1869 under Iowa law to build and operate a railroad from Keokuk, Iowa, to the Iowa-Minnesota border in the direction of St. Paul. The railroad was succeeded by the Keokuk, Iowa City & Minnesota RailRoad Company in 1870.

Kettle River RailRoad was incorporated in 1886 by William H. Grant, John P. Knowles, Charles G. Lawrence, James P. Pond, and Lafayette Shaw to build a railway from a point along the St. Paul & Duluth RailRoad in Pine County, Minnesota, to Kettle River, Minnesota. It had initial capital stock of $100,000 and its principal place of business was St. Paul. The railroad was organized in 1886. The railroad operated until 1887 and was initially succeeded by the St. Paul & Duluth RailRoad and was subsequently succeeded by the Eastern Railway of Minnesota and then by the Great Northern RailRoad. [See note for Charles G. Lawrence for 703 Lincoln Avenue.]

Knife Falls RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1877, was essentially a branch of the St. Paul & Duluth RailRoad, ran 16.5 miles between the North Pacific Junction and Cloquet, Minnesota, operated until 1900, and was succeeded by the Northern Pacific RailRoad.

Komoko & St. Louis River RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated as a Minnesota corporation in 1871.

Lac Qui Parle RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1983. The Lac Qui Parle Regional Rail Authority was created in 1983 under Minnesota Statutes, Sections 398A.01 to 398A.09 and was intended to re-activate the 38 mile rail line originally built by the Chicago Northwestern RailRoad and abandoned in 1972 running from Madison, Minnesota, to Hanley Falls, Minnesota, and serving Madison, Minnesota, Dawson, Minnesota, Boyd, Minnesota, Clarkfield, Minnesota, and Hazel Run, Minnesota. The railroad rehabilitated and provided rail service from the junction with the Burlington Northern Santa Fe RailRoad at Hanley Falls, Minnesota, to Bellingham, Minnesota. The line’s previous owner, the Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railroad, initially leased the rail line and repurchased it in 1997. The Lac qui Parle Regional Rail Authority is headquarted in Dawson, Minnesota. Oversight and management is provided by a five member board of commissioners who are appointed by the Lac Qui Parle County Board of Commissioners. Board terms are on an annual appointment basis by the Lac qui Parle County Board of Commissioners.

La Crescent, Rochester & Yankton RailRoad: The railroad was authorized by the State of Minnesota shortly after statehood in 1857 and was incorporated in 1866 by Thomas H. Armstrong, Samuel Lord, C. G. Ripley, and others to build and operate a railroad from La Crescent, Minnesota, to Yankton, Dakota Territory, with a branch line to Rochester, Minnesota. The railroad had capital stock of $11,000,000 at incorporation. The railroad was organized in 1871.

LaCrosse, Iowa & Southern RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1883. In 1883, John G. Stradley (1854- ,) a former Rochester, Minnesota resident and a former Cresco, Iowa, resident, was the general manager of the railroad.

LaCrosse, Iowa & SouthWestern RailRoad was incorporated in 1883 by Mons Anderson, Robert Calvert, Joseph Clarke, J. S. Clarkson, F. M. Gilbert, O. W. Hart, Albert Hirshheimer, J. Seaton Kelso, William Listman, James McCord, John S. Medary, Charles Michel, J. S. Mills, Giles R. Montague, John Rath, Loren W. Reynolds, William A. Rosevelt, F. A. Roziene, J. S. Runnels, S. W. Soeske, A. R. Spriggs, B. W. Stevens, John L. Stevens, John Ulrick, and G. Van Steenwyk as a consolidation of the Minnesota, Iowa & SouthWestern RailRoad and the LaCrosse & SouthWestern RailRoad to build and operate a railway from a point on the West bank of the Mississippi River in Houston County, Minnesota, across from La Crosse, Wisconsin, to a point near Hesper, Iowa, thence through Charles City, Iowa, southwesterly to a point beyond the Missouri River. It had initial capital stock of $11,000,000 ($1,000,000 for the Minnesota Division and $10,000,000 for the Wisconsin Division) and its principal place of business was Charles City, Floyd County, Iowa.

LaCrosse & Omaha RailRoad was incorporated in 1879 by J. Clarke, C. L. Coleman, E. P. Dorival, W. E. Dunival, James McCord, Alex. McMillan, J. S. Medary, J. Paul, and Clark W. Thompson to build a railway from the Mississippi River in Houston County, Minnesota, opposite LaCrosse, Wisconsin, southwesterly to Omaha, Nebraska. It had initial capital stock of $500,000 and its principal place of business was Hokah, Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1879.

LaCrosse & SouthWestern RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1881. The railroad was incorporated in 1881 by Mons Anderson, R. Calvert, J. Clarke, B. F. Edwards, A. Hirchheimer, J. J. Hogan, William Listman, J. McCord, John S. Medary, C. Michel, G. R. Montague, William A. Roosevelt, Gran Steenwyck, C. W. Thompson, and John Ulrich to survey, locate, construct and operate a railway from a point on the West bank of the Mississippi River in Houston County, opposite La Crosse, Wisconsin, southwesterly to the Southern boundary of the State. The railroad had $800,000 in corporate stock. The principal place of business of the railroad was La Crescent, Minnesota.

LaCrosse, Trempealeau & Prescott RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1871, operated until 1877, and was succeeded by the Chicago & NorthWestern RailRoad.

Lake Branch RailRoad: The railroad went from the City of Brainerd, Minnesota, to the sawmill and to the Brainerd Brewing Company brewery and operated in 1893.

Lake Park & Crookston Airline RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1881. The railroad was incorporated in 1881 by William Anglin, C. P. Bailey, M. D. Bailey, M. R. Brown, K. D. Chase, J. D. Ensign, John Freidrich, T. Holten, D. E. Little, M. Mark, R. Reynolds, P. C. Sletten, and William W. Spalding to survey, locate, construct, and operate a single or double track railway from Lake Park, Becker County, Minnesota, northeasterly via Crookston, Minnesota, to a point along the Red River of the North and thence northerly to the mouth of the Thief River. The railroad had $2,000,000 in corporate stock. The principal place of business of the railroad was Crookston, Minnesota.

Lake Pepin & Omaha RailRoad: The railroad was authorized by the Minnesota Legislature shortly after statehood in 1857. The railroad was incorporated in 1867 by J. A. Leonard, N. S. Teft, O. P. Whitcomb, and others to build a rail line from Wabasha, Minnesota, by way of Plainview, Minnesota, Elgin, Minnesota, Rochester, Minnesota, High Forest, Minnesota, and Austin, Minnesota, South to the Minnesota-Iowa border in the direction of Omaha, Nebraska. In 1867, the St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad Company was authorized by Private Session Laws 1867, Page 3, to construct a branch line over the surveyed route from Wabasha, Minnesota, to Austin, Minnesota. In 1870, a route for the rail line was surveyed from Wabasha, Minnesota, and Austin, Minnesota. By 1873, the route became controlled by the Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad Company. In 1874, the railroad as a corporation was continued in the hopes of using it to connect with railroad projects in Wisconsin and to extend a Wisconsinrailroad through Wabasha, Minnesota, Plainview, Minnesota, Elgin, Minnesota, Rochester, Minnesota, High Forest, Minnesota, and Austin, Minnesota, Southwardly to the Minnesota-Iowa border. The railroad was organized in 1867 and had capital stock of $2,000,000.

Lake Superior & Central Minnesota RailRoad: The railroad was chartered by Territorial Laws of Minnesota 1856, Chapter 158, was incorporated in 1856 by George F. Brott, J. L. Crocker, David Gilman, John R. Irvin, Joel H. Johnson, S. B. Lowry, William B. Ogden, Alexander Ramsey, Reuben Richmond, Franklin Steele, Jesse M. Stone, Louis Stone, Eber Ward, and J. P. Wilson, and was intended to run a rail line from the mouth of the St. Louis River at Lake Superior by way of Mille Lac, Minnesota, Langola, Minnesota, and St. Cloud, Minnesota, to the Western border of the territory and with a branch rail line by way of St. Peter, Minnesota, to the Big Bend of the Missouri River, and was organized in 1871. The railroad had capital stock of $5,000,000. [See note on Alexander Ramsey for 265 South Exchange Street.]

Lake Superior Consolidated Iron Mines RailRoad: The Lewis Merritt family of Duluth, Minnesota, began searching northern Minnesota for minerals in 1888 and Merritts' crew encountered the first body of soft ore on the Mesabi Range at present Mountain Iron, Minnesota, in 1890. In 1891, the Merritts incorporated the Duluth, Missabe & Northern Railway Company in order to get their ore to market. By 1892, the Merritts' Duluth, Missabe & Northern RailRoad served almost all of the working mines on the Mesabi Range. Lon Merritt and Alfred Merritt sought financial support from Charles Wetmore of New York City, an associate of John D. Rockefeller, and vice-president of the American Steel Barge Company. Wetmore proposed that the American Steel Barge Company assist the Merritts in raising capital in exchange for the exclusive right to transport the Merritt's Mesabi ores for a period of 15 years and Lon Merritt signed the agreement with Wetmore in late 1892. In 1893, overextended during the Panic of 1893, Lon Merritt and Charles Wetmore approached John D. Rockefeller for his direct support of the troubled Mesabi enterprises and an agreement was concluded whereby all of the Merritt-Wetmore properties were combined under the Lake Superior Consolidated Iron Mines and Rockefeller put up $2 million to keep the enterprise in operation. Rockefeller later bought out the Merritts during the depths of the Panic of 1893. In 1894, the Lake Superior Consolidated Iron Mines Company acquired the Duluth Missabe & Northern Railway. In 1896, Rockefeller leased all of his Lake Superior Consolidated Iron Mines properties to the Carnegie Steel Company. By 1900, Lake Superior Consolidated Iron Mines produced 75 percent of America's iron ore and the Carnegie-Rockefeller Lake Superior Consolidated Iron Mine Company had 34 working mines, including eight on the Mesabi Range and four on the Vermilion Range. J.P. Morgan purchased Rockefeller's Lake Superior Consolidated Iron Mines, the Duluth, Missabe & Northern RailRoad and the Bessemer Steamship Company, for $8,500,000 in cash and $80,000,000 in stock in the newly formed consolidation, the United States Steel Corporation, and Morgan eventually gained control not only of the Carnegie and Rockefeller operations, but also of Federal Steel, National Steel, American Bridge, American Sheet Steel, American Steel Hoop, American Steel & Wire, American Tin Plate, National Tube, and the Oliver Iron Mining Company. The assets of the United States Steel Corporation included 78 blast furnaces and rolling mills, vast holdings of iron ore, coal, and limestone, over 1,000 miles of railroad, and a Great Lakes fleet of 112 ships.

Lake Superior & Crow Wing RailRoad: The railroad was chartered by First Extra Session Territorial Laws of Minnesota 1857, Chapter 74, was incorporated by Samuel B. Abbe, R. B. Carlton, W. W. Kingsbury, J. W. Lynde, Clinton Markell, Alexander Ramsey, Edmund Rice, Henry B. Stanton, Hiram Waldbridge, and J. S. Watrous, had capital stock of $2,000,000, was intended to locate and build a single or double rail line from a point at or near the head of Superior Bay, and was required to establish the rail line within five years of incorporation or be dissolved. The railroad reportedly was organized in 1871.

Lake Superior & Crow Wing Air Line RailRoad: The railroad was authorized by the State of Minnesota shortly after statehood in 1857 and was incorporated in 1861 by Michael S. Bright, Richard G. Coburn, William Mann and others, to build a railroad from Crow Wing, Minnesota, to Douglas County, Wisconsin. The capital stock at incorporation was $1,500,000. The railroad was organized in 1871.

Lake Superior & Dakota RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1881. The railroad was incorporated in 1881 by William Auglin, C. K. Davis, R. Fairweather, M. Graves, S. Harbaugh, Frank Ives, Charles Lockhart, C. W. McIntyre, and J. H. Stewart to construct and operate a railway and a telegraph line from Duluth, Minnesota, to the Western boundary of the State on the Red River of the North, with a branch line to the Eastern boundary of the State. The railroad had $5,000,000 in corporate stock. The principal place of business of the railroad was St. Paul.

Lake Superior & Iron Mountain RailRoad: The railroad was authorized by the State of Minnesota shortly after statehood in 1857. The railroad was incorporated in 1864 by Lyman Dayton, Ossian E. Dodge, Charles D. Williams, and others, to build and operate a railway from Duluth, Minnesota, to Vermillion Lake, Minnesota, Rainy Lake, Minnesota, and Pigeon River, Minnesota and back to Duluth, Minnesota. The railroad had $500,000 in capital stock at incorporation. The railroad was organized in 1871. [See note on Lyman Dayton in the general introduction.] [See note on Ossian Euclid Dodge for 294 Winifred Street East.]

Lake Superior & Mississippi RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in 1864 by W. L. Banning, William Branch, James Smith, Jr., and others to construct and operate a railway from Lake Superior to St. Paul and was organized in 1868. Lyman Dayton was the president of the the Nebraska & Lake Superior RailRoad, incorporated in 1857, subsequently renamed the Lake Superior & Mississippi RailRoad. The Lake Superior & Mississippi Railroad Company was incorporated under Minnesota legislation enacted in 1861 and received grants of lands approved by the U. S. General Land Office for transfer. The railroad provided the first service between Duluth, Minnesota, and the Twin Cities upon its completion in 1870, was the Eastern terminus of the Northern Pacific RailRoad, and linked the Great Lakes and the Mississippi River. In 1871, the railroad had capital stock of $32,410, leased for 999 years the Stillwater & St. Paul RailRoad and the Minneapolis & Duluth RailRoad, operated 170 miles of rail trackage, owned ten bridges, owned 136 trestles, owned 17 locomotives, owned 17 passenger cars, owned 486 freight cars, and owned seven company service cars. In 1871, the officers of the railroad were F. H. Clark, president, Charles Eliot Furness, secretary and treasurer, Thomas M. Davis, auditor, James Smith, Jr., attorney, and W. W. Hungerford, superintendent, and members of the board of directors of the railroad were W. L. Banning, George Burnham, Frank H. Clark, J. Hinckley Clark, Jay Cooke, Jr., S. M. Felton, Charles H. Graves, Isaac Hinckley, William G. Moorehead, B. S. Russell, James Smith, Jr., J. H. Stewart, and W. D. Washburn. The railroad was a victim of the Panic of 1873, defaulted on its bonds, operated until 1877, and was succeeded by the St. Paul & Duluth RailRoad. It was absorbed by the Northern Pacific RailRoad in 1900. [See note for William L. Banning for 57 Wilkin Street.] [See note on Jay Cooke for 432 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Lyman Dayton in the general introduction.] [See note on Charles Eliot Furness for 265 South Exchange Street.] [See note for William Drew Washburn for 2119 Third Avenue South.] [See note on the Lake Superior & Mississippi RailRoad in the general introduction.]

Lake Superior & Mississippi RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1871 as the successor, under Special Laws of Minnesota 1861, Chapter 1, to the Nebraska & Lake Superior RailRoad, authorized by special Minnesota Territorial legislation in 1857, and to the St. Paul & Lake Superior RailRoad, was initially succeeded by the St. Paul & Duluth RailRoad, and was ultimately succeeded by the Northern Pacific RailRoad. Special Laws of Minnesota 1861, Chapter 1, named as incorporators of the railroad Anson Blake, Levi Butler, A. G. Chatfield, Richard Chute, Orville Clark, Thomas Clark, Erastus Corning, Lyman Dayton, E. O. Hamlin, A. H. Hanchett, A. F. Hawley, Sidney Luce, John McKusick, C. T. Stearns, Henry A. Swift, Eber B. Ward, and Dwight Woodbury. The Lake Superior & Mississippi RailRoad was originally incorporated in 1863, when Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, financier Jay Cooke selected Duluth, Minnesota, as the northern end of a new railroad, began building the first railroad linking the Twin Cities and Duluth, Minnesota, and was completed with the driving of the last spike at Thompson, Minnesota, in 1870. The first passenger trains between the two cities began operation in September 1870. The Lake Superior & Mississippi RailRoad existed until 1877, was a victim of the Panic of 1873, as Jay Cooke's company was overextended and burdened with financial commitments to the Northern Pacific RailRoad, was either purchased by or reorganized as the St. Paul & Duluth RailRoad, and was later absorbed into the Northern Pacific RailRoad. Jay Cooke went bankrupt in late 1870, Edwin M. Lewis was appointed the trustee for Jay Cooke & Company, Lewis worked with Cooke to settle with all the creditors, and the final settlement of the bankruptcy was completed in 1890.

Lake Superior & Mississippi RailRoad: The Lake Superior & Mississippi RailRoad was incorporated as a heritage railroad in 1981 by volunteers from the Lake Superior Transportation Club. The railroad uses a portion of the original track along the St. Louis River and offers a passenger excursion service along the St. Louis River.

Lake Superior & Northern RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated under Minnesota law, was intended to build a number of logging railroads within the State, had L. R. Martin as its president in 1905, and had H. P. Gardiner as its secretary in 1905.

Lake Superior & Northern Pacific RailRoad: The railroad was chartered by Territorial Laws of Minnesota 1856, Chapter 158. The incorporators named in the 1856 legislation were John C. Breckenridge, Richard Chute, David L. Fuller, Jr., James Furgus, David B. Herriman, Renselaer R. Nelson, William H. Newton, George W. Perry, Alexander Ramsey, Edmund Rice, Daniel A. Robertson, Franklin Steele, William Sturgis, Calvin A. Tuttle, Joseph P. Wilson, and others. The railroad was intended to build and operate a rail line from a point at or near Superior Bay on Lake Superior by way of Mille Lac, Minnesota, and Little Falls, Minnesota, to the Western boundary of the territory and to build and operate a branch rail line to St. Cloud, Minnesota, or some other point along another rail line connecting to St. Paul. The railroad was organized in 1871, but no rail line was built.

Lake Superior & NorthWestern RailRoad was incorporated in 1883 by James Bardon, Herman Burg, Arasphas C. Jones, Joseph A. Mannheim, John McGuire, Leonidas Merritt, William C. Sargent, George R. Stuntz, and John H. Upham to build a railway from Minnesota Point to Duluth, Minnesota, across Superior Bay to Rice's Point, Minnesota, then northwesterly to a point on the Red River of the North at or near the mouth of the Red Lake River, with branch lines from a point along the rail line West of the Mississippi River northerly to the Northern boundary of the State between the Rainy River and the Red River of the North and to the Mississippi River near Brainerd, Minnesota, and from Duluth, Minnesota, northerly to Lake Vermillion, Minnesota, and from Duluth, Minnesota, northeasterly to the Pigeon River. It had initial capital stock of $5,000,000 and its principal place of business was Duluth, Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1883.

