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RailRoads in Minnesota, Part I

RailRoads in Minnesota, Part I

Assembled by

Lawrence A. Martin

Webpage creation: April 28, 2010

In General.

This webpage, Minnesota RailRoads, Part 1.5 and Minnesota RailRoads, Part 2 present available information on railroads that were established in Minnesota, incorporated in Minnesota, had a portion of their trackage run through Minnesota, or were intended to operate in whole or in part in Minnesota.

Minnesota has had railroads since 1860. The total rail trackage mileage in Minnesota was 0 miles in 1860, 1,092 miles in 1870, 3,151 miles in 1880, 5,470.51 miles in 1889, 5,545.35 miles in 1890, 5,666.38 miles in 1891, 5,874.08 miles in 1892, and 5,944.58 miles in 1893. By contrast, Wisconsin had 905 miles of rail trackage and Iowa had 655 miles of rail trackage in 1860, Wisconsin had 1,525 miles of rail trackage and Iowa had 2,683 miles of rail trackage in 1870, Wisconsin had 3,155 miles of rail trackage and Iowa had 5,400 miles of rail trackage in 1880, Wisconsin had 5,477.05 miles of rail trackage and Iowa had 8,440.24 miles of rail trackage in 1889, Wisconsin had 5,612.22 miles of rail trackage and Iowa had 8,416.13 miles of rail trackage in 1890, Wisconsin had 5,764.66 miles of rail trackage and Iowa had 8,436.51 miles of rail trackage in 1891, Wisconsin had 5,924.91 miles of rail trackage and Iowa had 8,506.00 miles of rail trackage in 1892, and, Wisconsin had 5,970.07 miles of rail trackage and Iowa had 8,513.44 miles of rail trackage in 1893.

Information on Specific RailRoads

Ada, Duluth & Northern Dakota RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1885 and was incorporated in 1885 by Asabel H. Baker, James V. Campbell, D. H. Fisk, Peter Hevbrandson, Knud Larson, John M. Martin, O. H. Myron, Fred Puhler, and E. T. Salverson to build one or more railways from Ada, Norman County, Minnesota, Easterly by the most feasible route to Duluth, Minnesota, and Westerly by the nearest feasible route to Caledonia, Dakota Territory. It had initial capital stock of $5,000,000 and its principal place of business was Ada, Minnesota.

Adams Mine Narrow Gauge RailRoad: The Adams Mine, named for Cuyler Adams, the surveyor who discovered the Cuyuna Iron Range, was in Deerwood Township, Minnesota, near Eveleth, St. Louis County, Minnesota, was put into operation before 1894, and used partial open pit and partial shaft mining techniques around 1902. The mine was owned by the Minnesota Iron Company in 1904. The railroad in 1904 consisted of five 20 ton locomotives and numerous dump cars. The mine railroad was deemed in Kline v. Minnesota Iron Company, 100 NW 681 (1904,) to be a "railroad" with the imposition of liability for an employee's injury resulting from the actions of another employee under the then railroad company fellow servant liability statute, notwithstanding that it was an incomplete railroad and that it was not in public traffic only. Four men were killed in mine injuries at the Adams Mine in 1906, including one in a railroad injury. In the Adams open-pit mine near Biwabik, Minnesota, 30 men died between 1905 and 1920. The Minnesota Iron Company owned 95.7 miles of track, 26,800 acres of property, 13 locomotives, 340 cars, the loading docks at Two Harbors, Minnesota, and five pit mines.

Airlake Terminal Railway: The Airlake Terminal Railway, affiliated with Progressive Rail, is a short line railroad operating approximately 2.35 miles of track in a large industrial park in Lakeville, Minnesota. The Airlake Terminal RailRoad owns ten three-bay covered hoppers now in salt service and eight four-bay covered hoppers currently in the recycled battery case hauling service.

Aitkin, Mille Lacs & Minneapolis RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in 1884 by Thomas R. Foley, D. J. Knox, George W. Knox, Freeman E. Krech, C. W. McDonald, James J. McDonald, Moses McKinney, and W. W. Parker to build, control, maintain, and operate a railway from Aitkin, Minnesota, by way of the North or East shore of Lake Mille Lacs, Minnesota, to Minneapolis. The railroad was organized in 1885. It had initial capital stock of $1,000,000 and its principal place of business was Aitkin, Minnesota.

Albert Lea & Geneva RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1900 by G. L. Carrington, H. H. Dunn, T. V. Knatvold, C. A. Ransom, R. G. Ransom, S. Svendson, and A. C. Wedge to build and operate a railroad. The railroad had $100,000 in capital stock in 1900.

Albert Lea & Southern RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in Minnesota in 1899 and operated from 1900 until 1902. The railroad was owned by the Illinois Central RailRoad in 1900 and operated an 18.39 rail line from Lyle, Minnesota, to Glenville, Minnesota, by way of London Township, Minnesota, in 1901. The railroad used the rail line of the Burlington, Cedar Rapids & Northern between Glenville, Minnesota, and Albert Lea, Minnesota. The railroad was consolidated into the Dubuque & Sioux City RailRoad in 1902, and was succeeded by the Dubuque & Sioux City RailRoad in 1903.

Albert Lea & State Line RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in 1871 and was organized in 1872. Cadwallader Washburn and William Drew Washburn were early investors in the railroad. The railroad existed only on paper and never was built. [See note for Cadwallader Colden Washburn, the Washburn Crosby Company, and General Mills for 2201 First Avenue South.] [See note for William Drew Washburn for 2119 Third Avenue South.]

Alger-Smith Lumber Company RailRoad The company railroad owned one Shay geared steam locomotive. It was located at Knife River, Minnesota, and logged into the Gunflint Lake, Rose Lake, Bearskin Lake, and Daniels Lake area. The Alger, Smith Lumber Company, a Michigan-based firm, was the successor of the W. H. Knox Lumber Company of Duluth, Minnesota. The Duluth & Northern Minnesota RailRoad was affiliated with the Alger Smith Lumber Company, hauling logs for the company at Knife River, Minnesota. The Manistique Railway, a Michigan logging railroad, also was owned by the Alger-Smith Lumber Company. John Millen was the manager of the Alger Smith Lumber Company in Duluth, Minnesota in 1912. The Alger Smith Lumber Company started logging in NorthEast Minnesota in 1898 and discontinued logging in NorthEast Minnesota in 1919. Portions of the Alger-Smith Lumber Company RailRoad were acquired by the General Logging Company, a Weyerhaeuser firm.

American Traction Company: The McGraw electric railway manual: the red book of American street railway, published in 1914, indicates that the railroad operated 6.75 miles of rail trackage connecting International Falls, Minnesota, Ranier, Minnesota, and South International Falls, Minnesota, with St. Francis, Ontario, Canada, owned two gasoline rail cars, one Edison storage battery car, and nine other rail cars, with electrification planned, had as its officers A. L. Sortor, president, Charles M. Andrist, vice president, L. L. Enger, vice president, L. H. Nord, treasurer and secretary, George R. Wiar, auditor, and R. B. Kook, general manager, and had its general office in Minneapolis.

Anoka Street RailRoad/Mahany & Company: The street railway was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1888. The railway company had $25,000 in capital stock and had its principal place of business in Anoka, Minnesota. In 1889, the railroad operated three miles of rail trackage, owned ten horses, owned three horse cars, and had as its officers C. J. Clough, president, Fred S. Wardwed, secretary, L. R. Gorman, treasurer, and Jeff. Hildreth, general manager. In 1890, the railroad operated 18 miles of rail trackage, owned three horse-drawn rail cars, and owned 18 horses. In 1893, the railroad had capital stock of $15,000, had three miles of track, operated with three horse-drawn rail cars, and had as its officers R. Mahany, president, J. Mahany, secretary, R. Mahany, Jr., treasurer, and W. W. Mahany, general manager. In 1894, the railroad had 3.5 miles of track, the railroad had three cars, the railroad had capital stock of $20,000, and the railroad's general manager was W. W. Mahany. According to Poor's Manual of the RailRoads of the United States, Volume 33 by Henry Varnum Poor in 1901, as of 1899, the railroad operated three miles of rail trackage, owned three rail cars and six horses, was leased by the City of Anoka, Minnesota, for a five year period, and had its general office in Anoka, Minnesota.

Austin, Geneva, Mankato & St. Cloud RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in 1886 by E. M. Atwood, Henry H. Corson, Charles H. Davidson, H. M. Davis, H. A. Finch, Michael Murphy, William E. Richardson, and D. B. Smith to build a railway from the Southern boundary of the State to St. Cloud by way of Austin, Minnesota, Geneva, Minnesota, New Richland, Minnesota, and Mankato, Minnesota. It had initial capital stock of $500,000 and its principal place of business was Austin, Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1887.

Austin & Mankato RailRoad was incorporated in 1880 by J. H. Baker, N. P. Clark, H. Cummins, H. Foster, C. A. Gilman, W. H. Officer, H. W. Page, E. O. Wheeler, John A. Willard, and John C. Wise to survey, locate, and build a railway from the Southern boundary of the State in Mower County, Minnesota, by way of Austin, Clay County, Minnesota, to Mankato, Blue Earth County, Minnesota. The railroad and organized in 1880. It had initial capital stock of $2,000,000 and its principal place of business was Mankato, Minnesota. E. O. Wheeler was an Austin, Minnesota, lawyer and real estate dealer who was born in Wayne County, New York, was the brother of Rush Wheeler, came to Minnesota in 1856, and was a Minnesota notary public from 1868 until 1870.

Austin & Mason City RailRoad: The railroad was formerly the Mason City & Minnesota Railway Company. It was built in 1871 and its rail line extended from Mason City, Iowa, Northeast, to Austin, Minnesota. It became a branch of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway.

Austin & Northwood RailRoad: The railroad was authorized by the Minnesota Legislature shortly after statehood in 1857. The railroad was incorporated in 1869 by L. Alderson, J. F. Atherton, H. W. Page, and others to construct and operate a rail line from Austin, Minnesota, Southwesterly to the Minnesota-Iowa border, had $300,000 in capital stock, and was organized in 1871.

Austin RailRoad/Austin Railway Company: The railroad was organized in 1881. The railroad was incorporated in 1881 by H. B. Ball, F. I. Crane, E. C. Dorr, R. O. Hall, W. H. Hollister, Ira Jones, C. A. Pooler, W. Shaw, Z. H. Sherwin, G. Schlender, and W. T. Wilkins to survey, locate and construct a single or double track railway from a point along the line of the Southern Minnesota Division of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad East of Ramsey, Mower County, Minnesota, Easterly to the Iowa & Minnesota Division of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad North of Austin, Mower County, Minnesota. The railroad had $50,000 in corporate stock. The principal place of business of the railroad was Austin, Minnesota.

Barnesville & Moorhead RailRoad was incorporated in 1880 by R. B. Angus, R. B. Galusha, James J. Hill, E. Sawyer, and A. B. Stickney to build, equip, and operate a railway from a point along the branch line of the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba RailRoad at or near Barnesville, Clay County, Minnesota, to Moorhead, Clay County, Minnesota. It had initial capital stock of $200,000 and its principal place of business was St. Paul. The railroad operated only in 1880 and was succeeded by the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba RailRoad. R. B. Angus (1831-1922) was born at Bathgate, West Lothian, Scotland, was educated at Bathgate Academy, was employed by the Manchester & Liverpool Bank, was hired by the Bank of Montreal in 1857, emigrated to North America and represented the bank in its offices in Chicago and New York City until 1864, relocated to Montreal, Quebec, in 1864, was the Bank of Montreal's general manager from 1869 until 1879, relocated to St. Paul to represent the interests of a group of railway entrepreneurs that had acquired the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba Railway, and rejoined the Bank of Montreal as president from 1910 until 1913. [See note on Reuben Barney Galusha for 885 Goodrich Avenue.] [See note on James Jerome Hill for 240 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Edward Sawyer for 461 Holly Avenue.] [See note on Alpheus Beede Stickney for 846 Lincoln Avenue.]

Bass Brook RailRoad: The railroad operated from 1889 until 1892. The logging railroad was incorporated as the Itasca RailRoad. The development of the Bass Brook Railroad in 1890 allowed for logging and some development in the Grand Rapids, Minnesota, area. Records indicate that the Itasca RailRoad had only one locomotive. The Itasca RailRoad was later renamed the Minneapolis & Rainy River RailRoad.

Bayfield, Lake Shore & Western RailRoad: The officers of the railroad in 1904 were T. J. Stevenson, president, and H. C. Hale, secretary. The first 15 miles of the proposed 70 mile rail line between Bayfield, Wisconsin, and either Duluth, Minnesota, or Superior, Wisconsin, to Cornucopia, Wisconsin, and Port Wing, Wisconsin, were surveyed and graded in 1904. Robert R. Dunn was a principal investor in the railroad.

Bayfield, Superior & Minneapolis RailRoad: The railroad was intended to operate a 300 mile rail line from Bayfield, Wisconsin, to Minneapolis. In 1900, trackage previously owned by the Bayfield Western RailRoad, promoted by former U.S. Senator D. M. Sabin of Stillwater, Minnesota, were deeded to the railroad. In 1901, the railroad owned six miles of rail trackage,owned one locomotive, owned 62 rail cars, was completing a 25 mile rail trackage extension, and had as its general manager was John L. Lamb. In 1901, John A. Rice of Merton, Wisconsin, was also associated with the railroad. In 1904, the Bayfield, Lake Shore & Western RailRoad revised its route in order to connect with the existing trackage of the Bayfield, Superior & Minneapolis RailRoad. The railroad was owned by the H. J. Wachsmuth Lumber Company of Bayfield, Wisconsin, and operated from 1900 until 1916.

Benton Power & Traction Company: The St. Cloud, Minnesota, electric railroad was incorporated in 1897 under Minnesota law by C. M. Hertig, Wendell Hertig, J. F. McGee, Charles Moffet, and J. B. Moffett,had capital stock of $50,000, had its general office in Sauk Rapids, Minnesota, and was the successor, by foreclosure purchase in 1898, to the St. Cloud City Street Car Company. According to Poor's Manual of the RailRoads of the United States, Volume 33 by Henry Varnum Poor in 1901, as of 1899, the railroad operated 7.75 miles of rail trackage, owned eight motor cars, had $50,000 in capital stock, had as its officers Charles M. Hertig, president, Wendell Hertig, secretary, and E. E. Clark, treasurer and superintendent, had as its board of directors E. E. Clark, Charles M. Hertig, Wendell Hertig, Charles T. Moffett, and J. B. Moffett, and had its general office at St. Cloud, Minnesota. Charles M. Hertig was the president of the Merchants’ National Bank of St. Cloud. In 1899, the company requested permission from the St. Cloud city council to compete with the St. Cloud Water, Light & Power Company in producing electricity for the city. In 1901, the St. Cloud Railway, the St. Cloud Street Car Company, and the Sauk Rapids Electric RailRoad all consolidated into the Benton Power & Traction Company. In 1900, the company was placed in the hands of a receiver, E. E. Clark, and Clark and company president Hertig were successfully sued by an electrical machinery manufacturer for fraudulent representations in a sale of an electrical compensator in American Electric Company v. Clark, 86 N.W. 342 (1901.) In 1901, A. Wilford Zahm, the former secretary and general manager of the Manhattan Light, Heat & Power Company, became the general manager of the Light, Heat, Transit & Power Company of St. Cloud, a consolidation of the Benton Power & Traction Company and the Hertig Light & Heat Company that operated the St. Cloud & Sauk Rapids Street Railway Company, an underground steam heating company, and the electric lighting plant for St. Cloud, Minnesota, and Sauk Rapid, Minnesota. In 1902, C. M. Hertig was a bidder for the lease of the street railway system of Chicago, Illinois. Previously, in 1881, in the Dakota Territory, C. M. Hertig was involved in the establishment of two railroads, the Milbank, Kibby and Tower City RailRoad and the Valley City & Turtle Mountain RailRoad. The Poor's Directory of RailRoad Officials, published by the Poor's RailRoad Manual Company in 1905, indicates that the officers of the railroad were C. M. Hertig, president, E. E. Clark, treasurer and superintendent, and F. B. Daten, electrician. In 1906, the railroad had capital stock of $50,000, had 7.33 miles of rail line, had eight motor cars, had as its officers C. M. Hertig, president, E. E. Clark, treasurer and superintendent, and F. B. Daten, electrician, and had its general office in St. Cloud, Minnesota. In 1906, the railroad also operated the St, Cloud & Sauk Rapids Electric RailRoad.

Big Fork & International Falls RailRoad was the successor of the Big Fork & Northern RailRoad, incorporated in 1892, was formed in 1906, was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1906, reportedly was Minnesota's only narrow gauge railroad, and ultimately was under a common management and ownership with the Minnesota & International RailRoad. The Brainerd & Northern Minnesota Railway Company became the Minnesota & International RailRoad in 1901 when the railroad began plans to reach International Falls, Minnesota. The railroad constructed a 34.01 mile rail line from Grand Falls, Minnesota, to International Falls, Minnesota, from 1906 until 1907. In 1907, the railroad had 35 miles of standard-gauge rail trackage under construction with Dempsey & Dougherty of Minneapolis as its contractor, had E. W. Backus as its president, and had George M. Huss as its chief engineer. In 1913, the railroad had as its officers J. M. Hannaford, president, C. W. Bunn, vice president, R. H. Relf, secretary, C. A. Clark, treasurer, H. A. Gray, auditor, and W. H. Gemmell, general manager, had as its board of directors C. W. Bunn, W. H. Gemmell, and J. M. Hannaford, had total capital stock of $10,000, had 34.17 miles of track in Minnesota, had one locomotive, had two passenger cars, had no freight cars, and had 224 total employees. In 1917, the railroad operated 33.64 miles of rail trackage, including a 31.611 mile rail ine from Northome, Minnesota, to Great Falls, Minnesota,that was built in 1905, owned one locomotive, owned one baggage car, and owned one passenger car, and had its general offices in Brainerd, Minnesota. By 1923, the Northern Pacific RailRoad obtained 70 percent ownership of the railroad, but the railroad continued to operate independently with their own locomotives, rolling stock, stations, maintenance facilities and records. In 1930, the officers of the railroad were W. H. Gemmell, president and general manager, C. W. Bunn, vice president, R. H. Relf, secretary, P. B. Lacy, treasurer, and F. E. Stout, auditor. After having been functioning after 1914 as an agent for the Northern Pacific RailRoad, the railroad merged into the Northern Pacific RailRoad in 1942. [See the note for Charles Wilson Bunn for 549 Portland Avenue.] [See note on Jule M. Hannaford for 405 Portland Avenue.] [See note on Richard Howard Relf for 600 Portland Avenue.]

Big Fork & Northern RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated by R. W. Clark, Thomas Cooper, W. H. Gemmell, Edwin Irle, and J. L. Pryor. The railroad was intended to extend the Minnesota & International RailRoad from Northome, Minnesota, to Grand Falls, Minnesota, operated in 1905, initially ran north from Northome, Minnesota, reached Gemmell, Minnesota, 146 miles north of Brainerd, Minnesota, was leased by the Minnesota & International RailRoad, then was succeeded by the Minnesota & International RailRoad, and then was succeeded by the Northern Pacific RailRoad in 1914. In 1905, E. J. Pearson, a civil engineer, was associated with the railroad. In 1916, the officers of the railroad were J. M. Hannaford, president, C. W. Bunn, vice president, C. A. Clark, treasurer, R. H. Relf, secretary, M. W. Downie, auditor, W. H. Gemmell, general manager, and H. A. Gray, comptroller, and the members of the board of directors were J. M. Hannaford, C. W. Bunn, and W. H. Gemmell. The head office of the railroad was located in St. Paul. Gemmell, Minnesota, had many cedar lumber mills. Gemmell, Minnesota, was first known as Stoner, Minnesota, and the name was later changed to Gemmell, Minnesota, in honor of W. H. Gemmell, the first roadmaster of the Minnesota & International RailRoad. [See the note for Charles Wilson Bunn for 549 Portland Avenue.] [See note on Jule M. Hannaford for 405 Portland Avenue.]

Biwabik Mine Narrow Gauge RailRoad: In 1892, the Duluth & Iron Range RailRoad built a spur to the Biwabik Mine to haul out iron ore mined at that site. In 1893, on a forty acre parcel, the Biwabik Mine had sunk over 40 shafts into the iron ore body and the estimate for the total ore load at the mine was 26,000,000 tons. In 1894, the Biwabik ore body was estimated at being one half mile long, one quarter mile long, and 100 feet in depth. In 1901, the Biwabik Mining Company purchased the old Cincinnati shaft mine, adjoining its open pit mine, and intended to use the shaft mine for pumping. In 1911, the Biwabik Mining Company owned the largest gyratory ore breaker in the world. The mine railroad was in operation before 1895. The "Biwabik" name is derived from the Ojibwe word for iron. The Biwabik Mining Company, a subsidiary of the Youngstown Sheet & Tube Company, mined iron ore on the Mesabi range in Minnesota.

Blue Earth Valley Railway Company: The railroad was incorporated in 1877 by Alex. Anderson, F. C. Brown, S. P. Child, Frank Cole, H. P. Constans, G. S. Converse, C. H. Dearborn, W. Dustein, E. D. Evans, S. W. Graham, A. Hasse, N. L. Heffron, Rail B. Johnson, Otto Kaupp, J. A. Keister, George B. Kingsley, G. D. Moore, Sabastine Pfeffer, Samuel Schulen, W. M. Scott, C. H. Slocum, Charles Sly, J. H. Sprout, Samuel Teskey, R. L. Tremain, J. B. Wakefield, G. D. Winck, and R. B. Woolery to build and operate a railway line from Blue Earth City, Minnesota, to Mankato, Minnesota, or to a point on an established railway line connecting with Mankato, Minnesota, and also Southwardly or Southeastwardly to the Iowa state line, was organized in 1877, was headquartered in Blue Earth City, Minnesota, and had capital stock of $500,000.

Blue Limestone Company RailRoad: In 1910, the Blue Limestone Company had a quarry in NorthEast Minneapolis, near 15th Avenue NE between Johnson Street and Central Street and had a stone crusher on site. The company used railroad dump cars pulled by Northern Pacific RailRoad engines to haul the crushed rock in 1910. It also transported the crushed limestone by truck in 1913. The Blue Limestone Quarry tracks were removed between 1917 and 1920.

Brainerd Electric RailRoad: In 1894, the railroad had 3.5 miles of track, the railroad had four Westinghouse rail cars, the railroad had $50,000 in capital stock, and its superintendent was C. N. Parker.

Brainerd Electric Street Railway: The railroad was built in 1893 to replace the Brainerd Street Railway and was intended to transport Northern Mill Company workers and Brainerd & Northern Minnesota RailRoad passengers the three mile distance between the southern terminus of the Brainerd & Northern Minnesota RailRoad/mill site in East Brainerd, Minnesota, and the Brainerd, Minnesota, depot of the Northern Pacific RailRoad. The railroad ran trolleys. The railroad had financial difficulties in 1897 and went out of business in 1898 after its officers declined to rebuild a wind-damaged.

Brainerd & Northern Minnesota RailRoad: The Brainerd & Northern Minnesota Railway was formed in 1892, was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1892, had as its officers E. P. Welles, president and general manager, J. E. Carpenter, vice president, W. F. Brooks, secretary, and E. L. Carpenter, treasurer, succeeded the Gull Lake & Northern RailRoad, and was built to haul timber from Leech Lake, Minnesota, to Brainerd, Minnesota. The railroad serviced the Brainard Lumber Company from 1894 until 1900, operated 82 miles of main rail line, operated 50 miles of branch rail line, owned 12 rod locomotives, and owned 500 logging rail cars. The railroad had two divisions, the 91.37 mile Southern Division rail line, extending from Brainerd, Minnesota, to Lake Hubert, Minnesota, and thence to Gilpatrick Lake, Minnesota, and the Northern Division, consisting of the existing 31.03 mile narrow gauge tracks of the former Gull Lake & Northern Railway from Gilpatrick Lake, Minnesota, to Spyder Lake, Minnesota. In 1892, the railroad completed a 42 mile rail line from Brainerd, Minnesota, to Gardner, Minnesota, and built a 673 foot trestle across the Gull Lake, Minnesota, narrows. In 1893, the railroad had capital stock of $500,000, had as its officers J. S. Pillsbury, president, G. A. Pillsbury, vice president, Ray W. Jones, second vice president and general manager, W. B. Ransom, treasurer, and J. E. Glass, secretary, and had as its board of directors A. E. Bardwell, R. W. Jones, J. A. Kellogg, J. E. Gloss, G. A. Pillsbury, J. S. Pillsbury, and W. B. Ransom. In 1893, the railroad decided to abandon the line to Spider Lake, Minnesota, and to build North from Lake Hubert, Minnesota, and, in 1894, the track from Lake Hubert, Minnesota, to Spider Lake, Minnesota, was removed. The railroad received a federal land grant in 1895. In 1896, the railroad operated 60 miles of main line and also had 40 miles of spurs, owned ten locomotives, and owned 500 logging cars. In 1898, an extension of 31.8 miles from Walker, Minnesota, to Bemidji, Minnesota, was built. In 1899, the Brainerd & Northern Minnesota RailRoad hauled 347,864 tons of freight and carried 25,546 passengers. According to Poor's Manual of the RailRoads of the United States, Volume 33 by Henry Varnum Poor in 1901, as of 1899, the railroad operated 90.92 miles of rail trackage from Walker, Minnesota, to Brainerd, Minnesota, owned 12 locomotives, three passenger cars, one box car, 193 flat freight cars, and 238 logging cars, had as its officers E. A. Merrill, president, J. E. Carpenter, vice president, E. L. Carpenter, treasurer, and W. F. Brooks, secretary, had as its board of directors E. W. Backus, J. E. Carpenter, E. L. Carpenter, A. E. How, C. A. Pillsbury, C. F. Welles, and E. P. Welles, and had its general office in Minneapolis. In 1900, Halverson & Company was contracted with by the railroad to build a 91 mile extension of the rail line from Bemidji, Minnesota, to Big Fork, Minnesota. In 1900, the railroad owned 12 locomotives, 298 logging cars, 193 flat cars, one box car, and three passenger cars. The railroad operated from 1892 until 1901 and was succeeded by the Minnesota & International RailRoad. [See note for William F. Brooks for 2201 East Lake of Isles Boulevard]. [See note on Eugene Adelbert Merrill for 2116 Second Avenue South.] [See note for Edward Wellington Backus, the Keewatin Lumber Company, the Great Lakes Paper Company, the Backus-Brooks Company, and the International Lumber Company for 2201 East Lake of Isles Boulevard]. [See note for Charles Alfred Pillsbury for 116 East 22nd Street South.]

Brainerd Shop RailRoad: The Brainerd, Minnesota, railroad shop was built before 1871 and serviced locomotives for the whole Northern Pacific RailRoad line around 1920. The Brainerd shop currently is a maintenance-of-way equipment shop responsible for performing repairs and preventative maintenance to track and equipment. In 1952, the Brainerd, Minnesota, shops constructed on site 1,000 box cars, 200 70 ton ore cars, and 50 steel cabooses.

Brainerd, St. Paul & Grand Forks RailRoad & Telegraph Company: The railroad was organized in 1881. The railroad was incorporated in 1881 by C. A. De Graff, B. B. Eaton, B. F. Hartley, C. F. Kindred, Newton McFadden, C. B. Sleeper, and F. B. Thompson to survey, locate, construct, maintain and operate a railway and a telegraph line from St. Paul northwesterly by way of St. Francis, Anoka County, Minnesota, Princeton, Mille Lacs County, Minnesota, Brainerd, Crow Wing County, Minnesota, and Crookston, Polk County, Minnesota, to Grand Forks, Dakota Territory, with branch lines from Princeton, Minnesota, northeasterly to Pine City, Pine County, Minnesota, from Princeton, Minnesota, southwesterly by way of Litchfield, Minnesota, Red Wood Falls, Minnesota, and Luverne, Minnesota, to the Southern boundary of Minnesota, and from Princeton, Minnesota, easterly to Taylor's Falls, Minnesota. The railroad had $5,000,000 in corporate stock. The principal place of business of the railroad was Brainerd, Minnesota.

Brainerd Street Railway/Brainerd Street Railway Company: Charles F. Kindred started the first Brainerd Street Railway Company in 1885 and the railroad was incorporated in 1886. The railroad operated a 1.5 mile horse drawn rail line in Brainerd, Minnesota, from 1885 or 1887 until 1893. The general office of the railroad was in Brainerd, Minnesota. The railroad was replaced by the Brainerd Electric Railway. The railroad ran from the intersection of Main Street and Sixth Street, then Eastward on Kingwood Street, then over to Kindred Street ('A' Street) and to a turntable in the middle of the intersection of Ash Avenue ('H' Street) and Third Avenue. The horse barn was on the corner of Ash Avenue and Third Avenue. In 1893, C. N. Parker was the president of the Brainerd Street Railway Company.

Brainerd Traction, Light & Power Company: In 1896, when the municipal electic light plant in Brainerd, Minnesota, failed, it was sold to the Brainerd Traction, Light & Power Company. The Brainerd Traction, Light & Power Company was incorporated in Illinois by E. C. Gibson, P. A. Gibson, C. N. Parker, Fred S. Parker, and W. S. McClenahan. The officers of the corporation were C. N. Parker, president, E. C. Gibson, vice president, P. A. Gibson, secretary and treasurer, Fred S. Parker, manager, and H. D. Freglawny, assistant secretary and treasurer. The company operates the electric light plant and the water power plant and supplies power to the Brainerd Electric Railway Company and the Brainerd telephone company. The Brainerd Electric Railway Company was consolidated into the traction company.

Browerville, Caledonia & State Line RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated under a territorial charter.

Browerville & Moorhead RailRoad: The railroad was organized under a territorial charter.