Lake Superior, Ortonville & Southwestern RailRoad was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1886 by C. E. Brooks, Samuel Bundock, Fredrick Gutterson, Paul Hauser, Sr., and J. K. Riley to build a railway from Lake Superior to Ortonville, Minnesota, and thence southwesterly. It had initial capital stock of $300,000 and its principal place of business was St. Paul. The railroad was organized in 1886.

Lake Superior & Pacific RailRoad was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1886 by George J. Mallory, Henry H. Myers, Jacob R. Myers, Fredrick W. Payne, and Alonzo J. Whiteman to build a railway from a point along the shore of Lake Superior to a point along the shore of the Pacific Ocean. It had initial capital stock of $5,000,000 and its principal place of business was Duluth, Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1886. The railroad completed surveying in 1888 and was planned to connect to Duluth, Minnesota. [See note for the Lake Superior & Mississippi RailRoad for 6 Irvine Park.]

Lake Superior, Puget's Sound & Pacific RailRoad/Lake Superior, Puget Sound & Pacific RailRoad: The railroad was chartered by Territorial Laws of Minnesota 1853, Chapter 16. The railroad was incorporated by L. A. Babcock, S. Blossom, Charles W. Borup, C. B. Curtis, James D. Doty, S. Draper, T. Dyer, George W. Farrington, M. H. Grinnell, J. R. King, N. W. Kittson, Abbott Lawrence, D. B. Loomis, J. B. Martin, L. B. May, L. B. McKinnon, C. H. Oakes, Alexander Ramsey, George Reed, H. M. Rice, J. L. Schoolcraft, H. H. Sibley, W. W. Snow, Franklin Steele, J. Striker, C. G. Trowbridge, R. J. Walker, J. White, and Alexander Wilkin. The commissioners of the railroad in 1853 were Levi Blossom, James Doty, Simeon Draper, John B. Macy, George Reed, John L. Schoolcraft, Henry H. Sibley, Charles C. Trowbridge, and Julius White. The rail line was intended to run from the head of Lake Superior to a point on Puget Sound on the Pacific Ocean. The capital stock of the railroad was $50,000,000. The railroad was organized in 1871. [See note on Charles W. Borup and Maude Borup for 555 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Norman Wolfred William Kittson for 225 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Alexander Ramsey for 265 South Exchange Street.] [See note on Henry Mower Rice for 4 Crocus Hill.] [See the note on Henry Hastings Sibley for 614 North Fountain Place.] [See the note on Alexander Wilkin.]

Lake Superior & Rainy Lake RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1871 and was incorporated in 1872.

Lake Superior & Red River RailRoad: The railroad was authorized by the State of Minnesota shortly after statehood in 1857 and was incorporated in 1860 by J. C. Burbank, Lyman Dayton, and E. S. Edgerton, to build and operate a railroad from a point along the St. Paul & Lake Superior Air Line RailRoad to the Red River of the North, with capital stock of $3,600,000. The railroad was organized in 1871. [See note on J. C. Burbank for 432 Summit Avenue.]

Lake Superior & Red River Valley RailRoad was incorporated in 1879 by James Bardon, Morris R. Brown, George Crocker, E. B. Ellsworth, John Friederich, I. W. Gates, J. Gervais, Frank Ives, William M. Ross, Thomas C. Shapleigh, and A. Yvernault to survey, locate, and build a single or double track railway from a point along the Minnesota-Wisconsin boundary in Range 15 West, Township 48, northwesterly by way of the mouth of the Cloquet River, St. Louis County, Minnesota, by way of Lake Winnebagoshish, Cass Lake, and Searle Lake in Cass County, Minnesota, and Itasca County, Minnesota, and by way of Red Lake Falls, Polk County, Minnesota, and Crookston, Polk County, Minnesota, to a point along the Red River of the North in or near Range 49, Township 149, in Polk County, Minnesota. It had initial capital stock of $5,000,000 and its principal place of business was Crookston, Minnesota.

Lake Superior, St. Anthony Falls & Minnesota River Air Line RailRoad: The railroad was authorized by the Minnesota Legislature shortly after statehood in 1857. The railroad was incorporated in 1868 by R. J. Baldwin, L. L. Baxter, Richard Chute, and others to construct and operate a rail line from some point on the Lake Superior & Mississippi RailRoad between St. Anthony, Minnesota, and Minneapolis to some point along the Minnesota Valley RailRoad at or above Shakopee, Minnesota, with a branch line to St. Peter, Minnesota, and other branch lines to be developed later. The railroad was organized in 1871 and had capital stock of $1,500,000.

Lake Superior & Southeastern RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in Wisconsin in 1904 to construct a 100 mile rail line from Marshfield, Wisconsin, or Ladysmith, Wisconsin, through the Lac Courte Oreille Reservation, Wisconsin, Douglas County, Wisconsin, Washburn County, Wisconsin, Bayfield County, Wisconsin, and Swayer county, Wisconsin, to Superior, Wisconsin, was organized in 1905, operated until 1906, was renamed to the Duluth Division & Terminal Railway of the Wisconsin Central RailRoad, and was succeeded by the Wisconsin Central RailRoad. In 1905, the incorporators of the railroad were C. E. Carter, R. T. Merrill, and H. D. Van Dyke.

Lake Superior & Southern RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1887 and was incorporated in 1887 by B. F. Bacon, B. H. Beckett, C. D. Beldon, Tams Bixby, L. S. Butler, E. Damon, B. B. Herbert, A. Knox, and W. W. Mayo to build a railway from some point on Lake Superior southwesterly by way of Red Wing, Minnesota, Rochester, Minnesota, Brownsdale, Minnesota, and Austin, Minnesota, to some point in Iowa. It had initial capital stock of $1,000,000 and its principal place of business was Austin, Minnesota.

Lake Superior & Southwestern RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in 1887 under Minnesota law by B. F. Bacon, B. H. Becket, C. D. Belden, T. Bixby, L. S. Butler, E. Damon, B. B. Herbert, D. W. Hurn, A. Knox, W. W. Mayo, and S. M. Smith. In 1887, the officers of the railroad were A. Knox, president, W. W. Mayo, vice president, C. D. Belden, secretary, and E. Damon, treasurer, and the members of the board of directors of the railroad were the incorporators. The general office of the railroad was in Austin, Minnesota. The railroad completed surveying from Rochester, Minnesota, to Northwood, Iowa, by way of Austin, Minnesota, in 1888, was engaged in discussions with the Soo & Southwestern RailRoad for track access going East in 1888, and planned to connect to Duluth, Minnesota, by agreement with the Duluth & Southern RailRoad in 1888. C. D. Belden was the secretary of the railroad in 1888. The railroad was succeeded by the Eastern Minnesota Railway Company in 1888.

Lake Superior Terminal RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in 1889 by Thomas J. Davis, James B. Geggie, James T. Hale, John P. Morrow, and Joseph Sellwood to build a railway and operate along the shores of Lake Superior, Superior Bay, and St. Louis Bay in St. Louis County, Minnesota. It had initial capital stock of $1,000,000 and its principal place of business was Duluth, Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1889.

Lake Superior Terminal & Transfer RailRoad was incorporated in 1883 under Wisconsin law by George S. Baxter, W. P. Clough, J. H. Hammond, James J. Hill, Allen Manvel, John C. Spooner, and E. W. Winter to build tracks, depots, storage tracks, and warehouses in Douglas County, Wisconsin. The members of the first board of directors of the railroad were George S. Baxter, William P. Clough, General John H. Hammond, James J. Hill, Allan Manvel, John C. Spooner, and E. W. Winter. The railroad also was the owner of the Superior, Wisconsin, Union Depot as the agent for five other railroads, the Northern Pacific RailRoad, the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis, & Omaha RailRoad, the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba RailRoad, the Duluth & Iron Range RailRoad (replaced upon its withdrawal in 1887 by the Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic RailRoad,) the St. Paul & Duluth RailRoad, and the Lake Superior & Southwestern RailRoad/Eastern Minnesota Railway Company. In 1901, the railroad planned to build a $20,000 round house in West Superior, Wisconsin. In 1917, the railroad operated a rail yard and sidings with 23.179 miles of rail trackage in Superior, Wisconsin, adjoining or associated with the Superior, Wisconsin, Union Depot, owned 11 locomotives and one work rail car, leased six locomotives from other railroads, and was controlled by the Northern Pacific Railway, the Great Northern Railway, the Chicago, Saint Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railway, and the Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic Railway. [See note on William Pitt Clough for 500 Summit Avenue.] [See note on John Henry Hammond for 276 South Exchange Street.] [See note on James Jerome Hill for 240 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Edwin Wheeler Winter for 415 Summit Avenue.]

Lake Superior & Vermilion Lake RailRoad: The railroad was authorized by the Minnesota Legislature shortly after statehood in 1857. The railroad was incorporated in 1869 by William W. Spaulding, James E. Thompson, William Willard and others to construct and operate a rail line from Vermilion Lake, Minnesota, to a point on the shore of Lake Superior in Lake County, Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1871 and had capital stock of $2,000,000. [See note on James Egbert Thompson for 682 Fairmount Avenue.]

Lake Superior, Willmar & Dakota RailRoad was incorporated in 1883 by Paul H. Boise, Hans J. Dale, Hiram R. Gale, W. R. Gillis, Benjamin F. Jenness, Andrew Larson, Louis Larson, Dennis O'Brien, John Paulson, George H. Perkins, Andrew Railson, Albert E. Rice, John M. Spicer, and Lars O. Thorpe to build a railway and a telegraph line from some point along the line of the Northern Pacific RailRoad at or near St. Cloud, Minnesota, Westerly via Willmar, Minnesota, and Granite Falls, Minnesota, to the Western boundary of the State, with a branch line from a point West of Granite Falls, Minnesota, northwesterly to the Western boundary of the State in Lac Qui Parle County, Minnesota. It had initial capital stock of $1,250,000 and its principal place of business was Willmar, Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1883.

Lakeside RailWay Company: The railroad was operated by the Duluth Street Railway Company and operated from 1892 until 1900. In 1892, the City of Duluth, Minnesota, passed an ordinance granting to Lakeside Railway Company the right to construct, maintain and operate an electric street railway in Lakeside, Minnesota. The railroad had capital stock of $100,000, had eight miles of electric rail trackage in 1899, owned six motor cars in 1899, and had as its officers Charles R. Haines, president, Charles H. Graves, vice president, and J. B. Greenfield, secretary and treasurer, in 1899. The railroad was purchased by Thomas Lowry in 1900. The 1918 McGraw Transit Directory indicates that the railroad was owned by the Duluth-Superior Traction Company. The Lakeside RailWay Company sued the Duluth Street Railway Company over compensation for building a rail line extension in Lakeside RailWay Company v. Duluth Street Railway Company, 78 Minn 129 (1899.) [See note on Thomas Lowry and Horace Lowry for 670 Goodrich Avenue.]

Lanesboro, Rochester & St. Paul RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in 1884 by W. B. Anderson, M. P. Bean, H. Christopherson, H. J. Cook, Dennis Galligan, R. R. Greer, Ole Iverson, Edward Johnson, C. O. Krogsland, B. A. Mann, Louis Miller, E. S. Nelson, S. A. Nelson, D. O'Brien, E. W. Ruth, M. Scanlan, James Thompson, T. Thompson, and O. G. Wall to build and operate a railway from a point on the Iowa State line in Fillmore County, Minnesota, northerly by way of Lanesboro, Minnesota and Rochester, Minnesota, to St. Paul. The railroad had capital stock of $1,000,000 and its principal place of business was Lanesboro, Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1884.

Leech Lake & Northern RailRoad: The railroad ran for 17 miles in 1905 from Leech Lake, Minnesota, to Cuba, Minnesota. It was operated under contract with the Swan River Logging Company. The railroad was organized by W. H. McCarthy and Alvin E. Clapp.

Le Sueur & Owatonna RailRoad: The railroad was authorized by the Minnesota Legislature shortly after statehood in 1857. The railroad was incorporated in 1871 by John H. Abbott, George D. Snow, George W. Stewart, and others to construct and operate a railway from Le Sueur, Minnesota, to Owatonna, Minnesota. The railroad had capital stock of $1,000,000 at incorporation. The railroad was organized in 1871.

Light, Heat, Transit, & Public Service Company: The Light, Heat, Transit, & Public Service Company was formed in St. Cloud, Minnesota, in 1900 by Albert Gideon Whitney (1860-1922.) The Granite City Railway was incorporated in 1906 and took over the St. Cloud, Minnesota, street railway system of eight miles of track, two carhouses, 15 closed passenger cars, and two snow plows. In 1924, the Northern States Power Company acquired the Granite City Railway Company.

Linton & Company was a railroad construction firm. The firm was established by Alonzo H. Linton and R. B. Langdon. The Linton family was related to Joseph Chamberlain and Selah Chamberlain of Cleveland, Ohio. Alonzo H. Linton came to Minnesota in 1857 and formed Linton & Company in 1870. Linton & Company, comprised of Alonzo H. Linton and Cavour S. Langdon, were railroad contractors and were located at the New York Life Building in 1907. Alonzo H. Linton owned a lake cottage on Lake Minnetonka, Minnesota, in 1890. [See note on Linton & Langdon for 2505 Park Avenue South.]

Little Falls & Dakota RailRoad was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1879 by E. P. Barnum, A. Barto, William Brown, William Butler, J. Capron, Q. A. Churchill, J. D. Good, P. J. Hoffman, K. J. Kinney, Samuel Larson, H. T. Lovett, N. H. Miner, Alex. Moore, George A. J. Overton, N. Richardson, Jonathan Simmons, A. B. Stedman, H. W. Stone, E. E. West, J. G. Wittemore, and Nels B. Wollan to build one or more railways from Little Falls, Minnesota, westerly by way of Sauk Centre, Minnesota, Glenwood, Minnesota, Lake Whipple, Minnesota, and Morris, Minnesota, to the western boundary of Minnesota. It had initial capital stock of $2,000,000 and its principal place of business was Sauk Centre, Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1879 and opened for business with an 87.85 mile rail trackage from Little Falls, Minnesota, to Morris, Minnesota, constructed by DeGraff & Company, between 1881 and 1882. The original members of the board of directors of the railroad were A. Barto, R. J. Kenney, N. Richardson, J. Simmons, N. B. Stedney, H. W. Stone, and J. G. Whitman and the original officers of the railroad were General H. Haupt, president, George V. Sims, secretary, and William P. Clough, counsel. In 1888, the railroad was leased to the Northern Pacific RailRoad. In 1889, the railroad had 87.85 miles of rail trackage, owned one bridge, and owned 99 trestles. In 1889, the officers of the railroad were Robert Harris, president, T. F. Oakes, vice president, George H. Earl, secretary, and George S. Earl, treasurer, and the members of the board of directors of the railroad were S. R. Ainslee, Frederick Billings, Robert Harris, James McNaught, T. F. Oakes, Henry Stanton, and J. B. Williams. The railroad operated until 1900 and was succeeded by the Northern Pacific RailRoad. [See note on Thomas Fletcher Oakes for 432 Summit Avenue.] [See note on William Pitt Clough for 500 Summit Avenue.] [See note on General Herman Haupt for 312 Summit Avenue.]

Little Falls, Mille Lacs & Lake Superior RailRoad was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1886 by Peter W. Blake, J. C. Flynn, Frank X. Goulet, Charles Gravel, and John Stumpf to build a standard or narrow gauge railway from Little Falls, Morrison County, Minnesota, to the south end of Lake Mille Lacs, Minnesota, and thence to the eastern boundary of Minnesota. It had initial capital stock of $2,000,000 and its principal place of business was Little Falls, Minnesota. Pierz, Morrison County, Minnesota, was authorized by the Minnesota Legislature (Laws of Minnesota 1891, Chapter 412) to issue bonds to support the railroad. The railroad was organized in 1886.

Little Falls & Southern RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1890 or 1891, was incorporated in 1892 by Charles S. Bunker, W. D. Cornish, and W. H. S. Wright to build and operate a rail line from Little Falls, Minnesota, South to the Iowa border, initially constructed about 30 miles of rail line in 1892, operated until 1899, and was succeeded by the Northern Pacific RailRoad in 1899. The railroad built a 1.08 mile rail line in Little Falls, Minnesota, from 1890 until 1891.

Louisiana & Minnesota RailRoad: The railroad was chartered by Territorial Laws of Minnesota 1853, Chapter 6, with George W. Farrington of St. Paul as the chief author. The incorporators of the railroad were William L. Ames, Charles W. Borup, Samuel Burkleo, Caleb Dorr, George W. Farrington, John Farrington, A. M. Fridley, Ard Godfrey, John R. Irvine, Charles King, William G. LeDuc, William R. Marshall, Horace H. McKinstry, Socrates Nelson, Charles H. Oakes, Justus C. Ramsey, Alexander Ramsey, Henry M. Rice, Henry H. Sibley, Franklin Steele, Calvin A. Tuttle, and Alexander Wilkin. The railroad was intended to construct a rail line from some point in St. Paul either to the falls of the St. Louis River or to some point between the falls of the St. Louis River and the outlet of the St. Louis River into Lake Superior. The capital stock was $3,000,000. The railroad was organized in 1871. W. L. Ames, C. W. Borup, Christopher Carli, Emanuel Case, Lyman Dayton, C. D. Fillmore, W. H. C. Folsom, J. R. Irvine, W. G. LeDuc, John G. Lennon, D. B. Loomis, W. R. Marshall, John McCusick, Elias McKain, R. R. Nelson, J. W. North, Charles H. Oakes, Alexander Ramsey, H. M. Rice, R. P. Russell, H. H. Sibley, Franklin Steele, Orange Walker, Alexander Wilkin, and others invested in the railroad. [See note on Charles W. Borup and Maude Borup for 555 Summit Avenue.] [See note on John R. Irvine.] [See note on Alexander Ramsey for 265 South Exchange Street.] [See note on Justus Ramsey for 252 West Seventh Street.] [See note on Henry Mower Rice for 4 Crocus Hill.] [See the note on Henry Hastings Sibley for 614 North Fountain Place.] [See note on Alexander Wilkin.]

LTV Steel Mining Company RailRoad/LTV-Erie Mining Company RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1986 and operated until 2001. It ran from the iron ore mines in Hoyt Lakes, St. Louis County, Minnesota, to its ship loading docks at Taconite Harbor, Cook County, Minnesota. Ling-Temco-Vought (LTV) was a large U.S. conglomerate of the Ling Electric Company, L.M. Electronics, Altec Electronics, Temco Aircraft, and Chance Vought Aerospace, was initally led by James Ling, then by Paul Thayer, changed its name from Ling-Temco-Vought to the LTV Corporation in 1971, and ultimately operated from 1969 until 2000. After significant divestitures of its 33 acquisitions and the merger of the Jones & Laughlin subsidiary with Republic Steel Corporation in 1984, the company was primarily a steel producer, renamed itself LTV Steel, and moved its headquarters to Cleveland in 1993. LTV Steel filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in 2000, ceased operations in 2001, and its assets were acquired and merged with Weirton Steel to form the International Steel Group.

Lyndale RailRoad/Minneapolis, Lyndale & Lake Calhoun RailRoad/Minneapolis, Lyndale & Minnetonka RailRoad was a narrow guage railroad incorporated as the Lyndale RailRoad by Colonel William McCrory and associates in 1878, was organized in 1878, became the Minneapolis, Lyndale & Lake Calhoun RailRoad in 1879, and became the Minneapolis, Lyndale & Minnetonka RailRoad in 1881. The steam dummy (a steam engine that was enclosed in a wooden structure that resembled a railroad passenger coach) line ran from First Street in Minneapolis to Lake Calhoun, then was extended in Minneapolis to Lake Harriet in 1880 and to Excelsior, Minnesota, on Lake Minnetonka, in 1881. The financially struggling railroad was purchased by Charles A. Pillsbury and James J. Hill in 1885 and the Lake Harriet to Lake Minnetonka portion of the line was abandoned in 1886. The line was leased to the Minneapolis Street RailRoad in 1887 after the City of Minneapolis prohibited steam locomotives traveling on city streets after 1889. The line was electrified in 1891 and was acquired by the successor Twin City Rapid Transit Company, which revitalized the Lake Harriet to Excelsior, Minnesota, portion of the line in 1905. The line from Hopkins, Minnesota to Excelsior, Minnesota, was abandoned in 1932 and the Hopkins, Minnesota, to Edina, Minnesota, portion of the line was abandoned in 1951. The trackage abutting Lake Calhoun and Lake Harriet was abandoned in 1954, but was subsequently revitalized by the Minnesota Transportation Museum as a summertime tourist activity. [See note on James Jerome Hill for 240 Summit Avenue.] [See note for Charles Alfred Pillsbury for 116 East 22nd Street South.]

Macon Street RailRoad Company: The street railroad was organized in 1889 to construct a one mile long street rail line and had as it president J. L. Griggs and had as its secretary J. R. Dinsmore.

Manitoba & Lake Superior RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1900 by Ralph J. Davis, James T. Rose, W. W. Sanford, F. E. Searle, and A. R. Sinclair to build a rail line from some point on Lake Superior or a connecting waterway in or near Duluth, Minnesota, in a Northwesterly direction to a point on the Minnesota-Manitoba international boundary, West of Lake of the Woods. The railroad had $100,000 in capital stock.

Mankato & Albert Lea RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1887 and was incorporated in 1886 by M. D. L. Collester, C. Cunningham, Henry Foster, Frank Hull, L. Patterson, D. F. Rosdall, F. D. Seaman, W. P. Sergeant, O. P. Smith, R. M. Todd, and J. A. Willard to build a railway from the Southern boundary of the State by way of Albert Lea, Minnesota, and Mankato, Minnesota, to the Northern boundary of the State. It had initial capital stock of $1,000,000 and its principal place of business was Mankato, Minnesota.

Mankato Electric Traction Company: The railroad initially was a West Virginia corporation. It became a New Jersey corporation in 1907, received either a 50 year or a 30 year charter from the City of Mankato, Minnesota, and had capital stock of $200,000 in 1907. The incorporators in 1907 were E. D. Adcock, Colin C. H. Fyffe, A. M. Hewes, M. J. Porter, and A. J. Whipple. The railroad got its electricity from the Rapidan Dam. The railroad ran two trolley lines through the city, with the first along Broad Street from Tourtellotte Park to Vine Street, crossed to Front Street, then ran to Park Lane and down to Sibley Park, and the second on Main Street, from Front to Fifth Street, then past the Blue Earth County Courthouse and the Normal School to Warren Street, west to Fourth Street, then to Clark Street, Center Street, and Byron Street, ending on Pleasant Street and Willard Street. In 1908, G. L. Conklin became the general manager of the railroad, succeeding A. A. Lightfoot and H. E. Hance. In 1914, the railroad considered an extension of its system along Front Street in Mankato, Minnesota, to the Mankato Fair Grounds. The McGraw electric railway manual: the red book of American street railway, published in 1914, indicates that the railroad was owned by the Mississippi Valley Electric Company of Iowa City, Iowa, operated five miles of electrified rail trackage, owned eight single truck passenger motor cars, owned three trail cars, had as its officers J. O. Schulze, president and general manager, J. H. Rohret, vice president, D. A. Reese, secretary and treasurer, and A. Mueller, auditor and superintendent, had as its board of directors D. A. Reese, J. H. Rohret, and J. O. Schulze, had its repair shops in Mankato, Minnesota, and had its general office in Mankato, Minnesota. In 1917, the railroad agreed to contribute $5,300 towards the construction of a bridge to North Mankato, Minnesota, and the addition of electric cabling for trolleys on the bridge. The 1918 McGraw Transit Directory indicates that the railroad was owned and operated by the Mississippi Valley Electric Company of Iowa City, Iowa, operated 5.3 miles of rail trackage, operated eight motor cars and two other cars, had as its officers J. O. Schulze, president, J. H. Rohret, vice president and treasurer, F. N. Sueppel, secretary, and E. N. Thyse, superintendent, and had its general office in Mankato, Minnesota. The electric street car line ceased operation in 1930. Frank W. Barth was an employee of the street car company.

Mankato & New Ulm RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in 1899, built in 1900 a 25.58 mile rail line from Mankato, Minnesota, to New Ulm, Minnesota, to provide a direct rail connection to Mankato, Minnesota, from thew West. The railroad had a 25.58 mile line from Mankato, Minnesota, to New Ulm, Minnesota, initially was succeeded by the Winona and Saint Peter RailRoad,and was acquired by the Chicago & NorthWestern RailRoad in 1899, forming a part of the route from the Twin Cities to the Black Hills of South Dakota.

Mankato & Northeastern RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in 1892 to build and operate a 75 mile rail line from Mankato, Minnesota, to a point along the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad at or near Farmington, Minnesota, with construction beginning in 1892. The officers of the railroad were P. H. Carney, president, J. D. Hilger, vice president, J. G. Fowler, secretary, D. L. Rose, treasurer, and F. D. Woodbury, chief engineer. The capital stock of the railroad was $1,000,000.

Mankato & St. Cloud RailRoad was incorporated in 1879 by J. H. Baker, W. F. Bonniwell, N. P. Clark, H. Cummins, C. A. Gilman, J. Koons, and John A. Willard to build a railway from Mankato, Minnesota, Northerly by way of Hutchinson, Minnesota, and Litchfield, Minnesota, to St. Cloud, Minnesota. It had initial capital stock of $2,000,000 and its principal place of business was Mankato, Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1879 or 1880 and issued 300 shares of stock. In 1880, the officers of the railroad were identical to the officers of the Austin & Mankato RailRoad.

Mankato Street RailRoad: The Mankato Street railroad was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1886 by W. W. Farr, S. Lamm, and others and had its principal place of business in Mankato, Minnesota. The Mankato Street Railway system ran from 1886 to 1895 and horse-drawn street cars provided service to a limited area of town. In 1889, the railroad had capital stock of $50,000, operated 3 ˝ miles of rail trackage, owned four horse-drawn rail cars, owned 14 horses, had W. M. Farr as its president and general manager, and had John C. Noe as its secretary and treasurer. In 1893, the railroad had capital stock of $50,000, the railroad operated 3.5 miles of track with five horse drawn rail cars, and its officers were S. Lamm, president, John C. Noe, secretary-treasurer, and W. M. Farr, general manager. In 1894, the railroad had 3.5 miles of track, the railroad had five passenger cars, its president was S. Lamm, and its general manager was W. M. Farr. In 1895, the system proved unprofitable and the line stopped running.

Mantorville RailRoad: The railroad was authorized by the Minnesota Legislature shortly after statehood in 1857. The railroad was incorporated in 1868 by B. S. Cook, B. B. Miller, William West and others to construct a railroad from Mantorville, Minnesota, to Kasson, Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1871, had capital stock of $50,000, received a bonus from Mantorville, Minnesota, of $15,000 after surveying the planned rail route, but did not lay rail trackage as of 1872.

Mantorville Railway & Transfer Company: The railroad was organized in 1895, operated until 1897, and was succeeded by the Chicago Great Western RailRoad.

Mantorville, Winona & St. Peter RailRoad: The railroad was authorized by the State of Minnesota shortly after statehood in 1857. The railroad was incorporated in 1866 by B. S. Cook, G. B. Cooley, A. D. LeDuc, and others to construct and operate a railway from Mantorville, Minnesota, to a junction with the Winona & St. Peter RailRoad. The railroad had capital stock of $25,000 at incorporation. The railroad was organized in 1871.

Martin County RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated by Frank A. Day, T. Jervis Edwards, Fred A. Paterson, Joseph Ramsdale, and Henry F. Shearman in 1877 to build and operate a railway line from Winnebago City, Minnesota, to Fairmount, Minnesota, with its principal place of business in Fairmount, Minnesota, with capital stock of $400,000, and organized in 1877.

Mason City & Fort Dodge RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1881 as an Iowa corporation. In 1904, the officers of the railroad were A. B. Stickney, president, A. F. Fairchild, first vice president, H. S. Pace, secretary, C. E. Seekworth, treasurer, A. G. Briggs, general counsel, C. O. Kalman, auditor, and S. C. Stickney, general manager, and the members of the board of directors were A. S. Fairchild, Myron T. Herreck, H. A. Hutchens, A. B. Stickney, and T. H. Wheeler. In 1888, the officers of the railroad were Charles H. Benedict, president, Hamilton Browne, vice president, Webb Vincent, secretary, and S. T. McServey, treasurer, the members of the board of directors of the railroad were Charles H. Benedict, Hamilton Browne, James J. Hill, D. C. Shepard, and William A. Stephens, operated 92 miles of rail trackage, owned five locomotives, two passenger cars, two baggage, mail and express rail cars, 25 box cars, 20 stock cars, 80 platform and coal cars, and one caboose, the railroad had its principal office in Mason City, Iowa. In 1904, the railroad had capital stock of $920,000, had 82 employees in Minnesota, owned 28 locomotives, owned 15 passenger cars, owned 1,947 freight cars, owned 123 company service cars, owned three bridges, owned 26 trestles, and operated 378.27 total miles of railway trackage (27.83 miles in Minnesota.) In 1913, the railroad had as its officers S. M. Felton, president, J. W. Blabon, vice president, J. F. Coykendall, secretary and treasurer, and Con F. Krebs, auditor, had as its board of directors J. W. Blabon, Luther Drake, S. M. Felton, E. C. Finkbine, C. H. McNider, and G. W. Wattles, had as its principal place of business Chicago, Illinois, and had total capital stock of $32,841,152. The railroad operated until 1909 and was then leased by the Chicago Great Western RailRoad. [See note on Asa Gilbert Briggs for 793 Fairmount Avenue.] [See note on C. O. Kalman for 590 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Alpheus Beede Stickney for 846 Lincoln Avenue.] [See note on Samuel Crosby Stickney for 653 Goodrich Avenue.]

Mason City & Minnesota Railway Company: The railroad was organized by the Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad in 1870 and operated until 1871. Russell Sage was associated with the railroad. The railroad was intended to build a 28 mile rail line from Lyle, Minnesota, a junction with the Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad, to Mason City, Iowa, where it met the rail line of the Central RailRoad Company of Iowa/Central Iowa Railway. The railroad was initially succeeded by the Austin & Mason City RailRoad and was subsequently succeeded by the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad.

McAlpine Lumber Company RailRoad: The railroad operated eight miles of rail trackage from 1905 until 1907, including over four miles of former Mitchell & McClure lines of the Duluth & Iron Range Rail Road. The railroad was connected with the McAlpine Lumber Company, a business organization that was formed by John McAlpine and John Millen, initial steps to incorporate the business were taken, but the enterprise was never actually incorporated. The business operated with McAlpine as president and Millen as vice president and used the name “McAlpine Lumber Company Inc.” The two business partners litigated their legal responsibilities for the firm’s business activities and logging contracts in McAlpine v. Millen, 116 NW 583 (Minnesota 1908.)

McGregor Western RailRoad: The railroad was authorized by the Minnesota Legislature shortly after statehood in 1857. The railroad was incorporated in Iowa in 1863, succeeded the McGregor, St. Peters & Missouri River RailRoad Company, organized in 1857 and sold in a foreclosure sale, was incorporated in Minnesota in 1867 by F. Andros, David J. Ely, James L. Reynolds, and others to construct and operate a railroad from McGregor to the West or Northwest, finished the route from McGregor, Iowa, to Cresco, Iowa, in 1866, was organized in Minnesota in 1867, had capital stock of $10,000,000, purchased the Minnesota Central Railway in 1867, operated until 1867, when it was sold to the Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad and was succeeded by the Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad. The railroad was eligible to receive a federal land grant in Iowa under an 1864 Congressional enactment, failed to meet the construction progress conditions, had its land grant regranted to the McGregor & Sioux City Railway Company in 1868, and when that railroad failed to meet construction progress requirements, had its Iowa land grant again regranted to the McGregor & Missouri River RailRoad in 1876. Controversies about the land grant were litigated in Hamblin v. Western Land Company, 147 U.S. 531 (1893) and in Sioux City & St. Paul Railroad Company v. Countryman, 159 U.S. 377 (1895.) When the McGregor Western RailRoad met the Minnesota Central RailRoad in Austin, Minnesota, in the late 1860’s, Will W. Cargill built a warehouse in Austin, Minnesota. The railroad was reorganized in 1871, was initially succeeded by the Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad, and was ultimately succeeded by the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad, which also succeeded the McGregor & Missouri River RailRoad. Russell Sage was the president of the railroad after 1871. John Lawler (1832-1891) played a prominent role in the Northwestern Packet Company and in the McGregor Western Railroad Company during the 1860’s. David Hammer (1815- ) took an active part from 1858 to 1861 in the organization and construction of the McGregor Western Railroad. In 1867, Alexander Mitchell, the president of the Milwaukee & Prairie du Chien RailRoad and a member of the board of directors of the Milwaukee & Mississippi RailRoad, purchased the McGregor Western RailRoad.

Menominee & St. Paul RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in Michigan in 1899 and was intended in 1901 to operate a 300 rail line from Menominee, Michigan, to St. Paul. The railroad had $2,000,000 in capital stock. The Ann Arbor RailRoad gained control of the Menominee & St. Paul in 1899. In 1901, S. M. Stephenson was the general manager or superintendent of the railroad. In 1915, the railroad operated 3.171 miles of rail trackage at a car ferry slip on the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, much of it leased to the Ann Arbor RailRoad. Arthur K. Atkinson was an officer and member of the board of directors of the railroad.

Mesaba Electric RailRoad Company/Mesabi Electric Railway: The McGraw electric railway manual: the red book of American street railway, published in 1914, indicates that the company was incorporated in 1912 as a holding company that owned the stock of the Mesaba Railway Company and had as its officers George D. Appleton, president, Merrill Griswold, secretary, and S. F. Shannon, treasurer.

Mesaba RailRoad/Mesaba Railway Company: The railroad was a part of the Mesaba Mining Consolidation, controlled by the Rockefellers, and operated until 1927. The Lake Superior Branch of the railroad connected Ore Junction, Minnesota, and the Lake Superior mines at Hibbing, Minnesota. In 1894, the members of the board of directors of the railroad were A. D. Allibone, J. B. Colton, Alexander McDougall, H. C. Merritt, W. B. Merritt, W. J. Olcott, D. M. Philbin, S. R. Payne, and A. D. Thomson. In 1894, George Wellwood Murray was the general counsel of the railroad. In 1914, the company owned the Mesaba Electric Railway.

Mesaba Railway Company: The railroad was organized in 1910, was incorporated in 1911 as a Minnesota corporation, became operational in 1913, and was controlled by the Mesaba Electric RailRoad Company. The railroad operated a 36 mile long 750 volt DC electric rail line from Hibbing, Minnesota, by way of Buhl, Minnesota, Virginia, Minnesota, and Eveleth, Minnesota, to Gilbert, Minnesota, after 1913. In 1914, the officers of the railroad were Oscar Mitchell, president and general counsel, R. W. Watson, vice president, B. R. Heney, secretary, P. L. Saltonstall, treasurer, J. O. Bergeson, auditor, and H. S. Newton, general manager, the members of the board of directors of the railroad were C. A. Duncan, A. C. Gillette, B. R. Heney, E. E. Hewitt, Oscar Mitchell, P. L. Saltonstall, and R. W. Watson, the railroad had its general offices in Virginia, Minnesota, had 35.7 miles of railway trackage, had $1,100,000 in capital stock, had 15 passenger cars, two express cars, 13 work cars, and one snowplow, and the railroad had 144 employees with total annual salaries of $91,030. The rail line reportedly was owned by Boston, Massachusetts, interests. The McGraw transit directory, published in 1918 by the McGraw-Hill Publishing Company, indicates that the railroad operated 35 miles of rail trackage connecting Virginia, Minnesota, Hibbing, Minnesota, Eveleth, Minnesota, Chisholm, Minnesota, Mountain Iron, Minnesota, Gilbert, Minnesota, Kinney, Minnesota, Buhl, Minnesota, and Genoa, Minnesota, owned 13 motor cars and eight other cars, purchased its energy from the Great Northern Power Company, had repair shops in Virginia, Minnesota, had as its officers Oscar Mitchell, president, R. W. Watson, vice president, A. S. Whiting, secretary, P. L. Saltonstall, treasurer, J. O. Bergeson, auditor, and Ray W. Reynolds, general manager, and had its general office in Virginia, Minnesota. Revenues fell after 1920, had an operating deficit in 1924, went into a receivership in 1924, and was abandoned in 1927. The Mesaba Railway Company operated interurbans between Hibbing, Minnesota, and Gilbert, Minnesota, by way of Virginia, Minnesota, and Eveleth, Minnesota, from 1912 until 1927. The company ordered five identical cars from the Niles Car & Manufacturing Company in 1912. In deference to the Minnesota winters, the composite wood and steel cars delivered by Niles were built with double side walls artel fitted with storm sash. At the end of operations in 1927, the trucks and motors of the company’s rail cars were sold for scrap to the Duluth Iron & Metal Company and the carbodies were sold. The subsidiary Mesaba Railway Coach Company began operating supplemental bus service in 1925. In 1927, all bus operations and rail franchise were sold to Northland Transportation Company, which then also began operating bus service to replace the interurban railway route. In 1929, Northland Transportation Company was consolidated into the Northland Greyhound Lines.