Buffalo Ridge RailRoad: The railroad operated from 1989 until 1992 and was succeeded by the Nobles & Rock RailRoad. In 1988, Larry Wood of the Minnesota Valley Transportation, Inc., bought a former Chicago & North Western Railway line from between Agate Junction, just west of Worthington, Minnesota, to Sioux Falls, South Dakota, and named it the Buffalo Ridge RailRoad. The Buffalo Ridge RailRoad operated until 1992, was closed until 1993, and was succeeded by the Nobles & Rock RailRoad.

Burlington, Cedar Rapids & Minnesota RailRoad: The railroad was intended to run from Burlington, Iowa, by way of Wapello, Iowa, West Branch, Iowa, Cedar Rapids, Iowa, Vinton, Iowa, and Waterloo, Iowa, to St. Paul. The railroad was organized in 1868 and was a consolidation under Iowa law in 1868 of the Cedar Rapids & St. Paul RailRoad and the Cedar Rapids & Burlington RailRoad. In 1873, the railroad operated 368 miles of rail line that went from Burlington, Iowa, by way of Latty, Iowa, Sperry, Iowa, Mediapolis, Iowa, Linton (Garland,) Iowa, Morning Sun, Iowa, Wapello, Iowa, and Bard, Iowa, to Columbus Junction, Iowa, 41 miles, by 1870, went from Columbus Junction, Iowa, by way of Port Allen, Iowa, Cone Station (Conesville,) Iowa, Nichols, Iowa, West Liberty, Iowa, Centerdale, Iowa, West Branch, Iowa, Oasis, Iowa, Ives (Elmira,) Iowa, Morse, Iowa, Solon, Iowa, Ely, Iowa, and Putlege, Iowa, to Cedar Rapids, Iowa, 57 miles, and from from Vinton, Iowa, by way of Mount Auburn, Iowa, La Porte City, Iowa, and Washburn, Iowa, to Waterloo, Iowa, 29 miles, by 1871, went from Waterloo, Iowa, by way of Cedar Falls, Iowa, Norris, Iowa, Winslow, Iowa, Waverly Junction, Iowa, Shell Rock, Iowa, Clarksville, Iowa, Roots Siding (Packard,) Iowa, Greene, Iowa, Marble Rock, Iowa, Rockford, Iowa, Nora Junction (Nora Springs,) Iowa, and Rock Falls, Iowa, to Plymouth Junction, Iowa, 69 miles, from Nichols, Iowa, by way of Lone Tree, Iowa, River Junction, Iowa, and Iowa Junction, Iowa, to Riverside, Iowa, 15 miles, from Nichols, Iowa, by way of Adams Iowa, and Bayfield Iowa, to Muscatine, Iowa, 16 miles, from Vinton, Iowa, by way of Garrison, Iowa, to Dysart, Iowa, 16 miles, and from Dysart, Iowa, to Traer, Iowa, by 1872, and went from Linn Junction, Iowa, by way of Toddville, Iowa, Center Point, Iowa, Walker, Iowa, Rowley, Iowa, Independence, Iowa, Passing Track, Iowa, Bryantburg (Bryantsburg,) Iowa, Hazelton, Iowa, Oelwein, Iowa, Maynard, Iowa, Randalia, Iowa, Donnan, Iowa, West Union, Iowa, Brainard, Iowa, Elgin, Iowa, Clermont, Iowa, and Junction, Iowa, to Postville, Iowa, 94 miles, by 1873. The railroad purchased the Muscatine & Western Railroad Company in 1872. The railroad stopped construction in 1873, defaulted on its bonds in 1873, went into a receivership in 1875, and operated until 1876, when its property was sold to the bond holders of the railroad, who then organized the Burlington, Cedar Rapids & Northern RailRoad. In 1868, the officers of the railroad were Judge George Greene (1817-1880,) president, and D. W. C. Rowley, secretary. In 1869, J. H. Potter was the superintendent of the First Division of the railroad, William Greene was the superintendent of the Second Division of the railroad, and the Iowa & Minnesota Construction Company was the contractor constructing the rail line. In 1872, the railroad completed the connection between Burlington, Iowa, and St. Paul. The railroad was succeeded by the Burlington, Cedar Rapids & Northern of Iowa Railway in 1876.

Burlington, Cedar Rapids & Northern RailRoad/Burlington, Cedar Rapids & Northern of Iowa Railway: The railroad was incorporated under an 1873 Iowa law in 1876, as the successor to the Burlington, Cedar Rapids & Minnesota RailRoad, which was an 1868 consolidation of the Cedar Rapids & St. Paul RailRoad and the Cedar Rapids & Burlington RailRoad. The railroad built 138 miles of rail line after 1876. The railroad built from Northwood, Iowa, by way of Gordonsville, Iowa, and Glenville, Minnesota, to Albert Lea, Minnesota, 17 miles, by 1877, leased the Iowa City & Western Railway Company in 1879, purchased the Chicago, Clinton & Western RailRoad Company in 1879, leased the Cedar Rapids, Iowa Falls & Northwestern Railway in 1880, sold the Chicago, Clinton & Western RailRoad Company to the Cedar Rapids & Clinton Railway Company in 1883, was controlled by the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railway Company through a majority stock purchase in 1885, leased the Chicago, Decorah & Minnesota Railway Company in 1889, leased the Cedar Rapids & Clinton Railway Company in 1889, purchased the Davenport, Iowa & Dakota RailRoad Company in 1892, purchased the Cedar Rapids, Garner & Northwestern Railway Company in 1900, built from Germania/Lakota, Iowa, by way of Stevens, Iowa, and Rake, Iowa, and Bricelyn, Minnesota, Walters, Minnesota, and Conger, Minnesota, to Albert Lea, Minnesota, 45 miles, by 1900, built from Albert Lea, Minnesota, by way of Clarks Grove, Minnesota, Ellendale, Minnesota, Owatonna, Minnesota, Medford, Minnesota, and Faribault, Minnesota, to Comus Junction, Minnesota, 53 miles, in 1901, built from West St. Paul, Minnesota, to South St. Paul, Minnesota, eight miles, in 1901, and purchased the Cedar Rapids, Iowa Falls & Northwestern Railway Company, the Iowa City & Western Railway Company, the Chicago, Decorah & Minnesota Railway Company, the Cedar Rapids & Clinton Railway Company, and the Waverly Short Line Railroad Company in 1902. The railroad operated from 1878 until 1903, was purchased by the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railway Company in 1903, and was succeeded by the Cedar Rapids, Iowa Falls & Nothwestern RailRoad. In 1878, the officers of the railroad were John I. Blair, president, General E. F. Winslow, vice president and manager, C. J. Ives, superintendent, W. D. Walker, secretary, and J. C. Broeksmit, auditor. In 1882, the officers of the railroad were Judge J. Tracy, president and corporate counsel, S. S. Dorwart, secretary, S. K. Tracy, solicitor, H. H. Hollister, treasurer, J. C. Brocksmit, auditor, and C. J. Ives, general superintendent, and the members of the board of directors were E. S. Bailey, Charles Bard, J. I. Blair, J. W. Blythe, J. Carscadden, C. D. Close, Lyman Cook, J. N. Dewey, P. H. Griggs, C. Lynde, J. C. Peasley, C. P. Squire, and Judge J. Tracy. In 1885, the officers of the railroad were C. J. Ives, president and general superintendent, Robert Williams, vice president, S. S. Dorwart, secretary, H. H. Hollister, treasurer, and J. C. Brocksmit, auditor, and the members of the board of directors were E. S. Bailey, J. W. Blythe, R. R. Cable, J. Carscadden, C. D. Close, Lyman Cook, J. N. Dewey, F. H. Gregg, C. J. Ives, C. Lynde, J. C. Peasley, T. J. Potter, and C. P. Squires. In 1885, the railroad had issued capital stock of $6,705,000, operated 990.66 miles of rail trackage (81.41 miles in Minnesota,) owned 96 locomotives, owned 56 passenger cars, owned 3948 freight cars, and owned 227 company cars, and had 2,199 total employees (165 Minnesota employees.) In 1887, the railroad leased four other railroads, the Cedar Rapids, Iowa Falls & Northwestern Railway Company, the Chicago, Decorah & Minnesota Railway Company, the Cedar Rapids & Clinton Railway Company, and the Iowa City & Western Railway Company. In 1887, the officers of the railroad were C. J. Ives, president and general superintendent, Robert Williams, vice president, S. S. Dorwart, secretary, and H. H. Hollister, treasurer, and J. C. Brocksmit, auditor, the general office of the railroad was in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, and the fiscal office was in New York, New York. In 1888, the officers of the railroad were C. J. Ives, president, R. Williams, vice president, H. H. Hollister, treasurer, S. S. Dorwart, secretary and assistant treasurer, and C. J. Brocksmit, auditor, the members of the board of directors of the railroad were E. S. Bailey, J. W. Blythe, R. R. Cable, J. Carskaddan, C. D. Close, Lyman Cook, J. N. Dewey, F. H. Griggs, Thomas Hedge, C. J. Ives, J. C. Peasley, W. G. Purdy, and C. P. Squires, the railroad operated 1,053.40 miles of rail trackage, of which it owned outright 402.08 miles of rail trackage, owned 105 locomotives, 31 passenger cars, eight baggage, mail and express rail cars, seven baggage rail cars, 15 combination rail cars, 20 refrigerator cars, 2873 box cars, 719 flat and coal cars, 169 stock cars, six fast freight rail cars, 443 hand and rubble cars, 17 iron trucks, 14 snow plows, four flangers, and 18 miscellaneous rail cars, owned one bridge-building train, owned one wrecking train, and the main office of the railroad was located in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. In 1892, the officers of the railroad were C. J. Ives, president, S. S. Dorwart, secretary and assistant treasurer, H. H. Hollister, treasurer, S. K. Tracy, general counsel, J. C. Broeksmit, auditor, and the board of directors of the railroad were E. S. Bailey, J. W. Blythe, George W. Cable, R. R. Cable, J. Carskaddan, Lyman Cook, F. H. Griggs, Thomas Hedge, C. J. Ives, J. C. Peasley, W. G. Purdy, C. P. Squires, and W. H. Truesdale. In 1892, the railroad had $5,500,000 in issued capital stock, had 114 locomotives, had 72 passenger cars, had 4,521 freight cars, had 130 company cars, had a total of 1,083.3 miles of track owned or leased, had 167 employees in Minnesota, and had 3,199 total employees. According to the Manual of the RailRoads of the United States, Volume 27 by Henry Varnum Poor in 1895, the railroad operated 1,134.29 miles of rail trackage, with the main line running from Burlington, Iowa, to Albert Lea, Minnesota, owned 119 locomotives, 39 passenger cars, nine baggage cars, nine mail and express cars, 17 combination cars, 44 refrigerator cars, 3,403 box cars, 633 coal and flat freight cars, 202 stock cars, two fast freight cars, 50 furniture cars, 72 other rail cars, 462 hand and rubble cars, 24 iron trucks and velocipede cars, 15 snow plows, four flangers, three bridge-building trains, 16 wrecking trains, and 15 miscellaneous rail cars, had $5,500,000 in capital stock, had as its officers R. R. Cable, chairman of the board, C. J. Ives, president, Robert Williams, vice president and general superintendent, S. S. Dorwart, secretary, H. H. Hollister, treasurer, and J. C. Broeksmit, auditor, had as its board of directors, J. W. Blythe, George W. Cable, R. R. Cable, J. Carskadden, Lyman Cook, F. H. Griggs, Thomas Hedge, C. J. Ives, A. Kimball, J. C. Peasley, W. G. Purdy, C. P. Squires, and W. H. Truesdell, and had its general office in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. In 1900, an extension of the rail line from Germania, Iowa, to Albert Lea, Minnesota, and a 48 mile extension from Albert Lea, Minnesota, to Faribault, Minnesota, were completed. The railroad operated until 1902 and was succeeded by the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific RailRoad.

Burlington Northern RailRoad: The railroad operated from 1970 until 1996 and was succeeded by the Burlington Northern & Santa Fe RailRoad.

Burlington Northern & Santa Fe RailRoad: The railroad operated after 1996. The BNSF Railway is the product of nearly 400 different railroad lines that merged or were acquired over the course of 160 years. The final merger was when the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway was merged into the Burlington Northern Railroad. The railroad is headquartered in Fort Worth, Texas. The BNSF Railway directly owns and operates track in 27 U.S. states. In 2007, the railway had more than 40,000 employees, 6,400 locomotives, and 85,338 freight cars. Warren Buffett and Berkshire Hathaway purchased BNSF for $44 billion in 2010.

Burlington, Stillwater & Duluth RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1887 and was incorporated in 1887 by A. K. Doe, E. W. Durant, C. H. Graves, R. F. Hersey, C. Markell, Samuel Mathews, and J. N. Searles to build a railway from a junction with the Chicago, Burlington & Northern RailRoad at Prescott, Wisconsin, by way of Stillwater, Minnesota, and St. Croix Falls, Wisconsin, North to Duluth, Minnesota. It had initial capital stock of $3,600,000 and its principal place of business was Stillwater, Minnesota. In 1888, the railroad acquired land in Duluth, Minnesota, for terminal facilities. In 1890, the railroad contracted with the St. Paul & Duluth RailRoad leasing trackage rights for the rail line from Stillwater. [See note on Roscoe Hersey for 467 Portland Avenue.] [See the note for Edward W. Durant for 546 Portland Avenue.]

Burt-Pool-Day Mine Narrow Gauge RailRoad: The Day mine opened in 1898, was located at Section 31, Township 58, Range 20, in St. Louis County, Minnesota, and was combined with the Burt mine to form the Burt-Pool-Day Mine before 1905. In 1920, the Burt-Pool-Day mine shipped 602,726 tons of iron ore. The mine was owned by the U. S. Steel Corporation in 1924. The Duluth, Missabe & Iron Range RailRoad had a railroad station connected to the Burt Mine in Stuntz Township, Minnesota.

Caledonia & Mississippi RailRoad was organized in 1873 and incorporated in 1873 by Thomas Abbott, J. N. Cooper, N. E. Dorival, and Richard Lester. The railroad graded a 14 mile line from Reno/Caledonia Junction, Minnesota, to Caledonia, Minnesota, before ending active operation in 1874. The railroad was ultimately succeeded by the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad.

Caledonia, Mississippi & Western RailRoad was the successor of the Caledonia & Mississippi RailRoad and was incorporated in 1879 by Thomas Abbotts, D. S. Buell, J. W. Cook, D. Haing, Nic. Koob, J. Vassen, O. J. Weide, H. Wheaton, and George B. Winship, to build a narrow gauge railway from the Mississippi River at Sumner, Minnesota, on the Chicago, Clinton, Dubuque & Minnesota RailRoad by way of Caledonia, Houston County, Minnesota, to the western boundary of the State. It had initial capital stock of $300,000 and its principal place of business was Caledonia, Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1879. The railroad, with a $400,000 contribution by the Chicago, Clinton, Dubuque & Minnesota RailRoad, completed a line from Reno/Caledonia Junction, Minnesota, to Preston, Minnesota, by the end of 1879. The narrow gauge railroad was purchased by the Chicago, Clinton, Dubuque & Minnesota RailRoad in 1880. Later in 1880, the Chicago, Clinton, Dubuque & Minnesota RailRoad was absorbed into the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad. In 1899 legislation, the Minnesota RailRoad & Warehouse Commission was authorized to order the conversion of narrow gauge rail lines into full width rail lines, but the Commission never issued the orders. In 1901, the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad converted the line into a full width line and extended the 58 mile line an additional six miles to Isinours, Fillmore County, Minnesota. The Reno, Minnesota-Caledonia, Minnesota portion of the line was abandoned in 1947 and the balance of the line was abandoned under Interstate Commerce Commission order in 1976.

Calumet Construction Company: The railroad was a 20 mile extension of the Duluth Transfer RailRoad from Fond du Lac, Minnesota, to Lester River, Minnesota, a three mile extension from Ironton, Minnesota, and Spirit Lake, Minnesota, to Winnipeg Junction, Minnesota, and an 18 mile projected extension to Superior, Wisconsin, by way of a bridge over the St. Louis River.

Canada, La Crosse & SouthWestern RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated as a Wisconsin corporation by Charles F. Ainsworth, James L. Gates, James McCord, William T. Price, Loren W. Reynolds, William H. Roach, F. E. Roseine, William J. Thompson, and James Wadsworth, to construct a railroad from La Crosse, Wisconsin, to a point in Marinette County, Wisconsin, and thence Northerly to Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan. It was organized in 1885 as part of a broader vision to build a railroad from St. Joseph, Missouri, through Iowa, Minnesota, and Wisconsin, to the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, ending in Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan. The railroad had capital stock of $12,500,000. R. Calvert was the secretary of the Canada, LaCrosse & SouthWestern RailRoad in 1883. John G. Stradley was the mayor of Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan, in 1885 and was one of the engineers who surveyed the rail line route.

Canadian-Minnesota Bridge Company: The company was incorporated in 1906 by a special act of the Canadian Parliament, Special Laws 1906, Chapter 6. The company was authorized to construct and operate a bridge between International Falls, Minnesota, to Fort Frances, Ontario, Canada, at Pitcher's Point, about two miles above the falls. The bridge was authorized to include rail trackage.

Canadian National RailRoad: The Canadian National Railways was created between 1918 and 1923 after the Government of Canada assumed majority ownership of the near bankrupt Canadian Northern Railway, and was a Canadian Crown corporation from its inception in 1918 until its privatization in 1995. The railroad purchased the Grand Trunk Western RailRoad, the Detroit, Toledo & Ironton RailRoad, the Duluth, Winnipeg & Pacific Railway, the Central Vermont Railway and the Grand Trunk Eastern RailRoad in the 1980's, purchased the Illinois Central RailRoad in 1998, purchased Wisconsin Central RailRoad in 2001, purchased Great Lakes Transportation, a holding company that was the owner of Bessemer & Lake Erie RailRoad, Duluth, Missabe & Iron Range Railway, and the Pittsburgh & Conneaut Dock Company in 2003, purchased BC Rail in 2004, and purchased the Elgin, Joliet & Eastern Railway Company in 2008. The railroad has its U.S. lines incorporated under the Grand Trunk Corporation for legal purposes.

Canadian Northern RailRoad was incorporated in Canada in 1880 as the Nelson Valley Railway & Transportation Company and the Winnipeg & Hudson Bay Railway & Steamship Company and, after the consolidation of those two companies, and the acquisition of five other rail companies, was renamed the Canadian Northern RailRoad in 1898/1899. In 1901, the Northern Pacific & Manitoba Railway was subleased from the Manitoba provincial government. In 1907, the railroad was building a 55 mile rail line from Gunflint, Ontario, to Ely, Minnesota, and had M. H. McLeod as its chief engineer. In 1911, the Edmonton, Yukon & Pacific RailRoad was absorbed by the railroad. In 1913, the officers of the railroad were William MacKenzie, president, W. H. Moore, secretary, L. W. Mitchell, treasurer, F. H. Phippen, general counsel, and J. D. Morton, assistant comptroller and the board of directors were R. M. Horne-Payne, Z. A. Lash, Donald Mann, William MacKenzie, and Frederick Nichols. In 1913, the railroad had total capital stock of $77,000,000, had 16,006 total employees, had 426 locomotives, had 411 passenger cars, and had 21,858 freight cars. In 1914, the railroad operated 4,965.90 miles of rail trackage from Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada and Port Arthur, Ontario, Canada, Westward into the Province of Alberta and into the Keewatin Territory in Canada, including 43.72 miles of rail trackage in Minnesota, principally carried lumber, owned 603 locomotives, owned 634 passenger cars, owned 28,285 freight cars, had as its officers William Mackenzie, president, Donald Mann, vice president, D. B. Hanna, third vice president, W. H. Moore, secretary, M. H. McLeod, general manager, and L. W. Mitchell, treasurer, had as its board of directors D. B. Hanna, R. M. Horne-Payne, Z. A. Lash, R. J. Mackenzie, William Mackenzie, Donald Mann, Frederic Nichols, and E. R. Wood, had $125,000,000 in capital stock, and had its general office in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. The railroad was succeeded by the Canadian National RailRoad in 1923.

Canadian Pacific RailRoad: The Canadian Pacific Railway was formed by a Montreal-based syndicate officially composed of George Stephen, James J. Hill, Duncan Mctyre, Richard B. Angus, and John Stewart Kennedy (and also unofficially including Donald A. Smith and Norman Kittson) to physically unite Canada from coast to coast, was incorporated in 1881, and completed the line to the Pacific coast in 1885. British Columbia had insisted upon a transport link to the east as a condition for joining the Confederation of Canada in 1863, initially requesting a wagon road. George Stephen was its first president, but when the initial year of construction resulted in only 131 miles of track laid, he was fired and William Cornelius Van Horne was made president, laying 418 miles of track in 1882. The eastern and western portions of the Canadian Pacific Railway met at Craigellachie, British Columbia, in 1885, where Donald A. Smith drove the last spike. The Canadian Pacific RailRoad began land settlement and land sales in 1881, erected telegraph lines alongside the main transcontinental line, acquired the Dominion Express Company in 1882, began manufacturing steam locomotives and passenger cars in 1883, operated steamships on the Great Lakes in 1883, chartered ships on the Pacific Ocean in 1886, advocated a national park system in the Canadian Rockies in 1886, discovered natural gas on the Prairies in 1886, launched its own Pacific fleet in 1891, operated paddle wheelers in British Columbia's interior in 1893, operated paddle wheelers on the British Columbia coast in 1901, and operated paddle wheelers on the Atlantic Ocean in 1903. It was known as CP Rail between 1968 and 1996. The Canadian Pacific RailRoad now operates a 14,000-mile network from Vancouver in the Canada's West to Montreal in Canada's East, and to the U. S. industrial centers of Chicago, Newark, New Jersey, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Washington, D. C., New York City, and Buffalo, New York. The Canadian Pacific Railway was formed by a Montreal-based syndicate officially composed of George Stephen, James J. Hill, Duncan Mctyre, Richard B. Angus, and John Stewart Kennedy (and also unofficially included Donald A. Smith and Norman Kittson) to physically unite Canada from coast to coast, was incorporated in 1881, and completed the line to the Pacific coast in 1885. In 1885, William Cornelius Van Horne was made a member of the railroad’s board of directors, the railroad’s vice president, and the railroad’s general manager. British Columbia had insisted upon a transport link to the east as a condition for joining the Confederation of Canada in 1863, initially requesting a wagon road. In 1887, the railroad had as its officers Sir George Stephen, president, Edmund B. Osler, and W. C. Van Horne, vice president, and the members of the board of directors were Richard B. Angus, Richard J. Crosse, Sandford Fleming C.E.C.M.G., George R. Harris, George A. Kirkpatrick M.P., R. V. Martinez, Levi P. Morton, and W. S. Scott, Sir Donald A. Smith K. C. M. G. and M. P., Sir George Stephen, and W. C. Van Horne. George Stephen was its first president, but when the initial year of construction resulted in only 131 miles of track laid, he was fired and William Cornelius Van Horne was made president, laying 418 miles of track in 1888. In 1903, the officers of the railroad had as its officers D. McNicoll, second vice president and general manager, I. G. Ogden, third vice president, G. M. Bosworth, fourth vice president, Charles Drinkwater, secretary and assistant to the president, A. R. Creelman, chief solicitor, W. S. Taylor, treasurer, and H. L. Penny, general auditor, operated 7,587.8 miles of rail trackage, and had its general office in Montreal, Quebec. In 1914, the railroad operated 12,044 miles of rail trackage from Montreal, Quebec, Canada, to Vancover, British Columbia, Canada, in eight divisions (Eastern, Ontario, Lake Superior, Atlantic, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta, and British Columbia,) controlled the Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sault Ste. Marie RailRoad, the Wisconsin Central Railway, the Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic RailRoad, the Mineral Range RailRoad, the Dominion Atlantic RailRoad, the Alberta Railway & Irrigation Company, and the Quebec Central RailRoad, owned 2,248 locomotives, owned 2,772 passenger cars, owned 95,367 freoght and company cars, had as its officers Sir T. G. Shaughnessy, K. C. V. O., president, D. McNicoll, vice president, I. G. Ogden, vice president, G. M. Bosworth, vice president, George Bury, vice president, W. R. Baker, secretary, and H. E. Suckling, treasurer, had as its board of directors Richard B. Angus, Adam R. Creelman, K. C., James Dunsmuir, Sir Sandford Fleming, K. C. M. G., Herbert S. Holt, C. R. Hosmer, Robert Mackay, W. D. Matthews, David McNicoll, Augustus M. Nanton, Edmund B. Osler, Sir T. G. Shaughnessy, K. C. V. O., Thomas Skinner, M. P., and Sir W. C. Van Horne, K. C. M. G., had capital stock of $338,224,673, and had its general office in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. It was known as CP Rail between 1968 and 1996. The Canadian Pacific RailRoad now operates a 14,000-mile network from Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, in the Canada's West to Montreal, Quebec, Canada, in Canada's East, and to the U.S. industrial centers of Chicago, Newark, New Jersey, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Washington, D. C., New York City, and Buffalo, New York. The Canadian Pacific RailRoad, as the owner of the Soo Line RailRoad, intermingles locomotives and rolling stock along Soo Line tracks. [See note on James Jerome Hill for 240 Summit Avenue.] [See note for Norman Kittson for 225 Summit Avenue.]

Cannon River Improvement Company: The company was incorporated in the state of Minnesota in 1865 to constructing canals, locks, dams and generally to construct slack water navigation from the Mississippi River by way of the Cannon River and the lakes connected to it and then by way of Lake Elysian to the Minnesota River near Mankato, Minnesota. The company railroad was organized in 1872 when the articles of incorporation were amended to permit it to construct and to operate a railroad. In 1873, the land grant franchises of the Cannon River Improvement Company and of the Minnesota Central RailRoad Company were consolidated by a special enactment of the Minnesota Legislature, leading to the construction of the Minnesota Central line from Red Wing, Minnesota, to Waterville, Minnesota.

Cedar Falls & Minnesota RailRoad: The railroad was organized by two former Illinois Central RailRoad officials in 1858 and was incorporated under Iowa law to build a rail line North from Mona Junction, Iowa, near Cedar Falls, Iowa, did som grading of the rail line in 1860 and 1861, and reached Waverly, Iowa, by 1865. The Illinois Central RailRoad leased the railroad in 1867. By 1870, the rail line reached to the Minnesota border, connecting with the Milwaukee Road at Lyle, Minnesota. In 1888, the officers of the railroad were J. Kennedy Tod, president, John Kean, Jr, vice president, and C. H. Booth, secretary-treasurer, and the members of the railroad’s board of directors were John Crerar, F. W. Foote, John Kean, Jr., J. Kennedy Tod, and William Stewart Tod, and owned a 75.58 mile rail line from Cedar Falls, Iowa, to Mona, Minnesota, on the Iowa-Minnesota border. The railroad initially leased its rail line to the Dubuque & Sioux City RailRoad early in 1867, had the rail line lease assumed by the Illinois Central RailRoad later in 1867, had operations on the rail line conducted by the Illinois Central RailRoad after 1867, completed its rail line in 1870, received no lease payments after 1887, was engaged in litigation over the lease in 1888, and had as its principal place of business Dubuque, Iowa. In 1895, the officers of the railroad were J. Kennedy Tod, president, and C. H. Booth, secretary-treasurer, and the members of the board of directors of the railroad were J. Crerar, F. W. Foote, John Kean, Jr., J. K. Tod, William Stewart Tod. The railroad became the Albert Lea & Southern RailRoad and it completed the rail line from the Minnesota-Iowa border to Glenville, Minnesota, in 1900.

Cedar Rapids, Iowa Falls & Northwestern RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated under Iowa law as a holding and construction company in 1880 by J. W. Barnes, George W. Bever, George J. Boal, W. P. Brady, J. T. Buttolph, John F. Ely, A. L. Robertson, and George Wells in 1882 to locate, construct and maintain a railway from Holland, Grundy County, Iowa, through Iowa Falls, Iowa, to some point in Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1882. The railroad had $2,000,000 in capital stock and had as its principal place of business in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. The railroad was created and controlled by the Burlington, Cedar Rapids & Northern Railway Company and was leased to Burlington, Cedar Rapids & Northern Railway Company in 1880. Ultimately, the railroad built 483 miles of rail line. The railroad built a 26 mile rail line from Holland, Iowa, to Iowa Falls, Iowa, by way of Wellsburg, Iowa, Cleves, Iowa, Abbott Crossing, Iowa, and Robertson, Iowa, and built a 30 mile rail line from Iowa Falls, Iowa, to Clarion, Iowa, by way of Burdette, Iowa, Popejoy, Iowa, Dows, Iowa, and Galt, Iowa, by 1880. The railroad built a 58 mile rail line from Clarion, Iowa, to Emmetsburg, Iowa, by way of Holmes, Iowa, Goldfield, Iowa, Hardy, Iowa, Livermore, Iowa, Bode, Iowa, Ottosen, Iowa, West Bend, Iowa, and Rodman, Iowa, by 1881, built a 50 mile rail line from Emmetsburg, Iowa, to Lake Park, Iowa, by way of Osgood, Iowa, Graettinger, Iowa, Wallingford, Iowa, Estherville, Iowa, Superior, Iowa, Hotel Orleans/Orleans, Iowa, Spirit Lake, Iowa, West Okoboji, Iowa, and Gaylord/Montgomery, Iowa, by 1882, built a 21 mile rail line from Lake Park, Iowa, to Worthington, Minnesota, by way of Round Lake, Minnesota by 1882, purchased the Iowa & Minnesota Railroad Company in 1883, built a 15 mile branch rail line from Dows, Iowa, to Belmond, Iowa, by way of Rowen, Iowa, and Lena, Iowa, by 1884, built an eight mile rail line from Hayfield Junction, Iowa, to Hayfield, Iowa, by 1884, built a 164 mile rail line from Lake Park, Iowa, to Watertown, South Dakota, by way of Harris, Iowa, Ocheyedan, Iowa, Allendorf, Iowa, Sibley, Iowa, Little Rock, Iowa, Ellsworth, Minnesota, Kanaranzi, Minnesota, Luverne, Minnesota, Hardwick, Minnesota, Trosky, Minnesota, Pipestone, Minnesota, Cazenovia, Minnesota, Cresson, Minnesota, Ward, South Dakota, Elkton, South Dakota, McKain, South Dakota, Bushnell, South Dakota, White, South Dakota, Toronto, South Dakota, Brandt, South Dakota, Clear Lake, South Dakota, Bemis, South Dakota, and Hanton, South Dakota, by 1884, built a 42 mile rail line from Ellsworth, Iowa, to Sioux Falls, South Dakota, by way of Midland, Iowa, Rock Rapids, Iowa, Lester, Iowa, Larchwood, Iowa, Granite, Iowa, and Shindlar, South Dakota, by 1886, built a six mile rail line from Trosky, Minnesota, to Quarries, Minnesota, by 1891, built a three mile rail line from Quarries, Minnesota, to Jasper, Minnesota, by 1892, purchased the Chicago & Iowa Western Railway Company in 1894, built a 46 mile rail line from Forest City, Iowa, to Armstrong, Iowa, by way of Neils, Iowa, Thompson, Iowa, Buffalo Center, Iowa, Germania/Lakota, Iowa, Gerled, Iowa, and Swea City, Iowa,by 1895, and built 36 miles of rail line from Worthington, Minnesota, to Hardwick, Minnesota, in 1900. In 1887, the officers of the railroad were C. J. Ives, president and general manager, J. C. Broeksmit, vice president, W. P. Brady, secretary, S. S. Dorwart, treasurer, and H. F. White, chief engineer. The railroad was sold to the Burlington, Cedar Rapids & Northern Railway Company in 1902. The railroad received a federal land grant. The railroad was eventually succeeded by the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific RailRoad.