Mesabe Southern RailRoad: The logging railroad, the "Smokey Southern," was incorporated in 1894 by Charles N. Nelson, of Danish ancestry, and was organized in 1894 under Laws of Minnesota 1894, Chapter 34, operated until 1896, had capital stock of $40,000, was owned and operated by the Northern Lumber Company, a Weyerhaeuser company, after Charles N. Nelson retired, and was succeeded by the Northern Lumber Company RailRoad. The railroad operated a 38 mile rail line from Gowans, Minnesota, and the St. Louis River. The railroad owned two Shay geared steam locomotives, with one located at Haywire Junction, Minnesota, and one located at Kinrose, Minnesota. In 1904, the railroad ordered 75 freight cars from the Russell Wheel & Manufacturing Company. In 1905, the railroad owned six locomotives, owned 175 logging cars and owned two cabooses. The railroad ceased operation in 1912 or 1913. The railroad had its general office in Cloquet, Carlton County, Minnesota, but operated wholly in St. Louis County, Minnesota. The Kinross, Minnesota, Shay locomotive, an 1887 62,000 lbs. (50,000 lbs. empty,) three cylinder, coal-fired, steam locomotive built by the Lima Locomotive Works and acquired from D. C. Davis & Sons of Cady Mills Wisconsin, was subsequently sold to the Duluth Iron & Metal Company, Duluth, Minnesota, then was sold to the Southern Iron & Equipment Company of Atlanta, Georgia, and then was sold to the Cecil Lumber Company of Orvisburg, Mississippi, in 1918 before being scrapped in 1924. The Haywire, Minnesota, Shay locomotive, an 1891 27,800 lbs. empty weight, two cylinder, coal-fired, steam locomotive built by the Lima Locomotive Works and acquired from the C. N. Nelson Lumber Company of Cloquet, Minnesota, in 1894, was subsequently sold to the Duluth & Northeastern RailRoad Company of Cloquet, Minnesota, before it was scrapped.

Mexican Gulf & Manitoba RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in 1912 to build and operate a railroad from Baton Rouge, Louisiana, to Winnipeg, Canada. The railroad was promoted by John M. Wiley, a railroad engineer. Some preliminary surveying for the railroad occurred in 1912.

Midland RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in 1876 by W. C. Andrews, G. N. Chase, S. P. Snyder, H. L. Terrell, and W. S. Walton to build and operate a railway from Wabasha, Minnesota, Westerly through Wabasha, Minnesota, Goodhue, Minnesota, and Rice County, Minnesota, by way of Mankato, Minnesota, and New Ulm, Minnesota, to Big Stone Lake, Minnesota. It had initial capital stock of $2,000,000 and its principal place of business was Wabasha, Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1876.

Milwaukee, Lake Shore & Western RailRoad: The railroad connected to Duluth, Minnesota, in 1884 by way of Northern Pacific RailRoad tracks. In 1881, the officers of the railroad were F. W. Rhinelander, president, William H. Guion, vice president, Allyn Cox, treasurer, Alfred L. Cary, secretary, J. P. C. Cotrill, attorney, C. F. Rand, auditor, and H. G. H. Reed, general superintendent.

Milwaukee & Minnesota Railroad Company: The Milwaukee & Minnesota Railroad Company was a successor to the La Crosse & Milwaukee Railroad Company when that railroad was sold in 1859 and had portions of it placed in the possession of the St. Paul Railway Company by a court in 1863. The railroad became the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific Railroad Company.

Milwaukee & Nashua RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated under Minnesota law by S. F. Eastman, Andy Felt, C. A. Greeley, E. T. Greeley, and W. P. Perrin, to construct and operate a rail line from the Southern border of the state at some point in Fillmore County, Minnesota, Northeasterly to the Mississippi River in 1873. The railroad had capital stock of $2,500,000 and was organized in 1873. Obsolete American securities and corporations, compiled by R. M. Smythe and published by R. M. Smythe in 1911, indicates that bonds and stock for the railroad were issued, but the railroad was never built.

Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1867, operated until 1874, and was succeeded by the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad. The railroad was the successor to the Milwaukee & Waukesha RailRoad, the Milwaukee & Mississippi RailRoad, the Milwaukee & Prairie du Chien RailRoad, the Minneapolis & Cedar Valley RailRoad, the Minnesota Central RailRoad, and the LaCrosse & Milwaukee RailRoad. In 1872, the railroad had 125 locomotives, 122 passenger coaches, 398 flatcars, 1,850 boxcars and 53 handcars. In 1873, the officers of the railroad were Alex. Mitchell, president, Russell Sage, vice president, R. D. Jennings, secretary-treasurer, J. P. Whaling, auditor, John W. Cary, solicitor, and S. S. Merrill, general manager, and the members of the board of directors of the railroad were James Buell, Selah Chamberlain, N. A. Cowdrey, Elias L. Frank, James G. Garner, Walter S. Gurnee, Fred P. James, S. S. Merrill, Alexander Mitchell, F. A. Mueller, Levi P. Morton, Russell Sage, and Julius Wadsworth. In 1873, the railroad was divided into three divisions, the Minnesota Central Division/Iowa & Minnesota Division, the River Division, and the Hastings & Dakota Division. In 1873, the railroad employed 1,421 employees (967 in the Minnesota Central Division/Iowa & Minnesota Division, 299 in the River Division, and 155 in the Hastings & Dakota Division,) owned 38 wood bridges, owned one iron bridge, owned three stone bridges, owned 75 wooden trestles, owned 119 locomotives, owned 20 first class passenger cars, owned 14 second class/emigrant passenger cars, owned 16 baggage, mail and express cars, owned 575 freight cars, owned two sleeping cars, operated 24 stations, and operated four engine houses. In 1874, the railroad was renamed the Chicago, Milwaukee, and St. Paul RailRoad. Alexander Mitchell (1817-1887,) a Milwaukee, Wisconsin, resident, took over the railroad after its bankruptcy and expanded the line to more than 5,000 miles in seven states. The corporate headquarters were moved from Milwaukee, Wisconsin, to Chicago, Illinois in 1889.

Minneapolis, Anoka & Cuyuna RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1915, was the successor of the Minneapolis & Northern Railway, and became electrified in 1915, replacing the prior gasoline McKeen rolling stock and borrowed steam locomotives. The McGraw transit directory, published in 1918 by the McGraw-Hill Publishing Company, indicates that the railroad operated 19.21 miles of rail trackage between Minneapolis and Anoka, Minnesota, owned seven motor passenger cars, one other motor car, four other cars, and one electric locomotive, purchased its energy from the Minneapolis General Electric company, had a car barn and repair facility in Anoka, Minnesota, had as its officers C. P. Bratnober, president, Henry Junge, vice president, H. H. Stevens, secretary, F. H. Stevens, treasurer, C. A. Bratnober, auditor, and A. E. Appleyard, general manager, and had its general office in Minneapolis. The railroad continued steam operations for freight until 1922, went bankrupt in 1926, was reorganized, discontinued street car passenger service in 1939, was purchased in 1943 by the Northern Punp Company to transport workers to a Fridley, Minnesota, defense plant, discontinued the Fridley, Minnesota, defense plant transit service in 1948, operated until 1966, and was succeeded by the Great Northern RailRoad.

Minneapolis Belt Line RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1917, after the board of the Great Northern RailRoad decided to build a rail line from the Hopkins, Minnesota, Junction to a point on its Minneapolis to St. Cloud, Minnesota, rail line in Frdiley, Minnesota, when the Great Northern RailRoad Board decided to organize it and when Louis W. Hill, E. C. Lindley, and L. E. Katzenbach incorporated it. The railroad built the rail line from Hopkins Junction, Minnesota, to Fridley, Minnesota, and immediately turned it over to the Great Northern RailRoad to operate. The railroad operated as a shell until 1928, when it was formally purchased by and succeeded by the Great Northern RailRoad.

Minneapolis Belt Line Railway & Transfer Company: The railroad was incorporated in 1878, was organized in 1878 and 1892, operated until 1898, and was succeeded by the Minnesota Transfer Railway Company in 1898 when the Minnesota Transfer Railway Company purchased the New Brighton, Minnesota, stockyards, with which the Minneapolis Belt Line Railway & Transfer Company was a subsidiary.

Minneapolis & Cedar Valley RailRoad: The railroad was granted a charter by the Territory of Minnesota under Territorial Laws 1856, Chapter 166. The named incorporators of the railroad were Ezra Abbott, John H. Abbott, Benjamin L. Arnold, Isaac Atwater, H. O. Billings, James F. Bradley, A. B. Cornell, Alexander Farribault, F. W. Fisk, A. M. Fridley, D. M. Hanson, John C. Ide, Charles Jewett, John W. North, William F. Pettit, R. P. Russell, James Shields, H. H. Sibley, Franklin Steele, A. Town, A. B. Vaughn, Orlando Wilder and others. The railroad was intended to construct a railroad from the Iowa line, at or near the crossing of the Cedar River by the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway Company line through the valley of the Strait River to Minneapolis. The railroad had initial capital stock of $3,000,000. In early 1858, the officers of the railroad were J. W. North, president, E. Abbott, treasurer, and W. R. Marshall and J. G. Farley, trustees. Later in 1858, J. A. Shields was the president of the railroad and George Loomis was the treasurer of the railroad. Special Laws of Minnesota 1861, Chapter 2, transferred State purchased rights of the former Minneapolis & Cedar Valley RailRoad to a rechartered Minneapolis & Cedar Valley RailRoad, incorporated by John Abbott, Elliott Anthony, James W. Brooks, Erastus Corning, William H. Dike, Thomas A. Harrison, James F. Joy, John Jay Knox, William G. LeDuc, Roswell B. Mason, Walter L. Newberry, J. W. North, William Osborne, Dean Richmond, and Platt Smith. The railroad was organized in 1871. The railroad conducted surveys and graded some roadbeds, but laid no rail. The State of Minnesota became the owner of the rights, franchises, and property of the railroad as a result of legal proceedings in 1860. The rights, franchises, and property of the Minneapolis & Cedar Valley RailRoad were transferred by State legislation to the Minnesota Central RailRoad in Laws of Minnesota Extra Session 1857, Chapter 20, and Special Laws of Minnesota 1863, Chapter 137. [See note for John Jay Knox for 26 Irvine Park.] [See note for John Wesley North for 30 Irvine Park.] [See note for William Rainey Marshall for 30 Irvine Park.] [See the note on Henry Hastings Sibley for 614 North Fountain Place.]

Minneapolis & Champlin RailRoad was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1886 by E. T. Abbott, George A. Brackett, Robert W. Jordan, James W. Lawrence, George W. Marchant, Edward H. Steele, and Eugene M. Wilson to build one or more railways from Minneapolis to Champlin, Hennepin County, Minnesota, and to operate a suburban railway. It had initial capital stock of $500,000 and its principal place of business was Minneapolis. In 1898, the 15 mile rail line from Minneapolis to Champlin, Minnesota, was graded and prepared fro track laying, In 1898, C. D. Staples was the president of the railroad, S. M. Hanley was the general manager of the railroad, F. D. Woodbury was the chief engineer of the railroad, and John Grant of Faribault, Minnesota, was the construction contractor. [See note for George Brackett for 2018 Second Avenue South.]

Minneapolis & Duluth Railway Company: The railroad was a Minnesota corporation, was incorporated by William Drew Washburn and Henry Titus Welles, began work on the rail line in 1870, was organized and open for traffic in 1871, was the successor of the Minnesota Western Railway Company, built a 13.09 mile rail line from Minneapolis to White Bear, Minnesota, in 1871, leased its rail line to the Lake Superior & Mississippi RailRoad in 1871, and had its lease assigned to the Northern Pacific RailRoad in 1872. In 1873, the officers of the railroad were W. D. Washburn, president, Charles Elliot Furness, secretary, and Frank H. Clark, treasurer. In 1873, the railroad owned two locomotives, owned three stations, owned two bridges, and owned one trestle. The railroad operated until 1901, was initially succeeded by the Lake Superior & Mississippi RailRoad, was in turn succeeded by the Minneapolis & St. Louis RailRoad, and was ultimately succeeded by the Northern Pacific RailRoad. In 1880, the president of the railroad was Isaac Atwater and the vice president was W. D. Hale, the railroad had capital stock of $200,000, and the railroad operated 15 miles of railway track from East Minneapolis Easterly to White Bear, Ramsey County, Minnesota. William Dinsmore Hale was a member of the board of directors and the treasurer of the railroad from 1875 until 1881. Isaac Atwater was the president of the railroad from 1875 until 1881. [See note on Charles Elliot Furness for 265 South Exchange Street.]

Minneapolis Eastern RailRoad was organized in 1878 and 1879 and was incorporated in 1879 to build a railway from Minneapolis to St. Paul. Its principal place of business initially was Minneapolis. The railroad was organized and chartered in 1878 under the General Statutes of Minnesota 1878, Chapter 43. In 1882, the railroad had as its officers J. S. Pillsbury, president, C. H. Prior, secretary-treasurer, and H. A. Gray, auditor, had as members of its board of directors J. A. Chandler, J. H. Hiland, S. S. Merrill, J. A. Monroe, P. M. Myers, J. S. Pillsbury, C. H. Prior, W. H. Truesdale, and E. W. Winter, has $1,000,000 in capital stock, operated 2.9 miles of rail trackage, all in Minnesota, had one bridge and two trestles, owned one locomotive and one hand car, and employed ten personnel. The 1882-1883 Minnesota railroad commission report indicated that this line carried 96,732 tons of grain, 104,340 tons of flour and other meal, and 27,204 tons of forest products, for an overall total of 258,048 tons of freight carried for that year. In 1885-1886, the Minneapolis Eastern hauled a total of 344,727 tons of freight, with 108,738 tons of wheat, 155,848 tons of flour and meal, 49,768 tons of lumber, and 9,165 tons ofcoal. In 1888, the officers of the railroad were John S. Pillsbury, president, W. G. Collins, secretary-treasurer, and L. A. Robinson, auditor, the members of the board of directors of the railroad were J. T. Clark, W. G. Collins, J. H. Howe, W. H. Norris, J. S. Pillsbury, and E. W. Winter, operated 3.2 miles of rail trackage, owned one locomotive and one service rail car, and the principal office of the railroad was in Minneapolis. In 1893, the officers of the railroad were John S. Pillsbury, president, H. R. Williams, secretary-treasurer, W. H. Norris, general counsel, and L. A. Robinson, auditor, and the members of the board of directors were J. A. Chandler, J. T. Clark, W. G. Collins, J. H. Howe, Roswell Miller, W. H. Norris, J. S. Pillsbury, W. A. Scott, and E. W. Winter. In 1893, the railroad had capital stock of $1,000,000, had 2.91 miles of railway trackage, owned one bridge and one trestle, had 16 employees, and had one switching locomotive. The Poor's Directory of RailRoad Officials, published by the Poor's RailRoad Manual Company in 1898, indicates that the officers of the railroad were John S. Pillsbury, president, C. W. Case, secretary and treasurer, and L. A. Robinson, auditor, that the railroad had its general office in Minneapolis, and that the railroad had three miles of rail trackage. In 1900, the railroad operated four miles of rail trackage, owned three locomotives, and had its general office in Minneapolis. In 1904, the railroad had capital stock of $30,000, had E. O. Beach as its general manager, had 29 employees in Minnesota, owned two locomotives, owned one bridge, owned one trestle, and operated 2.94 total miles of railway trackage, all in Minnesota. In 1904, the officers of the railroad were F. A. Chamberlain, president and general manager, A. J. Earling, vice president, E. D. Sewall, secretary and treasurer, W. H. Norris, attorney, and L. A. Robinson, auditor, and the members of the board of directors of the railroad were F. A. Chamberlain, J. T. Clark, Marvin Hughitt, Roswell Miller, W. H. Norris, E. D. Sewall, A. W. Trenholm, H. R. Williams, Thomas Wilson, and E. E. Woodman. The Poor's Directory of RailRoad Officials, published by the Poor's RailRoad Manual Company in 1905, indicates that the officers of the railroad were F. A. Chamberlain, president, A. J. Earling, vice president, E. D. Sewall, secretary and treasurer, L. A. Robinson, auditor, and W. H. Norris, attorney. In 1913, the railroad had as its officers F. A. Chamberlain, president, A. J. Earling, vice president, J. H. Foster, secretary and treasurer, W. H. Norris, general counsel, and Charles Jench, auditor, had as its board of directors F. A. Chamberlain, J. T. Clark, A. J. Earling, J. H. Foster, W. A. Gardner, W. H. Norris, T. A. Pollys, E. D. Sewall, and A. W. Trenholm, had as its principal place of business St. Paul, had total capital stock of $125,000, had 2.63 miles of track in Minnesota, had two locomotives, and had 23 total employees. In 1919, the railroad operated 3.751 miles of rail trackage, owned two switcher locomotives, and was controlled by the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway and the Chicago, Saint Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railway. In 1925, the Great Northern RailRoad purchased 0.51 miles of Minneapolis Eastern RailRoad track on the east side of the Mississippi River. The railroad operated until 1972 and was succeeded by the Chicago & NorthWestern RailRoad and by the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad. [See note for John Sargent Pillsbury for 116 East 22nd Street South.] [See note on Thomas Wilson for 761 Goodrich Avenue.] [See note on Edwin Wheeler Winter for 415 Summit Avenue.]

Minneapolis, Faribault & Cedar Valley RailRoad: The railroad was created by the State of Minnesota in Special Laws of Minnesota 1862, Chapter 17 and was granted the rights, franchises, and property of the former Minneapolis & Cedar Valley RailRoad acquired by the State in 1860. The name of the railroad was changed in 1864 to the Minnesota Central Railway Company by special legislation.

Minneapolis Horse RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1867, was incorporated by Benjamin Seth Bull (1832-1889,) William Gibson, and others in 1868, laid track along Second Street, linking the Milwaukee and Manitoba rail stations, but apparently never went into full operation. The goal of the railroad, with $100,000 in corporate stock, was to lay track to the city's levees to be used to move freight from arriving steamboats, thereby replacing St. Paul as the acknowledged "head of navigation" on the Mississippi River, saving a $0.10 charge imposed in the 1860's on each barrel of flour hauled to St. Paul.

Minneapolis, Hutchinson & SouthWestern RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1881. The railroad was incorporated in 1881 by S. G. Anderson, W. T. Bonniwell, J. C. Edson, Charles S. Hulbert, W. J. Ives, Charles A. Pillsbury, and J. C. Riebe to construct and operate a railway from Lake Minnetonka, Hennepin County, Minnesota, by way of Hutchinson, McLeod County, Minnesota, to the Western boundary of the State. The railroad had $1,000,000 in corporate stock. The principal place of business of the railroad was Minneapolis. [See note for Charles Alfred Pillsbury for 116 East 22nd Street South.]

Minneapolis Industrial RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1959, succeeded the Minnesota Western Railroad/Luce Line, was formed by the Electric Short Line Railway's bondholders, operated until 1960, and was succeeded by the Chicago & NorthWestern RailRoad.

Minneapolis & Lake Park RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in 1880 to connect Minneapolis with Excelsior, Minnesota, and Lake Park, Minnesota. The railroad was projected to enter operation in 1881.

Minneapolis Land & Improvement Company RailRoad: The St. Louis Park Land & Improvement Company was created in 1886. The Minneapolis Land & Investment Company was established by Thomas Barlow Walker, Henry F. Brown and Calvin G. Goodrich in 1890. In 1890, the Minneapolis Land & Investment Company bought up 1700 acres of land in the center of St. Louis Park, Minnesota and had the right to lay gas, water, underground conduit and mains and the right to operate a street railroad system. In 1892, the Minneapolis Land & Investment Company filed a plat of 12,000 lots on their 1,700 acres. The Minneapolis Land & Improvement Company was in operation from at least 1892 and promoted the establishment of St. Louis Park, Minnesota, in published advertisements in 1892. The electric railroad had a rail line of six miles of track from Minneapolis to Hopkins, Minnesota. The Poor's Directory of RailRoad Officials, published by the Poor's RailRoad Manual Company in 1905, indicates that the officers of the railroad were T. B. Walker, president, W. J. Walker, vice president, and Louis R. Gorham, secretary and railway manager. It owned three cars in 1906, had its general office at 807 Hennepin Avenue in Minneapolis, had a power station in Minneapolis and had a repair station in St. Louis Park, Minnesota. The officers of the railroad in 1906 were Thomas Barlow Walker, president, Willis J. Walker, vice president, and Louis R. Gorham, secretary and manager of railroad operations. [See the note for Platt B. Walker, Thomas B. Walker, and the Walker family for 1046 Summit Avenue.] [See note for Calvin G. Goodrich and Calvin Gibson Goodrich for 1827 La Salle Avenue.]

Minneapolis, Lyndale & Lake Calhoun Railway: The Minneapolis, Lyndale & Lake Calhoun Railroad, later extended to Lake Minnetonka, was representative of the large suburban dummy lines in the United States. A dummy was a steam locomotive that was boxed up to look like a passenger car. The railroad operated three-foot-gauge trackage, was organized in 1878 to connect Minneapolis with its western suburbs, and began service in 1879. By 1883, the railroad owned four Baldwin dummy engines, 17 coaches, and 20 miles of track. Although the net earnings for 1883 were reported at 36.6 percent of revenues, the railroad was in foreclosure in 1887. In 1889, the railroad owned 15 dummy locomotives, 56 passenger cars, and 16 million passengers. The railroad was electrified in 1891 and became a trolley line.

Minneapolis, Lyndale & Lake County RailRoad/Minneapolis, Lyndale & Minnetonka RailRoad: The railroad succeeded the Lyndale Railway Company, was organized in 1879, had initial capital stock of $1,000,000, and was incorporated in 1879. The railroad was renamed in 1881, initially built a three foot gauge rail line and operated a steam street railroad from downtown Minneapolis to Lake Calhoun along Nicollet Avenue and 31st Street in 1879, and extended the rail line to Lake Harriet in 1880 and to Excelsior, Minnesota, on Lake Minnetonka, in 1882. In 1882, the railroad had as its officers William McCrory, president, William B. Hawkes, vice president, A. L. Scott, secretary,S. E. Neiler, treasurer, J. N. Cross, solicitor, A. L. Scott, auditor, and George W. Cooley, chief engineer, had as members of the board of directors J. N. Cross, William B. Hawkes, R. S. Innes, William McCrory, and A. L. Scott, had $1,000,000 in capital stock, operated 21.25 miles of rail trackage, owned four bridges, owned one locomotive, four motor cars, 13 passenger rail cars, one expressand baggage rail car, one box rail car, 10 flat and coal rail cars, two hand cars, and 10 other rail cars, and employed 31 personnel. In 1885, the railroad had 19 stations, all in Minnesota, owned five bridges, operated 25 miles of rail trackage, owned seven locomotives, owned 33 passenger cars, owned 11 freight cars, owned two company cars, and had 51 total employees, all in Minnesota. In 1885, the officers of the railroad were William McCrory, president and general manager, R. Brinkerhoff, vice president, T. J. Janney, secretary and auditor, Samuel E. Neiler, treasurer, and Judson N. Cross, attorney, and the members of the board of directors were R. Brinkerhoff, Judson N. Cross, R. S. Innes, T. J. Janney, and William McCrory. The general office of the railroad was in Minneapolis. The railroad was sold to James J. Hill and the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba RailRoad in 1886, operated until 1887, was leased for 30 years to the Minneapolis Street Railway in 1887, and was succeeded by the Minneapolis Street Railway. In 1889, the officers of the railroad were S. S. Small, president, C. A. Pillsbury, vice president, P. S. Mackay, secretary, J. K. Sidle, treasurer, and T. J. Janney, superintendent, and the members of the board of directors were P. S. Mackay, C. A. Pillsbury, J. K. Sidle, S. S. Small, and E. H. Steele. In 1889, the railroad operated 18 miles of rail trackage, had 109 employees, owned 15 locomotives, owned 60 passenger cars, and owned one bridge. The Poor's Directory of RailRoad Officials, published by the Poor's RailRoad Manual Company in 1898, indicates that the officers of the railroad are F. C. Pillsbury, president, H. C. Benedict, vice president, J. K. Sidle, treasurer, Peter S. Mackay, secretary and auditor, C. G. Goodrich, general manager, John McMullen, superintendent, and J. N. Cross, solicitor, and that the railroad operated 24 miles of rail trackage. By 1891, the railroad had become an electric street railroad line. The Twin City Rapid Transit Company succeeded the Minneapolis Street Railway Company. [See note on James Jerome Hill for 240 Summit Avenue.] [See note for Charles Alfred Pillsbury for 116 East 22nd Street South.] [See note for Calvin G. Goodrich and Calvin Gibson Goodrich for 1827 La Salle Avenue.]

Minneapolis, Merrill & Marinette Railway: The railroad was located in Merrill, Wisconsin, and planned to build a 35 mile rail system in 1914.

Minneapolis, Mille Lacs & Northern RailRoad was incorporated in 1884 by John Baxter, C. H. Chadbourne, Hiram B. Cowles, Horace Henry, Henry Hill, Thomas Lowry, R. P. Russell, Samuel B. Tibbits, John B. Walcot, and E. M. Wilson to acquire, control, maintain and operate a railway from Minneapolis north northwesterly by way of Princeton, Minnesota, Mille Lacs Lake, Lake Winnebagoshish, and Red Lake to Lake of the Woods, with a branch line from Princeton, Minnesota, westerly and northerly by way of Granite Falls, Minnesota, to Brainerd, Minnesota. The railroad had capital stock of $1,500,000 and its principal place of business was Minneapolis. The railroad was organized in 1884. [See note on Thomas Lowry and Horace Lowry for 670 Goodrich Avenue.]

Minneapolis, Minnehaha & Fort Snelling RailRoad: was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1884 by Frank H. Carlton, Judson N. Cross, Thomas J. Janney, William McCrory, and Samuel E. Neiler to construct a railroad and a telegraph /telephone line from some point in Minneapolis to Minnehaha Falls and thence to Fort Snelling, Minnesota. The railroad had capital stock of $500,000 and its principal place of business was Minneapolis. The railroad was organized in 1884. William McCrory (1839- ) was the president of the railroad in 1885. The railroad was succeeded by the Minneapolis, Lyndale & Minnetonka Railway Company.

Minneapolis, New Ulm & SouthWestern RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1895 by New Ulm, Minnesota, milling and brewing interests, was organized in 1895, built a 20.22 mile rail line from Winthrop, Minnesota, to New Ulm, Minnesota, from 1895 until 1896, operated until 1899, and was succeeded by the Minneapolis & St. Louis RailRoad. In 1896, the railroad had constructed and owned a short railway line, 20.22 miles, extending south from a junction with the Minneapolis & St. Louis RailRoad at Winthrop, Minnesota, to New Ulm, Brown County, Minnesota, by way of Gibbon, Minnesota, Fairfax, Minnesota, and Morton, Minnesota. The capital stock of the railroad was owned by the Minneapolis & St. Louis RailRoad Company in 1897. In 1899, the Minneapolis & St. Louis RailRoad purchased the railroad.

Minneapolis & Northern RailRoad/Minneapolis & Northern Gasoline Motor Railway: The railroad was incorporated in 1878 and was organized in 1912. Henry Lyman Little (1857- ) was the secretary and a member of the board of directors of the railroad. In 1912, E. G. Potter was the president of the railroad, awarded the construction contract to James F. O'Neill Company, planned to build an 18 mile single track rail line from Minneapolis to Anoka, Minnesota, and planned to utilize gasoline rail cars. In 1912, the railroad ordered a 200-h.p. switching locomotive from the McKeen Motor Car Company of Omaha, Nebraska, from which it already had received a 55 foot motor freight and express car. In 1912, the Minneapolis and Northern Railway Company obtained the right of way for a trolley line from Minneapolis to Anoka, Minnesota, by way of Fridley, Minnesota, and Coon Rapids, Minnesota. In 1913, the officers of the street railroad were George Heaton, president and treasurer, F. H. Hunter, vice president, secretary, and general superintendent, Cobb, Wheelright & Dille, general solicitor, and R. G. Crossley, auditor, and the members of the board of directors were L. H. Boldue, R. G. Crossley, George Heaton, R. W. Heaton, F. H. Hunter, A. A. Kranhold, and L. W. Merritt. In 1913, the railroad had capital stock of $500,000, operated 17.48 miles of railway trackage from Minneapolis to Anoka, Minnesota, had two passenger cars, had one freight car, and had 23 employees. In 1914, the railroad was using a McKeen Motor Car Company gasoline motor freight car on its Minneapois to Anoka, Minnesota, line. In 1914, the railroad was put into receivership with the Minnesota Loan & Trust Company. In 1915, the railroad line was one-half mile from the site of the planned Coon Rapids Hydro-Electric plant on the Mississippi River in Anoka County, Minnesota, and contracted to build a spur to the plant.

Minneapolis, Northfield & Southern RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated under South Dakota law in 1918 for the purpose of acquiring and operating a railroad between Minneapolis and Northfield, Minnesota, and to make extensions to therail road,acquired by purchase the Minneapolis, St. Paul, Rochester & Dubuque Electric Traction Company at a foreclosure sale in 1918, was organized in 1918, operated until 1982, and was succeeded by the Soo Line RailRoad. The Minneapolis, Northfield & Southern Railway was an 87 mile long short line railroad that connected Minneapolis with Northfield, Minnesota, and took over the trackage of and was the reorganization of the former Minneapolis, St. Paul, Rochester & Dubuque Electric Traction Company, "the Dan Patch Line." The railroad had its corporate office at Pierre, South Dakota, and its general administrative office was at Minneapolis. In 1920, the railroad operated 59.28 miles of rail trackage, owned one steam locomotive, owned 19 freight cars, owned eight passenger cars, and owned four work cars. The railroad operated a branch rail line to Randolph, Minnesota, where it connected with the Chicago Great Western RailRoad. The railroad was acquired by the Soo Line Railroad in 1982, and was kept as a separate railroad until officially merged into the Soo Line RailRoad in 1986. Benjamin B. Sheffield (1860- ) was a member of the board of directors of the railroad as well as being the president of the Sheffield Elevator Company, the president of the Commander Elevator Company, the president of the Commander Mill Company, the president of the Big Diamond Mills Company and the president of the Empire Milling Company. Percy Howe Smith (1879-1960) was the general superintendent of the Minneapolis, Northfield & Southern RailRoad until 1930. Billy Nelson Howery (1915-1999) was a vice president and the general manager of the railroad in 1961 and before retirement in 1980.

Minneapolis & Northwestern RailRoad was organized in 1878 and 1879, was incorporated in 1878 to build a railway from Minneapolis westerly, and began operations in 1881. It had initial capital stock of $250,000 and its principal place of business was Minneapolis. The railroad ceased operations in 1883, was initially succeeded by the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba RailRoad, and was ultimately succeeded by the Great Northern RailRoad.

Minneapolis & Pacific Railway: The railroad was operated until 1862, and was succeeded by the St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad.

Minneapolis & Pacific RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1884 by W. W. Eastman, William D. Hale, Anthony Kelly, C. M. Loring, Thomas Lowry, Charles J. Martin, John Martin, Clinton Morrison, George R. Newell, Charles A. Pillsbury, J. K. Sidle, W. D. Washburn, and H. T. Welles. The railroadwas organized in 1884, built 286 miles of rail trackage (a 216 mile rail ine from Minneapolis, to Ledgerwood, Dakota Territory , in 1886 and a 70 mile rail line from Ledgerwood, Dakota Territory, to Boynton, Dakota, in1887,) and was succeeded by the Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sault Ste. Marie RailRoad in 1888. The railroad was to provide for westward expansion into the wheatfields of Minnesota and the Dakotas, allowing grain to be moved to the Minneapolis mills. In 1886, the Dakota Midland RailRoad was absorbed into the railroad after having graded a rail line in Sergeant County, Dakota Territory, and Dickey County, Dakota Territory. Frederick Douglas Underwood (1849-1942) was the general superintendent of Minneapolis & Pacific Railway in 1886. The Poor's Directory of RailRoad Officials, published by the Poor's RailRoad Manual Company in 1898, indicates that the officers of the railroad were W. D. Washburn, president, Thomas Lowry, vice president, M. P. Hawkins, secretary, H. E. Fletcher, treasurer, E. D. Underwood, general manager, and C. W. Gardner, auditor, that the general office of the railroad was in Minneapolis, and that the railroad operated 218 miles of rail trackage from Minneapolis to Lidgerwood, Minnesota. In 1899, the railroad was sold to the Minneapolis & St. Louis RailRoad for $1.5 million. Edmund Pennington (l848-l926) was the president of the railroad from l909 until l922. [See note for William Drew Washburn for 2119 Third Avenue South.] [See note on Thomas Lowry and Horace Lowry for 670 Goodrich Avenue.]

Minneapolis & Pacific Railway Company was organized in 1884 and was incorporated in 1884 by Thomas Lowry, John Martin, Clinton Morrison, J. C. Oswald, J. K. Sidle, W. D. Washburn, and H. T. Welles to acquire, construct, maintain, and operate a railway from Minneapolis northwesterly to some point on the Red River of the North, in a near Breckenridge, Minnesota. The initial capital stock of the railroad was $5,000,000 and the principal place of business was Minneapolis. The railroad was organized in 1886 and operated until 1888. The Minneapolis & Pacific Railway was constructed through Wright County, Minnesota, in 1886, with the roadway skirting the north side of Lake Sarah between Loretto, Minnesota, and Rockford, Minnesota. In 1886, the Minneapolis & Pacific Railway reached Lidgerwood, Dakota Territory. In 1888, the Minneapolis & Pacific Railway and three other affiliated lines were consolidated into one single corporation, the Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sault Ste. Marie Railway Company. In 1886 and 1887, Charles W. Gardner (1861- ) was the auditor of the railroad. The railroad was succeeded by the Minneapolis, Sault Ste. Marie & Atlantic RailRoad in 1888. The railroad was eventually succeeded by the Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sault Ste. Marie RailRoad. [See note for William Drew Washburn for 2119 Third Avenue South.] [See note on Thomas Lowry and Horace Lowry for 670 Goodrich Avenue.]

Minneapolis, Perham & Manitoba Air Line RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1881. The railroad was incorporated in 1881 by S. Butler, S. Caughey, W. S. Hurst, H. Kemper, A. McCrea, D. Newcomb, F. J. Rothpletz, P. Schroeder, and C. H. Tuesley to survey, locate, construct and operate a railway and telegraph line northerly and northwesterly from St. Cloud, Stearns County, Minnesota, by way of Alexandria, Douglas County, Minnesota, Perham, Otter Tail County, Minnesota, and crossing the Red Lake River between Crookston, Polk County, Minnesota, and the Red Lake Indian Reservation, to the Northern boundary of the State. The railroad had $3,000,000 in corporate stock. The principal place of business of the railroad was Perham, Minnesota.