Cedar Rapids & St. Paul RailRoad: The railroad was formed and incorporated in 1865. D. W. C. Rowley did the initial grading for the railroad and the Cedar Valley Construction Company was the contractor for the initial portion of the railroad. The railroad was incorporated to construct, own and operate a railroad and branches extending northwesterly from Cedar Rapids, Linn County, Iowa, up the Cedar Valley. The railroad built a 24 mile rail line from Cedar Rapids, Iowa, to Vinton, Iowa, by way of Linn Junction, Iowa, Palo, Iowa, Shellsburg, Iowa, and Gressers , Iowa. The railroad was consolidated into the Burlington, Cedar Rapids and Minnesota Railway Company in 1868. The railroad was merged with the Cedar Rapids & Burlington RailRoad, organized in 1866 and incorporated in 1868, to form the Burlington, Cedar Rapids & Northern RailRoad in 1868. According to the Manual of the RailRoads of the United States For 1868-1869, published by Henry Varnum Poor in 1868, the railroad operated 53 miles of rail trackage from Cedar Rapids, Iowa, to Waterloo, Iowa, was intended to connect with the Cedar Rapids & Burlington RailRoad and the Cedar Falls & Minnesota RailRoad to ultimately provide a rail line from Burlington, Iowa, to St. Paul, had as its officers George Greene, president, J. W. Traer, vice president, E. N. Greene, secretary, S. C. Bever, treasurer, and W. W. Walker, chief engineer, had as members of its board of directors S. C. Bever, C. H. Conklin, J. F. Ely, George Greene, L. N. Isham, Alexander Runyon, J. W. Traer, W. W. Walker, S. H. Watson, and John Weare, and had its principal office in Cedar Rapids, Linn County, Iowa.

Cedar River RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1992 and is owned by the Canadian National RailRoad. The railroad operates on former Illinois Central Gulf RailRoad trackage. In 1991, the railroad was formed as a reorganization of the bankrupt Cedar Valley Railroad. It was owned by the Chicago Central & Pacific Railroad, an Illinois Central Gulf RailRoad spin-off that was reacquired by the successor Illinois Central Railroad in 1996. The railroad has connections with the Union Pacific RailRoad in Glenville, Minnesota, the Iowa, Chicago & Eastern RailRoad in Charles City, Iowa and Lyle, Minnesota, and the Chicago Central & Pacific Railroad at Waterloo, Iowa.

Cedar Valley RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1984, operated until 1992, and was succeeded by the Cedar River RailRoad.

Central Minnesota & Dakota RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1881. The railroad was incorporated in 1881 by G. W. P. Bowman, Morris B. Derrick, Lucien B. Martin, Treat T. Prosser, Lawson S. Warner, Russell Y. Waters, and Henry Whipple to survey, locate and operate a single or double track railway from a point in Central Minnesota westerly to the Minnesota-Dakota Territory boundary and further westerly into the Dakota Territory. The railroad had $4,800,000 in corporate stock. The principal place of business of the railroad was St. Paul. [See note on Henry Benjamin Whipple for 9 Crocus Place.]

Central RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in 1882 by F. B. Clement, Mark D. Flower, John F. Meagher, Lane K. Stone, and Robert C. Wright to build, maintain and operate a rail line from Mankato, Blue Earth, Minnesota, to the Western border of the State of Minnesota and was organized in 1882. The railroad had capital stock of $4,000,000 and its principal place of business was St. Paul. [See note on Lane K. Stone for 255 Summit Avenue.]

Central RailRoad Company of Minnesota/Central Railway of Minnesota: The railroad was organized in 1872, succeeding the Minnesota & Northwestern RailRoad, chartered in 1857, and commenced building in 1871. In 1872, a 38.5 mile portion of the rail line was graded from Mankato, Minnesota, to Wells, Minnesota. Clark W. Thompson and James B. Hubbell were the construction contractors for the rail line. By 1873, the railroad had received $175,000 in financial grants from the communities along the rail route. In 1874, the railroad had as its officers John A. Willard, president, Clark W. Thompson, vice president, James B. Hubbell, secretary, John N. Hall, treasurer, and H. W. Holley, chief engineer, and had as its board of directors Sheldon F. Barney, J. W. Hoerr, James B. Hubbell, William F. Lewis, J. W. Meagher, William Pfaender, O. O. Pitcher, J. J. Shanbut, Clark W. Thompson, H. C. Walt, and John A. Willard. In 1878, the officers of the railroad were Henry A. Taylor, president, Bailey Hascall, secretary, W. C. Van Horne, general manager, and H. G. Haugan, auditor, the members of the board of directors were A. W. Burlingame, Walter Edwards, Jr., James R. Ferris, J. B. Hubbell, Joseph M. Hulbert, Christopher Meyer, Henry A. Taylor, Albert G. Thorp, Jr., Isaac S. Waterman, Thomas Watson, and John A. Willard, the railroad had its general offices at Mankato, Minnesota, the railroad had $8,000,000 in capital stock, the railroad had 40 miles of railway trackage from Mankato, Minnesota, to Wells, Minnesota, the railroad owned 16 wooden bridges and ten wooden trestles, the railroad had one locomotive, one combination passenger and baggage car, ten flat and coal cars, and six hand cars. The railroad continued until 1879, was initially succeeded by the Southern Minnesota RailRoad, and was ultimately succeeded by the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad.

Charter Oak RailRoad: The railroad was authorized by the State of Minnesota shortly after statehood in 1857. The railroad was incorporated in 1858 to build and operate a railway from Island City, Houston County, Minnesota, to a point along the route of the Southern Minnesota RailRoad. The railroad was organized in 1871. The members of the board of directors in 1872 were A. W. Barron, Edwin P. Barron, W. H. Barron, A. W. Shepard, and Charles P. Sykes. The railroad had capital stock of $100,000.

Chatfield RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1878 and was incorporated in 1878. The railroad operated an 11.46 mile rail line from Eyota, Minnesota, to Chatfield, Minnesota, in 1878. In 1880, the officers of the railroad were M. Hughitt, vice president, J. B. Redfield, secretary, and M. M. Kirkman, treasurer, and the members of the board of directors were B. C. Cook, I. F. O. Farrall, M. Hughitt, Albert Keep, M. M. Kirkman, J. B. Redfield, S. Sanborn, M. L. Sykes, and C. C. Wheeler. In 1880, the railroad had capital stock of $30,000. The railroad continued until 1881, was purchased by the Winona & St. Peter RailRoad in 1881, and was ultimately succeeded by the Chicago & NorthWestern RailRoad. Marvin Hughitt (1838-1928) was born in Genoa, New York, was a telegraph operator in Albany, New York, in 1853, supervised the complicated departure of trains carrying Union soldiers to Cairo, Illinois, as superintendent of the Southern Division of the Illinois Central RailRoad, in 1863, was the assistant general manager of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad, was the manager of the Pullman Palace Car Company, was the general superintendent, the president, and then finally finance committee chair, of the Chicago & Northwestern RailRoad, was one of the organizers of the Chicago Homeopathic College, was a member of the board of directors of the New York Central RailRoad, was a member of the board of directors of the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern RailRoad, was a member of the board of directors of the Michigan Central RailRoad, was Chairman of the Board of Directors of the Chicago & North Western RailRoad, and was a member of the board of trustees of the Sunday Evening Club.

Cherokee & Dakota RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1887 and was incorporated under Iowa law in 1887 by M. Gilleas, J. Jacobs, Edward T. Jeffery, William J. Knight, William R. Polmyer, F. W. Quinby, and John C. Welling to construct a 96 mile rail line from Cherokee County, Iowa, into the State of Minnesota and into the Dakota Territory. The railroad was incorporated with the understanding that it would be purchased by the Illinois Central RailRoad upon completing construction. Construction was undertaken by the Illinois Central RailRoad. It had initial capital stock of $4,000,000 and its principal place of business was Dubuque, Iowa. The railroad completed the rail line from Cherokee, Iowa, to Sioux Falls, South Dakota, in 1887, completed the rail line from Onawa Junction, Iowa, to Onawa, Iowa, in 1888, and operated only in 1888. The rail line ultimately extended to 165 miles (a 59 mile rail line from Cherokee, Iowa, to Onawa, Iowa, constructed from 1887 until 1888, and a 96 mile rail line from Cherokee, Iowa, to Sioux Falls, Dakota Territory, in 1888.) The railroad was initially succeeded by the Dubuque & Sioux City RailRoad in 1888, and was succeeded by the Illinois Central RailRoad in 1891. In 1942, the segment between Onawa, Iowa, and Anthon, Iowa, was pulled up. In 1978, the tracks between Anthon, Iowa, and Onawa Junction, Iowa, were abandoned.

Chicago, Burlington & Northern RailRoad was an 1885 consolidation of the prior Chicago, Burlington & Northern Railway Company of Minnesota and the prior Chicago, Burlington & Northern Railway Company of Wisconsin and was incorporated under General Statutes of Minnesota 1878, Chapter 34, in 1885 by Charles L. Allen, Frank S. Bragg, C. M. Higginson, H. W. Weiss, and R. C. Wells to build, improve and operate a railway from a point in Washington County, Minnesota, on the State boundary near Prescott, Wisconsin, northwesterly by way of St. Paul to Minneapolis. The railroad was organized in 1886. It had initial capital stock of $4,500,000 and its principal place of business was St. Paul before the consolidation and LaCrosse, Wisconsin, after the consolidation. In 1887, the officers of the railroad were A. E. Tonzalin, president, J. Murray Forbes, secretary & treasurer, N. B. Hinckley, auditor, and W. H. Holcomb, general superintendent, and the general office was at St. Paul. In 1888, the railroad completed surveying for a route planned to connect to Duluth, Minnesota. In 1893, the officers of the railroad were J. M. Forbes, chairman of the board, George B. Harris, president, W. J. Ladd, secretary, J. C. Peasley, treasurer, J. W. Losey, general counsel, and N. B. Hinckley, auditor, and the members of the board of directors of the railroad were J. M. Forbes, J. L. Gardner, George B. Harris, F. W. Hunnewell, Richard Olney, C. J. Paine, and C. E. Perkins. In 1892, the railroad had $12,000,000 in capital stock, had 1,355 employees, had 56 locomotives, had 37 passenger cars, had 3,350 freight cars, and had 190 company cars. The Poor's Directory of RailRoad Officials, published by the Poor's RailRoad Manual Company in 1898, indicates that George B. Harris was the manager of the railroad. The railroad was succeeded by the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy RailRoad in 1899.

Chicago, Burlington & Quincy RailRoad was chartered as the Aurora Branch RailRoad in 1849, changed its name to the Chicago & Aurora RailRoad in 1852, was incorporated in Illinois in 1855 and was the result of the merger or acquistion of the Central Military Tract RailRoad in 1856, the Jacksonville & Savannah RailRoad in 1861, the Peoria & Burlington RailRoad in 1864, the Quincy & Chicago RailRoad in 1865, the Burlington & Missouri River RailRoad in 1875, the Burlington & Missouri River RailRoad Company in Nebraska in 1880, the Republican Valley RailRoad in 1882 and 1888, the Grand Island & Wyoming Central RailRoad in 1897, the Big Horn Southern RailRoad in 1897, the Grand Island & Northern Wyoming RailRoad in 1897, the Peoria & Hannibal RailRoad in 1861 and 1868, the Ottawa, Oswego & Fox River Valley RailRoad in 1899, the Illinois Grand Trunk RailRoad in 1899, the American Central RailRoad in 1899, the Dixon & Quincy RailRoad in 1899, the Dixon, Peoria & Hannibal RailRoad in 1899, the Carthage & Burlington RailRoad in 1899, the Quincy & Warsaw RailRoad in 1899, the Quincy, Alton & St. Louis RailRoad in 1899, the Chicago and Iowa RailRoad in 1899, the Chicago & Rock River RailRoad in 1899, the St. Louis, Rock Island & Chicago RailRoad in 1899, the Illinois Valley & Northern RailRoad in 1899, the Joliet, Rockford & Northern RailRoad in 1899, the Galesburg & Rio RailRoad in 1899, the Chicago, Burlington & Northern RailRoad Company of Illinois in 1899, the Chicago, Burlington & Northern RailRoad in 1899, the Keokuk & St. Paul RailRoad in 1901, the Albia, Knoxville & Des Moines RailRoad in 1901, the Des Moines & Knoxville RailRoad in 1901, the Chariton, Des Moines & Southern RailRoad in 1901, the Creston Branch of the Burlington & Missouri River RailRoad in 1901, the Burlington & Missouri RailRoad in 1901, the Brownville & Nodaway Valley RailRoad in 1901, the Clarinda, College Springs & South Western RailRoad in 1901, the Nebraska City, Sidney & North Eastern RailRoad in 1901, the Leon, Mount Ayr & Southwestern RailRoad in 1901, the Creston & Northern RailRoad in 1901, the Hastings & Avoca RailRoad in 1901, the Red Oak & Atlantic RailRoad in 1901, the Humeston & Shenandoah Railway in 1901, the Western Iowa RailRoad in 1901, the Chicago, Ft. Madison & Des Moines RailRoad in 1901, the Murray & Creston RailRoad in 1901, the Chillicothe & Chariton RailRoad in 1901, the Fairfield & Ottumwa RailRoad in 1901, the Hannibal & St. Joseph RailRoad in 1901, the Grant City & Southern RailRoad in 1901, the St. Joseph & Nebraska RailRoad in 1901, the St. Joseph & Des Moines RailRoad in 1901, the Kansas City, St. Joseph & Council Bluffs RailRoad in 1901, the Keokuk & Western RailRoad in 1901, the St. Louis, Keokuk & Northern RailRoad in 1901, the Chicago, Burlington & Kansas City Railway in 1901, the Burlington & Western Railway in 1903, the Quincy RailRoad Bridge Company in 1903, the Iowa & St. Louis Railway in 1903, the Jacksonville & Saint Louis Railway in 1905, the Fenton & Thompson RailRoad in 1906, the Burlington & Colorado RailRoad in 1908, the Nebraska & Colorado RailRoad in 1908, the Colorado & Wyoming RailRoad in 1908, the Cheyenne & Burlington RailRoad in 1908, the Nebraska Railway in 1908, the Lincoln & North Western RailRoad in 1908, the Atchison & Nebraska RailRoad in 1908, the Big Horn RailRoad in 1908, the Omaha & South Western RailRoad in 1908, the Omaha & North Platte RailRoad in 1908, the Nebraska, Wyoming & Western RailRoad in 1908, the Denver & Montana RailRoad in 1908, the Lincoln & Black Hills Railroad in 1908, the Beaver Valley RailRoad in 1908, the Republican Valley, Kansas & Southwestern RailRoad in 1908, the Chicago, Nebraska & Kansas RailRoad in 1908, the Kansas City & Omaha Railway in 1908, the Republican Valley & Wyoming RailRoad in 1908, the Denver, Utah & Pacific RailRoad in 1908, the Sioux City & Western Railway in 1908, the Fulton County Narrow Gauge RailRoad in 1908, the Adair County RailRoad in 1911, and the Northern & Southern Illinois RailRoad in 1911. According to the Manual of the RailRoads of the United States For 1868-1869, published by Henry Varnum Poor in 1868, the railroad operated 400 miles of rail trackage, owned 111 locomotives, 95 passenger cars, and 2,285 freight cars, had as its officers John N. Denison, board chair, James F. Joy, president, Amos T. Hall, secretary and treasurer, W. McCredie, auditor, and Robert Harris, general superintendent, had as its board of directors Sidney Bartlett, William Boott, John W. Brooks, Chauncey S. Colton, Erastus Corning, John N. Denison, John M. Forbes, John C. Green, James F. Joy, Nathaniel Thayer, and Robert S. Watson, and had as its general office Chicago, Illinois. The Poor's Directory of RailRoad Officials, published by the Poor's RailRoad Manual Company in 1898, indicates that the officers of the railroad were C. E. Perkins, president, T. J. Potter, first vice president, J. C. Peasley, second vice president and treasurer, T. S. Howland, secretary, J. D. Besler, superintendent, J. L. Lathrop, general auditor, and Wirt Dexter, general solicitor and the railroad operated 3646.04 miles of railway trackage. In 1904, the railroad had capital stock of $110,839,100, owned 1,337 locomotives, owned 1,099 passenger cars, owned 47,213 freight cars, owned 2298 company service cars, had 260 employees in Minnesota, and operated 8,123.64 miles of railway trackage (23.61 miles in Minnesota.) In 1907, the railroad had 23.61 miles of rail trackage in Minnesota and 8,473.91 in total rail trackage. In 1913, the officers of the railroad were George B. Harris, chairman of the board, D. Miller, president, T. S. Howland, secretary and treasurer, C. M. Dawes, general counsel, and C. L. Sturgis, general auditor, and the board of directors were George F. Baker, George C. Clark, William P. Clough, Howard Elliott, George B. Harris, James J. Hill, James N. Hill, Darius Miller, Edward T. Nichols, Hale Holden, and Samuel Thorne. In 1913, the railroad had total capital stock of $110,839,100, had 23.61 miles of track in Minnesota, had 1,772 locomotives, had 1,253 passenger cars, had 55,735 freight cars, and had 51,177 total employees. In 1917, the railroad had 13,020.217 miles of track, owned 1,759 locomotives, owned 66,932 freight cars, owned 1,216 passenger cars, owned 5,444 company cars, leased five locomotives, leased 166 freight cars, leased six passenger cars, leased 11 work cars, wholly controlled the Black Hills & Fort Pierre RailRoad, the Deadwood Central RailRoad, the Quincy, Omaha & Kansas City RailRoad, and the St. Louis and Kansas City Land Company, and partially controlled the Atchison Union Depot & RailRoad Company, the Belt Railway of Chicago RailRoad, the Chicago Union Station Company, the Colorado & Southern RailRoad, the Davenport, Rock Island & NorthWestern RailRoad, the Denver Union Terminal RailRoad, the Hannibal Union Depot RailRoad, the Iowa Transfer RailRoad, the Kansas City Terminal RailRoad, the Keokuk Union Depot RailRoad, the Minnesota Transfer RailRoad, the Paducah & Illinois RailRoad, the Saint Paul Union Depot RailRoad, the Saint Joseph Union Depot RailRoad, the Toledo, Peoria & Western Railway, the Terminal RailRoad Association of St. Louis, the Union Depot, Bridge & Terminal RailRoad, and the Winona Bridge RailRoad. The railroad came under the control of the Northern Pacific RailRoad and the Great Northern RailRoad in 1914. The railroad was succeeded by the Burlington Northern Railroad in 1970. The Chicago, Burlington & Quincy RailRoad, the official name of the "Burlington Route," began in 1849 in Aurora, Illinois, as the Aurora Branch RailRoad, and was the second railroad, after the Galena & Chicago Union RailRoad, to serve Chicago. By 1864, the railroad had 400 miles of track and had adopted the name "Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company," which described its trackage stretching from Chicago to Burlington, Iowa, and Quincy, Illinois, on the Mississippi River. The railroad, operated by John Murray Forbes of Boston and Charles E. Perkins, forged a system out of previously loosely-held affiliates, virtually tripling Burlington's size from 1881 to 1901. The company became known as the "Granger Railroad," due to its association with farmers and ranchers. At the turn of the 20th century, 97.2 percent of the CB&Q was purchased by James J. Hill, founder of the Great Northern Railroad, for $200 per share. The Burlington's first freight diesels were purchased in 1944, and 95 percent of its trains were dieselized by 1953. In 1945, Burlington created America's first vista-dome passenger car. The railroad eventually reached Denver, its western terminus, and reached east to the Chicago, Kansas City and St. Louis gateways. CB&Q lines also went to Omaha, Nebraska, and St. Joseph, Missouri. In 1970, the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad became a part of the Burlington Northern Railroad. In 1995, another merger took place, combining the Burlington Northern RailRoad with the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe RailRoad and creating the current Burlington Northern Santa Fe (BNSF) RailRoad. (in part per Richard S. Steele and the 1915-1920 Interstate Commerce Commission valuation) [See note on William Pitt Clough for 500 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Howard Elliott for 1118 Summit Avenue.] [See note on James Jerome Hill for 240 Summit Avenue.]

Chicago, Clinton, Dubuque & Minnesota RailRoad: The railroad operated from 1878 until 1880, was initially succeeded by the Clinton & Dubuque RailRoad and by the Dubuque & Minnesota RailRoad in 1880, and was subsequently succeeded by the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad.

Chicago & Dakota RailRoad was incorporated in 1879 by Marvin Hughitt, M. M. Kirkman, J. B. Redfield, S. Sanborn, and Thomas Wilson to build a railway from a point along the Winona & St. Peter RailRoad at or near Tracy, Lyon County, Minnesota, westerly to the western boundary of the State in Lincoln County, Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1879 and it received a federal land grant. It had initial capital stock of $300,000 and its principal place of business was Winona, Minnesota. The railroad operated a 46.40 mile rail line from Tracy, Minnesota, to the Minnesota-South Dakota state line in 1879. The railroad was purchased by the Winona & St. Peter RailRoad in 1881 and was ultimately succeeded by the Chicago & NorthWestern RailRoad. [See note on Thomas Wilson for 761 Goodrich Avenue.]

Chicago, Decorah & Minnesota Railway Company: The railroad was organized in 1881 and was incorporated in 1881 as an Iowa corporation to locate, construct, maintain and operate a railway running Northerly and Southerly or other direction from Decorah, Winneshiek County, Iowa, to points in Iowa and Minnesota and to points of connection with other railways. The railroad built a 23 mile rail line from Postville Junction, Iowa, to Decorah, Iowa, by way of Castalia, Iowa, Ossian, Iowa, and Nordness, Iowa. The railroad was leased to the Burlington, Cedar Rapids & Northern RailRoad in 1887. In 1887, the officers of the railroad were C. J. Ives, president and general manager, J. C. Broeksmit, vice president, W. P. Brady, secretary, H. H. Hollister, treasurer, S. S. Dorwart, assistant treasurer, and H. F. White, chief engineer. The railroad was sold to the Burlington, Cedar Rapids & Northern Railway Company in 1902. The railroad was ultimately succeeded by the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railway.

Chicago, Dubuque & Minnesota RailRoad: The railroad was authorized by the Minnesota Legislature shortly after statehood in 1857 and was incorporated in 1871 by J. K. Groves, C. H. McArthur, J. A. Rhomberg, and others to construct and operate a railway from the SouthEast corner of Minnesota to Winona, Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1871. The railroad had $750,000 capital stock at incorporation. The railroad succeeded the Dubuque & M'Gregor RailRoad, incorporated in 1868 and renamed the Dubuque & Minnesota RailRoad in 1869, operated from 1872 until 1878, was conveyed in foreclosure to the Dubuque & Minnesota RailRoad, was incorporated in 1877 and consolidated with the Clinton & Dubuque RailRoad in 1878, was initially succeeded by the Chicago, Clinton, Dubuque & Minnesota RailRoad, and was ultimately succeeded by the Chicago, Milwauklee & St. Paul RailRoad. John Thompson was the receiver of the railroad in 1877. In 1877, the railroad had 133 miles of railway track, of which 25 miles were in Minnesota, owned three wooden bridges, owned 18 wooden trestles, operated ten locomotives, five passenger cars, two express and baggage cars, 243 box, freight and stock cars, 53 flat and coal cars, 54 hand and rubble cars, and three cabooses. In 1877, the railroad was succeeded by the Dubuque & Minnesota RailRoad. It ultimately was succeeded by the Dubuque & Minnesota RailRoad, by the Chicago, Clinton, Dubuque & Minnesota RailRoad, and by the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad.

The Chicago, Freeport & St. Paul RailRoad was organized in 1882 and was incorporated in 1882/1884/1885 under Illinois, Wisconsin, and Minnesota law as a consolidation of the Chicago, Freeport & St. Paul RailRoad, the Chicago, Freeport & Northwestern RailRoad Company, and the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Chicago RailRoad Company by Adam Eulberg, Aldro Jenks, Thomas Kennedy, Peter Morris, Charles J. Thomas, for the construction, maintenance and operation of a rail line from the Southern Wisconsin border near the Pecatonica River in Cadiz, Green County, Wisconsin, and thence North and Westerly to a point in Minneapolis. The railroad had its general office in Dodgeville, Wisconsin, and had $10,000,000 in capital stock. In Minnesota, a branch railway was authorized to run from Minneapolis easterly through Hennepin County, Minnesota, Ramsey County, Minnesota, and Washington County, Minnesota, to the Wisconsin-Minnesota boundary. In 1883, the members of the board of directors were E. Baldwin, Warren C. Clark, Charles Kennedy, Henry J. Porter, A. V. Richards, John F. Smith, William P. Watson, M. H. Wilcoon, and William O. Wright.

Chicago & Great Western RailRoad: The railroad was established in 1885 and operated until 1890, when it was succeeded by the Chicago & Northern Pacific RailRoad. The Chicago Great Western Railway was a Class I railroad that linked Chicago, Illinois, Minneapolis, Omaha, Nebraska, and Kansas City, Missouri. It was founded by Alpheus Beede Stickney in 1885 as a regional line between St. Paul and the Iowa state line as the Minnesota & Northwestern RailRoad. After mergers and new construction, the railroad was renamed the Chicago Great Western after 1892, and was a multi-state carrier. It was nicknamed the "Corn Belt Route" or the "Lucky Strike Road." It was merged with the Chicago and North Western Railway in 1968, which subsequently abandoned most of the Chicago Great Western RailRoad's trackage.