Minneapolis & Rainy River RailRoad: In 1901, the railroad was reorganized out of the Itasca RailRoad by its owners, the Itasca Lumber Company, and was incorporated in Minnesota in 1904. The general offices, the shops, and the roundhouse of the railroad were in Deer River, Minnesota. In 1901, the railroad had four locomotives. In 1907, the officers of the railroad were William Thomas Joyce (1860-1940,) president, H. C. Akeley, vice president, Fred A. Bill, secretary and treasurer, A. Y. Merrill, general counsel, and Franklin C. Gerhard, connected with W. T. Joyce of Clinton, Iowa, general manager, and board of directors were H. C. Akeley, Fred A. Bill, F. C. Gerhard, Thomas Hume, and W. T. Joyce. In 1905, F. C. Deerhead was the general manager of the railroad. The Poor's Directory of RailRoad Officials, published by the Poor's RailRoad Manual Company in 1905, indicates that the officers of the railroad were W. T. Joyce, president, H. C. Akeley, vice president, F. C. Gerhard, general manager, and W. L. Lacroix, superintendent. In 1907, the railroad had capital stock of $400,000 and had 41.72 miles of rail trackage. By 1911, the rail line reached to Craig, Minnesota, north of Bigfork, Minnesota, and there was a branch line at the Alder, Minnesota, station that went past Jessie Lake, Minnesota, and terminated north of Wirt, Minnesota, with total trackage of 97.86 miles. In 1911, the railroad had 11 locomotives, 272 logging cars, 92 flat cars, eight box cars, four passenger cars, and four miscellaneous cars. In 1913, the railroad had as its officers Frank P. Leffingwell, president, Thomas Hume, vice president, Fred A. Bill, secretary, treasurer, and auditor, Powell & Simpson, general counsel, and F. C. Gerhard, general manager, had as its board of directors Fred A. Bill, F. C. Gerhard, Thomas Hume, James Stanley Joyce, and Frank P. Leffingwell, had as its principal place of business in Minneapolis, had total capital stock of $1,700,000, had 87.96 miles of track in Minnesota, had ten locomotives, had four passenger cars, had 323 freight cars, and had 73 total employees. In 1915, the railroad operated 95.302 miles of rail trackage (40 miles of rail line acquired by purchase of a logging rail line from the Itasca Lumber Company, 33 miles of rail line built by the railroad from 1906 until 1910, and 14.488 miles of rail line owned by the railroad but located on land owned by the Itasca Lumber Company,) owned seven locomotives , owned 314 freight rail cars, owned four passenger rail cars, and owned five work rail cars, and was controlled by the Itasca Lumber Company. In 1924, the railroad had five locomotives, 67 flat cars, four passenger cars, and 14 miscellaneous cars. Ultimately, the railroad had rail lines between Deer River, Minnesota, to Turtle Lake, Minnesota, from Alder, Minnesota, to Bass Lake, Minnesota, from Marcell, Minnesota, to Big Fork, Minnesota, and to Carter, Minnesota, from Bass Lake, Minnesota, to Stanley, Minnesota, from Marcell, Minnesota, to Turtle Lake, Minnesota, from Stanley, Minnesota, to Pomeroy, , Minnesota, and from Stanley, Minnesota, to Dora Lake, Minnesota. In 1931, the railroad petitioned the Interstate Commerce Commission for the abandonment of 63 miles of rail line and the application was granted in 1932.

Minneapolis & Red River RailRoad: The railroad was authorized by the State of Minnesota shortly after statehood in 1857. The railroad was incorporated in 1861 by A. E. Ames, Hugh G. Harrison, J. K. Sidle, and others to construct a railway from Minneapolis to Breckenridge, Minnesota. The railroad had $4,000,000 in capital stock at incorporation. The railroad was organized in 1871.

Minneapolis, Red Lake & Manitoba RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1898, was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1904, and operated a 33.5 mile rail line from the Great Northern RailRoad line at Bemidji, Minnesota, to Redby, Minnesota, on Lower Red Lake. The Minneapolis, Red Lake & Manitoba RailRoad was incorporated by the same St. Paul attorney that incorporated the city of Bemidji, Minnesota. Officers of the company in 1904 included Minneapolis lumberman Charles A. Smith, president, Charles M. Amsden, secretary, Andreus Ueland, treasurer, and A. L. Molander, general manager. The Minneapolis, Red Lake & Manitoba RailRoad purchased the assets of the Red Lake Transportation Company for $42,000 in a sheriff's foreclosure sale in 1904. The Minneapolis, Red Lake & Manitoba RailRoad was given permission by the federal Congress in 1905 to purchase up to 320 acres of land from the Red Lake Band of Chippewa to conduct its railroad business. In 1905, H. K. Halvorson & Company was contracted to complete the 35 mile rail line from Bemidji, Minnesota, to Red Lake, Minnesota. M. D. Stoner, C.E., was the chief engineer of the railroad in 1905. Alfred L. Molander succeeded Walter G. Marson as the general manager of the railroad in 1908. In 1913, the railroad had as its officers C. A. Smith, president, C. M. Amsden, vice president, A. Ueland, secretary and general counsel, and A. L. Molander, treasurer and general manager, had as its board of directors C. M. Amsden, C. J. Johnson, John Lind, C. S. Pillsbury, C. A. Smith, A. Ueland, and C. C. Wyman, had its principal place of business in Bemidji, Minnesota, had total capital stock of $100,000, had 33.50 miles of track in Minnesota, from Bemidji, Minnesota, to Redby, Minnesota, had three locomotives, had three passenger cars, had 68 freight cars, and had 74 total employees. In 1918, the railroad operated 39.778 miles in rail trackage, owned two locomotives, owned 60 freight cars, owned three passenger cars, and owned five work cars. The railroad's board were authorized to apply for federal and state government permission to abandoned the rail line in 1931. The railroad was sold to A. L. Molander for $50,000 in 1932, the railroad applied for government permission to abandon the rail line in 1937, the railroad operated until 1938, when its removable porperty was purchased by the Washington and Great Northern Townsite Company for $49,000, and the railroad's rails were taken up in 1939. [See note for Charles Axel Smith for 2000 First Avenue South.] [See the note for John Lind for 651 Fairmount Avenue.] [See note for Charles S. Pillsbury for 2201 First Avenue South.] [See note for Charles Axel Smith for 2000 First Avenue South.] [See note for Andreas Ueland for 2000 First Avenue South.]

Minneapolis, Rochester & Dubuque Traction Company: The railroad was a New Jersey corporation, solicited bids for construction of the railroad in 1907, was approved by the Army Corps of Engineers for the construction of a temporary bridge and a permanent bridge over the Minnesota River at Savage, Minnesota, in 1907, was organized in 1911, and was succeeded by the Minneapolis, St. Paul, Rochester & Dubuque Electric Traction Company. The railroad began construction of 37.34 miles of rail trackage in 1907. William P. Mason was a member of the board of directors of, the secretary of, and general manager of the Minneapolis, Rochester & Dubuque Traction Company in 1907.

Minneapolis, Rochester & La Crosse RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in 1872.

Minneapolis & St. Cloud RailRoad: The railroad was chartered by Territorial Laws of Minnesota 1856, Chapter 160, and the initial named incorporators were Alfred E. Ames, John Banfil, George F. Brott, J. L. Crocker, A. M. Fridley, William Hanson, R. P. Russell, Franklin Steele, John H. Stevens, J. P. Wilson, J. M. Winslow, and others. The railroad was initially intended to construct within seven years and operate a rail line from a point in Minneapolis to St. Cloud, Minnesota, and a rail line from Mille Lac, Minnesota, to the mouth of the St. Louis River at Lake Superior. The railroad was actually incorporated in 1864 by B. B. Meeker, R. M. Richardson, J. P. Wilson, and others to construct and operate a railway from Minneapolis via St. Cloud, Minnesota, to Lake Superior and a branch railway from St. Cloud, Minnesota, to St. Peter, Minnesota, and Mankato, Minnesota, was organized in 1882, operated until 1883, and was succeeded by the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba RailRoad. The railroad had corporate stock of $5,000,000 at incorporation. The railroad was organized in 1871. In 1873, the officers of the railroad were L. Emmett, president, and J. P. Wilson, secretary, and the members of the board of directors of the railroad were E. S. Adams, Isaac Atwater, H. C. Burbank, Levi Cook, L. Emmett, L. A. Evans, T. C. McClure, R. J. Mendenhall, Oscar Taylor, John M. Waldron, H. T. Welles, and J. P. Wilson. The railroad was reorganized in 1881, with James J. Hill, president, and Edward Sawyer, secretary. The railroad became part of the Great Northern RailRoad in 1889. [See note for John Banfil/Banfill for 230 Banfil Street.] [See note on James Jerome Hill for 240 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Edward Sawyer for 461 Holly Avenue.] [See note for Henry Clay Burbank for 277 Goodrich Avenue.] [See the note for Oscar Livingston Taylor for 544 Portland Avenue.]

Minneapolis, St. Cloud & Sauk Rapids RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1878 by Samuel E. Adams, Theodore B. Casey, William H. Dunwoody, Charles A. Gilman, Hugh G. Harrison, Thomas Lowry, John Martin, Thomas C. McClure, William W. McNair, Tobias G. Mealey, Eder H. Moulton, Samuel E. Neiler, and Samuel Whiting, Jr., to construct and maintain a 62 mile rail line on the West side of the Mississippi River from Sauk Rapids, Minnesota, to Minneapolis. The railroad was organized in 1878 and had capital stock of $200,100. The railroad incorporators were supported by the NorthernPacific RailRoad to gain a competitor to the St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad between the Twin Cities and Sauk Rapids, Minnesota, agreeing to lease and operate the rail line for 99 years. The incorporators constituted the initial board of directors. The proposed route of the railroad was surveyed by General Thomas Lafayette Rosser (1836- ,) a former Confederate cavalry officer, a railroad engineer, and a Northern Pacific RailRoad employee. When arrangements were completed with the St. Paul & Pacific Railroad Company for the use of its track by the Northern Pacific RailRoad between St. Paul and Minneapolis and St. Cloud, the proposed construction of the Minneapolis, St. Cloud & Sauk Rapids Railroad was abandoned.

Minneapolis & St. Croix RailRoad/Minneapolis & St. Croix River RailRoad was incorporated in 1883 by Charles Martin, Charles A. Pillsbury, J. K. Sidle, William D. Washburn, and Henry T. Welles to build a railway line from Minneapolis northeasterly to some point on the St. Croix River between Stillwater, Minnesota, and a point opposite the mouth of Big Rock Creek, Wisconsin, and thence northeasterly to some point along the Minneapolis, Sault Ste. Marie & Atlantic RailRoad, was a subsidiary of the Minneapolis, Sault Ste. Marie & Atlantic RailRoad, began operation in 1885, constructed a 36 mile rail line from Shoreham, Wisconsin, to the Minnesota/Wisconsin state line in 1887 and a five mile rail line from Cardigan Junction, Wisconsin, to Soo Line Junction, Minnesota, in 1888, and was acquired by the Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sault Ste. Marie RailRoad in 1888. It had initial capital stock of $1,000,000 and its principal place of business was Minneapolis. The railroad was organized in 1883. In 1887, the officers of the railroad were J. M. Robinson, president, C. A. Pillsbury, vice president, M. P. Hawkins, secretary, and Charles K. Sidle, treasurer. The railroad operated until 1888 and was succeeded by the Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sault Ste. Marie RailRoad.

[See note for Charles Alfred Pillsbury for 116 East 22nd Street South.] [See note for William Drew Washburn for 2119 Third Avenue South.]

Minneapolis & St. Louis RailRoad: The Minneapolis & St. Louis RailRoad was an American Class I railroad that built and operated rail lines radiating from Minneapolis South to Mason City, Iowa, and Peoria, Illinois, and West to LeBeau, Walworth County, South Dakota, from 1870 to 1960. The railroad was a Minnesota corporation and was organized in 1870. The railroad was reorganized in 1894 and was an amalgamation of several earlier railroads, the Minnesota Western RailRoad, incorporated in 1853 under special Minnesota legislation and acquired in 1870, the Minneapolis & Duluth RailRoad, incorporated in 1871 under special Minnesota legislation and acquired in 1881, the Minnesota & Iowa Southern RailRoad, incorporated in 1878 under Iowa law and acquired in 1881, and the Fort Dodge & Fort Ridgely RailRoad, incorporated in 1876 under Iowa law and acquired in 1881. The railroad was originally organized in 1870/1871 as a renaming of the Minnesota Western Railroad by Minnesota investors John S. Pillsbury, Henry Titus Welles, William D. Washburn, and Cadwallader C. Washburn, who were interested in establishing a railroad connection between Minneapolis and the agricultural regions to the South, and created a Pacific Extension in 1879, and the members of its initial board of directors included William Moorhead, S. M. Felton, and Frank H. Clark, all Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, bankers. In 1878, the officers of the railroad were W. D. Washburn, president, R. B. Langdon, vice president, R. J. Baldwin, treasurer, A. H. Bode, secretary and superintendent, and Isaac Atwater, solicitor, the members of the board of directors of the railroad were W. P. Ankaeny, Isaac Atwater, R. J. Baldwin, A. H. Bode, L. Butler, Paris Gibson, W. D. Hale, R. B. Langdon, C. J. Martin, John Martin, W. W. McNair, C. H. Pettit, C. A. Pillsbury, John S. Pillsbury, R. P. Russell, W. D. Washburn, and H. T. Welles, the railroad had its general offices in Minneapolis, the railroad had $2,500,000 capital stock, the railroad had 49.5 miles of railway trackage, the railroad had eight stations, the railroad had one wooden bridge and 16 trestles, and the railroad had four locomotives, three passenger cars, two express and baggage cars, 41 box, freight and stock cars, 15 flat and coal cars, and seven company cars. The railroad terminated the Pacific Extension in 1881. William D. Washburn was the president of the railroad before 1882. In 1881, the Minneapolis and St. Louis Railway was incorporated under Minnesota law and was also reorganized under an act of consolidation in Minnesota and Iowa. In 1882, Ransom Reed Cable, the vice-president of the Rock Island Railroad, became the president of the railroad. In 1882, the railroad had as its officers R. R. Cable, president, A. B. Stickney, vice president, M. P. Hawkins, secretary, A. H. Bode, treasurer, J. D. Springer, solicitor, F. W. Partridge, auditor, C. H. Hudson, general manager, E. Ryder, superintendent, and W. W. Rich, chief engineer, had as members of its board of directors H. R. Bishop, Benjamin Brewster, R. R. Cable, W. W. McNair, W. R. Merriam, H. H. Porter, A. B. Stickney, W. D. Washburn, and J. F. Withrow, had $20,000,000 in capital stock, operated 419 miles of rail trackage (209.5 miles in Minnesota,) owned 69 locomotives, 18 passenger cars, seven express or baggage rail cars, 1245 box, freight and stock cars, 661 flat and coal rail cars, and 30 other rail cars, and employed 2,888 personnel. In 1888, the officers of the railroad were W. H. Truesdale, president, receiver, and general manager, J. D. Springer, vice president, Joseph Gaskell, secretary-treasurer, and R. G. Brown, auditor, the members of the board of directors of the railroad were R. R. Cable, C. F. Hatch, C. J. Ives, A. Kimball, R. B. Langdon, J. D. Springer, W. H. Truesdale, W. D. Washburn, and Thomas F. Withrow, the railroad operated 377.60 miles of rail trackage, the railroad owned 68 locomotives, 19 passenger cars, 11 baggage, mail and express rail cars, 1,246 box cars, 165 platform rail cars, 56 stock rail cars, 483 coal rail cars, and 38 other rail cars, and the principal place of business for the railroad was in Minneapolis. In 1888, the railroad engaged in a Sunday crossing war with the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba RailRoad. The railroad went into receivership in 1888. The railroad initially had branch lines in Iowa and South Dakota. The Minneapolis & St. Louis RailRoad used the official slogan "Peoria Gateway," and gained the unofficial nickname, when it still had a passenger service, of "Midnight and Still Later." In 1893, the officers of the railroad were W. H. Truesdale, receiver, Jos. Gaskell, secretary-treasurer, A. E. Clarke, general solicitor, O. C. Post, auditor, and T. E. Clarke, general superintendent, and the members of the board of directors were H. R. Bishop, A. E. Clarke, Jos. Gaskell, W. D. Hale, C. J. Ives, R. B. Langdon, L. C. Mitchell, W. H. Truesdale, and W. D. Washburn. In 1893, the railroad had capital stock of $10,000,000, owned 367.70 miles of railroad trackage (230.10 miles in Minnesota,) owned 20 bridges, 189 trestles, and one tunnel, had 1,135 employees (904 in Minnesota,) owned 68 locomotives, owned 38 passenger cars, owned 2,152 freight cars, and owned 74 company service cars. The Minneapolis & St. Louis Railway was succeeded by the Minneapolis and St. Louis RailRoad, incorporated under Minnesota law, in 1894 and then by the Minneapolis & St. Louis Railroad & Telegraph Company of Iowa, incorporated under Iowa law, in 1895. Its first receivership was terminated in the mid-1890's, it absorbed the Wisconsin, Minnesota & Pacific RailRoad in 1899, it merged operations with the Iowa Central RailRoad, incorporated in 1866, in 1901, and it formally purchased the Iowa Central RailRoad in 1912. The Poor's Directory of RailRoad Officials, published by the Poor's RailRoad Manual Company in 1898, indicates that the officers of the railroad were R. R. Cable, president, W. H. Truesdale, vice president and general manager, J. Gaskell, secretary and treasurer, T. J. Hyman, auditor, E. T. Clarke, superintendent, and J. D. Springer, general solicitor and that the railroad operated 575 miles of rail trackage, including the Wisconsin, Minnesota & Pacific RailRoad. In 1904, the officers of the railroad were Edwin Hawley, president, L. F. Day, vice president, Joseph Gaskell, secretary, F. H. Davis, treasurer, Albert E. Clark, general counsel, L. G. Scott, auditor, and L. F. Day, general manager, and the members of the board of directors were George Crocker, F. H. Davis, L. F. Day, Edwin Hawley, H. E. Huntington, Edwin Langdon, F. E. Palmer, J. E. Searles, and L. C. Weir. In 1904, the railroad had capital stock of $10,000,000, had 1,192 employees in Minnesota, owned 79 locomotives, owned 65 passenger cars, owned 2,736 freight cars, owned 117 company service cars, owned 28 bridges, owned 212 trestles, and operated 631.73 total miles of railway trackage (378.61 miles in Minnesota.) The Poor's Directory of RailRoad Officials, published by the Poor's RailRoad Manual Company in 1905, indicates that the officials of the railroad were R. Hawley, president, L. F. Day, vice president and general manager, Joseph Gaskell, secretary, F. H. Davis, treasurer, L. G. Scott, auditor, D. C. Noonan, superintendent, and A. E. Clarke, solicitor. In 1912, W. G. Bierd was a vice president and general manager of the railroad. In 1913, the railroad had as its officers Newman Erb, president, F. N. Davis, vice president and treasurer, C. W. Huntington, vice president and general manager, A. C. Doan, secretary, A. E. Smith, auditor, and F. M. Miner, general attorney, had as its board of directors F. H. Davis, A. C. Doan, Newman Erb, F. P. Frazier, H. E. Huntington, Ward C. Pearson, T. P. Shonts, Frank Trumbull, and W. J. Wollman, had total capital stock of $21,287,700, had 378.02 miles of track in Minnesota, had 220 locomotives, had 129 passenger cars, had 7,416 freight cars, and had 5,592 total employees. The railroad reorganized again, as the Minneapolis and St. Louis RailRoad, incorporated under Iowa law, and absorbed the Iowa Central and Western Railway in 1916. In 1917, the railroad operated 1,935.374 miles of rail trackage, owned 219 locomotives, owned 7,325 freight cars, owned 141 passenger cars, owned 327 work cars, wholly controlled the Railway Transfer Company of the City of Minneapolis and the Hocking Coal Company, and partially controlled the Minnesota Transfer Railway and the Saint Paul Union Depot Company. In 1923, the Minneapolis & St. Louis RailRoad again went into receivership, which terminated in 1943. The railroad abandoned several branch lines in the 1930's, began the conversion to diesel engines in 1938, and reorganized in 1942 after the longest receivership in Class I railroad history. In 1955, the Minneapolis & St. Louis RailRoad purchased the Minnesota Western Railroad, the successor line to the Luce Line RailRoad in central Minnesota, and renamed the Minnesota Western RailRoad as the Minneapolis Industrial Railroad in 1959. The railroad operated until 1960 and was succeeded by the Chicago NorthWestern RailRoad. [See note for John Sargent Pillsbury for 116 East 22nd Street South.] [See note for Cadwallader Colden Washburn, the Washburn Crosby Company, and General Mills for 2201 First Avenue South.] [See note for William Drew Washburn for 2119 Third Avenue South.]

Minneapolis, St. Louis & Canadian RailRoad: In 1912, the railroad was a new line created under the auspices of the Minneapolis & St. Louis RailRoad for a 300 mile long rail line from Watertown, South Dakota, to the Canadian border. The railroad issued stock in 1912.

Minneapolis, St. Paul & Ashland RailRoad: The railroad was intended to run between Ashland, Wisconsin, and the Twin Cities in Minnesota by way of Hayward, Wisconsin, Shell Lake, Wisconsin, and St. Croix Falls, Wisconsin. The railroad was organized in 1894, the rail line was built by the Standard Construction Company, the railroad was initially run by S. G. Cook, who had a mill located in Ashland, Wisconsin, and by the Keystone Lumber Company, and the railroad later was run by Frederick Weyerhaeuser, who had taken over the S. G. Cook mill, after 1900. The logging railroad operated from Ashland, Wisconsin, southwesterly to Chequamegon Junction, a point along the main line of the Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic RailRoad. Ashland County, Wisconsin, bonded for $140,000 to build the railroad and paid off those bonds until 1918. The original main rail line was built in 1895 and 1896, opened in 1897, and, after 1899, had a branch from a point on the main line near Ashland, Wisconsin, across Northern Bayfield County, Wisconsin, to Ole Olson, Wisconsin, about a mile away from Port Wing, Wisconsin, to facilitate logging off several sections of land owned by Fredrick Weyerhaeuser. The railroad was known as the "Peerless Line," based on a brand of tobacco commonly used by its employees. In 1901, S. G. Cook was the president of the railroad and A. S. Peterson was the secretary of the railroad. The railroad had 46.5 miles of rail trackage in 1902. The Poor's Directory of RailRoad Officials, published by the Poor's RailRoad Manual Company in 1905, indicates that the officials of the railroad were S. G. Cook, president, Thomas Bardon, vice president, J. S. Porteous, secretary and treasurer, and John Dunlavey, general manager and general superintendent. When logging on the Weyerhaeuser property was completed in 1906, the railroad was purchased by a Milwaukee, Wisconsin, company and was completely abandoned other than 1.76 miles of track on the Ashland, Wisconsin, waterfront, which served a box factory, until 1911. Five rod locomotives and one Shay locomotive previously owned by the railroad went to the Duluth & Northeastern RailRoad of Cloquet, Minnesota, also controlled by Weyerhaeuser.

Minneapolis, St. Paul & Iowa RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in 1875 by J. B. Bassett, R. W. Chase, George Douglas, J. F. Eley, W. W. Hungerford, C. M. Loring, S. E. Neilor, L. Z. Rogers, J. W. Traer, John van der Horck, W. W. Walker to build and operate a railway from some point on the Southern boundary of the State in Freeborn County, Minnesota, through Freeborn County, Minnesota, Waseca County, Minnesota, Le Seuer County, Minnesota, and Scott County, Minnesota, by way of Albert Lea, Minnesota, Wilton, Minnesota, Waseca, Minnesota, Watertown, Minnesota, and Jordan, Minnesota, to Minneapolis and St. Paul. It had initial capital stock of $2,500,000 and its principal place of business was Minneapolis. The railroad was organized in 1876. [See the note for Joel Bean Bassett in the introduction.]

Minneapolis, St. Paul & Lake Superior RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in 1893 to build and operate a 136 mile rail line from St. Paul to Lake Superior and to build and operate a 12 mile branch rail line from South Superior, Wisconsin, to West Superior, Wisconsin. The survey for the rail line was completed in 1893, with Samuel Grant and D. W. Grant of Faribault, Minnesota, contracted to construct it. The railroad had $4,000,000 in capital stock and had its general office in Minneapolis. In 1893, the railroad had planned for the acquisition of 40 locomotives, 22 passenger cars, 1,000 freight cars, and 300 other rail cars, had as its officers Donald Grant, president, K. D. Chase, vice president, William Dawson, treasurer, F. H. Anson, secretary, and F. D. Woodbury, chief engineer, and had as its board of directors F. H. Anson, K. D. Chase, M. E. Clapp, William Dawson, D. Grant, D. W. Grant, and Samuel Grant.

Minneapolis & St. Paul RailRoad was incorporated in 1878 by John W. Cary, John A. Chandler, Sherburne S. Mitchell, Alexander Mitchell, and Charles H. Prior to build a railway from a point on the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad in St. Paul westerly through Ramsey County and Hennepin County to a junction with the St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad and various branches. It had initial capital stock of $1,000,000 and its principal place of business was Minneapolis. The railroad was organized in 1879. In 1888, Charles W. Holt, the president of the Holt Electric Company, was associated with the railroad. John Tonge was the master mechanic and the master tool maker for the railroad in 1906. The railroad continued to at least 1916.

Minneapolis & St. Paul Rapid Transit Company: The railroad was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1888, had capital stock of $500,000, and had its principal place of business in Minneapolis.

Minneapolis, St. Paul, Rochester & Dubuque Electric Traction Company: The railroad was incorporated under the general laws of Maine in 1907, purchased the assets of the Minneapolis, Rochester & Dubuque Traction Company, a New Jersey corporation, and was organized in 1911. The railroad served Antler Park at Lake Marion, Minnesota, developed by Marion Savage. The McGraw electric railway manual: the red book of American street railway, published in 1914, indicates that the railroad operated 52 miles of gasoline/electric rail trackage from Minneapolis and St. Paul Southerly towards Rochester, Minnesota, owned 12 gasoline/electric cars, including one purchased from the Strang Gas Electric Car Company of Overland Park, Kansas, “Irene,” 12 steel trailers, one gasoline/electric locomotive and 24 freight cars, had $15,000,000 in capital stock, had as its officers M. W. Savage, president and treasurer, M. H. Boutelle, secretary, M. L. Tankel, auditor, and D. S. Smith, general manager, had as its board of directors M. H. Boutelle, C. N. Boynton, Aaron Carlson, W. J. Morris, M. E. Savage, M. W. Savage, D. S. Smith, and H. Wehmann, and its general office was in Minneapolis. In 1914, the officers of the railroad were M. W. Savage, president and treasurer, M. H. Boutelle, secretary and general counsel, M. L. Tankel, auditor, and D. S. Smith, general manager, and the members of the board of the railroad were M. H. Boutelle, C. N. Boynton, Aaron Carlson, M. J. Morris, M. E. Savage, M. W. Savage, D. S. Smith, and H. Wehman, the railroad had 52.4 miles of railway trackage, the railroad had $8,022,500 in capital stock, the railroad had one electric locomotive, 24 passenger cars, 23 freight cars, and one baggage car, and the railroad had 133 employees. In 1914, the company announced that it expected to purchase three gas-electric locomotives, three gas-electric motor cars, and 12 steel coaches. The railroad was placed under receivership in 1916, operated until 1918, and was acquired by and succeeded by the Minneapolis, Northfield & Southern RailRoad. The McGraw transit directory, published in 1918 by the McGraw-Hill Publishing Company, indicates that the railroad operated 52 miles of rail trackage connecting Minneapolis with St. Louis Park, Minnesota, Savage, Minnesota, Lakeville, Minnesota, Northfield, Minnesota, and intermediate points, owned three gasoline-electric passenger cars, four trail passenger cars, and 60 other cars, owned one steam locomotive, had as its officers C. E. Warner, receiver, R. J. Towey, auditor, and E. T. Selmer, general manager, owned and serviced Antlers Amusement Park on Lake Marion, Minnesota, had repair shops in Minneapolis, and had its general office in Minneapolis. It was known as the "Dan Patch Line" and was promoted by Marion W. Savage, the owner of the race horse Dan Patch. The railroad utilized gasoline motor cars. The railroad never reached beyond Northfield, Minnesota. Antlers Amusement Park was developed by Marion Savage and Prairie Lake, originally named by J.J. Brackett, a Saint Paul lumber baron, in 1855, was renamed Lake Marion by Marion Savage. [See note for Marion W. Savage and Marietta Savage for 2600 Portland Avenue South.]

Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sault Ste. Marie RailRoad: The "Soo Line" railroad was incorporated in 1883 under Wisconsin law, was the successor of the Menominee & Sault Ste. Marie RailRoad, a Michigan corporation, the Minneapolis & Pacific RailRoad, an 1884 Minnesota corporation, the Aberdeen, Bismarck & Northwestern RailRoad, an 1883 Dakota Territorial corporation, and the Minneapolis & St. Croix RailRoad, an 1885 Minnesota corporation, in 1886, was the result of acts od consolidation in Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, and the Dakota Territory in 1888, and was organized in 1888. The railroad acquired the Minneapolis, Sault Ste. Marie & Atlantic Railway in 1888, the Minneapolis & St. Croix Railway in 1888, the Aberdeen, Bismark & Northwestern Railway in 1888, the Minneapolis & Pacific Railway in 1888, the Rice Lake, Dallas & Menominee Railway in 1899-1900, the Rice Lake & Northern Railway in 1902, the Bismark, Washburn & Great Falls Railway in 1904, the Superior, Balsam Lake & Southern Railway in 1901, the Tony & North Eastern Railway in 1903, the Cuyuna Iron Range Railway in 1910, the Fairmont & Veblen Railway in 1915, and the Wisconsin & Northern Railroad in 1921. In 1888, the Minneapolis, Sault Ste. Marie & Atlantic RailRoad had trains operating in from Minneapolis and St. Paul to Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, and West from Minneapolis to Boynton, Dakota Territory. Also in 1888, the Canadian Pacific RailRoad secured control of the Minneapolis, Sault Ste. Marie & Atlantic RailRoad. In 1888, the officers of the railroad were W. D. Washburn, president, Thomas lowry, vice president, M. P.Hawkins, secretary-treasurer, and C. W. Gardner, auditor, the members of the board of directors of the railroad were W. H. Eustis, H. S. Fletcher, M. B. Koon, R. B. Langdon, Thomas Lowry, C. J. Martin, John Martin, O. C. Merriam, J. C. Oswald, C. H. Pettit, J. S. Pillsbury, J. M. Shaw, and W. D. Washburn, operated 789.50 miles of rail trackage, owned 62 locomotives, 38 passenger cars, 11 baggage, mail and express cars, 2,658 box cars, 25 stock rail cars, 776 platform rail cars, 35 cabooses, and 21 other rail cars, and the principal place of business for the railroad was in Minneapolis. In 1893, the officers of the railroad were Thomas Lowry, president, R. B. Langdon, first vice president, W. L. Martin, secretary-treasurer, Alfred H. Bright, solicitor general, C. W. Gardner, auditor, and F. D. Underwood, general manager, and the members of the board of trustees were R. B. Langdon, Thomas Lowry, John Martin, C. H. Pettit, J. S. Pillsbury, W. C. Van Horne, and W. D. Washburn. In 1893, the railroad had capital stock of $21,000,000, had 1,984 employees (567 in Minnesota,) had 902.15 miles (223.59 miles in Minnesota) of railway trackage, owned 1.5 bridges and 165 trestles, owned 75 locomotives, owned 50 passenger cars, owned 4,062 freight cars, and owned 51 company service cars. The Poor's Directory of RailRoad Officials, published by the Poor's RailRoad Manual Company in 1898, indicates that the officers of the railroad were W. D. Washburn, president, John Martin, vice president, F. J. Leavenworth, secretary, C. H. Pettit, treasurer, and F. D. Underwood, general manager, that the general office of the railroad was in Minneapolis, and that the railroad operated 141 miles of rail trackage between Rhinelander, Wisconsin, and Turtle Lake, Wisconsin. In 1904, the railroad had as its officers Thomas Lowry, president, John Martin, vice president, E. Penington, second vice president and general manager, C. F. Clement, secretary-treasurer, and C. W. Gardner, auditor, had as members of the board of directors of the railroad were R. B. Angus, Alfred H. Bright, Thomas Lowry, John Martin, G. R. Newell, E. Pennington, C. H. Pettit, Sir T. G. Shaughnessy, Sir William C. Van Horne, W. D. Washburn, and E. B. Young, had capital stock of $21,000,000, had 1,369 employees in Minnesota, owned 133 locomotives, owned 109 passenger cars, owned 8,287 freight cars, owned 95 company service cars, and operated 1,629.64 total miles of railway trackage (314.34 miles in Minnesota and 355.66 miles in Wisconsin.) In 1900, the railroad purchased the Rice Lake, Dallas & Menomonie RailRoad. In 1904, the railroad had a 164 mile branch line built by Foley Brothers, Larson & Company, from Glenwood, Minnesota, to a point ten miles North of Erskine, Minnesota. In 1904, the railroad purchased the Bismarck, Washburn & Great Falls RailRoad, purchased a 15.54 mile rail line from Rex, Michigan, to Meads Quarry, Michigan, constructed 100.85 miles of rail line extensions, and also ordered a rail coach from Barney & Smith Car Manufacturing Company. The Poor's Directory of RailRoad Officials, published by the Poor's RailRoad Manual Company in 1905, indicates that the officers of the railroad were Thomas Lowry, president, E. Pennington, second vice president and general manager, Charles F. Clement, secretary and treasurer, G. R. Huntington, general superintendent, C. W. Gardner, auditor, and A. H. Bright, general solicitor. In 1909, the railroad leased for 99 years 1,066 miles of track from the Wisconsin Central RailRoad. In 1913, the railroad had as its officers E. Pennington, president, W. L. Martin, vice president, G. W. Webster, secretary, C. F. Clement, treasurer, A. H. Bright, general counsel, C. W. Gardner, comptroller, and G. R. Huntington, general manager, had as its board of directors R. B. Angus, Alfred H. Bright, H. Lowry, W. L. Martin, G. R. Newel, I. G. Ogden, E. Pennington, Charles S. Pillsbury, Sir T. G. Shaughnessy, and E. A. Young, had total capital stock of $37,810,200, had 995.77 miles of track in Minnesota, had 529 locomotives, had 374 passenger cars, had 26,150 freight cars, and had 16,318 total employees. In 1915, the railroad purchased the Fairmount & Veblen RailRoad and the Minnesota Northwestern Electric Railway. In 1916, the railroad operated 4,228 miles of rail line in North Dakota, Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Michigan and was controlled by the Canadian Pacific RailRoad. In 1916, the railroad operated 3,803.567 miles of rail trackage, owned 319 locomotives, owned 16,285 freight cars, owned 263 passenger cars, owned 276 work rail cars, leased one locomotive, leased one passenger car, totally controlled the Central Terminal RailRoad, the Western Express Company, the Tri-State Land Company, and the Wisconsin Central RailRoad, partially owned the Ste. Marie Depot RailRoad, the Sault Ste. Marie Bridge Company, the Minnesota Transfer Railway, the Saint Paul Union Depot Company, and the Belt Railway Company of Chicago, and was controlled by the Canadian Pacific Railway. In 1921, the railroad purchased the Wisconsin & Northern RailRoad. Clyde T. Jaffrey was the president of the railroad for many years around World War II. In 1944, a new corporation was established after reorganization as the Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sault Ste. Marie Railroad Company. In 1950, the corporate name was dropped except for legal matters, the trade name "Soo Line Railroad" was adopted, and the initials MStP&SSMRR, in small type, were used under the railroad’s trade mark. The railroad operated until 1961 and was succeeded by the Soo Line RailRoad. [See note on the Soo Line RailRoad for 688 East Fourth Street.] [See note for Curtis H. Pettit for 2400 Third Avenue South.] [See note for John Sargent Pillsbury for 116 East 22nd Street South.] [See note for Charles S. Pillsbury for 2201 First Avenue South.] [See note for William Drew Washburn for 2119 Third Avenue South.] [See note on Thomas Lowry and Horace Lowry for 670 Goodrich Avenue.]

Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sea Coast RailRoad was incorporated in 1882 and in 1883 in a consolidation by Richard Chute, Judson N. Cross, Joel D. Harvey, Norman W. Kittson, A. B. Nettleton, Ralph Plumb, Alexander Ramsey, Henry H. Sibley, J. S. Stacy, and Edward H. Thayer to build a railway and a telegraph line from Minneapolis via St. Paul to a point on the southern boundary of the State to meet up with the Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sea Coast RailRoad, incorporated in Iowa, with a rail line and telegraph line running from the Mississippi River between Clinton County, Iowa, and Davenport, Iowa, to the northern boundary of Iowa in Worth County, Iowa, in Mitchell County, Iowa, or in Howard County, Iowa. It had initial capital stock of $3,000,000 and subsequently (1883) of $15,000,000 and its principal place of business was St. Paul. The railroad was organized in 1882 and 1883. [See the note on Henry Hastings Sibley for 614 North Fountain Place.] [See note on Alexander Ramsey for 265 South Exchange Street.] [See note for Norman Kittson for 225 Summit Avenue.] [See the note for Richard Chute for 1812 Marshall Street NE.]