Chicago Great Western RailRoad was originally organized as the Wisconsin, Iowa & Nebraska RailRoad which became the Chicago, St. Paul & Kansas City in 1886, finally was organized in 1892 under an 1891 Illinois statute and was organized in 1909 as the Chicago Great Western RailRoad Company. The Chicago Great Western RailRoad linked the key rail cities of Chicago, Kansas City, Saint Paul, and Omaha. Built by A. B. Stickney, the Chicago Great Western Railway began in 1885 as a 110-mile route from St. Paul to Iowa, the Minnesota & Northwestern RailRoad, and quickly extended the tracks to Chicago and Kansas City. In 1887, the Minnesota & Northwestern RailRoad was acquired by another Stickney railroad, the Chicago, St. Paul, & Kansas City RailRoad. In 1892, the Chicago Great Western Railway Company took over the bankrupt Chicago, St. Paul & Kansas City Line. The Chicago Great Western RailRoad relied heavily on rate cutting and efficient operations to compete with other railroads. Its reputation as a rate cutter ended when Stickney retired in 1908. The railroad was reorganized in 1909. According to Poor's Manual of the RailRoads of the United States, Volume 33 by Henry Varnum Poor in 1901, as of 1899, the railroad operated 929.51 miles of rail trackage, owned 158 locomotives, 50 passenger cars, four suburban rail cars, nine combination cars, 18 baggage cars, four milk cars, three dining cars, two buffet cars, 4,544 box cars, 386 stock cars, 588 flat and coal cars, 11 refrigerator cars, 240 furniture cars, 85 cabooses, two miscellaneous freight cars, and 422 miscellaneous cars, had $70,000,000 in capital stock, had as its officers A. B. Stickney, president, Ansel Oppenheim, vice president, C. W. Benson, vice president, Arnold Kalman, vice president, W. B. Bend vice president and auditor, C. O. Kalman, treasurer, R. C. Wight, secretary and auditor, and Samuel C. Stickney, general manager, had as its board of directors C. W. Benson, H. E. Fletcher, Arnold Kalman, J. W. Lusk, Ansel Oppenheim, A. B. Stickney, Samuel C. Stickney, F. Weyerhaeuser, and T. H. Wheeler, and had its general office located in St. Paul. In 1904, the railroad owned 264 locomotives, owned 144 passenger cars, owned 6,763 freight cars, owned 266 company service cars, and had 733.63 total miles of railway trackage (117.63 miles in Minnesota.) In 1904, the railroad had capital stock of $76,910,324 and had as members of its board of directors M. D. Flower, who was newly elected to replace W. A. Read, and A. B. Stickney and Frederick Weyerhaeuser, who were reelected. In 1907, the railroad had 117.63 miles of track in Minnesota and 755.20 miles of track in its total system. In 1913, the officers of the railroad were S. M. Felton, president, J. F. Coykendall, secretary and treasurer, John Barton Payne, general counsel, and Con. F. Krebs, auditor, and the members of the board of directors were John S. Bell, Clyde M. Carr, C. H. Conover, S. M. Felton, E. C. Finkbine, E. N. Hurley, J. R. Morrow, John A. Spoor, A. A. Sprague, II, Charles Steele, E. T. Swinney, Milton Tootle, Jr., and F. Weyerhaeuser. In 1913, the railroad had total capital stock of $86,268,315, had 399.55 miles of track in Minnesota, had 289 locomotives, had 190 passenger cars, had 10,891 freight cars, and had 8312 total employees. In 1916, the railroad had 1,159.747 miles of rail trackage, owned 255 locomotives, owned 8,866 freight cars, owned 156 passenger cars, owned 501 work cars, succeeded the Chicago Great Western Railway in 1909 and the De Kalb & Great Western Railway in 1911, was the result of the merger of or acquisition of the City Terminal Railway, the Mantorville Railway & Transfer Company, the Minnesota & Northwestern RailRoad, the Leavenworth & St. Joseph Railway, the Chicago, St. Paul & Kansas City Railway, the Wisconsin, Iowa & Nebraska Railway, the Minnesota & Northwestern RailRoad, the Dubuque & Northwestern Railway, the Dubuque & Dakota RailRoad, and the Iowa Pacific RailRoad, and leased the Mason City & Fort Dodge RailRoad, the Wisconsin, Minnesota & Pacific RailRoad, the Wisconsin, Minnesota & Pacific Railway, the Duluth, Red Wing & Southern Railroad, the Winona & Western Railway, the Minnesota Central RailRoad, the Cannon River Improvement Company, the Winona & Southwestern Railway, the Winona & La Crosse Railroad, and the Winona, Osage & Southwestern Railway. The railroad was succeeded by the Chicago & NorthWestern RailRoad in 1968. The Chicago Great Western RailRoad enjoyed relative economic prosperity during the post World War II boom. The Chicago Great Western RailRoad is remembered for its early use of internal combustion equipment, extremely long freight trains, piggyback service, and welded rail. The Chicago Great Western RailRoad merged with the Chicago & North Western RailRoad in 1968, and the Chicago & North Western RailRoad subsequently abandoned much of the Chicago Great Western RailRoad trackage. Built by A. B. Stickney, the Chicago Great Western Railway began in 1885 as a 110-mile route from St. Paul to Iowa, the Minnesota & Northwestern RailRoad, and quickly extended the tracks to Chicago and Kansas City. In 1887, the Minnesota & Northwestern RailRoad was acquired by another Stickney railroad, the Chicago, St. Paul, & Kansas City RailRoad. In January, 1892, the Chicago Great Western Railway Company took over the bankrupt Chicago, St. Paul, & Kansas City RailRoad. The Chicago Great Western RailRoad relied heavily on rate cutting and efficient operations to compete with other railroads. Its reputation as a rate cutter ended when Stickney retired in 1908. The Chicago Great Western RailRoad enjoyed relative economic prosperity during the post World War II boom. The Chicago Great Western RailRoad is remembered for its early use of internal combustion equipment, extremely long freight trains, piggyback service, and welded rail. The Chicago Great Western RailRoad merged with the Chicago & North Western RailRoad in 1968, and the Chicago & North Western RailRoad subsequently abandoned much of the Chicago Great Western RailRoad trackage. (in part per Richard S. Steele and the 1915-1920 Interstate Commerce Commission valuation) [See note on Alpheus Beede Stickney for 846 Lincoln Avenue.] [See note on Frederick Weyerhaeuser for 266 Summit Avenue.] [See note on the Chicago Great Western Railway for 882 West Linwood Avenue.]

Chicago, Iowa and Northern Pacific Railroad Company: The railroad was incorporated to construct a rail line from a point on the Mississippi River near or below the mouth of the Wapsipinicon River along the Wapsipinicon River valley to the North line of the State of Iowa, from the Mississippi River to Chicago, from the North line of the State of Iowa Northwest to a connection with the Northern Pacific Railroad, and from the North line of the State of Iowa Northward to St. Paul and Minneapolis. The railroad was sold to the Davenport, Iowa & Dakota RailRoad Company in 1888.

Chicago, Milwaukee & Minneapolis RailRoad: The railroad, a stock company, was organized and incorporated in 1878, obtained in auction the interests of Walston H. Brown, David Dows, and H. H. Porter in the West Wisconsin RailRoad, had as its officers in 1878 W. H. Ferry, president, H. H. Weakley, secretary and land commissioner, R. P. Flower, treasurer, J. B. Redfield, assistant treasurer, E. W. Winter, general superintendent, C. D. Young, auditor, and J. C. Spooner, general counsel, and had as its board of directors in 1878 R. Edgerton, J. W. Ferry, W. H. Ferry, W. H. Ferry, Jr., J. H. Howe, J. B. Redfield, Philetus Sawyer, G. B. Smith, J. C. Spooner, E. H. Winter, and D. W. Young. Other investors in the railroad were David Dows, A. R. Flower, R. Flower, George Galpin, R. S. Patterson, and Henry Seifert. The railroad had initial capital stock of $5,000,000. In 1878, the railroad and the Chicago, Milwaukee, & St. Paul RailRoad sponsored the Minneapolis Eastern RailRoad, incorporated by J. B. Bassett. David Dows (1814-1890) was one of the organizers of the Produce Exchange Bank, was one of the organizers of the Corn Exchange Bank, was the vice president of the Chicago & Rock Island RailRoad, was a member of the board of directors of the Chicago & Northwestern RailRoad, was a member of the board of directors of the Chicago, Minneapolis, & Omaha RailRoad, was a member of the board of directors of the Union Pacific RailRoad, was a member of the board of directors of the Delaware & Hudson RailRoad, and was an investor in several insurance and trust companies. [See the note for Joel Bean Bassett in the introduction.] [See note on Edwin Wheeler Winter for 415 Summit Avenue.]

Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad: The "Granger" railroad was organized in 1863 under a Wisconsin enactment as the Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway, changed its name to the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad in 1874, was the successor to the foreclosed LaCrosse & Milwaukee RailRoad, and began operations in Minnesota in 1878. In 1864, the railroad operated ten miles of track in Minnesota. In 1880, the officers of the railroad were Alex. Miller, president, Julius Wadsworth, vice president, R. D. Jennings, secretary-treasurer, John W. Cary, general counsel, and S. S. Merrill, general manager and the members of the board of directors were John M. Burke, S. Chamberlain, H. T. Dickey, David Dows, J. C. Easton, Peter Geddes, S. S. Merrill, J. Millbank, Alex. Mitchell, John Plankinton, J. Stillman, A. R. Van Nest, and Julius Wadsworth. In 1880, the railroad had capital stock of $27,683,744, had 1771.40 miles of track (493.53 miles in Minnesota,) and owned 36 bridges and 333 trestles. In 1880, William Cornelius Van Horne was the general superintendent of the railroad. In 1882, the officers of the railroad were Alexander Mitchell, president, Julius Wadsworth, vice president, P. M. Myers, secretary, R. D. Jennings, treasurer, John W. Cary, general solicitor, J. P. Whaling, general auditor, S. S. Merrill, general manager, and Z. T. Clark, general superintendent, the members of the board of directors of the railroad were S. Chamberlain, H. T. Dickey, J. C. Easton, Peter Geddes, S. S. Merrill, J. Millbank, Alexander Mitchell, John Plankinton, William Rockefeller, J. Stillman, A. R. Van Nest, Julius Wadsworth, and James T. Woodward, the railroad had capital stock of $35,509,744, the railroad had total rail trackage of 4,327.92 miles (1,023.98 miles in Minnesota,) the railroad owned 583 locomotives, 227 passenger cars, 164 mail, express and baggage rail cars, 13,208 box, stock and freight rail cars, 39 sleeping and parlor rail cars, 4,392 flat and coal rail cars, and 354 other rail cars, the railroad employed 19,561 personnel, and the railroad operated the Minnesota Midland Railway and the Oshkosh & Mississippi River Railway under lease. In 1887, Frank S. Bond replaced Alexander Mitchell ( -1887) as president of the railroad. In 1888, the railroad completed surveying for a route planned to connect to Duluth, Minnesota. In 1887, the railroad operated 1,117 miles of rail trackage in Minnesota. In 1892, the officers of the railroad were Roswell Miller, president, P. M. Myers, secretary, F. G. Ronney, treasurer, John T. Fish, general solicitor, W. N. D. Winne, auditor, and A. J. Earling, general manager, and the members of the board of directors were Philip D. Armour, August Belmont, Frank S. Bond, Charles D. Dickey, Jr., Peter Geddes, Frederick Layton, Joseph Milbank, Roswell Miller, William Rockefeller, Samuel Spencer, A. Von SanFvoord, and I. Hood Wright. In 1892, the main offices of the railroad were in Chicago. Poor's Directory of RailRoad Officials, published by the Poor's RailRoad Manual Company in 1898, indicates that the officers of the railroad were Alex Mitchell, president, F. S. Bond, vice president, P. M. Myers, secretary, F. G. Ranney, treasurer, John W. Cary, general solicitor, J. P. Whaling, general auditor, and Roswell Miller, general manager, and that the railroad operated 5,201 miles of rail trackage. According to Poor's Manual of the RailRoads of the United States, Volume 33, published by Henry Varnum Poor in 1901, as of 1899, the railroad operated 6,337.44 miles of rail trackage, owned 813 locomotives, 105 passenger cars, 53 sleeping cars, 15 parlor cars, eight dinign cars, 296 baggage, mail, express and combination cars, 23,676 box cars, 2,726 stock cars, 6,407 flat, coal and ore cars, 715 refrigerator cars, and 591 service cars, had capital stock of $82,519,000, had its general office in Chicago, Illinois, had as it officers Roswell Miller, chairman of the board, A. J. Earling, president, Frank S. Bond, vice president, P. M. Myers, secretary, F. G. Ranney, treasurer, W. N. D. Winne, general auditor, and had as its board of directors Phillip D. Armour, August Belmont, Frank S. Bond, A. J. Earling, Peter Geddes, Charles W. Harkness, Frederick Layton, Joseph Milbank, Roswell Miller, William Rockefeller, Samuel Spencer, and Alfred Van Santvoord. In 1904, the officers of the railroad were Roswell Miller, chairman of the board, A. J. Earling, president, E. W. Adams, secretary, F. G. Ranney, treasurer, Burton Hanson, general counsel, H. G. Haugan, comptroller, George R. Peck, general counsel, H. R. Williams, general manager, and the members of the board of directors of the railroad were J. Ogden Armour, Frank S. Bond, A. J. Earling, Peter Geddes, Charles W. Harkness, Frederick Layton, Joseph Milbank, Roswell Miller, William Rockefeller, Henry H. Rogers, James H. Smith, Samuel Spencer, and John A. Stewart. In 1904, the railroad had capital stock of $106,588,300, owned 1,017 locomotives, owned 943 passenger cars, owned 41,424 freight cars, owned 609 company service cars, owned 171 bridges, owned 857 trestles, had 4,689 employees in Minnesota, and operated 6,892.43 miles of railway trackage (1202.42 miles in Minnesota.) In 1907, the railroad had 1202.48 miles of track in Minnesota and 7,029.29 miles of track in the total system. In 1909, the railroad completed its line from South Dakota to Seattle, Washington, and Tacoma, Washington, on Puget Sound, completing its 2,333 transcontinental rail line. In 1904, the railroad purchased 19 locomotives and ordered one new dining car, one new mail and express car, three new baggage cars, 273 new box cars, and 52 new stock cars. In 1913, the railroad had as its officers A. J. Earling, president, H. R. Williams, vice president, E. W. Adams, secretary, F. G. Ranney, treasurer, W. S. Cooper, general superintendent, H. H. Field, general solicitor, and B. A. Dousman, general auditor, had as its board of directors J. Ogden Armour, Walter P. Bliss, A. J. Earling, Stanley Field, Donald G. Geddes, Charles W. Harkness, Samuel McRoberts, L. J. Petit, William Rockefeller, P. A. Rockfeller, John D. Ryan, John A. Stewart, and H. R. Williams, had as its principal place of business Chicago, Illinois, had total capital stock of $232,623,100, had 1,241.75 miles of track in Minnesota, had 1952 locomotives, had 1,559 passenger cars, had 64,657 freight cars, and had 62,051 total employees. Ezekiel Gillespie (1818-1892,) an African-American of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, was employed by the railroad for 30 years. The railroad operated until 1926, and was succeeded by the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific Railroad. [See note on Philip Danforth Armour and Armour & Company for 3 Alice Court.] [See note on the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad for 5 Crocus Place.] [See note on the Milwaukee Road/Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad for 351 St. Clair Avenue.]

Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad: The railroad was reorganized in 1926 or 1928 from the bankrupt Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad, a result of the cost of the electrification of 668 miles of the line from Montana to Puget Sound, Washington (438 miles on the Rocky Mountain Division: Harlowton, Montana, to Avery, Idaho, constructed between 1915 and 1916, and 230 miles on the Coast Division: Othello to Tacoma, Washington, constructed between 1919 and 1920,) was the successor of the Milwaukee & Waukesha RailRoad, the Milwaukee & Mississippi RailRoad, and the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad, was known as the "Milwaukee Road," was in bankruptcy in 1935 and 1945, introduced streamlined passenger trains, including the "Hiawatha" in 1947, filed for bankruptcy in 1977, abandoned all but its most profitable routes after 1980, became the "Milwaukee Road, Inc." in 1985, operated until 1986, and was succeeded by the Soo Line RailRoad. In 1963, the railroad operated 10,664 miles of rail trackage, owned 896 locomotives, owned 588 passenger cars, and owned 42,325 freight cars.

Chicago & NorthWestern RailRoad: The Chicago & North Western RailRoad was a Class I railroad in the Midwest United States that operated more than 5,000 miles of track as of the turn of the 20th century and over 12,000 miles of track in seven states before retrenchment in the late 1970's. The Chicago & North Western Railroad was chartered in 1848, purchased the assets of the bankrupt Chicago, St. Paul & Fond du Lac RailRoad, incorporated in 1859 in Illinois, filed articles of consolidation in 1864 in Illinois, Wisconsin, and Michigan, merged with the Galena & Chicago Union RailRoad in 1865, obtained a majority of the stock of the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railway in 1882 and merged it in 1972, and became one of the longest railroads in the United States as a result of mergers with several other railroads. The company was purchased by Union Pacific Railroad in 1995 and ceased to exist. The railroad was organized in 1859 by an enactment of the Illinois Legislature and had ten railroads consolidated into it, the Dixon, Rockford & Kenosha RailRoad, established in 1864 and consolidated in 1864, the Galena & Chicago Union RailRoad, established in 1836 and consolidated in 1864, the Peninsula RailRoad, established in 1862 and consolidated in 1864, the Beloit & Madison RailRoad, established in 1852 and consolidated in 1871, the Baraboo Air Line RailRoad, established in 1870 and consolidated in 1871, the LaCrosse, Trempealeau & Prescott RailRoad, established in 1857 and consolidated in 1877, the Menominee River RailRoad, established in 1875 and consolidated in 1882, the Escanaba & Lake Superior RailRoad, established in 1880 and consolidated in 1882, the Elgin & State Line RailRoad, established in 1859 and consolidated in 1883, and the Chicago, Milwaukee & Nothwestern RailRoad, established in 1881 and consolidated in 1883, purchased 23 railroads, the Galesville & Mississippi River RailRoad, organized in 1882 and purchased in 1883, the Rock River RailRoad, organized in 1880 and purchased in 1883, the Chicago, Iowa & Nebraska RailRoad, organized in 1856 and purchased in 1884, the Cedar Rapids & Missouri River RailRoad, organized in 1859 and purchased in 1884, the Maple River RailRoad, organized in 1876 and purchased in 1884, the Stanwood & Tipton RailRoad, organized in 1872 and purchased in 1884, the Iowa Midland RailRoad, organized in 1870 and purchased in 1884, the Ottumwa, Cedar Falls & St. Paul RailRoad, organized in 1883 and purchased in 1884, the Iowa Southwestern RailRoad, organized in 1880 and purchased in 1884, the Des Moines & Minnesota RailRoad, organized in 1870 and purchased in 1884, the Maple Valley RailRoad, organized in 1886 and purchased in 1887, the Janesville & Evansville RailRoad, organized in 1886 and purchased in 1887, the Sioux Valley RailRoad, organized in 1887 and purchased in 1887, the Iowa Railway, Coal & Manufacturing Company, organized in 1873 and purchased in 1887, the Linn County RailRoad, organized in 1886 and purchased in 1887, the Sycamore & Cortland RailRoad, organized in 1858 and purchased in 1888, the Northern Illinois RailRoad, organized in 1884 and purchased in 1888, the Iron River RailRoad, organized in 1886 and purchased in 1889, the Iron Range RailRoad, organized in 1887 and purchased in 1889, the Lake Geneva & State Line RailRoad, organized in 1887 and purchased in 1889, the Toledo & Northwestern RailRoad, organized in 1869 and purchased in 1890, the Junction Railway Company, organized in 1889 and purchased in 1891, and the Paint River RailRoad, organized in 1890 and purchased in 1891, and controlled three railroads, the Dakota Central RailRoad, organized in 1879, the Princeton & Western RailRoad, organized in 1883, and the Winona & St. Peter RailRoad, chartered in 1862. The railroad controlled the Princeton & Western RailRoad, the Florence County RailRoad, the De Pue, Ladd & Eastern RailRoad, and the Chicago, Iowa & Minnesota RailRoad and leased the St. Paul Eastern Grand Trunk RailRoad. In 1863, the railroad operated 29.5 miles of track in Minnesota. In 1882, the officers of the railroad were Albert Keep, president, M. L. Sykes, first vice president, secretary, and treasurer, J. B. Redfield, auditor, B. C. Cook, solicitor, M. Hughitt, general manager, and J. D. Layng, general superintendent, the members of the board of directors were Samuel F. Barger, John M. Barke, Chauncy M. Depew, Sidney Dillon, David Dows, A. G. Duhlman, R. P. Flower, Jay Gould, M. Hughitt, Albert Keep, D. O. Mills, C. J. Osborn, Augustus Schell, William L. Scott, Anson Stager, M. L. Sykes, and F. W. Vanderbuilt, had $60,211,650.53 in issued stock, had 3310.31 miles of totat rail trackage (with 414 miles in Minnesota,) owned 557 locomotives, owned 235 passenger cars, owned 99 baggage and express cars, owned 11576 freight, box ,and stock cars, owned 2499 flat and coal cars, owned 3857 ore cars, owned 384 other rail cars, employed 15,406 personnel, and received 1,752,733.42 acres in land grants. In 1887, the railroad operated 414.13 miles of track in Minnesota. In 1893, the officers of the railroad were Albert Keep, chairman of the board, Marvin Hughitt, president, Martin L. Sykes, secretary and treasurer, William C. Goudy, general counsel, Clarence S. Darrow, attorney, and J. B. Redfield, auditor, and the members of the board of directors were Frederick L. Ames, Samuel F. Barger, John I. Blair, John M. Burke, Chauncey M. DePew, N. K. Fairbank, James C. Fargo, Marvin Hughitt, Albert Keep, David P. Kimball, Percy R. Payne, Byron L. Smith, M. L. Sykes, H. McK. Twombly, F. W. Vanderbilt, W. K. Vanderbilt, and Horace Williams. According to Poor's Manual of the RailRoads of the United States, Volume 33 by Henry Varnum Poor in 1901, as of 1899, the railroad operated 5,076.89 miles of rail trackage, owned 1,010 locomotives, 495 passenger cars, 22 parlor rail cars, nine dining cars, 26 chair cars, nine buffet and cafe cars, 106 combination cars, 153 baggage and express cars, 40 mail cars, five officer's cars, 26 boarding cars, 546 cabooses, 41 milk cars, 20,273 box cars, 4,500 gondola cars, 3,895 flat freight cars, 2,881 stock cars, 646 refrigerator cars, 4,351 iron ore cars, and 52 miscellaneous cars, owned the entire capital stock of the Fremont, Elkhorn & Missouri Valley RailRoad, owned the majority interest in the Sioux City & Pacific RailRoad, owned the majority interest in the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha RailRoad, had as its officers Albert Keep, chairman of the board, Marvin Hughitt, president, M. L. Sykes, vice president and secretary, M. M. Kirkman, vice president, H. R. McCullough, vice president, John M. Whitman, vice president, S. O. Howe, treasurer, J. B. Redfield, auditor, and W. A. Gardner, general manager, and had as its board of directors Oliver Ames, Samuel F. Barger, Zenas Crane, Chauncey M. DePew, N. K. Fairbank, James C. Fargo, Marshall Field, Marvin Hughitt, Albert Keep, David P. Kimball, Cyrus H. McCormick, Byron L. Smith, James Stillman, M. L. Sykes, H. Mck. Twombly, F. W. Vanderbilt, and W. K. Vanderbilt. In 1904, the officers of the railroad were Marvin Hughitt, president, Eugene E. Osborne, first vice president and secretary, S. O. Howe, treasurer, Lloyd W. Bowers, general counsel, J. B. Redfield, auditor, and W. A. Gardner, general manager, and the members of the board of directors were Oliver Ames, Samuel F. Barger, Zenas Crane, Chauncey M. Depew, James C. Fargo, Marshall Field, H. C. Frick, Marvin Hughitt, Albert Keep, David P. Kimball, Cyrus H. McCormick, Byron L. Smith, James Stillman, H. McK. Twombly, F. W. Vanderbilt, W. K. Vanderbilt, and Frank Work. Poor's Directory of RailRoad Officials, published by the Poor's RailRoad Manual Company in 1898, indicates that the officers of the railroad were Albert Keep, president, M. L. Sykes, vice president, treasurer, and secretary, W. C. Goudy, general counsel, C. C. Wheeler, general superintendent, and M. M. Kirkman, comptroller, and that the railroad operated 4,903 miles of rail trackage. In 1904, the railroad had capital stock of $74,229,430, owned 1,307 locomotives, owned 1,114 passenger cars, owned 50,674 freight cars, owned 1,019 company service cars, owned 65 bridges, owned 923 trestles, had 1,888 employees in Minnesota, and operated 7,373.52 miles of railway trackage (650.30 miles in Minnesota.) In 1907, the railroad had 650.30 miles of track in Minnesota and had 7,415.33 miles of track in its total system. In 1913, the railroad had as its officers Marvin Hughitt, chairman of the board, William A. Gardner, president, Samuel A. Lynde, vice president, Hiram R. McCullough, vice president, Richard H. Ashton, vice president, John D. Caldwell, secretary, Milton B. Van Zandt, treasurer, Carl C. Wright, general solicitor, Lewis A. Robinson, comptroller, and William D. Cantillon, general manager, had as its board of directors Oliver Ames, Zenas Crane, Chauncey M. DePew, James C. Fargo, John V. Farwell, Henry C. Frick, William A. Gardner, Marvin Hughitt, Chauncey M. Keep, David P. Kimball, Cyrus H. McCormick, Homer A. Miller, Byron L. Smith, James Stillman, F. W. Vanderbilt, Harold S. Vanderbilt, W. K. Vanderbilt, and W. K. Vanderbilt, Jr., had as its principal place of business Chicago, Illinois, had total capital stock of $154,854,486, had 650.30 miles of track in Minnesota, had 1,772 locomotives, had 1,789 passenger cars, had 60,429 freight cars, and had 46,484 total employees. In 1917, the railroad had 12,322.919 miles of rail trackage, owned 1,892 locomotives, owned 70,155 freight cars, owned 2,038 passenger cars, owned 4,074 work cars, owned nine miscellaneous cars, wholly controlled the Belle Fourche Valley RailRoad, the De Pue, Ladd & Eastern RailRoad, the Doland & South Eastern RailRoad, the Escanaba, Iron Mountain & Western RailRoad, the Florence County RailRoad, the Iowa Southern RailRoad, the James River Valley & Northwestern RailRoad, the Macoupin County Extension RailRoad, the Missouri Valley & Blair RailRoad, the Winona & St. Peter RailRoad, the Wolf River Valley RailRoad, the Albany RailRoad Bridge RailRoad, the Pierre and Fort Pierre Bridge RailRoad, the Pierre, Rapid City and NorthWestern RailRoad, the Wyoming & Northwestern RailRoad, and partially controlled the Chicago, Saint Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha RailRoad, the Sioux City Bridge RailRoad, the Indiana Harbor Belt RailRoad, and the Peoria & Pekin Union RailRoad. In 1995, the railroad was succeeded by the Union Pacific RailRoad. The Chicago & North Western Railway was chartered in 1848 and was the successor to the bankrupt Chicago, St. Paul & Fond du Lac RailRoad. The Chicago & North Western Railway merged with the Galena & Chicago Union RailRoad in 1865 and purchased a majority of the stock of the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railway in 1882. It also acquired over time the Cedar Rapids & Missouri River RailRoad, the Chicago Iowa & Nebraska RailRoad, the Peninsula RailRoad, the Chicago & Milwaukee RailRoad, the Fremont, Elkhorn & Missouri Valley RailRoad, the Milwaukee Lake Shore & Western RailRoad, the Litchfield & Madison RailRoad, the Minneapolis & St. Louis RailRoad, the Chicago Great Western RailRoad, the Fort Dodge Des Moines & Southern RailRoad, and the Des Moines & Central Iowa RailRoad. The Chicago & North Western Railway defaulted on debts in 1925, emerged from bankruptcy in 1936, began passenger train operating agreements with the Union Pacific RailRoad and the Southern Pacific RailRoad in the 1930's, narrowly avoided bankruptcy in 1955, became employee owned in 1972, ended the exclusive employee ownership arrangement in 1982, lost an attempt to acquire the bankrupt Milwaukee Road RailRoad to the Soo Line RailRoad in 1985, avoided a leveraged buyout by Japonica Partners, L.P., by agreeing to a 1989 sale to Blackstone Capital Partners, L.P., which was backed by the Union Pacific RailRoad, made an initial public stock offering in 1993, with the Union Pacific RailRoad owning 25 percent of the railroad, and was purchased entirely by the Union Pacific RailRoad in 1995. [See note for the Chicago & NorthWestern RailRoad for 702 Fairmount Avenue.] (in part per Richard S. Steele and the 1915-1920 Interstate Commerce Commission valuation)

Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1880 as an Illinois corporation and as an Iowa corporation and was reorganized before 1904. The Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific RailRoad was a Class I railroad and was the successor of the Rock Island & La Salle RailRoad, which was incorporated in 1847, and the Chicago & Rock Island RailRoad, which was incorporated in 1851 and which operated its first train in 1852 between Chicago and Rock Island, Illinois. The Rock Island acquired the Mississippi and Missouri Railroad in 1866, forming the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific RailRoad. Later, it acquired the Keokuk & Des Moines RailRoad, the Hannibal & St. Joseph RailRoad, the Burlington, Cedar Rapids & Northern Railway, the Chicago, Kansas & Nebraska Railway, the Chicago, Rock Island & Texas Railway, the Choctaw, Oklahoma & Gulf RailRoad, the Little Rock & Memphis Railroad, and the Rock Island, Arkansas, & Louisiana RailRoad. The railroad was an aggregation of several railroads, mostly by purchase or consolidation, including the Rock Island & LaSalle RailRoad, the Chicago & Rock Island RailRoad, the Mississippi & Missouri RailRoad, the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific RailRoad of Iowa, the Platte County & Fort Des Moines RailRoad, incorporated in 1860, the Leavenworth & Des Moines RailRoad, the Chicago & South-Western RailRoad, the Iowa Southern & Missouri Northern RailRoad, the Des Moines, Indianola & Missouri RailRoad, the Des Moines, Winterset & South-Western RailRoad, the Newton & Monroe RailRoad, the Atlantic & Audobon RailRoad, the Atlantic Southern RailRoad, the Avoca, Macedonia & South-Western RailRoad, the St. Joseph & Iowa RailRoad, the Avoca & Harlan RailRoad, the Guthrie & Northwest RailRoad, Chicago, Kansas & Nebraska RailRoad, the Rock Island & Peoria RailRoad, the Burlington, Cedar Rapids & Minnesota RailRoad, the Burlington, Cedar Rapids & Northern RailRoad, the Enid & Anadarko RailRoad, the Searcy & Des Arc RailRoad, the South St. Paul Belt RailRoad, the Minneapolis & St. Paul Terminal RailRoad, and the St. Paul & Minneapolis Transfer RailRoad. The Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railroad was the result of an act of consolidation under Illinois and Iowa laws in 1880 and acquired the Iowa Southern & Missouri Northern Railroad in 1880, the Newton & Monroe Railroad in 1880, the Atlantic & Audubon Railroad in 1880, the Avoca, Macedonia & South Western Railroad in 1880, the St. Joseph & Iowa Railroad in 1888, the Kansas City & Topeka Railway in 1889, the Fort Leavenworth Rail Road in 1899, the Keosauqua & Southwestern Railroad in 1890, the Guthrie & Northwestern Railroad in 1890, the Chicago, Kansas & Nebraska Railway in 1891), the Avoca, Harlan & Northwestern Railroad in 1899, the Enid & Tonkawa Railway in 1899, the Guthrie & Kingfisher Railway in 1900, the Rock Island & Peoria Railway in 1903, the Burlington, Cedar Rapids & Northern Railway of Iowa in 1903, the Enid & Andarko Railway in 1903, the Hazen & Northern Railroad in 1904, the Choctaw, Oklahoma & Western Railroad in 1904, the Minneapolis & St. Paul Terminal Railway in 1904, the Kansas City, Rock Island Railway in 1905, the Chicago, Rock Island & El Paso Railway in 1910, the Keokuk & Des Moines Ry in 1923, the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railroad in 1916, and the Rock Island & Oklahoma Railway in 1923. The Poor's Directory of RailRoad Officials, published by the Poor's RailRoad Manual Company in 1898, indicates that the officers of the railroad were R. R. Cable, president and general manager, David Dows, first vice president, A. Kimball, second vice president, W. G. Purdy, secretary and treasurer, H. F. Royce, general manager, F. W. Porter, auditor, and Thomas F. Withrow, general counsel, and that the railroad operated 1,384 miles of rail trackage. In 1901, the railroad had as its officers D. G. Reid, chairman of the board, W. B. Leeds, president, H. A. Parker, first vice president, Robert Mather, second vice president and general counsel, J. M. Johnson, third vice president, George H. Crosby, secretary, F. E. Hayne, treasurer, W. W. Stevenson, comptroller, and C. A. Goodnow, general manager, had 5,391.5 miles of rail trackage, owned 811 locomotives, owned 14,264 box cars, owned 3,151 stock cars, owned 2,905 flat cars, owned 356 cabooses, owned 445 company service and work cars, and had its general office in Chicago, Illinois. In 1904, the officers of the railroad were D. G. Reid, chairman of the board, B. I. Winchell, president, Robert Mather, first vice president and general counsel, and G. H. Crosby, secretary-treasurer, and the members of the board of directors were George S. Brewster, R. R. Cable, Marshall Field, F. L. Hine, W. B. Leeds, L. F. Loree, Ogden Mills, J. H. Moore, William H. Moore, A. E. Orr, D. G. Reid, B. L. Winchell, and B. F. Yorkum. In 1904, the railroad had capital stock of $102,468,638, owned 1,066 locomotives, owned 736 passenger cars, owned 32,527 freight cars, owned 1,893 company service cars, owned 38 bridges, owned 121 trestles, had 392 employees in Minnesota, and operated 6,354.32 total miles of railway trackage (236.05 miles in Minnesota.) In 1907, the railroad had 235.81 miles of track in Minnesota and had 4,938.03 miles of track in its total system. In 1913, the railroad had as its officers T. M. Schumacher, chairman of the board, H. U. Mudge, president, J. E. Gorman, first vice president, A. C. Ridgway, second vice president, E. S. Moore, vice president, George H. Crosby, secretary and treasurer, M. L. Bell, solicitor, Frank Nay, comptroller, and A. E. Sweet, general manager, had as its board of directors F. L. Hine, Arthur Curtiss James, James McLean, George G. McMurtry, Ogden Mills, John J. Mitchell, E. S. Moore, J. H. Moore, W. H. Moore, H. U. Mudge, D. G. Reid, T. M. Schumacher, and Roberts Walker, had as its principal place of business Chicago, Illinois, had total capital stock of $74,877,200, had 235.59 miles of track in Minnesota, had 1,552 locomotives, had 1,085 passenger cars, had 43,040 freight cars, and had 36,841 total employees. In 1932, the railroad operated 7,665.152 miles of rail trackage and controlled all or part of the Choctaw, Oklahoma & Gulf RailRoad, the Morris Terminal RailRoad, the Rock Island & Louisiana RailRoad, the Rock Island & Dardanelle RailRoad, the Rock Island Memphis Terminal RailRoad, the Rock Island Omaha Terminal RailRoad, the Rock Island, Stuttgart & Southern RailRoad, the St. Paul & Kansas City Short Line RailRoad, the Chicago, Rock Island & Gulf RailRoad, the Peoria Terminal RailRoad, the Gasconade Railway Construction Company Belt Railway of Chicago, the Chicago and Western Indiana Railroad, the Houston Belt & Terminal Railway, the Arkansas & Memphis Railway Bridge and Terminal Company, the Atchison Union Depot & Railroad Company, the Calumet Western Railway, the Denver Union Terminal Railway, the Iowa Transfer Railway, the Joliet Union Depot Company, the Kansas City Terminal Railway, the Keokuk Union Depot Company, the Leavenworth Depot & Railroad Company, the Minnesota Transfer Railway, the Missouri & Illinois Bridge & Belt Railroad, the Rock Island-Frisco Terminal Railway, the St. Joseph Union Depot Company, the St. Paul Union Depot Company, the Terminal Railroad Association of St. Louis, the Burlington-Rock Island Railroad, the Wichita Union Terminal Railway, the Kankakee & Seneca Railroad, the Chicago, Rock Island and El Paso Railway, the Kansas City Rock Island Railway, the Tucumcari & Memphis Railway, and the St. Louis, Rock Island Terminal Railway. The railroad operated until 1980. The Rock Island RailRoad entered its third and final bankruptcy in 1975 and was liquidated in 1980.

Chicago, St. Paul & Kansas City RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in 1886 under Iowa law, was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1888, was organized in 1887 or 1888, was the successor by purchase of the Wisconsin, Iowa & Nebraska RailRoad, and was the successor by purchase of the Minnesota & Northwestern RailRoad in 1886. It was incorporated in Minnesota in 1888 to construct, lease, purchase and operate railway and telegraph lines in Iowa, Illinois, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Missouri, Kansas, and Nebraska by Ansel Oppenheim, Sam. C. Stickney, A. F. Schiffman, Frank Skipwith, Robert G. Wight, W. H. Knowlton, and George B. Buroh. Its principal place of business was Dubuque, Iowa. In 1888, the officers of the railroad were A. B. Stickney, president, W. L. Boyle, vice president, M. C. Woodruff, secretary, W. B. Bend, treasurer, M. C. Healton, auditor, and John M. Egan, general manager, the members of the board of directors of the railroad were C. W. Benson, William Louis Boyle, William Dawson, A. Kalman, A. Oppenheim, A. B. Stickney, and S. C. Stickney, the railroad operated 690.33 miles of rail trackage, including 20.20 miles of rail trackage leased to the Central Iowa Railway Company, owned 82 locomotives, 34 passenger coaches, four parlor rail cars, six sleeping cars, four dining cars, 14 baggage, mail and express cars, 2,391 box cars, 469 stock cars, 434 flat rail cars, 160 coal cars, ten refrigerator cars, 56 cabooses, and two other passenger rail cars, and the railroad had its principal office in St. Paul. In 1888, the railroad completed surveying for a route planned to connect to Duluth, Minnesota. In 1891, the officers of the railroad were A. B. Stickney, chairman of the board, John Egan, president and general manager, C. W. Benson, vice president, M. C. Woodruff, secretary, W. B. Bend, treasurer, Lusk, Bunn & Hadley, general counsel, and M. C. Healion, auditor, and the members of the board of directors were M. Auerbach, C. W. Benson, William Lewis Boyle, William Dawson, A. M. Drake, John M. Egan, A. Kalman, J. W. Lusk, A. Oppenheim, John L. Pratt, David Rankin, A. Shinmer, A. B. Stickney, S. C. Stickney, and F. D. Stout. In 1891, the railroad had capital stock of $14,892,900, had 838.67 miles of track, had 3,048.5 total employees (872.5 employees in Minnesota,) owned 147 locomotives, owned 54 passenger cars, owned 2,591 freight cars, owned 117 company cars, leased 2,063 rail cars, owned eight bridges, and owned 119 trestles. The railroad operated until 1893, and was succeeded by the Chicago Great Western RailRoad. The Poor's Directory of RailRoad Officials, published by the Poor's RailRoad Manual Company in 1898, indicates that the officers of the railroad were R. T. Wilson, president, A. B. Stickney, vice president, M. C. Woodruff, secretary, W. M. Johnson, treasurer, George C. McMichael, general manager, and W. L. Dickson, auditor, and that the railroad operated 145 miles of rail trackage. [See note on Ansel Oppenheim for 590 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Maurice Auerbach for 400 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Arnold Kalman for 251 Summit Avenue.] [See note on William Dawson for 682 Fairmount Avenue.] [See note on Alpheus Beede Stickney for 846 Lincoln Avenue.] [See note on Samuel Crosby Stickney for 653 Goodrich Avenue.]

Chicago, St. Paul & Minneapolis RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated under Wisconsin law in 1878 by Walston H. Brown, George Caplin, John Comstock, David Dows, R. Edgerton, James W. Ferry, William H. Ferry, William H. Ferry, Jr., A. R. Flower, R. P. Flower, James H. Howe, R. S. Patterson, H. H. Porter, J. B. Redfield, Philetus Sawyer, Henry Siebert, George B. Smith, John C. Spooner, H. H. Weakley, E. W. Winter, and C. D. W. Young as the successor of the West Wisconsin Railway Company after a virtual bankruptcy. The railroad constructed no rail trackage. The railroad operated between Elroy, Illinois, to Hudson, Wisconsin, owned the St. Croix River bridge at Hudson, Wisconsin, and leased a rail line from Hudson, Wisconsin, to St. Paul. William H. Ferry was the first president of the railroad and H. H. Porter was the president when the railroad consolidated with the North Wisconsin Railway Company to form the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha RailRoad in 1880. [See note on Edwin Wheeler Winter for 415 Summit Avenue.]

Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & West Wisconsin RailRoad: In 1881, the St. Paul Globe rported that legislation was enacted that conveyed the rights, powers and immunities of the railroad to the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha RailRoad.

Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha RailRoad: The railroad was organized under an act of consolidation under Wisconsin law in 1880 in a merger of Chicago, St. Paul & Minneapolis RailRoad, a Wisconsin corporation, and the North Wisconsin RailRoad, a Wisconsin corporation. The Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha RailRoad was the result of the merger of the Chicago, St. Paul & Minneapolis RailRoad, the North Wisconsin Railway, and the West Wisconsin Railway, the purchase of the St. Paul & Sioux City RailRoad and the Sioux City & St. Paul RailRoad, and acquired the Black River RailRoad in 1880, the Sioux City & Nebraska RailRoad in 1883, the Chippewa Falls & Northern Railway in 1882 and 1883, the Eau Claire & Chippewa Falls Railway in 1883, the Neillsville & North Eastern Railway in 1884, the Ashland Railway in 1885, the North-Eastern Nebraska RailRoad in 1888, the Randolph & Northeastern Nebraska RailRoad in 1890, the Sault Ste. Marie & Southwestern Railway in 1893, the Eau Claire Railway in 1893, the Menominee Railway in 1893, the Superior Short Line Railway in 1895, the Watonwan Valley Railway in 1899, the Des Moines Valley Railway Company of Minnesota in 1900, the Minnesota & Wisconsin RailRoad in 1902, the Chippewa Valley & Northwestern Railway in 1904, and the Eau Claire, Chippewa Falls & Northeastern Railway in 1904. In 1880, the railroad operated 353.58 miles of railroad track in Minnesota. In 1881, the railroad owned 150 locomotives, 50 first class passenger cars, ten second class passenger cars, 31 baggage and express cars, three mail cars, one officers' car, one paymaster's car, two dining cars, 3,099 box cars, 1,315 flat freight cars, 210 stock cars, 100 cabooses, three derrick cars, one tool car, three steam shovels, two transfer steamers, one barge pile driver, and two car pile drivers. In 1882, the officers of the railroad were Marvin Hughitt, president, M. L. Sykes, vice president and treasurer, C. W. Porter, secretary, John C. Spooner, solicitor, E. W. Winter, assistant president, H. A. Gray, auditor, Charles F. Hatch, general superintendent, and Charles W. Johnson, chief engineer, had as the members of its board of directors David Dows, R. P. Flower, Marvin Hughitt, Albert Keep, Philetus Sawyear, Augustus Schell, John C. Spooner, M. L. Sykes, H. W. K. Twombly, Cornelius Vanderbilt, W. K. Vanderbilt, W. D. Washburn, and A. H. Wilder, had $50,000,000 in capital stock, operated 1,148.73 miles of rail trackage (416.43 in Minnesota,) owned 131 locomotives, owned 59 passenger cars, owned 29 baggage and express rail cars, owned 3105 freight, box and stock rail cars, owned 1257 flat and coal rail cars, owned 87 other rail cars, and employed 3,986 personnel. In 1885, the railroad had $50,000,000 in capital stock, owned 464 bridges, owned 32 trestles, owned 45 culverts, operated 1,525.27 miles of total rail trackage (493.31 in Minnesota,) had 181 locomotives, had 121 passenger cars, had 5,238 freight cars, had 115 company cars, had 4,172 total employees (1,252 employees in Minnesota,) and had 1,241.76 miles of telegraph line. In 1885, the officers of the railroad were Marvin Hughitt, president, M. L. Sykes, vice president and treasurer, E. E. Woodman, secretary, E. W. Winter, assistant president, J. M. Whitman, general superintendent, John D. Howe, attorney, and H. A. Gray, auditor, and the members of the board of directors were C. M. Depew, John D. Howe, J. H. Hoew, Marvin Hughitt, Albert Keep, W. L. Scott, M. L. Sykes, H. McK. Twombly, Cornelius Vanderbilt, William K. Vanderbilt, W. D. Washburn, John M. Whitman, and E. W. Winter. In 1887, the railroad operated 365.49 miles of railway trackage in Minnesota. In 1888, the officers of the railroad were Marvin Hughitt, president, M. L. Sykes, vice president, treasurer, and assistant secretary, E. E. Woodman, secretary, L. A. Robinson, auditor, J. H. Howe, general counsel, and Edwin W. Winter, general manager, the members of the board of directors of the railroad were Chauncey M. Depew, J. H. Howe, Marvin Hughitt, John A. Humbird, Albert Keep, David P. Kimball, W. L. Scott, M. L. Sykes, H. Mck. Twombly, Cornelius Vanderbilt, William K. Vanderbilt, John M. Whitman, and Edwin W. Winter, the railroad operated 1,394.35 miles of rail trackage, including 65.19 miles of leased trackage, the railroad owned 235 locomotives, 98 passenger cars, four parlor cars, two dining cars, 51 baggage, mail and express cars, 5,017 box cars, 2,123 platform rail cars, 410 stock cars, 24 charcoal cars, 108 cabooses, two officers’ rail cars, 15 derrick and tool rail cars, five pile driver cars, four ditching rail cars, three steam shovels, two transfer steamers, one barge pile driver, and one rotary snow plow, and the railroad had its principal office in St. Paul. The Poor's Directory of RailRoad Officials, published by the Poor's RailRoad Manual Company in 1898, indicates that the officers of the railroad were Marvin Hughitt, president, M. L. Sykes, vice president and treasurer, E. E. Woodman, secretary, E. W. Winter, general manager, L. A. Robinson, auditor, J. M. Whitman, general superintendent, and John D. Howe, general counsel, and the railroad operated 839.04 miles of rail trackage. According to Poor's Manual of the RailRoads of the United States, Volume 33 by Henry Varnum Poor in 1901, as of 1899, the railroad operated 1,532.57 miles of rail trackage, owned 275 locomotives, 101 passenger cars, five chair cars, two parlor cars, seven buffet and cafe cars, one dining car, 45 combination cars, 53 baggage, mail and express cars, 7,356 box cars, 1,159 flat freight cars, 85 refrigerator cars, 393 stock cars, 900 coal cars, and 204 company cars, had capital stock of $34,050,126.40, had a land grant of 1,448,619 acres, had its general office in St. Paul, had as its officers Marvin Hughitt, president, M. L. Sykes, vice president, James T. Clark, second vice president and general traffic manager, E. E. Woodman, secretary, Walter A. Scott, general manager, S. O. Howe, treasurer, and L. A. Robinson, comptroller, and had as its board of directors Horace G. Burt, Chauncey M. DePew, Marvin Hughitt, John M. Humbird, Albert Keep, David P. Kimball, Byron L. Smith, Martin L. Sykes, H. McK. Twombly, William K. Vanderbilt, John M. Whitman, and Thomas Wilson. In 1904, the officers of the railroad were Marvin O. Hughitt, president, E. E. Osborn, first vice president, E. E. Woodman, secretary, S. O. Howe, treasurer, Thomas Wilson, general counsel, Pierce Butler, general attorney, L. A. Robinson, comptroller, W. H. Stennett, auditor, and A. W. Trenholm, general manager, and the members of the board of directors of the railroad were Horace G. Burt, Chauncey M. Depew, Marvin Hughitt, John A. Humbird, Albert Keep, David P. Kimball, E. E. Osborn, Byron L. Smith, Henry McK. Twombly, F. W. Vanderbilt, William K. Vanderbilt, John M. Whitman, and Thomas Wilson. In 1904, the railroad had capital stock of $34,050,126, owned 311 locomotives, owned 242 passenger cars, owned 11,499 freight cars, owned 327 company service cars, owned 88 bridges, owned 542 trestles, had 2,471 employees in Minnesota, and operated 1,521.60 total miles of railway trackage (434.97 miles in Minnesota.) In 1907, the railroad had 436.08 miles of track in Minnesota and had 1,627.98 miles of track in its total system. In 1913, the railroad had as its officers William A. Gardner, president, S. A. Lynde, first vice president, J. T. Clark, second vice president, Edward M. Hyzer, general counsel, T. A. Polleys, secretary, M. B. Van Zandt, treasurer, and A. W. Trenholm, general manager, had as its board of directors Oliver Ames, J. D. Caldwell, James T. Clark, Zenas Crane, C. M. Depew, William A. Gardner, Marvin Hughitt, D. P. Kimball, Samuel A. Lynde, F. W. Vanderbilt, Harold S. Vanderbilt, William K. Vanderbilt, and William K. Vanderbilt, Jr., had as its principal place of busines Chicago, Illinois, had total capital stock of $34,044,195, had 431.72 miles of track in Minnesota, had 377 locomotives, had 321 passenger cars, had 12,569 freight cars, and had 9,160 total employees. In 1917, the railroad operated 2,516.315 miles of rail trackage, owned 374 locomotives, owned 12,486 freight cars, owned 344 passenger cars, owned 845 work cars, and had control of 16.66 percent of the Lake Superior Terminal and Transfer Railway, 11.11 percent of the Minnesota Transfer Railway, 50 percent of The Minneapolis Eastern Railway, 11.11 percent of The Saint Paul Union Depot Company, and 50 percent of the Sioux City Bridge. The railroad was succeeded by the Chicago & NorthWestern RailRoad in 1957. [See note for John A. Humbird for 937 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Thomas Wilson for 761 Goodrich Avenue.] [See note on Pierce Butler for 1345-1347 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Edwin Wheeler Winter for 415 Summit Avenue.] [See note for William Drew Washburn for 2119 Third Avenue South.]

Chicago, St. Paul & St. Louis RailRoad was incorporated in 1884 by D. H. Ainsworth, A. D. Barnum, J. S. Cameron, L. O. Goddars, and J. W. Traer to build and operate a railway from Minneapolis easterly by way of St. Paul to the State boundary with Wisconsin in Washington County, Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1882. The railroad had capital stock of $2,000,000 and the principal place of business for the railroad was St. Paul. The members of the initial board of directors were D. H. Ainsworth, A. D. Barnum, J. S. Cameron, L. O. Goddars, and J. W. Traer.

Chippewa Valley & Superior RailRoad: Special Laws of Minnesota 1872, Chapter 108, permitted the railroad to build a bridge over the Mississippi River at Wabasha, Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1881 to construct a railway line from Wabasha, Minnesota, on the Mississippi River, to Eau Claire, Wisconsin, began construction of its line from Wabasha, Minnesota, to Eau Claire, Wisconsin, in 1881, completed it, and opened it for traffic in 1882. Special Lawa of Minnesota 1881, Chapter 102, permitted the railroad to construct and maintain a railroad bridge over the Mississippi River between Read’s Landing, Wisconsin, and Wabasha, Minnesota, to connect its Minnesota and Wisconsin rail lines. After building a permanent pontoon bridge over the Mississippi River, it operated until 1882, and was succeeded by the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad, which purchased the railroad for $1,575,000. It became known as the Chippewa Valley Division of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad, followed the Chippewa River in Wisconsin for 50 miles with six stations. The extension of the railroad division to Chippewa Falls< Wisconsin, was opened for traffic in 1883. John Johnston was the treasurer and a member of the board of directors of the Chippewa Valley & Superior Railway Company.

Choctaw Coal and Railway Company: The railroad was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1887 and was authorized by an 1890 U. S. Congressional enactment (Senate Resolution 119,) with $2,500,000 in capital stock and a general office in Minneapolis, to mine, smelt, refine, deal in coal, Iron and all kinds of ores and minerals, and for the construction and operation of railroads. The railroad was organized in 1887 and, by 1890, built a 65 mile rail line from Wister, Oklahoma, to McAlester, Oklahoma, by way of Victor, Oklahoma, Caston, Oklahoma, Fanshawe, Oklahoma, Hughes, Oklahoma, Red Oak, Oklahoma, Panola, Oklahoma, Lutie, Oklahoma, Wilburton, Oklahoma, Limestone, Oklahoma, Hartshorne, Oklahoma, Halleyville, Oklahoma, Dow, Oklahoma, Alderson, Oklahoma, and Krebs, Oklahoma. The railroad later, by 1892, built a 26 mile rail line from El Reno, Oklahoma, to Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, by way of Banner, Oklahoma, Yukon, Oklahoma, and Council, Oklahoma. The railroad was sold under foreclosure to George H. Earle Jr., Francis I. Gowen, George B. Kirkbride, Nicholas Thouron, and Sydney F. Tyler, trustees in 1894. The railroad was succeeded by the Choctaw, Oklahoma & Gulf Railroad in 1894. The successor Choctaw, Oklahoma & Gulf Railroad was officially incorporated in 1894 by act of Congress and purchased the Choctaw Coal and Railway Company from its trustees in 1894. The railroad was ultimately succeeded by the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railway Company.

Cleveland-Cliffs Iron Company RailRoad/Cleveland Cliffs Mine RailRoad: The Cleveland Iron Company was founded in 1846, was chartered as a company by Michigan in 1850, and was renamed Cleveland Iron Mining Company. The Cleveland Iron Mining Company merged in 1890 with Jeptha Wade's Cliffs Iron Company and became the Cleveland-Cliffs Iron Company. In the early 1900's, the company made the transition from the hard-rock iron ore of the Upper Peninsula of Michigan to the soft hematite of Minnesota's Mesabi Range and adjacent lodes. The company railroad owned four Shay geared steam locomotives. It was located at the Sharon Mine near Buhl, St. Louis County, Minnesota. The Sharon Mine opened in 1901, produced nonBessemer hematite, and became inactive before 1920, In 1915, it purchased six center dump ore cars from the Clark Car Company. The company also operated a mine and railroad at Marble, Minnesota. The company was succeeded by the Hanna Mining Company.

Cliffs Erie RailRoad/LTV Steel Mining RailRoad: After 1957, LTV Steel Mining mined, processing and transported iron ore from Hoyt Lakes, Minnesota. The high grade ore (taconite pellets) were moved by rail to the docks at Taconite Harbor, Minnesota. LTV Steel Mining absorbed the bankrupt Erie Mining Company in the 1950's. The railroad hauled iron ore from the the Hoyt Lakes, Minnesota, Taconite plant to Erie Mining Company's dock & shipping port on the shores of Lake Superior at Taconite Harbor, Minnesota. During operation, 25 million tons of crude ore were mined each year and processed through a coarse crusher, where the crude is pounded into 6 inch rocks using 60 inch rotating crushers, additional crushers reduced these rocks to 3/4 inch size, and a concentrator ground it to a fine powder. The iron ore particles are separated magnetically and increased in concentration to 67 percent iron, with the concentrate rolled into balls, and finally heated to 2300 degrees to produce pellets. The pellets were loaded onto a train of 96 to 108 cars for a run of 74 miles to Taconite Harbor, Minnesota, for ore boat shipment to Indiana and Ohio steel plants. The railroad ended regular service in 2001, but had limited runs in 2004 and a final clean-up run of chips and ore fines from Taconite Harbor, Minnesota, back to Hoyt Lakes, Minnesota.

Cloquet Lumber Company RailRoad/General Lumber Company RailRoad: The company, owned by Weyerhaeuser interests, succeeded the Swallow & Hopkins Lumber Company RailRoad after 1922 and used the Horse Lake railroad line developed by the Swallow & Hopkins Lumber Company to connect with the Duluth, Missabi & Iron Range RailRoad and haul logs to Cloquet, Minnesota. By 1926, the company had ended its logging operations in the Ely, Minnesota, area. The Cloquet Lumber Company was the successor to the Charles N. Nelson Lumber, established in 1880, to the Knife Falls Lumber Company, established in 1883,) to the George Shaw Company of Davenport, Iowa, to the Frederick Weyerhaeuser Company, established in 1883, and then to the Renwick, Shaw and Crossett Company.

Cloquet Terminal RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 2002, succeeding the Duluth & Northeastern Railroad. It is a Class 3 terminal railroad operating four miles of track in Cloquet, Minnesota, interchanges with the Burlington Northern & Santa Fe RailRoad and Canadian Pacific Railroad in Cloquet, Minnesota, is owned by the SAPPI Paper Mill, and services the SAPPI Paper Mill, a USG Ceiling Tile plant, and a SMI Plant on the mill site. The railroad shop and offices are located on Dunlap Island in the St. Louis River. The railroad has 160 freight cars.

Como Railway Company was incorporated in 1880 by A. K. Barnum, R. H. Dougan, H. J. Hamm, Ed. A. Hemenway, and Thomas L. Kerr to survey, locate, build, maintain and operate a railway and a telegraph from a point at or near the central portion of St. Paul to a point at or near Lake Como, Ramsey County, Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1880. It had initial capital stock of $50,000 and its principal place of business was St. Paul.

Consumers Ore Company RailRoad The Consumers Ore Company was an iron minig company that was backed by M. A. Hanna & Company which purchased A. Maitland interests on the Minnesota Iron Range and owned the Frantz Mine near Buhl, Minnesota. The company railroad owned four Shay geared steam locomotives. It was located at Buhl, Minnesota.

Continental Cable & Street Railway Construction Company: The company was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1887, had capital stock of $100,000, and had its general office in Minneapolis.

Corrigan-McKinney Company RailRoad: The mining company railroad owned three Shay geared steam locomotives, including a 1908 Shay locomotive built by the Lima Locomotive Works. It had operations at Virginia, Minnesota, and at the Stevenson Mine at Hibbing, Minnesota. Captain James Corrigan (1848-1900,) with his partner, Frank Rockefeller, bought vast iron ore fields in the Lake Superior district of Minnesota and built a number of ore boats and grain freighters. The Corrigan-McKinney Steel Company, formed from a partnership with Judge Stevenson Burke of Cleveland, Ohio, was the successor of Corrigan, Ives & Company, dealers in iron ore and pig iron, established in Cleveland, Ohio, in 1890. Captain James Corrigan ( -1908) made a fortune with the Standard Oil Company. Corrigan-Ives went into receivership in 1893, and was reborn as Corrigan, McKinney & Company in 1895, with Price McKinney, a former bookkeeper for the company, as a partner. Under McKinney's leadership, the firm incorporated and grew to become the Corrigan-McKinney Steel Company with a strategically located plant along the Cuyahoga River as well as extensive iron ore and coal reserves. McKinney eventually renamed the firm the McKinney Steel Company. James William Corrigan (1881-1928,) through lawsuits and stock purchases, acquired control of the company in 1919 and ousted Price McKinney ( -1925,) who committed suicide. The Corrigan-McKinney Company, the tenth largest steel company in the United States in 1928, operated in the early 20th Century, owned the Newton Steel Company and the N. & G. Taylor Company, had a mill in Cleveland, Ohio, and also owned mines on the Upper Peninsula of Michigan and in Indiana County, Pennsylvania. The Genesee Furnace Company of Charlotte, New York, was a subsidiary of the Corrigan-McKinney Company and produced flux material. In 1928, John H. Watson Jr., became the president of the Corrigan-McKinney Steel Company, with a majority of the stock of the company owned by four women, Laura MacMarten (Mrs. James W.) Corrigan, Mrs. Price McKinney, Mrs. Stevenson Burke, and Mrs. Parthenia Burke Ross. Company practice was to build a railroad to each of its mines. In Cleveland, Ohio, the company railroad connected to the mill was known as the River Terminal RailRoad. In 1928, the tonnage produced by U. S. steel companies was U. S. Steel 23,046,000, Bethlehem Steel 7,900,000, Youngstown-Inland 5,040,000, Jones & Laughlin 3,000,000, Republic-Trumbull 1,950,000, American Rolling Mill 1,750,000, Central Alloy 1,400,000, Wheeling Steel 1,273,000, Colorado Fuel & Iron 1,138,000, and Corrigan-McKinney 1,000,000. In 1930, the Cleveland Cliffs Iron Company of Cleveland, Ohio, obtained control of the Corrigan-McKinney Steel Company of Cleveland, Ohio, through a stock purchase. In 1935, Cleveland Cliffs divested itself of Corrigan-McKinney and the federal Justice Department initially successfully enjoined a proposed merger of the Corrigan McKinney Steel Company and the Republic Steel Corporation under the Clayton Antitrust law, but Republic Steel eventually did purchase the company. With the acquisition of the Corrigan McKinney Steel Company, the headquarters of Republic Steel were moved from Youngstown, Ohio, to Cleveland, Ohio, in 1936. In 1983, a deal was reached for LTV Corporation to acquire Republic Steel Corporation and merge it with Jones and Laughlin Steel Corporation, creating the new LTV Steel Company.

Crookston Lumber Company RailRoad: The Crookston Lumber Company engaged in significant logging operations out of Kelliher, Minnesota, on a branch line from the Minnesota & International RailRoad at Kelliher, Minnesota. The Crookston Lumber Company eventually operated 30 miles of rail spurs from the Minnesota & International RailRoad from 1919 until 1922. The Crookston Lumber Company also used steam haulers, a small railroad locomotive boiler unit mounted on a carriage with treads, in its logging operations. The Crookston Lumber Company also owned at least one Shay geared steam locomotive and at least one Climax geared steam locomotive.