Minneapolis, St. Paul & SouthWestern RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in 1889 by Thomas Bohen, Paul Corwain, Charles C. Garland, Carman N. Smith, B. Warner Taylor, William G. Ward, John C. White, and Fremond D. Woodbury to survey, locate, build, maintain and operate a railway and telegraph line. It had initial capital stock of $15,000,000 and its principal place of business was Minneapolis. C. C. Garland was the president of the railroad and Thomas Bohen, C. C. Garland, Carmen N. Smith, William G. Ward, B. Warner Taylor, John C. White, and F. D. Woodbury were the members of the board of directors of the railroad in 1888. The railroad was organized in 1899. The railroad was intended to build a 687 mile air line railway from the Twin Cities to Kansas City, Missouri, by way of Des Moines, Iowa. In 1889, F. D. Woodbury of Waseca, Minnesota, was the Chief Engineer of the Minneapolis, St. Paul & SouthWestern RailRoad. The railroad was the successor to the St. Paul & Southern RailRoad.

Minneapolis & St. Paul Suburban RailRoad Company: The railroad was incorporated in 1899 as the successor to the St. Paul & Suburban Railway Company, purchasing its assets at a foreclosure sale. In 1906, the railroad had capital stock of $300,000, was owned by the Twin City Rapid Transit Company, and was operated as part of the Twin City Rapid Transit Company system. In 1906, the officers of the railroad were C. G. Goodrich, president, M. D. Munn, vice president and counsel, E. S. Pattee, auditor, W. J. Hield, general manager, and C. C. Burdick, superintendent, and the members of the board of directors of the railroad were C. G. Goodrich, M. B. Koon, Thomas Lowry, and M. D. Munn. In 1906, the railroad had 20.25 miles of electric rail trackage, including a line from St. Paul to the Wildwood amusement park on White Bear Lake by way of White Bear, Minnesota, a line from Wildwood, Minnesota, to Mahtomedi, Minnesota, a line from Wildwood, Minnesota to Stillwater, Minnesota, and a line to Excelsior, Minnesota, at Lake Minnetonka, Minnesota, had 37 rail cars, and had power houses in Wildwood, Minnesota, and Stillwater, Minnesota. In 1913, the officers of the railroad were C. G. Goodrich, president, Horace Lowry, first vice president, John R. Mitchell, second vice president, A. M. Robertson, third vice president and secretary, E. A. Crosby, treasurer, N. M. Thygeson, general counsel, D. J. Strouse, auditor, and J. J. Caulfield, general superintendent, and the members of the board of directors were E. W. Decker, C. G. Goodrich, Horace Lowry, John R. Mitchell, and A. M. Robertson. In 1913, the railroad had $3,000,000 in capital stock, had 100.1 miles of electric street railway trackage in several lines in Dakota, Hennepin, Ramsey, and Washington Counties, Minnesota, had 26 passenger cars, had one baggage and express car, had two work cars, and had two snow plows, and had 354 employees. The McGraw electric railway manual: the red book of American street railway, published in 1914, indicates that the railroad operated 86.63 miles of electrified rail trackage, owned 31 rail cars, had $3,000,000 in capital stock, and was a subsidiary of the Twin City Rapid Transit Company. [See note for Calvin G. Goodrich and Calvin Gibson Goodrich for 1827 La Salle Avenue.] [See note on Thomas Lowry and Horace Lowry for 670 Goodrich Avenue.]

Minneapolis & St. Paul Terminal Railway Company: The railroad was incorporated under Minnesota law as the St. Paul & Minneapolis Transfer Company in 1902, was organized in 1902, was renamed the Minneapolis & St. Paul Terminal Railway Company in 1903, purchased the road, property and franchise of the South St. Paul Belt Railway Company in 1903, operated until 1904 when its road, property and franchise were sold to the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railway Company, and was succeeded by the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific RailRoad. The railroad operated five miles of rail line from South St. Paul, Minnesota, to Newport, Minnesota, by way of Inver Grove Junction, Minnesota, previously obtained from the South St. Paul Belt Railway.

Minneapolis, Sault Ste. Marie & Atlantic RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in 1883 in Wisconsin by W. W. Eastman, William D. Hale, Anthony Kelly, C. M. Loring, Thomas Lowry, Charles J. Martin, John Martin, Clinton Morrison, George R. Newell, Charles A. Pillsbury, J. K. Sidle, W. D. Washburn, and H. T. Welles, constructed 143 miles of rail trackage between 1883 and 1886 (a 47 mile rail line between Turtle Lake, Wisconsin, to Buce Creek, Wisconsin, in 1884, a 20 mile railline between Bruce, Wisconsin, to Main Creek, Wisconsin, in 1885, and a 76 mile rail line from Main Creek, Wisconsin, to Rhinelander, Wisconsin, in 1886) was the successor of a consolidation under Minnesota law and Wisconsin law by the Minneapolis, Sault Ste. Marie & Atlantic Railway and the Menominee & Sault Ste. Marie Railway, incorporated in 1885, in 1886, was organized in 1887, constructed 316 miles of rail trackage in 1887 and 1888 (37 mile rail line from the Minnesota/Wisconsin state line to Turtle Lake, Wisconsin, in 1887, a 126 mile rail line from Rhinelander, Wisconsin to Gladstone, Michigan, in 1887, a five mile rail line from Dresser Junction, Wisconsin, to St. Croix Falls, Wisconsin, in 1887, and a 148 mile rail line from Gladstone, Michigan, to Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan, in 1888,) operated until 1888, and was succeeded by the Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sault Ste. Marie RailRoad. In 1883, W. D. Washburn was the president of the railroad and Captain W. W. Rich was the chief engineer of the railroad. The railroad was completely financed by Minneapolis interests, with 75% of the stock owned by the flour manufacturing companies in Minneapolis. The tracks of the Minneapolis, Sault Ste. Marie & Atlantic Railway reached Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan, in 1888. In 1888, the railroad consolidated with Minneapolis & St. Croix RailRoad, with the Minneapolis & Pacific RailRoad, and the Aberdeen, Bismarck and Northwestern RailRoad as the Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sault Ste. Marie Railway Company. In 1888, the members of the board of directors were W. H. Eustis, H. S. Fletcher, M. B. Koon, R. B. Langdon, Thomas Lowry, C. J. Martin, John Martin, O. C. Merriam, J. C. Oswald, C. H. Pettit, J. S. Pillsbury, J. M. Shaw, and W. D. Washburn. The Poor's Directory of RailRoad Officials, published by the Poor's RailRoad Manual Company in 1898, indicates that Frederick D. Underwood was the general manager of the railroad.

Minneapolis, Shakopee & Minnesota Valley Narrow Gauge RailRoad was incorporated in 1880 by Samuel Anderson, E. B. Andrews, G. A. Burbank, William F. Cahill, James Clark, C. H. Clarke, H. D. Cunningham, J. Dean, Sever Ellingson, N. B. Harwood, F. S. Hinkle, C. T. Hobart, A. Kelly, Thomas Lowry, George H. Morrison, George R. Newell, J. C. Oswald, F. Peteler, C. H. Pettit, George A. Pillsbury, C. McC. Reeve, P. F. Ritchie, H. C. Sidle, J. K. Sidle, C. B. Terrell, and A. P. Thompson to survey, locate, and build a single or double track railway from some point in Minneapolis southerly by way of Richfield, Hennepin County, Minnesota, Bloomington, Hennepin County, Minnesota, Eden Prairie, Hennepin County, Minnesota, to Shakopee, Scott County, Minnesota, and thence westerly through Carver County, Minnesota, Sibley County, Minnesota, and Nicollet County, Minnesota, with a branch line through Scott County, Minnesota, and Rice County, Minnesota. It had initial capital stock of $200,000 and its principal place of business was Minneapolis. The railroad was organized in 1880. [See note for Curtis H. Pettit for 2400 Third Avenue South.] [See note on Thomas Lowry and Horace Lowry for 670 Goodrich Avenue.]

The Minneapolis Street Railway incorporated in 1873, was organized in 1873, and built 4.37 miles of horse drawn passenger car track beginning at the corner of Washington Avenue and Hennepin Avenue in downtown Minneapolis. The incorporators of the company in 1873 were W. W. Eastman, Paris Gibson, William S. King, R. B. Langdon, W. W. McNair, R. J. Mendenhall, D. Morrison, J. C. Oswald, W. D. Washburn, and W. P. Westfall and the officers of the company in 1875 were Philo Osgood, president, Thomas Lowry, vice president, William S. King, secretary, S. E. Neiler, treasurer, and James Tuckerman, general manager. The Minneapolis Street Railway began operating a horse car service in Minneapolis in 1875 and converted its horse car lines to standard gauge electric streetcar lines, initially with Fourth Avenue South line, in 1889. In 1889, the railroad had 61 miles of rail line, owned 160 rail cars, owned 1,080 mules and horses, had as its board of directors C. G. Goodrich, M. B. Koon, Thomas Lowry, Clinton Morrison, P. H. Perry, J. S. Pillsbury, and W. D. Washburn, and had as its officers Thomas Lowry, president, Clinton Morrison, vice president, E. H. Center, secretary, M. B. Koon, treasurer, and C. G. Goodrich, superintendent. In 1892, the Minneapolis Street Railway and the St. Paul City Railway Company merged into the Twin City Rapid Transit Company. The Poor's Directory of RailRoad Officials, published by the Poor's RailRoad Manual Company in 1898, indicates that the officials of the railroad were Thomas Lowry, president, C. Morrison, vice president, C. G. Goodrich, secretary, W. W. Herrick, treasurer, and D. W. Sharp, superintendent, that the general office of the railroad was in Minneapolis, and that the railroad operated 51 miles of rail trackage and owned 426 horses, 102 mules, and 144 rail cars. [See the note for Paris Gibson for 18 Eastman Avenue.] [See note for Orange S. King, Preston King, and William S. King for 2400 Stevens Avenue.] [See note for Robert Bruce Langdon for 2200 Pillsbury Avenue South.] [See note for Dorilus Morrison for 2400 Third Avenue South.] [See the note for John Conrad Oswald in the introduction.] [See note on William Plaisted Westfall for 940 Portland Avenue.] [See note for John Sargent Pillsbury for 116 East 22nd Street South.] [See note on Martin B. Koon for 2265 Summit Avenue.] [See note for William Drew Washburn for 2119 Third Avenue South.] [See note for Calvin G. Goodrich and Calvin Gibson Goodrich for 1827 La Salle Avenue.] [See note on Thomas Lowry and Horace Lowry for 670 Goodrich Avenue.]

Minneapolis, Superior, St. Paul & Winnipeg RailRoad: In 1902, the planned and surveyed railroad was intended to construct a rail line from Minneapolis and St. Paul North through Anoka, Minnesota, Aitkin, Minnesota, and Grand Rapids, Minnesota, to the Minnesota-Canadian border, with a branch from Anoka, Minnesota, through Rush City, Minnesota, to Superior, Wisconsin. The railroad was intended to provide access to the Twin Cities for the Canadian Northern RailRoad, connecting at Baudette, Lake of the Woods County, Minnesota, on Rainy Lake, Minnesota, to provide competition with James J. Hill and his railroads, and to develop the tourist potential of Mille Lacs Lake, Minnesota. The entire route of the proposed rail line was surveyed in 1902. The railroad filed a trust deed to the Standard Trust Company of New York covering $10,000,000 in construction bonds for the two branches of the railroad. A bridge for the railroad over the Mississippi River between Champlin, Minnesota, and Anoka, Minnesota, was approved in legislation (S. 6079) signed by President Theodore Roosevelt and reported by the Chief of Engineers of the U. S. Army in 1902. In 1902, the officers of the railroad were Samuel M. Hanley, president, J. L. Lovering, vice president, H. S. Funson, secretary and general counsel, and E. C. Hollidge, chief engineer, and the members of the board of directors were S. M. Hanley, J. L. Lovering, H. M. Funson, and J. J. Elliott. The railroad issued stock and bonds in 1902. The railroad had $12,500,000 in capital stock in 1902.

Minneapolis Union RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in 1881 under Minnesota law by W. S. Alexander, R. C. Benton, R. B. Galusha, J. J. Hill, A. Manvel, C. A. Pillsbury, and E. Sawyer to construct, maintain, and operate a railway from the Union Stock Yard in Ramsey County, by way of the East bank of the Mississippi River opposite Hennepin Island, to a point along the branch line of the St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad North of NorthEast Third Street in Minneapolis. The railroad had $1,000,000 in corporate stock, which was owned by the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba RailRoad. The principal place of business of the railroad was Minneapolis. The railroad was organized in 1883. The railroad operated 7.38 miles of track from the Union Stock Yards to the Union Station in Minneapolis. The railroad built the Stone Arch Bridge, designed by Colonel Charles C. Smith and constructed by Edward Darragh and Michael Haviland, in Minneapolis in 1882-1883. The railroad amended its articles of incorporation in 1886. In 1888, the officers of the railroad were James J. Hill, president, Allen Manvel, vice president, A. H. Bode, secretary-treasurer, and H. V. Dougan, superintendent, the members of the board of directors of the railroad were W. S. Alexander, R. C. Benton, A. H. Bode, H. V. Dougan, James J. Hill, Allen Manvel, and Edward Sawyer, operated 2.6 miles of rail trackage (primarily the Stone Arch bridge over the Mississippi River,) and the principal place of business was in Minneapolis. The Poor's Directory of RailRoad Officials, published by the Poor's RailRoad Manual Company in 1898, indicates that the officers of the railroad were James J. Hill, president, A. Manvel, vice president and general manager, Edward Sawyer, treasurer, and H. V. Dougan, secretary and superintendent, that the general office of the railroad was in St. Paul, and that the railroad operated two miles of rail trackage. According to Poor's Manual of the RailRoads of the United States, Volume 33 by Henry Varnum Poor in 1901, as of 1899, the railroad operated 9,97 miles of rail trackage within the City of Minneapolis, was intended to provide depot, terminal, and transfer services to other railroads, had as its officers J. N. Hill, president, W. P. Clough, vice president, Edward Sawyer, secretary and treasurer, and R. I. Farrington, comptroller, and had its general office in St. Paul. In 1904, E. B. Wakeman was the superintendent of the passenger railroad, which operated 13 miles of rail trackage. In 1913, Samuel H. Hill, the husband of James J. Hill's daughter, Mary Hill, was the president of the railroad. The railroad operated until 1907, had its bonds assumed by the Great Northern RailRoad, and was succeeded by the Great Northern RailRoad. [See note on Reuben Barney Galusha for 885 Goodrich Avenue.] [See note on James Jerome Hill for 240 Summit Avenue.] [See note for Charles Alfred Pillsbury for 116 East 22nd Street South.] [See note on Edward Sawyer for 461 Holly Avenue.] [See note on William Pitt Clough for 500 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Robert I. Farrington, Thayer B. Farrington, and John D. Farrington for 457-459 Portland Avenue.]

Minneapolis West Side Street Railway Company: The railroad was a Minnesota corporation, was authorized as a street railroad by the Minneapolis City Council in 1887, was incorporated in 1888 by Randolph Burgess, John T. Byrnes, A. G. Chamberlain, H. J. Mitchell, and Matthew Walsh,had capital stock of $200,000, and was intended to build, construct, and operate a rail line in Minneapolis on 34th Street from Lake Calhoun to Tenth Avenue South, then on Tenth Avenue South to 29th Street, and thence on 29th Street to 13th Avenue South, thence on 13th Avenue South to 28th Street, and thence on 28th Street to Fort Avenue South. In 1889, the railroad constructed seven miles of rail line, had as its officers R. Burgess, president, John T. Byrnes, secretary-treasurer, and Albert C. Chamberlain, superintendent, and had its main office in Minneapolis. In 1891, the Minnesota Legislature enacted a law (Laws of Minnesota 1891, Chapter 127) authorizing the City of Minneapolis to claims by contractor James Gorman for work he did under contract for the railroad before the railroad became insolvent.

Minneapolis Western RailRoad was incorporated in 1884 by W. F. Cahill, Woodbury Fisk, H. H. Holmes, C. J. Martin, C. W. Moore, C. H. Pettit, William Pettit, C. A. Pillsbury, and J. K. Sidle to serve the Minneapolis flour mills. The railroad was organized in 1884. By 1891, it had started building riverside yards just downstream of the mills. According to Poor's Manual of the RailRoads of the United States, Volume 33 by Henry Varnum Poor in 1901, as of 1899, the railroad was chartered in 1894, had its capital stock entirely owned by the Great Northern RailRoad, operated 3.29 miles of rail trackage within Minneapolis, owned two locomotives, had as its officers James J. Hill, president, A. J. Shores, vice president, F. E. Ward, secretary, E. Sawyer, treasurer, and R. I. Farrington, comptroller, and had its general office at St. Paul. In 1904, the officer of the railroad were Louis W. Hill, president, R. I. Farrington, first vice president, E. Sawyer, secretary-treasurer, M. D. Grover, general counsel, and F. E. Ward, general manager, and the members of the board of directors were J. W. Blabon, R. I. Farrington, M. D. Grover, Louis W. Hill, and Edward Sawyer. In 1904, the railroad had capital stock of $250,000, had 36 employees in Minnesota, owned two locomotives, owned two bridges, and operated 1.69 total miles of railway trackage, all in Minnesota. In 1913, the railroad had as its officers J. M. Gruber, president, Ralph Budd, vice president, L. E. Katzenbach, secretary and treasurer, G. R. Martin, comptroller, and G. H. Emerson, general manager, had as its board of directors Ralph Budd, J. M. Gruber, L. E. Katzenbach, E. C. Lindley, and Lewis Penwell, had total capital stock of $750,000, had 1.69 miles of track in Minnesota, had two locomotives, had one freight car, and had 38 total employees. In 1917, the railroad had P. L. Clarity as its superintendent, operated seven miles of rail trackage, owned two locomotives, owned one rail car, and had its general offices in Minneapolis. The railroad operated until 1928 and was succeeded by the Great Northern RailRoad. [See note on Robert I. Farrington for 457-459 Portland Avenue.] [See note for Curtis H. Pettit for 2400 Third Avenue South.] [See note for Charles Alfred Pillsbury for 116 East 22nd Street South.] [See note on Edward Sawyer for 461 Holly Avenue.] [See note on Louis Warren Hill for 260 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Jacob Koontz Sidle for 331 Maple Street.] [For more information on Frank Earl Ward, see 1522 Portland Avenue.] [See note on Ralph Budd for 475 Portland Avenue.] [See note on James Jerome Hill for 240 Summit Avenue.]

Information from Interstate Commerce Commission records researched by Richard S. Steele, LaBelle Woodworking, Cheyenne, Wyoming, was used in this website.

With questions about this website, contact Larry Martin at l_a_martin@lycos.com.

Minnesota RailRoads Part I

Minnesota RailRoads, Part III

Minnesota RailRoads Part IV

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This page was last updated on November 19, 2013.