Crookston, Minneapolis & Duluth RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1885 and was incorporated in 1885 by Ansel Bates, M. R. Brown, K. D. Chase, E. D. Childs, E. S. Corser, John Cromb, George L. Erskine, James Hill, W. D. Hurlbut, C. E. Page, Thomas B. Walker, E. M. Walsh, and E. C. Whitney to build a railway from Crookston, Minnesota, by way of Leech Lake, Minnesota, to Minneapolis and to Duluth, Minnesota. It had initial capital stock of $1,000,000 and its principal place of business was Crookston, Minnesota. E. S. Corser was the president of the Minneapolis Real Estate Exchange. [See the note for Thomas B. Walker and the Walker family for 1046 Summit Avenue.] [See note on James Jerome Hill for 240 Summit Avenue.]

Crookston & SouthEastern RailRoad was incorporated in 1887 by C. O. Christianson, B. Clements, M. Ericson, A. G. Gallasch, R. B. Gates, Robert Houston, Delos Jacobus, Joseph Lawrence, Alex. McKinnon, C. C. Utzinger, August Walter, and others to build a railway from Fertile, Polk County, Minnesota, northwesterly by way of Crookston, Minnesota, to the Red River of the North. It had initial capital stock of $2,000,000 and its principal place of business was Crookston, Minnesota.

Crookston & Southwestern RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1887.

Crookston Street Railway Company: The street railroad was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1887 by E. D. Childs, John Cromb, Charles E. Sawyer, W. Steenerson, and Andrew D. Stephens and had its general office in Crookston, Minnesota. In 1889, the railroad had capital stock of $100,000, had as its officers Charles E. Sawyer, president, John Cromb, secretary, and A. D. Stephens, treasurer, and was scheduled for construction.

Croxton Mine Narrow Gauge RailRoad: The Croxton mine was located at Range 20, Township 58, Section 13, Balkan Township, Minnesota, between Chisholm, St. Louis County, Minnesota, and Buhl, St. Louis County, Minnesota. The Croxton mine was owned in 1905 by Sellwood and the Cherry Valley Iron Company, was stripped by 1905, was mined by the milling process in 1905, produced about 59 percent pure iron ore, lies on the South side of a 45 acre plot owned by Mary Syme of Wisconsin, connected with the Great Northern RailRoad, and produced 120,000 tons by 1905. Alfred Martin was the superintendent of the mine.

Cuyuna Iron Range RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in 1909 by Cuyler Adams and two attorneys employed by the Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sault Ste. Marie RailRoad to build and operate a railway from Rabbit Lake, Minnesota, to either Duluth, Minnesota, or Superior, Wisconsin, was organized in 1909 to serve the Orelands Mining Company, and was principally owned by Cuyler Adams. The railroad initially served the Kennedy Mine on the Cuyuna Iron Range. Cuyler Adams was a mining engineer, was the developer of the Cuyuna Iron Range in Minnesota, and was also the general manager and president of both the Cuyuna Iron Range Railroad and the Cuyuna Northern Railroad Company. The railroad operated until 1910 and was purchased by and succeeded by the Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sault Ste. Marie RailRoad in 1910.

Cuyuna Northern RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1911, had capital stock of $1,000,000, was organized in 1912, built two branch lines, a 5.16 mile rail line from Deerwood, Minnesota, to the Mille Lacs Mine, Minnesota/Mille Lacs, Minnesota, ore shaft, built in 1912, and a 3.56 mile rail line from Deerwood, Minnesota, to Oreland, Minnesota, built in 1911 and 1912, operated until 1914, and was succeeded by purchase by the Northern Pacific RailRoad in 1914. The railroad initially served Adams' Cuyuna/Mille Lacs Mine. Cuyler Adams was a mining engineer, was the developer of the Cuyuna Iron Range in Minnesota, and was also the general manager and president of both the Cuyuna Iron Range Railroad and the Cuyuna Northern Railroad Company.

Cyprus Mining RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1989, operated until 1994, and was succeeded by the North Shore Mining RaiRoad.

Dakota & Great Northern RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1900, was incorporated in 1900 in North Dakota by W. P. Clough, M. D. Grover, James N. Hill, Edward Sawyer, and F. E. Ward, and had capital stock of $2,000,000. The capital stock of the railroad was wholly owned by the Great Northern RailRoad. In 1901, the railroad, in conjunction with the Great Northern RailRoad, built a 30 mile rail line North from Lakota, North Dakota, and built a 12 mile rail line NorthWest from Bottineau, North Dakota. In 1905, the railroad opened new rail lines in conjunction with the Great Northern RailRoad from York, North Dakota, to Thorne, North Dakota, from Towner, North Dakota, to Maxbass, North Dakota, and from Munich, North Dakota, to Sarles, North Dakota. The railroad was succeeded by the Great Northern RailRoad. In 1907, the Great Northern RailRoad acquired outright Dakota & Great Northern RailRoad as well as the Montana Central RailRoad, the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba RailRoad, the Eastern Railway of Minnesota, the Wilmar & Sioux Falls Railway, the Park Rapids & Leech Lake Railway, the Minnesota & Great Northern Railway, the Duluth, Watertown & Pacific Railway, the Montana & Great Northern Railway, the Billings & Northern Railway, the Spokane Falls & Northern Railway, the Columbia & Red Mountain Railway, the Washington & Great Northern Railway, the Seattle & Montana Railway, the Minneapolis Union Railway, and the Duluth & Superior Terminal Company.

Dakota & Hastings RailRoad: In 1882, the railroad owned 28,900.96 acres of land in Minnesota.

Dakota, Minnesota & Eastern Railroad: The railroad is a Class II railroad subsidiary of the Canadian Pacific Railway that operates across South Dakota and southern Minnesota with branches extending into Wyoming, Nebraska and Iowa. When initially organized in 1986, the railroad operated over tracks that were spun off from the Chicago & North Western Transportation Company in South Dakota and Minnesota. Kevin V. Schieffer, legal counsel for former South Dakota Republican Senator Larry Pressler, succeeded J. C. McIntyre as president of the railroad in 1996. In 1997, the railroad announced plans to build into Wyoming's Powder River Basin to haul coal East. The railroad purchased the assets of I&M Rail Link railroad in 2002, renaming it the Iowa, Chicago & Eastern Railroad, and combining its management and dispatching duties with those of the Duluth, Minnesota & Eastern RailRoad under holding company Cedar American Rail Holdings. In 2007, the Canadian Pacific Railway announced that it would acquire the railroad and the merger was completed in 2008.

Dakota Rail RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1985, had 44 miles of trackage between Wayzata, Minnesota, and Hutchinson, Minnesota, operated until 1999, was owned by RailAmerica, Inc. of Boca Raton, Florida, and was sold to the Hennepin County Regional Rail Authority for $7.6 million. The route of the former rail line is now a regional recreational trail.

Dale & Bumgardner Company RailRoad: Dale & Bumgardner was a St. Paul steam shovel firm and railway contractors who graded and leveled the ground for the ore stock pile at the Adams mine southwest of Deerwood, Minnesota, on the Iron Range in 1912. John Dale (1844- ) and L. E./L. A. Bumgardner were the partners who made up the firm. Louis A. Bumgardner and John Dale resided at 272 Prescott Street in St. Paul in 1891. John Dale (1844-1921) was born in Manchester, England, emigrated to the United States in 1866, first became a freight hauler in Burlington, Iowa, moved to St. Paul in 1870, formed the firm of Dale & Bumgardner, contractors for roadbed building and grading for railroads, married S. E. Peabody in 1893, was a Mason, was an Episcopalian, and officed at the the Scandinavian-American Bank Building. Louis A. Bumgardner was a member of the Minnesota Historical Society in 1922. Louis A. Bumgardner was granted a patent (#786,263) for a card holding attachment for a telephone in 1905, two-thirds of which he assigned to John Dale and Francis E. Peabody, both of St. Paul.

Davenport, Iowa & Dakota RailRoad Company: The railroad was organized in 1882, was originally incorporated as an Iowa corporation to construct and operate a railroad with a double or a single track, between Davenport, Iowa and the Territory of Dakota, and had its articles of incorporation amended to authorize the construction and operation of a railroad from Davenport, Iowa, through the State of Iowa, and into and through the State of Minnesota and the Dakota Territory to the Pacific Coast and to the British Possessions and from Davenport, Iowa, through the State of Illinois to the Great lakes and to the Atlantic Ocean. The railroad built a 26 mile rail line from Davenport, Iowa, to Sunbury, Iowa, by way of Black Hawk, Iowa, Blue Grass, Iowa, and Stockton, Iowa, was purchased by the Chicago, Iowa & Northern Pacific Railroad Company in 1888, built a five mile rail line from Sunbury, Iowa, to Bennett, Iowa, by 1890, and was sold to the Burlington, Cedar Rapids & Northern Railway Company in 1892.

Davenport & St. Paul RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1872, was incorporated in 1872 to build and operate a railroad from Davenport, Iowa, to St. Paul, Minnesota, by way of Wyoming, Iowa, and Monticello, Iowa. The initial membership of the board of directors of the railroad was identical to the membership of the board of directors of the railroad’s construction company. Andrew Carnegie and the Pennsylvania RailRoad were significant investors in the railroad in 1872. Hiram Price was the president of the railroad in 1871. Frederick Benjamin Doolittle (1825-1912) was the treasurer of the railroad in 1872. The railroad was eventually renamed the Davenport & NorthWestern RailRoad. The transfer of controlling interest in the railroad to the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific RailRoad was being negotiated in 1874. Colonel George H. French, a former mayor of Davenport, Iowa, was the president of the railroad in 1874. The railroad was obtained in an 1876 bondholder foreclosure purchase by the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad.

Decorah, Rochester & Red River RailRoad was incorporated in 1884 by George W. Adams, John W. Booth, J. M. Buck, B. W. Eaton, Hiram T. Horton, E. W. Knowlton, Andrew Nelson, P. Pollock, R. H. Wales, and R. W. Wells to locate, construct, operate and maintain a railway, with branches and appendages, from Decorah, Iowa, northerly, southerly, easterly, and southeasterly to points in Iowa, Wisconsin, Illinois, Dakota Territory, and Minnesota to connect with other railroads. The railroad had initial capital stock of $5,000,000 and its principal place of business was Decorah, Iowa. The railroad was organized in 1884.

Des Moines & Minneapolis RailRoad: 1915-1920 valuation files published by the Interstate Commerce Commission and compiled by Richard S. Steele indicate that the former Des Moines & Minnesota RailRoad was renamed Des Moines & Minneapolis RailRoad in 1877, operated 20.34 miles of rail trackage from Ames, Iowa, to Callahan, Iowa, in 1878, and was succeeded by the Chicago & North Western Railway.

Des Moines & Minnesota RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated under Iowa law in 1870, initially was a narrow guage railroad, acquired the Iowa & Minnesota Railway in 1873, changed to a standard guage railroad, operated a 37.00 mile rail line from Des Moines, Iowa, to Ames, Iowa, in 1874, was initially succeeded by the Des Moines & Minneapolis RailRoad, and was subsequently succeeded by the Chicago & North Western Railway.

Des Moines Valley RailRoad/Des Moines Valley RailRoad Company of Minnesota: The railroad was organized in 1899, was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1899, was the successor to the Keokuk, Fort Des Moines & Minnesota RailRoad Company, which incorporated before 1867, was controlled by the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha RailRoad in 1899, constructed a 38.63 mile rail line from Bingham Lake, Minnesota, to Currie, Minnesota, from 1899 until 1900, operated until 1900, and was succeeded by sale by the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha RailRoad in 1900. In 1899, the railroad operated a rail line from Bingham Lake, Minnesota, to Currie, Minnesota. In 1900, the railroad operated a 19.74 mile rail line from Jeffers, Minnesota, to Currie, Minnesota.

Douglas County Street Railway Company: The Douglas County Street Railway Company was organized in 1881, was authorized by the town board of Superior, Wisconsin, and was incorporated under Wisconsin law in 1884 to construct and operate a street railway in Superior, Wisconsin. Construction of the street railway actually began in 1887. By 1890, the company owned four horse-cars and eight horses. Electrification of the system occurred in 1890. In 1890, the railroad had capital stock of $50,000, had as its officers Henry D. Minot, president, Frank C. Ward, secretary and treasurer, M. O'Brien, superintendent, and S. T. Norvett, general manager, and owned five Daft and Thomson-Houston rail cars. The Superior Rapid Transit Company acquired the rights and properties of the Douglas County Street Railway Company in 1892. Additional track was constructed in 1892 and in 1893 and was financed by mortgage bonds that were issued by the railroad in 1894. The railroad ultimately had 78.02 miles of track. The company defaulted on the interest payments and was placed into receivership in 1896. The Superior Rapid Transit Company went into the hands of receivers in 1896, the receivers operated the property until 1900, when it was sold in a foreclosure sale and was acquired by the Duluth Street Railway Company. The Duluth Street Railway Company and the Superior Traction Company were consolidated and reorganized in 1898.

Drake & Stratton Company RailRoad: Drake & Stratton was a New York and Philadelphia contracting company and was a mine stripping firm, a substructure, foundation and masonry company, and a dredging company. In 1903, the Drake & Stratton Company was involved in Mining at the Stevenson mine near Hibbing, Minnesota. In 1906, the Drake & Stratton Company was engaged in iron ore stripping at the Leonard mine, at the Morris mine and at the Fayal mine. In 1910, the Drake & Stratton Company was mining iron ore at the Dale-Uno mine near Hibbing, Minnesota. Drake & Stratton was an engineering company with offices in New York and Philadelphia that assisted many Northeast and Midwest railroads with bridge building tasks.

Dubuque, Bellevue & Mississippi RailRoad/Chicago, Clinton, Dubuque & Minnesota RailRoad was incorporated in 1870 to construct a rail line from Bellevue, Iowa, to Dubuque, Iowa. In 1871, it became the Chicago, Clinton, Dubuque & Minnesota RailRoad after the president of the sister railroad, the Dubuque & Minnesota RailRoad also became the president of the Dubuque, Bellevue & Mississippi RailRoad. The railroad was known as the "River Road." The president of the Chicago, Clinton, Dubuque & Minnesota RailRoad before 1882 was James F. Joy and after 1881 was Alexander Mitchell and the secretary of the railroad before 1882 was John N. Denison and after 1881 was P. M. Myers. It ran from Rome Junction, Houston County, Minnesota, southerly along the Mississippi River to Midland Junction, Clinton County, Iowa, with a branch line from Turkey River Junction, Minnesota, to Wadena, Minnesota.

Dubuque & Minnesota RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1872, was incorporated in 1878, operated until 1878, was initially succeeded by the Chicago, Clinton, Dubuque & Minnesota RailRoad, and was ultimately succeeded by the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad.

Dubuque, St. Paul & Minneapolis RailRoad was incorporated in 1880 by Robert S. Innes, Samuel P. Snider, Alfred G. Wilcox, Charles A. Winship, and John G. Wolley to build, maintain, and operate a freight and passenger railway from the Twin Cities by way of Hennepin County, Minnesota, Ramsey County, Minnesota, Dakota County, Minnesota, Goodhue County, Minnesota, Dodge County, Minnesota, and Mower County, Minnesota, to the Southern boundary of the State. It had initial capital stock of $3,000,000 and its principal place of business was Minneapolis.

Dubuque & Sioux City RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated under Iowa law in 1860, after Morris K. Jesup forced the DUBUQUE AND PACIFIC RAIL ROAD COMPANY into receivership, and was organized in 1888. The railroad was sold in a foreclosure sale in 1860. The railroad was the successor through an amalgamation of the Dubuque & Pacific RailRoad, organized by Jesse P. Farley, Asa Horr, Lucius Hart Langworthy, and Platt Smith, and chartered in Iowa in 1853 or 1856, the Cedar Falls & Minnesota RailRoad, incorporated in Iowa in 1858, the Iowa Falls & Sioux City RailRoad, incorporated in Iowa in 1861, the Cherokee & Dakota RailRoad, incorporated in Iowa in 1887, the Cedar Rapids & Chicago RailRoad, incorporated in Iowa in 1886, the Fort Dodge & Omaha RailRoad, incorporated in Iowa in 1898, the Albert Lea & Southern RailRoad, incorporated in Minnesota in 1899, the Stacyville RailRoad, incorporated in Iowa in 1897, the Cedar Falls & New Hartford RailRoad Company, incorporated in Iowa in 1903, and the Cedar Falls & NorthEastern RailRoad Company, incorporated in Iowa in 1904. The controlling interest in the railroad was acquired by the Illinois Central RailRoad in 1888. In 1888, the officers of the railroad were W. J. Knight, president, E. C. Woodruff, vice president, A. G. Hackstaff, secretary, and Henry De Wolf, treasurer, and the members of the board of directors of the railroad were John Anthon, S. V. R. Cruger, S. L. Dows, Stuyvesant Fish, A. S. Garretson, W. D. Guthrie, J. T. Hancock, E. H. Harriman, E. T. Jeffery, W. J. Knight, J. F. Peavey, J. V. Rider, M. M. Walker, H. F. Webster, and E. C. Woodruff, the railroad owned 142.72 miles of rail trackage, and the railroad had as its principal place of business Dubuque, Iowa. According to Poor's Manual of the RailRoads of the United States, Volume 33, by Henry Varnum Poor in 1901, as of 1899, the railroad operated 599.59 miles of rail trackage, had as its officers Stuyvesant Fish, president, J. C. Welling, vice president, A. G. Hackstaff, secretary, and E. T. H. Gibson, treasurer, and had its general office at Dubuque, Iowa. In 1904, the officers of the railroad were Stuyvesant Fitch, president, John C. Welling, vice president and comptoller, J. F. Merry, secretary, E. T. H. Gibson, treasurer, and J. T. Harahan, general manager, and the members of the board of directors were J. W. Auchincloss, J. W. Conchar, W. G. Dows, Stuyvesant Fitch, E. T. H. Gibson, J. T. Harahan, E. H. Harriman, George E. Lichty, A. R. Loomis, J. V. Rider, F. D. Stout, O. O. Tolerton, W. H. Torbert, M. M. Walker, and John C. Welling. In 1904, the railroad had capital stock of $11,734,500, owned 55 locomotives, owned 45 passenger cars, owned 199 freight cars, owned seven company service cars, owned three bridges and 15 trestles, had 82 employees in Minnesota, operated 759.56 total miles of railway trackage (29.89 miles in Minnesota,) and was operated by the Illinois Central RailRoad. In 1913, the railroad had as its officers C. H. Markham, president, W. L. Park, vice president, F. B. Bowes, vice president, C. F. Parker, vice president, F. E. Couch, secretary, A. J. Wykes, treasurer, and M. P. Blauvelt, comptroller, had as its board of directors J. T. Adams, J. W. Auchincloss, D. R. Burbank, Henry de Forest, R. J. Goelet, W. A. Harriman, A. R. Loomis, R. S. Lovett, Walter Luttgen, C. H. Markham, W. L. Park, Charles A. Peabody, Philip Stockton, Cornelius Vanderbilt, and A. J. Wykes, had as its principal place of business in Chicago, Illinois, had total capital stock of $11,759,500, had 30.18 miles of track in Minnesota, had 55 locomotives, had 45 passenger cars, had 199 freight cars, and had 4,731 total employees. The railroad was succeeded by the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad. In 1915, the railroad operated 967.90 miles of rail trackage, owned no equipment, and was controlled by the Illinois Central RailRoad.

Duluth Belt Line RailRoad: The railroad was organized as a Minnesota corporation in 1888 as the Duluth Incline Railway and changed its name in 1890. The Belt Line ran near Central Avenue and Main Street in Duluth, Minnesota, up to Bay View Heights in West Duluth, Minnesota. The railroad also was known as the West Duluth Incline because originally it was West of the corner of Arlington Avenue and Duke Street in Duluth, Minnesota. In 1904, the officers of the railroad were J. R. Myers, president, C. E. Dickerman, first vice president, B. F. Myers, secretary, H. H. Myers, treasurer and general manager, and Victor Stearns, counsel, and the members of the board of directors were C. E. Dickerman, B. F. Myers, H. H. Myers, J. R. Myers, and H. S. Moody. In 1904, the railroad had capital stock of $159,751, owned two passenger cars, owned six freight cars, owned three bridges, owned one tunnel, and operated 2.00 total miles of railway trackage, all in Minnesota. In 1913, the railroad had as its officers J. R. Myers, president, B. F. Myers, secretary, Victor Stearns, general counsel, and H. H. Myers, general manager, had as its board of directors C. E. Dickerman, H. S. Moody, B. F. Myers, H. H. Myers, and J. R. Myers, had its principal place of business in Duluth, Minnesota, had total capital stock of $138,500, had 1.50 miles of track in Minnesota, and had five total employees. The Duluth Belt-line Railway ran passenger and freight service from Central Avenue in West Duluth, Minnesota, to Vinland Street in Bayview Heights, Minnesota. It was 7,300 feet long and had a rise of 600 feet. The steepest grade was 16 percent and a one-way trip took 24 minutes. The railway also had a freight service, which consisted mostly of transporting lumber from the sawmills on Grassy Point. The incline railroad had two cars, which were permanently attached to a single cable. The rail trackage East of 61st Avenue West was abandoned in 1909. Operations were shut down for the winter in 1916 and by Fall, 1917, the rails were torn up and sold for scrap.

Duluth, Crookston & Northern RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1889 by William Auglim, John Locken, John R. McKinnon, John McLean, Robert J. Montague, Nathan P. Stone, Edmund M. Walsh to build a railway from a point in or near Duluth, Minnesota, westerly via Crookston, Minnesota, to the Dakota Territory boundary. It had initial capital stock of $5,000,000 and its principal place of business was Crookston, Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1889 and operated a railroad that extended from Fertile Junction, Minnesota, through Crookston, Minnesota, to Carthage Junction, Minnesota. The railroad constructed 44.5 miles of rail line (a 22.40 mile rail line from Fertile, Minnesota, to Crookston, Minnesota, in 1889 and a 22.10 mile rail line from Crookston, Minnesota, to Carthage Junction, Minnesota, in 1890) between 1889 and 1890. There was litigation successfully challenging the entitlement to the proceeds of Crookston, Minnesota, municipal bonds by the railroad and whether the railroad met the timeline condition precedent in McManus v Duluth, Crookston & Northern RailRoad Company, 52 NW 980 (Minnesota 1892.) The railroad operated until 1898 and was succeeded by the Northern Pacific RailRoad.

Duluth & Dakota RailRoad & Telegraph Company: The railroad was organized in 1876. The railroad was incorporated in 1881 by Z. B. Clarke, W. A. Foland, M. Hoban, A. W. Lathrop, William Moses, Ole Peterson, D. D. Robinson, H. W. Stone, Lane K. Stone, and Frank M. Thornton to survey, locate, construct and operate a railway and telegraph line from Sauk Center, Stearns County, Minnesota, southwesterly by way of Chippewa Falls, Pope County, Minnesota, Benson, Swift County, Minnesota, and Appleton, Swift County, Minnesota, to the Western boundary of the State, with a branch line by way of Montevideo, Chippewa County, Minnesota, and Lac Qui Parle County, Minnesota, to the Western boundary of the State. The railroad had $2,000,000 in corporate stock. The principal place of business of the railroad was Benson, Minnesota. [See note on Lane K. Stone for 255 Summit Avenue.]

Duluth & Dakota Railway Company: The railroad was incorporated in 1876 by R. W. Barton, F. E. Davidson, O. G. Evans, C. F. Ireland, R. R. Johnson, A. W. Lathrop, W. V. Lathrop, S. P. Snyder, and L. R. Whitney to build and operate a railway from a point along the Northern Pacific RailRoad near Brainerd, Minnesota, West SouthWesterly by way of Appleton, Minnesota, and Glenwood, Minnesota, to the Western boundary of the State. It had initial capital stock of $500,000 and its principal place of business was Appleton, Swift County, Minnesota.

Duluth, Fargo & Black Hills RailRoad: The railroad was under construction in 1884 and in 1888 and connected to Duluth, Minnesota.

Duluth, Fergus Falls & Breckenridge RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in 1872 and was organized in 1872.

Duluth, Fergus Falls & Southern RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in 1887 by Jacob Austin, F. P. Barrows, J. A. Brown, E. E. Corliss, G. O. Dahl, C. H. Graves, Carroll E. Gray, R. S. Munger, C. E. Page, M. R. Tyler, and C. O. Wheeler to build a railway from Fergus Falls, Minnesota, to Duluth, Minnesota, and from Fergus Falls, Minnesota, southwesterly. The railroad had capital stock of $2,000,000 and had as its principal place of business in Fergus Falls, Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1887. In 1888, the officers of the railroad were Jacob Austin, president, C. E. Gray, vice president, E. E. Corless, treasurer, and James A. Brown, secretary J. G. Darrell was the president of the railroad in 1906.. The railroad was still proposed in 1907 for a rail line from Fergus Falls, Minnesota, to a point along the line of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad at Wheaton, Minnesota, or to a point along theline of the Soo Line RailRoad at Elbow, Minnesota.

Duluth, Glencoe & Southwestern RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1888 and was incorporated in 1888 to construct and operate a line of railway from Duluth, Minnesota, in a southerly direction by way of Glencoe, Minnesota, to southern line of the State by E. A. Childs, G. K. Gilbert, A. H. Reed, William Vanderbilt, and H. Wadsworth. The railroad had capital stock of $3,000,000 and its principal place of business was Glencoe, Minnesota.

Duluth Great Western RailRoad: The railroad was the successor to the Duluth, Red Lake Falls & Northern RailRoad, was projected in 1893 to build and operate a rail line between Duluth, Minnesota, and the Mesabi Iron Range of Minnesota, had as its officers in 1893 James M. Paine, president, J. B. Holmes, vice president, Luther Mendenhall, treasurer, and Frank Meyer, secretary, and had as its board of directors in 1893 M. R. Baldwin, J. D. Ensign, C. H. Graves, H. H. Hanford, J. B. Holmes, Luther Mendenhall, James M. Paine, and J. D. Ray.

Duluth Highland Cable Railway Company: The railroad was incorporated in 1889, financed by H. W. Bradley, William W. Billson, and J. A. Willard, had capital stock of $200,000, and intended to build a cable street railway to the top of the hills adjoining Duluth, Minnesota, unless the old street railway company files a notice that it will build there.

Duluth, Huron & Denver RailRoad, the "Cross Cut Line," was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1886 by E. P. Caldwell, John P. Conkey, Fred T. Day, T. C. Day, Lesley Durley, Charles M. Harrison, E. G. Hodgson, C. E. Marbie, and Franklin C. Platt to build a railway from Duluth, Minnesota, to Denver, Colorado. The railroad also was expected to connect with the Union Pacific RailRoad in Nebraska. It had initial capital stock of $10,000,000 and its principal place of business was Huron, Dakota Territory. The railroad was organized in 1886. In 1886, grading work began on 90 miles of the railroad and the railroad ordered six passenger rail cars, 40 box cars, 40 flat rail cars, and ten tank rail cars. In 1886, the railroad attempted to gain a route through the Lake Traverse Sisseton–Wahpeton Oyate Reservation in Dakota Territory. Rail trackage was laid between Benson, Minnesota, and a connection with the Northern Pacific RailRoad at Sauk Centre, Minnesota, before1888 and between Sauk Centre, Minnesota, and the South Dakota border before 1889 and completion of the line from Sauk Centre, Minnesota, to Duluth, Minnesota, was scheduled for 1891. In 1890, the railroad was sold to the Duluth & Southwestern RailRoad. In 1890, John P. Conkey was the president of the railroad and __?__ Evans was the secretary of the railroad and was the prime contractor with the railroad. Marvin Hughitt reportedly joined forces with James J. Hill to wreck plans of the Duluth, Huron & Denver Railway to build from Sauk Centre, Minnesota in Great Northern RailRoad territory into south-central Dakota in Chicago & NorthWestern RailRoad territory. Three shareholders and board of director members unsuccessfully sued John P. Conkey, the acting president of the railroad, and __?__ Evans, the prime contractor retained by the railroad, for illegal actions in conducting affairs of the railroad in Hodgson v. Duluth, Huron & Denver RailRoad, 46 Minn. 454, 49 N.W. 197 (Minn. 1891.) The railroad and its prime crontractor were sued by a subcontractor for construction work done in 1887 in Fowlds v. Evans, 54 N.W. 743 (Minn. 1893.)

Duluth, Iowa, & Dakota RailRoad was incorporated in 1879 by E. P. Barnum, Ole N. Barsness, A. A. Brown, P. J. Kniss, Edward Larsson, Ole Peterson, Gorham Powers, John C. Riebe, and A. M. Stiles to build a railway from the Northern Pacific RailRoad line in Todd County, Minnesota, Westerly by way of Sauk Centre, Minnesota, Swift Falls, Minnesota, and Benson, Minnesota, to a point along the Western boundary of Minnesota in or near Lyon County, Minnesota. It had initial capital stock of $2,000,000 and its principal place of business was Benson, Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1879.

Duluth Iron & Metal Company RailRoad The scrap iron company was founded in 1885 or 1887 by Max Zalk, became a partnership with the addition of H. Y. Josephs in the early 1890's, and the partnership further expanded with the addition of Louis Zalk in 1904. The company expanded to the handling of a wide variety of metals and extended its service area to Washington and Oregon. The company made a specialty of buying complete railroads that were through serving their territory and of distributing their equipment around the country. During World War I, the company was a valuable supplier of the Minnesota Steel Company and its output of the munition steel. The company railroad owned one Shay geared steam locomotive, built in 1887, purchased from the Mesabe Southern Railway, located at Kinross, Minnesota, and eventually sold to the Southern Iron & Equipment Company, and one 1907 Climax patent geared locomotive, a product of the Climax Manufacturing Company of Corry, Pennsylvania. The railroad was located at Duluth, Minnesota.

Duluth & Iron Range RailRoad: The Duluth & Iron Range Railway Company was organized in 1874 and was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1875 by C. P. Bailey, J. B. Culver, Louis M. Dickens, J. D. Ensign, J. D. Howard, J. C. Hunter, Clinton Markell, L. Mendenhall, Peter Mitchell, William W. Spaulding, G. C. Stone, and W. R. Stone to build and operate a railway from Duluth to a point in the Missabe Iron Range. It had initial capital stock of $3,000,000 and its principal place of business was Duluth, Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1874. The railroad was chartered in 1874, incorporated in Minnesota in 1875 by an Ontonagon, Michigan-based syndicate headed by Peter Mitchell that was exploring for iron ore on the eastern end of the Mesabi Iron Range, obtained a land grant from the Minnesota Legislature, and planned for the construction of a railroad line from a point near Babbitt, Minnesota, to Duluth, Minnesota. The unbuilt railroad was purchased by Charlemagne Tower of Philadelphia in 1882. The terminus of the proposed rail line was changed from Duluth, Minnesota, to Agate Bay/Two Harbors, Minnesota, and construction was begun in 1883. In 1883, the officers of the railroad were George C. Stone, president, Richard H. Lee, chief engineer, and H. F. Thompson, secretary and treasurer, and the members of the board of directors of the railroad were C. P. Bailey, Thomas L. Blood, J. B. Culver, J. B. Ensign, Richard H. Lee, George C. Stone, H. F. Thompson, Charlemagne Tower, and Charlemagne Tower, Jr. The company's line from Two Harbors to Soudan was completed in 1884, and the first iron ore shipment from the Soudan, Minnesota, mines arrived at Two Harbors, Minnesota, in 1884. In 1884, 67.6 miles of rail trackage were opened from Duluth, Minnesota to Tower, Minnesota, along with a 1.6 mile branch line from Tower, Minnesota, to nearby mines. In 1885, the railroad operated 76.6 miles of railway trackage, all in Minnesota, owned 11 locomotives, owned three passenger cars, owned 386 freight cars, owned 31 company cars, had 194 total employees, all in Minnesota, had no bridges, and had 66 trestles. In 1885, the officers of the railroad were C. Tower, Jr., president, George C. Stone, vice president and treasurer, I. P. Beck, secretary, R. H. Lee, general superintendent, A. H. Viele, auditor, and H. F. Thompson, attorney, and the members of the board of directors were C. P. Bailey, I. P. Beck, Edward Breitung, R. H. Lee, George C. Stone, H. F. Thompson, C. Tower, C. Tower, Jr., and A. H. Viele. In 1886, the railroad completed a 0.46 mile rail line from Two Harbors Junction, Minnesota, to Two Harbors, Minnesota. In 1887, control of the railroad was acquired by Illinois Steel Company interests, a syndicate that included Henry H. Porter, head of the Illinois Steel Company, Marshall Field, Cyrus McCormick, John D. Rockefeller, William Rockefeller, and Jay C. Morse, of Union Steel Company. In 1887, the railroad had as its officers H. R. Bishop, president, R. H. Lee, vice president, C. W. Hillard, secretary-treasurer, and G. H. White, general superintendent, and had as its board of directors George H. Ball, H. R. Bishop, Benjamin Brewister, David Dows, Marshall Field, H. M. Flagler, R. P. Flower, F. H. Kelly, R. H. Lee, D. O. Mills, H. H. Porter, George C. Stone, and C. Tower, Jr. In 1888, the railroad opened a 21 mile rail line from Tower, Minnesota, to Ely, Minnesota, the railroad operated 186.26 miles of total rail trackage, the railroad owned 27 locomotives, seven passenger cars, two combination cars, two baggage, mail and express cars, 50 box cars, two stock cars, 304 platform cars, 15 coal cars, 480 ore cars, 15 cabooses, three other cars, one tug boat, and one lighter, the railroad ordered in 1888 one business coach, seven locomotives, 270 ore cars, and six cabooses, and the railroad had its principal office in Duluth, Minnesota. According to Poor's Manual of the RailRoads of the United States, Volume 33 by Henry Varnum Poor in 1901, as of 1899, the railroad operated 184.83 miles of rail trackage, owned 60 locomotives, ten passenger cars, two baggage, mail and express cars, 85 box cars, 271 flat freight cars, two stock cars, 15 coal cars, 2,598 iron ore cars, and 68 service cars, leased seven refrigerator cars, had capital stock of $10,000, had as its officers J. L. Greatsinger, president, C. W. Hillard, vice president, C. P. Coffin, secretary and treasurer, and A. H. Viele, auditor, had as its board of directors D. H. Bacon, George S. Brewster, M. J. Carpenter, J. H. Chandler, C. P. Coffin, Marshall Field, H. M. Flagler, A. R. Flower, J. L. Greatsinger, C. W. Hillard, D. O. Mills, H. H. Porter, and E. W. Winter, and had its general office located in Duluth, Minnesota. The railroad, along with the Duluth, Missabe & Northern RailRoad, became a part of United States Steel Corporation in 1901 when the Federal Steel Company, successor to the Illinois Steel Company, was acquired by a group of capitalists headed by Elbert H. Gary and J. P. Morgan, who combined it with the Carnegie Steel Company to form the United States Steel Corporation. In 1904, the officers of the railroad were F. E. House, president and general manager, A. H. Viele, first vice president and auditor, H. Johnson, secretary, F. C. Marshall, treasurer, J. B. Cotton, solicitor, and F. B. Kellogg, general counsel, and the members of the board of directors were R. Angst, T. F. Cole, W. E. Corey, William Edenborn, E. H. Gary, James Gayley, F. E. House, N. P. Hulst, H. Johnson, F. C. Marshall, Thomas Murray, A. H. Viele, and F. H. White. In 1904, the railroad had capital stock of $3,000,000, owned 69 locomotives, owned 16 passenger cars, owned 4,051 freight cars, owned 92 company service cars, owned 15 bridges, owned 69 trestles, had 1,662 employees in Minnesota, and operated 210.83 total miles of railway trackage, all in Minnesota. In 1913, the railroad had as its officers F. E. House, president and general manager, J. H. McLean, first vice president, J. H. Hearding, second vice president, H. Johnson, secretary, F. C. Marshall, treasurer, Thomas Owens, superintendent, F. D. Adams, general solicitor, had as its board of directors J. A. Farrell, E. H. Gary, F. E. House, H. Johnson, J. H. McLean, Thomas Murray, and George L. Reis, had its principal place of business at Duluth, Minnesota, had total capital stock of $3,000,000, had 271.41 miles of track in Minnesota, had 102 locomotives, had 28 passenger cars, had 5,602 freight cars, and had 2,713 total employees. In 1916, the railroad had $3,500,000 in capital stock. In 1927, the railroad served iron mines located at Aurora, Minnesota, Babbitt, Minnesota, Biwabik, Minnesota, Colby, Minnesota, Ely, Minnesota, Eveleth, Minnesota, Largo, Minnesota, McComber, Minnesota, McKinley, Minnesota, Mariska, Minnesota, Pettit, Minnesota, Sparta, Minnesota, Tower Junction/Soudan, Minnesota, Virginia, Minnesota, and Winton, Minnesota. In 1919, the railroad was controlled by the Minnesota Iron Company, a subsidiary of the United States Steel Corporation, operated 545.683 miles of rail trackage, owned 110 locomotives, owned 7,021 freight rail cars, owned 25 passenger rail cars, owned three pieces of floating equipment, owned three miscellaneous rail cars, and owned 102 work rail cars. Between 1883 and 1921, the railroad constructed its rail lines, including a 25 mile rail line from Duluth, Minnesota, to Two Harbors, Minnesota, in 1886, a 70 mile rail line from Two Harbors, Minnesota, to Tower Junction, Minnesota, from 1883 to 1884, a 24 mile rail line from Tower Junction, Minnesota, to Winton, Minnesota, in 1888, a one mile rail line from Tower Junction, Minnesota, to Tower, Minnesota, in 1886, an 18 mile rail line from Allen Junction, Minnesota, to McKinley, Minnesota, in 1892, a six mile rail ine from McKinley, Minnesota, to Virginia, Minnesota, in 1893, a nine mile rail line from McKinley, Minnesota, to Eveleth, Minnesota, in 1895, a 15 mile rail line from Waldo, Minnesota, to Rollins, Minnesota, in 1898, a five mile rail line from Mesaba, Minnesota, to Spring Mine, Minnesota, in 1907, a 16 mile rail line from Spring Mine, Minnesota, to Dunka River, Minnesota, in 1910, a four mile rail line from Eveleth, Minnesota, to Webster, Minnesota, in 1910, a three mile rail line from Robinson, Minnesota, to Burnside Lake, Minnesota, in 1913, a 19 mile rail line from Wales, Minnesota, to Whyte, Minnesota, in 1918, and a 2.91 mile rail line from Divide, Minnesota, to Babbit, Minnesota, in 1921. The railroad operated until 1937 and was succeeded by the Duluth, Missabe & Iron Range RailRoad. [See note on Frank B. Kellogg for 710 West Linwood Avenue.] [See note on Edwin Wheeler Winter for 415 Summit Avenue.]

Duluth & Mackinac RailRoad: The railroad was under construction in 1888, connected to Duluth, Minnesota, and also connected to the New York Central RailRoad.

Duluth & Manitoba Railway/Duluth & Manitoba RailRoad was incorporated under Minnesota General Laws 1884, in 1884 by Ernest Buse, James B. Holmes, Charles Langevin, Paul C. Sletten, and Hugh Thompson, and changed its name from the Duluth & Manitoba Railway Company to the Duluth & Manitoba RailRoad Company in 1885 for a railway that ran from a point on the Northern Pacific RailRoad line in Clay County, Minnesota, northerly through Clay County, Minnesota, Polk County, Minnesota, and Norman County, Minnesota, via Red Lake Falls, Minnesota, to the northern boundary of Minnesota in Norman County and a branch westerly to the western boundary of Minnesota in Polk County. It had initial capital stock of $2,000,000 and had a principal place of business in St. Paul before 1885 and in Minneapolis after 1885. The articles of incorporation of the railroad were amended in 1885, when it changed its name from the Duluth & Manitoba Railway to the Duluth & Manitoba RailRoad. The railroad was organized in 1884 or 1886. The railroad was authorized by an act of the U. S. Congress in 1887 to construct a bridge across the Red River of the North. The railroad received the proceeds of bonds issued by Crookston, Minnesota. The rail line was built by the Foley Brothers & Company. The railroad constructed 208.69 miles of rail line (a 105.00 mile rail line from Manitoba Junction, Minnesota, to Grand Forks, Dakota Territory, from 1886 until 1887, a 3.38 mile rail line from Key West, Minnesota, to Omera, Minnesota, from 1886 until 1887, a 1.06 mile rail line from Red Lake Falls Junction, Minnesota, to Red Lake Falls, Minnesota, from 1886 to 1887, a 96.30 mile rail line from Grand Forks, Dakota Territory, to Pembina, Dakota Territory, in 1887, and 2.95 mi. Omera, Minnesota, to Sherack, Minnesota, in 1895) from 1886 through 1895. In 1889, the railroad operated 206.75 total miles of trackage (110 miles in Minnesota,) owned three bridges, owned 73 trestles, and leased the entire rail line to the Northern Pacific RailRoad. In 1889, the officers of the railroad were Robert Harris, president, T. F. Oakes, vice president, George H. Earl, secretary, and George H. Baxter, treasurer, and members of the board of directors of the railroad were F. Billings, George H. Earl, Robert Harris, James McNaught, Thomas F. Oakes, Henry Stanton, and J. B. Williams. In 1891, the railroad was a proprietary company of the Northern Pacific RailRoad Company. In 1894, the Northern Pacific RailRoad abrogated its 50 year lease of the Duluth & Manitoba RailRoad, prompting the formation of a bondholders committee comprised of James Lennox Banks, Hugh L. Cole, Evan R. Dick, Charles S. Fairchild, Johnstone Livingston, and Charlemagne Tower. In 1895, the Northern Pacific RailRoad defaulted on the bonds of the Duluth & Manitoba RailRoad. The railroad operated until 1898 and was succeeded by the Northern Pacific RailRoad. When absorbed into the Northern Pacific RailRoad, the railroad line extended from Winnipeg Junction, Minnesota, via Red Lake Falls, Minnesota, to the western boundary of Minnesota, and then to Grand Forks, North Dakota, and then to the boundary line between North Dakota and Canada. Colgate Hoyt (1849-1922,) the some of James M. Hoyt and Mary Ella Hoyt, of Cleveland, Ohio, once was the vice president of the railroad as well as being a member of the board of directors of the Northern Pacific RailRoad and an investor in the Wisconsin Central RailRoad. James B. Holmes was engaged in the rolling mill business and later was engaged in a wholesale hardware enterprise. [See note on Thomas Fletcher Oakes for 432 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Thomas Wilson for 761 Goodrich Avenue.]

Duluth, Milbank & SouthWestern Railway Company: The railroad was incorporated as a Dakota Territory corporation in 1888 to construct and operate a 175 mile rail line from Duluth, Minnesota, to a point on the Sioux River near Sioux Falls, Dakota Territory, had capital stock of $3,000,000, and had as its incorporators and first board of directors in 1888 James C. Drake, Robert F. Gibson, Jr., George W. Hawes, John C. Knapp, and Aubrey M. Wright.

Duluth, Minnesota & Eastern RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1986. The Dakota, Minnesota & Eastern RailRoad operates more than 2,500 route miles of track systemwide (472 miles in Minnesota) and serves more than 200 communities across eight states as the largest contiguous Class II regional rail system in the United States and the only regional railroad with a direct connection to all major Class I railroads. DM&E has 1,000 employees systemwide (130 employees in Minnesota) and is headquartered in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. Canadian Pacific Railway assumed control of the DM&E in 2008, operating it as a separate entity. The Dakota, Minnesota & Eastern RailRoad began operations in 1986, with approximately 1,100 route miles of railway track acquired from the Chicago & North Western Transportation Company. DM&E subsequently acquired the former Iowa, Chicago & Eastern RailRoad, which operated 1,400 route miles of railway track of the former I&M Rail Link. The DM&E merged its IC&E and Cedar American Rail Holdings subsidiaries into a single company in 2009.

Duluth, Missabe & Iron Range RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1937 when the Duluth, Missabe & Northern RailRoad and the Spirit Lake Transfer Railway Company consolidated and was expanded when the Duluth and Iron Range RailRoad and the Interstate Transfer Railway were added in 1938. The railway had two operating divisions, the Missabe Division and the Iron Range Division, based upon their predecessor's roads. Before dieselization, the railroad operated very large steam locomotives to haul ore from northern St. Louis County, Minnesota, down to the docks at Duluth, Minnesota, including 18 2-8-8-4 Yellowstone type locomotives, 2-8-8-2 articulated locomotives, 2-8-2 Mikado type locomotives, 2-10-2 Santa Fe type locomotives, and 2-10-4 Texas type locomotives. The 2-8-8-4 Yellowstone type locomotives were able to handle 115-car 8,750-ton trains over 0.62% grades without stalling. In 1988, U.S. Steel, now USX, spun off the Duluth, Missabe & Iron Range RailRoad and their other ore railroads and shipping companies into a subsidiary corporation, Transtar, which then sold majority control to the Blackstone Group and USX. In 2001, the Duluth, Missabe & Iron Range RailRoad and other holdings were spun off from Transtar into the Great Lakes Transportation Company, which was owned fully by the Blackstone Group. The Duluth, Missabe & Iron Range RailRoad was subsequently acquired by the Canadian National RailRoad in 2003.

Duluth, Missabe & Northern RailRoad was incorporated in Minnesota in 1891/1892 to build a railroad from mines near Mountain Iron, Minnesota, and Biwabik, Minnesota, to Duluth, Minnesota, became controlled by the Lake Superior Consolidated Iron Mines Company in 1894, was leased to Carnegie Steel in 1896, became part of the United States Steel Corporation in 1901, was jointly operated with the Duluth & Iron Range RailRoad as a single operation by the United States Steel Corporation from 1901 until 1927, and leased the Duluth & Iron Range RailRoad in 1930. According to Poor's Manual of the RailRoads of the United States, Volume 33 by Henry Varnum Poor in 1901, as of 1899, the railroad operated 97.12 miles of rail trackage, owned 33 locomotives, five passenger cars, one combination car, 45 box cars, 269 flat freight cars, 2,701 ore cars, four refrigerator cars, and 24 service cars, had $5,000,000 in capital stock, had as its officers F. T. Gates, president, William J. Olcott, vice president, S. R. Payne, secretary, E. S. Kempton, treasurer, and J. B. Hanson, auditor, and had as its board of directors Joseph B. Cotton, Fred T. Gates, Alex McDougall, William J. Olcott, S. R. Payne, George D. Swift, and A. D. Thomson, and had its general office in Duluth, Minnesota. In 1904, the officers of the railroad were W. J. Olcott, president, W. A. McGonagle, first vice president, Edward B. Ryan, Jr., secretary, E. S. Kempton, treasurer, J. B. Cotton, general solicitor, Frank B. Kellogg, general counsel, J. B. Hanson, auditor, and J. W. Kreitter, superintendent, and the members of the board of directors of the railroad were H. L. Dresser, J. B. Hanson, E. S. Kempton, W. A. McGonagle, W. J. Olcott, George D. Swift, and A. B. Wolvin. In 1904, the railroad had capital stock of $2,512,500, had 1,168 employees in Minnesota, owned 52 locomotives, owned 16 passenger cars, owned 3,275 freight cars, owned 58 company service cars, and operated 169.56 total miles of railway trackage, all in Minnesota. In 1907, H. L. Dresser was the chief engineer of the railroad. In 1913, the railroad had as its officers William A. McGonagle, president, William J. Olcutt, first vice president, Charles F. Carlson, secretary, Edward S. Kempton, treasurer, Frank D. Adams, general solicitor, and John W. Kreitter, superintendent, had as its board of directors Hermon L. Dresser, William J. Filbert, Edward S. Kempton, David G. Kerr, William A. McGonagle, William J. Olcutt, and George D. Swift, had as its principal place of business Duluth, Minnesota, had total capital stock of $4,112,500, had 354.45 miles of track in Minnesota, had 110 locomotives, had 37 passenger cars, had 7,438 freight cars, and had 3,233 total employees. In 1919, the railroad was controlled by the United States Steel Corporation, operated 645.260 miles of rail trackage, owned 131 locomotives, owned 9,188 freight rail cars, owned 35 passenger rail cars, owned four pieces of floating equipment, owned 154 work rail cars, and owned three miscellaneous rail cars. The railroad built rail lines between 1891 and 1911, including a 48.00 mile rail line from Stony Brook, Minnesota, to Mountain Iron, Minnesota, from 1891 until 1892, a six mile from Wolf, Minnesota, to Virginia, Minnesota, in 1892, a 15.00 mile rail line from Iron Junction, Minnesota, to Biwabik, Minnesota, from 1892 until 1893, a 31.00 mile rail line from Missabee Junction/Duluth, Minnesota, to Culvert, Minnesota, from 1893, a 17.00 mile from Wolf, Minnesota, to Hibbing, Minnesota, in 1893, a three mile rail line from Spruce, Minnesota, to Eveleth, Minnesota, in 1894, a five mile rail line from Wilpen, Minnesota, to Chisholm, Minnesota, from 1902 until 1903, an eight mile from Keenan, Minnesota, to Sherwood, Minnesota, from 1905, a 54.00 mile rail line from Alborn, Minnesota, to Coleraine, Minnesota,from 1905 until 1906, a four mile rail line from Sherwood, Minnesota, to Sharon, Minnesota, from 1910 until 1911, and an 18.00 mile rail line from Hull Junction, Minnesota, to the Hull-Rust Mine Yard/Hibbing, Minnesota, in 1911. In 1937, the Duluth, Missabe & Northern RailRoad and the Spirit Lake Transfer Railway Company, a lessee of the Duluth, Missabe & Northern RailRoad, consolidated to form the Duluth, Missabe & Iron Range Railway Company. [See note on Frank B. Kellogg for 710 West Linwood Avenue.]

Duluth, Missabe & Western RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1898 by the Powers & Simpson Logging Company, operated a rail line that extended from Barclay Junction, Minnesota, at a point on the Great Northern RailRoad, to Crooked Lake, Minnesota, had various rail branches, and operated until 1908. The railroad owned three locomotives and owned 82 rail cars. The officers of the railroad were George Simpson, president, and A. H. “Al” Powers, vice president.

Duluth, Mississippi River & Northern RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1892 by the Wright, Davis & Company, a Saginaw, Michigan, lumber company, operated 50 miles of rail line constructed for it by the Swan River Logging Company from the Mississippi River northeastly to Dewey Lake, Minnesota. In 1893, the railroad had completed a 22 mile rail line (a 15 mile rail line from Swan River, Minnesota, and a seven mile logging camp rail line branch) and construction by the railroad of the remaining 27 mile rail line was underway in 1892. According to the Manual of the RailRoads of the United States, Volume 27 by Henry Varnum Poor in 1895, the railroad operated 22.38 miles of rail trackage, owned five locomotives, had $25,000 in capital stock, had as its officers A. W. Wright, president, Charles H. Davis, vice president, and Willis T. Knowlton, secretary and treasurer, had as its board of directors Russell M. Bennett, Charles H. Davis, Willis T. Knowlton, Gilbert M. Stark, and A. W. Wright, and had its general office in Swan River, Minnesota. In 1898, the railroad had nine locomotives. D. M. Philbin was the longtime general superintendent of the railroad. In 1899, the railroad had its property deeded over to James J. Hill and was succeeded by the Eastern Railway Company of Minnesota in 1902. The corporation was dissolved by court order in 1928. [See note on James Jerome Hill for 240 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Robert A. Smith for 15 Alice Court.]

Duluth & New Orleans RailRoad: The railroad was organized in the late 1890's by the Wardall family to build a railroad initially from Des Moines, Iowa, to Osage, Iowa, and eventually from Lake Superior to the Gulf of Mexico. In 1900, the railroad was reorganized and had as its officers J. A. Fitchpatrick, president, James Dillion, vice president, U. S. Alderman, secretary, W. F. Swayze, treasurer, H. M. Funson, general counsel, and T. V. Wardall, auditor. In 1900, the railroad let a contract to Elzy & Gilman of Marshalltown, Iowa, to build a rail line from Des Moines, Iowa, to Osage, Iowa, with grading completed between Nevada, Iowa, and Cambridge, Iowa. In 1901, the North & South RailRoad, a Nevada, Iowa-based corporation projected to build and operate a rail line from Osage, Iowa, to Des Moines, Iowa, by way of Nevada, Iowa, purchased rights, franchises and property of the railroad.

Duluth & Northeastern RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1898 and was incorporated as a Minnesota corporation in 1898. The railroad was known as the "Damn Narrow Escape" line. In 1900, F. Weyerhaeuser was the president of the railroad, which operated 35 miles of rail trackage, owned eight locomotives, and owned 78 rail cars. In 1903, the president of the railroad was F. Weyerhaeuser, the railroad operated 35 miles of rail trackage, the railroad operated three locomotives, the railroad owned 78 rail cars, and the general office of the railroad was in St. Paul. In 1913, the railroad had as its officers R. M. Weyerhaeuser, president, J. P. Weyerhaeuser, vice president, Hugo Schlenk, secretary, J. E. Lynds, treasurer, H. G. Stevens, auditor, and H. C. Hornby, general manager, had as its board of directors H. C. Hornby, J. E. Lynds, Hugo Schlenk, J. P. Weyerhaeuser, and R. M. Weyerhaeuser, had as its principal place of business Cloquet, Minnesota, had total capital stock of $500,000, had 63.25 miles of track in Minnesota, had six locomotives, had two passenger cars, had 241 freight cars, and had 107 total employees. In 1917, the officers of the railroad were R. M. Weyerhaeuser, president, J. P. Weyerhaeuser, vice president, H. C. Hornby, general manager, J. E. Lynds, treasurer, Hugo Schlenk, secretary, and H. G. Stevens, auditor, operated 62 miles of rail trackage, owned 11 locomotives, owned 146 logging cars, owned 171 flat cars, owned five box cars, and owned three cabooses, and had its general offices in Cloquet, Minnesota. The railroad once owned three Shay geared steam locomotives. The railroad was located at Cloquet, Minnesota. In 1919, the railroad was controlled jointly by the Cloquet Lumber Company and Northern Lumber Company, operated 76.175 miles of rail trackage that was built between 1898 and 1911, owned eight locomotives, owned two passenger rail cars, owned 226 freight rail cars, and owned four work cars. The railroad operated until 2002 and was succeeded by the Cloquet Terminal RailRoad. All Duluth & Northeastern RailRoad assets were conveyed to Cloquet Terminal Railroad Company, Inc., in 2002, and the Potlatch Corporation was a co-assignor. The Duluth & Northeastern RailRoad’s former employees were hired by the Cloquet Terminal RailRoad. D&NE was not dissolved as a corporation. The Cloquet Terminal Railroad Company currently is located in Cloquet, Minnesota.

Duluth & Northern Railroad: The railroad was organized in 1885, was incorporated in 1885, and had its principal office in Duluth, Minnesota. Frederick Fluella Huntress (1856-1938,) a lawyer and an owner of the Huntress & Brown Lumber Company in Duluth, Minnesota, was an incorporator of the railroad in 1885.

Duluth & Northern Minnesota RailRoad/Duluth & Minnesota Northern RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in Minnesota in 1898 and was organized in 1898. During the first year of construction in 1898, the presence of mosquitoes, black flies, deer flies limited the building of the mainline track to 7.5 miles. In 1899, the Alger-Smith Lumber Company bought the huge Knox Lumber Company sawmill on Rice's Point in Duluth, Minnesota. The first section of the railroad was completed in 1901 and the rail line was extended over the period 1903 to 1912. In 1902, the Alger-Smith Lumber Company also purchased the Mitchell & McClure sawmill at Grassy Point in West Duluth, Minnesota. In 1909, the Alger-Smith Lumber Company purchased the former Howe Lumber Company sawmill at Tower, Minnesota. The Duluth & Northern Minnesota was a logging railroad based in Knife River, Minnesota. The railroad was known as the "Alger-Smith Line" or the "Gunnysack Line." During the heyday of logging, thousands of trains carried pine logs to the sawmills in Duluth, Minnesota, and one of the principal log suppliers was the Duluth & Northern Minnesota RailRoad, which interchanged trains with the Duluth & Iron Range RailRoad at Knife River, Minnesota. The railroad was owned by Alger-Sullivan/Alger, Smith & Company lumber interests. At its peak, the Alger-Smith Company produced over 600,000 board feet a day in its two mills and employed 600 people. M. S. Smith was the president of the railroad in 1898. According to Poor's Manual of the RailRoads of the United States, Volume 33 by Henry Varnum Poor in 1901, as of 1899, the railroad operated 7.5 miles of logging rail trackage from Knife River, Minnesota, into the woods, owned two locomotives, nine flat freight cars, and 91 other cars, had $200,000 in capital stock, had as its officers R. A. Alger, president, John Millen ( -1916,) vice president and general manager, G. H. Stalker, treasurer and auditor, and J. C. McCaul, secretary, had as its board of directors R. A. Alger, R. N. Marble, J. C. McCaul, John Millen, and G. H. Stalker, and had its general office in Detroit, Michigan. In 1904, the officers of the railroad were Benjamin W. Arnold, president, John Millen, vice president and general manager, J. C. McComb, secretary, R. A. Alger, Jr., treasurer, G. H. Stalker, auditor, and the members of the board of directors were R. A. Alger, R. A. Alger, Jr., Benjamin W. Arnold, John E. Millen, R. N. Marble, and G. H. Stalker. Russell A. Alger was a former Governor of Michigan and a former Secretary of War under President McKinley. In 1904, the railroad had capital stock of $200,000, owned nine locomotives, owned 276 freight cars, owned five company service cars, owned three bridges, owned nine trestles, had 153 employees in Minnesota, and operated 74.00 total miles of railway trackage, all in Minnesota. By 1909, the railroad had passenger service to Finland, Minnesota, on mixed use trains. In 1911, the railroad owned 11 locomotives, owned 374 logging cars, owned 47 flat cars, owned eight coal cars, owned four box cars, owned two passenger cars, and owned 16 company service cars. In 1913, pulpwood rail rates set by the federal Interstate Commerce Commission were set so low that the railroad could not even maintain its equipment, much less make the business profitable. In 1913, the railroad had as its officers John Millen, president and general manager, Benjamin W. Arnold, vice president, J. W. Bayly, secretary, Russell A. Alger, treasurer, L. C. Harris, general counsel, and G. H. Stalker, auditor, had as its board of directors F. M. Alger, Russell A. Alger, Benjamin W. Arnold, J. W. Bayly, and John Millen, had as its principal place of business Duluth, Minnesota, had total capital stock of $200,000, had 115.30 miles of track in Minnesota, had 12 locomotives, had two passenger cars, had 446 freight cars, and had 307 total employees. By 1913, the railroad owned 13 locomotives and it leased additional engines during periods of increased activity. In 1915, the railroad operated 120.32 miles of rail line from Knife River, Minnesota, to Echo Lake, Minnesota, owned 12 locomotives, owned two passenger cars, owned seven combination cars, owned 479 freight cars, had as its officers John Millen, president and general manager, Benjamin W. Arnold, vice president, J. W. Bayly, secretary, assistant auditor, and general passenger agent, F. M. Alger, Russell A. Alger, treasurer, G. H. Stalker, auditor, and George Ward, general superintendent, had as its board of directors Russell A. Alger, Benjamin W. Arnold, J. W. Bayly, and John Millen, had $200,000 in capital stock, and had its general office in Duluth, Minnesota. In 1916, the railroad had $800,000 in capital stock. In 1918, the railroad operated 99 miles of main line trackage and 350 miles of branches and spurs. The railroad was sold to R. Waldron by 1919. Although the railroad was no longer viable in 1919, when the Alger-Smith logging operations ceased, although the railroad received permission from the Interstate Commerce Commission to abandon its line in Lake County, Minnesota, in 1921, and although the last section of rail was salvaged in 1923, the railroad did not fully cease operations until 1939. The Northern portion of the railroad was sold to the General Logging Company of Cloquet, Minnesota,

Duluth, North Shore & SouthWestern RailRoad was incorporated in 1883 by Phillip M. Graff, Louis H. Grieser, Herman E. Long, Richmond D. Mallet, Thomas W. Mayhew, Vespasian Smith, and William J. Tranah, to build a railway and a telegraph line from Duluth, Minnesota, northeasterly along the Lake Superior shore through Angle Bay, Minnesota, Beaver Bay, Minnesota, and Grand Marais, Minnesota, and thence to the northeast boundary of the State, with branches to the northern boundary of the state, and from Duluth, Minnesota, southwesterly through Pacific Junction, Minnesota, Mille Lacs, Minnesota, St. Cloud, Minnesota, Litchfield, Minnesota, Redwood Falls, Minnesota, Tracy, Minnesota, and Pipestone City, Minnesota, to the southwest boundary of the State, with branches northwesterly and southerly to the boundaries of the State. The railroad was organized in 1884. It also amended its articles of incorporation in 1884. It had initial capital stock of $10,000,000, it had capital stock in 1884 of $15,000,000, and its principal place of business was Duluth, Minnesota.

Duluth & Northern RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1885 and was incorporated in 1885 by T. B. Casey, George H. Christian, Charles F. Hatch, Fred F. Huntress, L. Mendenhall, A. Miller, R. S. Munger, and F. R. Webber to construct, acquire by purchase, maintain and operate one or more railways from Duluth, Minnesota, northerly to the Northern boundary of the State. It had initial capital stock of $3,000,000 and its principal place of business was Duluth, Minnesota.

Duluth & Northwestern RailRoad was incorporated in 1883 by Calvin P. Bailey, Ernest R. Jefferson, Clinton Markell, Luther Mendenhall, Roger S. Munger, Ozora P. Stearns, and Henry Truelson to build a railway and telegraph line along Minnesota Point, from the ship canal to the Superior entry, thence across Superior Bay to Rice's Point, thence northwesterly to the Northern boundary of the State and with one or more branch lines to the Western part of the State. It had initial capital stock of $2,000,000 and its principal place of business was Duluth, Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1883.

Duluth, Northwestern & Winnipeg Railway Company: The railroad was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1888, had capital stock of $3,000,000, and had its principal place of business in Duluth, Minnesota.

Duluth & Ontario RailRoad: The railroad was planned in 1919 by H. Baxter, the attorney of the Duluth, Winnipeg & Pacific RailRoad, Matthew J. Dooley, the general manager of the Minneapolis, Northfield & Southern RailRoad, R. M. Hunter, James S. Sebree, and R. Waldron to use the Duluth & Northern Minnesota RailRoad as the nucleus for a railway from Duluth, Minnesota, and Fort William, Ontario, Canada, but the railroad never operated.

Duluth, Park Point & Southern RailRoad was incorporated in 1886 by Frederick D. Banning, William L. Banning, William Dawson, Jr., A. De Graff, and Robert A. Smith to build a railway from Rice's Point in Duluth, Minnesota, across the Duluth, Minnesota, harbor to Minnesota Point, Minnesota, and then both southerly and northerly along Minnesota Point, Minnesota. It had initial capital stock of $500,000 and its principal place of business was St. Paul. The railroad was organized in 1886. [See note for William L. Banning for 6 Irvine Park.] [See note on William Dawson for 682 Fairmount Avenue.]

Duluth, Pierre & Black Hills RailRoad: The railroad connected to Duluth, Minnesota, in 1884. The railroad was a branch of the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba RailRoad in 1888. In 1893, the board of the railroad ratified contracts to complete the grading, bridging, ironing and operating the 130 mile rail line between Aberdeen, South Dakota, and Pierre, South Dakota, of which 100 miles had already been graded. The railroad was intended to be a link in a through rail line between Denver, Colorado, and Duluth, Minnesota, by way of the Black Hills of South Dakota and St. Paul. The officers of the railroad in 1893 were W. S. Wells, president, J. C. Eager, vice president, James A. Ward, treasurer and general manager, L. B. Albright, secretary, and R. P. Humphrey, chief engineer, and the members of the board of directors in 1893 were L. B. Albright, Coe I. Crawford, J. C. Eager, J. C. McManims, T. W. Pratt, James A. Ward, and W. S. Wells. In 1893, the principal office of the railroad was Pierre, South Dakota. In 1901, the Wyoming, South Dakota & Eastern RailRoad proposed to use the old rail grade of the Duluth, Pierre & Black Hills RailRoad for 130 miles of rail line between Aberdeen, South Dakota, and Pierre, South Dakota. In 1902, about 60 miles of the rail line had been graded near Aberdeen, South Dakota, and about 15 miles of the rail line had been graded near Pierre, South Dakota. In 1910, the Duluth, Pierre & Black Hills RailRoad filed articles of incorporation in South Dakota, had capital stock of $5,000,000, and had its general office in Pierre, South Dakota. The railroad planned in 1910 to construct a rail line between Pierre, South Dakota, and Aberdeen, South Dakota, by way of Cresbard, South Dakota, through Hughes County, South Dakota, through Sully County, South Dakota, through Hyde County, South Dakota, through Faulke County, South Dakota, through Edmunds County, South Dakota, and through Brown County, South Dakota. Officers of the railroad and members of the board of directors in 1910 were W. G. Bierd, Charles E. Deland, V. C. F. Foote, John I. Newell, and George W. Seevers. Bierd, Foote, and Seevers were officials of the Minneapolis & St. Louis RailRoad.

Duluth RailRoad, Transfer & Dock Company was incorporated in 1883 by A. C. Barlow, H. C. Kendall, Joseph E. Knowlton, A. M. Morrison, Moses O'Brien, R. W. Petre, Morris Thomas, A. J. Whitman, and Iver Wisted to build a railway from the Southern extremity of Minnesota Point along the westerly side of the point to the ship canal and thence across Superior Bay to Duluth, Minnesota. It had initial capital stock of $500,000 and its principal place of business was Duluth, Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1883.

Duluth, Rainy Lake River & Southwestern RailRoad: The railroad was a Minnesota corporation. The route of the rail line was from from the city of Duluth in a northwesterly direction through Saint Louis County, Minnesota, and Itasca County, Minnesota, to the mouth of Rainy Lake River, Minnesota, south of Lake of the Woods, Minnesota, and at or near the boundary post on the highlands opposite to what is known as the Forte Louise Reserve, on the Canadian side, thence northwesterly to or near the mouth of WarRoad River, thence southwesterly or westerly through Beltrami County, Minnesota, Kittson County, Minnesota, and Marshall County, Minnesota, to the Red River of the North. In 1888, the railroad completed surveying for a rail route planned to connect to Duluth, Minnesota. Acts Of the 50th Congress, First Session, April 24, 1888, Chapter 192, granted the right of way to the Duluth, Rainy Lake River & Southwestern Railway Company through certain Bois Forte Band Indian lands and Red Lake Band Indian lands in the State of Minnesota. In 1888, James J. Hill wrote to T. Jefferson Coolidge of Boston, Massachusetts, in a letter in the collections of the Minnesota Historical Society, to explain that the empty, rocky, marshy country of the Duluth, Rainy Lake River & Southwestern RailRoad Company was impossible economical1y, that the Red Lake Indian Reservation of Minnesota was not yet open, and that timber was only to be found on the reservation. The railroad completed its rail line to Ranier, Minnesota, in 1907 and completed a bridge over Rainy Lake, Minnesota and the Canadian border to a point along the rail line of the Canadian Northern RailRoad in 1908.

Duluth, Rainy Lake & Winnipeg RailRoad: The railroad was formed in 1905 through the reorganization and renaming of the Duluth, Virginia & Rainy Lake RailRoad, a 1901 Minnesota corporation, was organized 1905, succeeded the Duluth, Virginia & Rainy Lake RailRoad, and opened for rail traffic in 1907. In 1905, the railroad laid rail trackage through Fort Frances, Ontario, and William Mackenzie and Donald Mann, two Canadian railroad builders, acquired a controlling interest in the railroad. In 1906, a 65 mile rail line from Ashawa, Minnesota, to Rainy Lake, Minnesota, and a 74 mile rail line from Virginia, Minnesota, to Duluth, Minnesota, were in the progress of construction. In 1907, the members of the board of directors of the railroad were David O. Anderson, Granville D. Jones, V. J. Mullery, William O'Brien, and James F. Walsh, the officers of the railroad were William O'Brien, president, Granville D. Jones, vice president, James F. Walsh, secretary, David O. Anderson, treasurer, J. L. Washburn, general solicitor, Julius Sobotta, auditor, and M. A. Murphy, superintendent, operated 43.5 miles of rail trackage, had capital stock of $2,000,000. By 1908, the railroad had completed a rail line from Cook, Minnesota, to the Minnesota-Canada border. In 1912, the railroad had as its officers D. B. Hanna, president, J. D. Morton, vice president, and L. W. Mitchell, secretary and treasurer, had as its board of directors W. D. Bailey, A. D. Davidson, D. B. Hanna, L. W. Mitchell, and J. D. Morton, had as its principal place of business in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, had total capital stock of $2,000,000, and had 91.61 miles of track in Minnesota, owned 12 locomotives, owned six passenger cars, and owned 522 freight cars. In 1913, William Mackenzie and Donald Mann reportedly purchased the railroad outright. Moody's reported in 1915 that the railroad was owned entirely by the Duluth, Winnipeg & Pacific RailRoad, had 88 miles of main rail line trackage from Virginia, Minnesota, to Ranier, Minnesota, had 22.5 miles of rail spurs and sidings, had its officers D. B. Hanna, president, J. D. Morton, vice president and auditor, L. W. Mitchell, secretary and treasurer, M. H. MacLeod, general manager, and J. R. Cameron, superintendent, had as its board of directors W. D. Bailey, A. D. Davidson, D. B. Hanna, L. W. Mitchell, J. D. Morton, had $2,000,000 in capital stock, and had its general office in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. In 1919, the railroad operated 115.894 miles of rail trackage, owned eight locomotives, owned 97 freight rail cars, owned four passenger rail cars, owned seven work cars, and built a 66.00 mile rail line from Cook, Minnesota, to Ranier, Minnesota, from 1906 until 1908. The railroad was initially succeeded by the Duluth, Winnipeg & Pacific RailRoad and subsequently succeeded by the Canadian National RailRoad.

Duluth, Red Wing & Northern RailRoad was incorporated in 1886 by Charles Bettcher, William F. Cross, Silas B. Foot, Frederick W. Hoyt, Frederick W. McKinney, Roger S. Munger, Peter Nelson, Theodore B. Sheldon, William W. Spaulding, Alonzo T. Stebbins, Henry F. Thompson, and M. J. Toher to build a railway from the northeast boundary of Minnesota to Red Wing, Minnesota, and thence southerly to the northerly boundary of Iowa. It had initial capital stock of $1,000,000 and its principal place of business was Duluth, Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1886.

Duluth, Red Wing & Southern RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated under Wisconsin law in 1880 and Minnesota in 1866 and was organized in 1889. The railroad was intended to provide access to the port of Duluth, Minnesota, for Southern Minnesota and Northern Iowa. In 1887, the railroad had as its officers F. W. Hoyt, president, O. S. Powell, vice president, Dr. G. H. Crary, secretary, and T. B. Sheldon, treasurer, and had as its board of directors H. S. Baldwin, G. W. Crary, A. B. Foot, F. W. Hoyt, Gov. L. F. Hubbard, James H. Parker, W. T. Phelps, O. S. Powell, W. C. Ross, T. B. Sheldon, A. T. Stebbins, T. M. Toher, and Dr. W. H. Toyford. The Duluth Red Wing & Southern RailRoad completed surveying in 1888. The Red Wing, Duluth & Sioux City Construction Company laid tracks for the railroad from Red Wing, Minnesota, to Zumbrota, Minnesota, in 1889. In 1888, the officers of the railroad were F. W. Hoyt, president, S. B. Foote, vice president, G. H. Crary, secretary, T. B. Sheldon, treasurer, L. F. Hubbard, general manager, and William Danforth, chief engineer, the members of the board of directors of the railroad were G. H. Crary, S. B. Foote, F. W. Hoyt, L. F. Hubbard, Calvin R. Morse, R. S. Munger, W. G. Rice, C. E. Sheldon, T. B. Sheldon, A. T. Stebbins, W. H. Tinford, M. J. Todd, and M. J. Toher, the railroad operated 448 miles of rail trackage, and the principal office of the railroad was in Red Wing, Minnesota. The railroad added a spur from Claybank, Minnesota, to Clay Pits, Minnesota, in 1893. In 1893, the railroad still projected to construct and operate a 423 mile rail line from Duluth, Minnesota, to Sioux City, Iowa, and planned in the near future to construct a 175 mile rail line from Superior, Wisconsin, to Red Wing, Minnesota, and a 65 mile rail line from Zumbrota, Minnesota, to Albert Lea, Minnesota. In 1893, the railroad was operated by the Red Wing, Duluth & Sioux City Construction Company, its officers were T. B. Sheldon, president, S. B. Foot, vice president, G. H. Crary, secretary and treasurer, G. C. Davis, auditor, and L. F. Hubbard, general manager, and the members of its board of directors were D. H. Crary, S. B. Foot, L. F. Hubbard, W. A. Morin, C. R. Morse, J. W. Park, H. E. Perkins, H. O. Powell, W. C. Rice, C. E. Sheldon, T. B. Sheldon, A. T. Stebbins, E. J. Swan, R. M. Todd, M. J. Toher, and W. H. Twiford. In 1893, the railroad had $15,000,000 in capital stock, operated 24.63 miles of rail trackage from Red Wing, Minnesota, to Zumbrota, Minnesota, owned one freight locomotive, owned two passenger cars, owned 24 freight cars, owned one bridge and 24 trestles, and had 39 employees. According to Poor's Manual of the RailRoads of the United States, Volume 33 by Henry Varnum Poor in 1901, as of 1899, the railroad operated 28 miles of rail trackage, owned three locomotives, owned two passenger cars, owned ten box cars, owned 33 clay freight cars, had $15,000,000 in capital stock, had as its officers T. B. Sheldon, president, S. B. Foot, vice president, G. H. Crary, secretary and treasurer, L. F. Hubbard, general manager, and C. Davis, auditor, had as its board of directors G. H. Crary, S. B. Foot, N. P. Hangen, L. F. Hubbard, A. J. Meacham, W. A. Morin, W. C. Rice, T. B. Sheldon, A. T. Stebbins, M. J. Toher, and W. H. Twiford, and had its general office in Red Wing, Minnesota. Both sets of tracks were acquired by the Chicago Great Western Railway Company in 1901, but were operated as the Wisconsin, Minnesota & Pacific Railway Company, of which the Chicago Great Western RailRoad had acquired stock in 1899. During the period 1902-1903, the Chicago Great Western RailRoad built a line from Rochester, Minnesota, to Zumbrota, Minnesota, and in 1911, built a spur from Bellechester Junction, Minnesota, to Bellechester, Minnesota, to gain access to the rich clay deposits that were found in the area. The railroad operated until 1901 and was succeeded by the Wisconsin, Minnesota & Pacific RailRoad. The Claybank, Minnesota, to Clay Pits, Minnesota, spur was removed in 1936 and the Bellechester Junction, Minnesota, to Bellechester, Minnesota, spur was removed in 1952. Between 1964 and 1965, the tracks between Red Wing, Minnesota, and Pine Island, Minnesota, were phased out due to the enormous cost of repairing the tracks.

Duluth, Rice Lake & Western RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in 1893 by Arthur R. Coleman, Alfred E. McCordie, William McKinley, Fred W. Paine, and Douglas A. Petre to build and operate a rail line from Duluth, Minnesota, to some point along the Canadian border. In 1893, the officers of the railroad were A. D. Petre, president, William McKinley, vice president, Arthur A. Coleman, secretary, and Fred W. Paine, treasurer, the railroad had capital stock of $100,000, and the general office of the railroad was at Duluth, Minnesota.

Duluth, St. Cloud & Denver RailRoad was incorporated in 1886 by F. E. Baldwin, O. W. Baldwin, D. W. Buckart, Henry J. Rosenberger, and John M. Rosenberger to build one or more railways from a point along Lake Superior, at or near Duluth, Minnesota, southwesterly through Minnesota, Dakota Territory, and Nebraska and with a branch line from where the main line crosses the Minnesota River to the Iowa coal fields. It had initial capital stock of $15,000,000 and its principal place of business was St. Cloud, Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1886. The railroad apparently never operated.

Duluth, St. Cloud, Glencoe & Mankato RailRoad: In 1901, the railroad had surveyed a 287 mile rail line from Duluth, Minnesota, to Albert Lea, Minnesota, and had surveyed a 157 mile raill line from Albert Lea, Minnesota, to St. Cloud, Minnesota. In 1905, the railroad was intended to run from Duluth, Minnesota, to Albert Lea, Minnesota, surveyed the route from Albert Lea, Minnesota, to St. Cloud, Minnesota, and let a contract for the grading of 52.5 miles of the route from Mankato, Minnesota, to Albert Lea, Minnesota, with E. L. Tobie of New York. In 1901 and 1905, A. H. Reed of Glencoe, Minnesota, was the president of the railroad and, in 1905, W. W. Olney was the chief engineer of the railroad. The railroad was organized in either 1901 or 1907. In 1907, 50 miles (Albert Lea, Minnesota, to Mankato, Minnesota) of the proposed 287 mile rail line from Albert Lea, Minnesota, to Duluth, Minnesota, had been graded, with H. F. Balch & Company of Minneapolis as its contractor. In 1906, E. L. Toble was the general manager of the railroad and J. R. Dickinson was the secretary of the railroad. The railroad operated until 1910 and was succeeded by the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad.

Duluth, St. Cloud, Mankato & Southern RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1887. The railroad was incorporated in 1887 by C. L. Atwood, E. Cross, W. H. Greenleaf, Frank Hall, J. E. Hayward, Andrew H. Henderson, John R. Howes, A. Knox, J. F. Meagher, John Murphy, W. P. Sergeant, Dan B. Smith, W. H. Tarisford, J. A. Willard, and Deloo Young to build a railway from Duluth, Minnesota, to the Southern bouandary of the State at or near the rail line of the St. Cloud, Mankato & Austin RailRoad. It had initial capital stock of $6,000,000 and its principal place of business was St. Cloud, Minnesota. In 1888, the railroad completed surveying for a route planned to connect to Duluth, Minnesota.

Duluth, St. Cloud & Yankton RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in 1873 under Minnesota law by J. W. Blake, H. C. Burbank, A. Degraff, W. N. Greenleaf, J. T. G. Honner, T. F. Knappen, and W. G. Ward to build and operate a railroad from Lake Superior to the Western boundary of the state by way of St. Cloud, Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1873 and had $500,000 in capital stock. Special Laws of Minnesota 1873, Chapter 165, authorized Aitken County, Minnesota, Benton County, Minnesota, Carlton County, Minnesota, Kanabec County, Minnesota, Kandiyohi County, Minnesota, Lyon County, Minnesota, Meeker County, Minnesota, Mille Lacs County, Minnesota, Pine County, Minnesota, Redwood County, Minnesota, Renville County, Minnesota, St. Louis County, Minnesota, and Stearns County, Minnesota, to issue bonds to aid the railroad if the railroad located its eastern terminus at Lake Superior in Minnesota.

Duluth, St. Paul & Omaha RailRoad: The railroad completed surveying for a rail line connecting to Duluth, Minnesota, in 1887 or 1888. The railroad apparently was never built.

Duluth Short Line RailRoad was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1886 by Jonathan G. Callahan, William H. Coleman, George F. Copeland, Philip S. Harris, and David A. McKinlay to build a railway from a junction with the St. Paul & Duluth RailRoad near Thomson, Carlton County, Minnesota, Easterly through St. Louis County, Minnesota, to the Eastern Minnesota boundary. The railroad was extended to Wisconsin under General Laws of Wisconsin 1887. It had initial capital stock of $600,000 and its principal places of business were Duluth, Minnesota, and St. Paul. The railroad was organized in 1886. In 1893, the railway built 17.75 miles of railway trackage from Thompson, Minnesota, to West Superior, Wisconsin, from 1886 to 1888, it was operated by the St. Paul & Duluth RailRoad, its officers were R. S. Hayes, president, A. B. Plough, vice president, and W. H. Coleman, secretary-treasurer, and the members of its board of directors were W. H. Coleman, R. S. Hayes, D. A. McKinley, L. S. Miller, and A. B. Plough. Construction of the line was completed in 1888. The line was leased to the St. Paul & Duluth Railway Company for 99 years, was sold to the St. Paul & Duluth RailRoad in 1898, and thereafter became a subsidiary of the Northern Pacific RailRoad. The railroad ceased operations 1898, initially was succeeded by the Chicago Great Western RailRoad, then was succeeded by the St. Paul & Duluth RailRoad, and was finally succeeded by the Northern Pacific RailRoad.

Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic RailRoad: The Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic Railway was incorporated in 1886 under the railway laws of Michigan and Wisconsin to construct and operate a railroad from St. Ignace, Michigan, and Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan, to Superior, Wisconsin, and Duluth, Minnesota, as an 1887 consolidation of the Duluth, Superior & Michigan RailRoad with several Upper Michigan ore-country railroads, the Sault Ste. Marie & Marquette Railroad Company, the Mackinaw & Marquette Railroad Company, and the Wisconsin, Sault Ste. Marie & Mackinac Railway Company, and served Michigan's Upper Peninsula, Northern Wisconsin, and Duluth, Minnesota. It was incorporated in both Minnesota and Wisconsin in 1887, began operation in 1887, and acquired seven prior railroads, the Sault Ste. Marie & Marquette Railroad in 1887, the Duluth, Superior & Michigan Railway in 1887, the Wisconsin, Sault Ste. Marie & Mackinac Railway in 1887, the Mackinaw & Marquette RailRoad in 1887, the Marquette, Houghton & Ontonagon RailRoad in 1890, the Negaunee & Palmer RailRoad in 1890, and the Dead River Railroad in 1907. In 1887, the railroad had as its board of directors C. R. Cummings, Calvin S. Brice, A. D. Julliard, Hugh McMillan, Joseph McMillan, George I. Seney, and Samuel Thomas. James McMillan (1838-1902) built the Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic Railway, was its president, and also formed the Detroit Car Wheel Company, the Baugh Steam Forge Company, the Detroit, Mackinaw & Marquette Railroad, and the Detroit & Cleveland Steam Navigation Company. In 1888, the officers of the railroad were James McMillan, president, Calvin S. Brice, vice president, L. M. Schwan, secretary, and W. A. C. Ewen, treasurer, the members of the railroad’s board of directors were Calvin S. Brice, Richard J. Cross, James McMillan, John G. Moore, Thomas W. Pearsall, George I. Seney, Doanld Smith, George Stephen, John W. Sterling, Samuel Thomas, and William C. Van Horne, the railroad operated 544.05 miles of rail trackage, the railroad owned 116 locomotives, 46 passenger cars, 13 baggage, mail, and express cars, 829 box cars, 808 platform rail cars, 4,188 ore cars, 23 charcoal cars, 56 cabooses, one Pullman officer’s car, three derrick cars, 156 hand and larrie cars, and one snow plow, leased the Marquette, Houghton, & Ontonagon RailRoad, the result of the Marquette & Houghton RailRoad and the Houghton & Ontonagon RailRoad, and the railroad’s principal office was in Marquette, Michigan. In 1888, the Canadian Pacific RailRoad purchased the Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic Railway. The Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic Railway purchased the Marquette, Houghton, and Ontonagon Railroad in 1890, took control of the Mineral Range RailRoad and Hancock & Calumet RailRoad in 1893, and organized the Houghton County Street Railway Company in 1899. The Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic Railway suffered from the willful neglect of its owner, the Canadian Pacific RailRoad, the alternating competition and cooperation with the Soo Line RailRoad, and the competition for the ore hauling trade with the Milwaukee Road RailRoad, the Chicago & NorthWestern RailRoad, and the Lake Superior & Ishpeming RailRoad. In 1904, the officers of the railroad were William F. Fitch, president, Sir Thomas G. Shaughnessy, vice president, Arthur Starke, secretary, E. W. Allen, treasurer, A. B. Eldredge, general counsel, A. E. Delf, auditor, and C. E. Lytle, general superintendent, and the members of the board of directors were Richard P. Angus, George H. Church, Charles Drinkwater, William F. Fitch, R. Y. Hebden, Thomas W. Pearsall, James O. Ploss, Sir Thomas G. Shaughnessy, E. V. Skinner, John W. Sterling, and Sir William C. Van Horne. In 1904, the railroad had capital stock of $22,000,000, owned 73 locomotives, owned 57 passenger cars, owned 2,534 freight cars, owned 173 company service cars, and had 15 employees in Minnesota. In 1904, the railroad contemplated building a rail line from Duluth, Minnesota, to Thief River Falls, Minnesota. Ephraim W. Allen was the treasurer and Mart Adson was the general passenger agent of the Duluth South Shore & Atlantic RailRoad in 1905. In 1913, the railroad had as its officers A. B. Eldredge, president, W. W. Walker, vice president and general manager, James Clarke, secretary, E. W. Allen, treasurer, A. E. Miller, legal counsel, and A. E. Delf, auditor, had as its board of directors Richard B. Angus, W. A. Bog, J. O. Boss, George H. Church, A. B. Eldredge, William F. Fitch, R. Y. Hebden, S. G. Ogden, John W. Sterling, W. F. Stevenson, and Wayland W. Walker, had as its principal place of business Marquette, Michigan, had total capital stock of $22,000,000, had 97 locomotives, had 67 passenger cars, had 3,309 freight cars, and had 2,569 total employees. In 1916, the railroad operated 720.917 miles of railroad trackage, including a 20.00 mile rail linefrom Marquette, Michigan, to Glenwood, Michigan, in 1880, a 135.00 mile rail line from Glenwood, Michigan, to St. Ignace, Michigan, in 1881, a 47.00 mile rail line from Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan, to Soo Junction, Michigan, in 1887, and a 208.00 mile rail line from Nestoria, Michigan, to Allouez, Wisconsin, in 1888, owned 82 locomotives, owned 3,004 freight cars, owned 67 passenger cars, owned 142 work rail cars, and owned seven miscellaneous rail cars. In 1918, A. B. Eldredge (1853-1918) was the president of the railroad. The Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic Railway filed for bankruptcy in 1937, was run by Edward A. Whitman and James L. Homire as bankruptcy trustees, and was reorganized in 1949 as the Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic RailRoad. The railroad was given or acquired numerous monikers or aliases, including “Damn Slow Service and Abuse,” ”Damn Small Salary and Abuse,” “Damn Slow and Sure Awful,” “Dead Slow Service and Agony,” ”Delayed, Short-Steamed and Antiquated,” “Damned Slow, Shabby Affair,” “Dirt, Soot, Smoke, and Agony,” ”Damned Seldom, Slow, and Abusive,” “Dependable, Satisfactory Service & Attention,” and “Dust, Sand, Soot, and Ashes.”Its name was changed to the Soo Line RailRoad in the 1960 amalgamation with the Soo Line RailRoad and the Wisconsin Central RailRoad. Some remaining Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic RailRoad trackage in northern Michigan became part of the Wisconsin Central RailRoad, which was later acquired by Canadian National RailRoad.

Duluth & Southwestern RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in 1889 by William Ames, M. J. Jacke, J. A. McLeod, A. A. Mead, and E. H. Smith to build a railway from Duluth, Minnesota, to Cheyenne, Wyoming. In 1890, the railway purchased the Duluth, Huron & Denver RailRoad. It paid incorporation fees in 1891 and 1896 and sought $250,000 in funding from St. Louis County, Minnesota, in 1896. It had initial capital stock of $50,000 and its principal place of business was Minneapolis. In 1897, the railroad was intended to build and operate a 165 mile railway from Duluth, Minnesota, by way of Red Wing, Minnesota, to the Southern boundary of the State. C. H. Graves was the president of the railroad in 1897. The railroad was organized in 1899.

Duluth Street RailRoad: The railroad was chartered in 1881 for 50 years and began operations in 1882. In 1889, the railroad operated seven miles of track, had eight horses, had 167 mules, had 18 rail cars, carried 996,650 passengers from January, 1888, until January, 1889, had $300,000 in capital stock, had a board of directors comprised of A. S. Chase, Samuel Hill, Thomas Lowry, A. L. Ordean, and Thomas P. Wilson, and had as its officers Samuel Hill, president, T. P. Wilson, vice president, A. S. Chase, secretary-treasurer, and F. S. Wardwell, general manager. The railroad was authorized by the Village of West Duluth, Minnesota, in 1891, prior to the municipality’s incorporation into the City of Duluth, Minnesota. In 1893, the railroad had capital stock of $300,000, operated 40 miles of track, had 51 rail cars, had as its board of directors A. S. Chase, Samuel Hill, Thomas Lowry, A. L. Ordean, and Thomas P. Wilson, and had as its officers L. Mendenhall, president, G. G. Hartley, vice president, T. W. Hoopes, secretary-treasurer, and Fred S. Wardwell, general manager. In 1893, the street railway had 20 rail cars manufactured by the LaClede Car Company of St. Louis, Missouri. In 1894, the railroad had 42 miles of track, the railroad had 71 rail cars, the railroad had $300,000 in capital stock, its president was L. Mendenhall, and its general manager was H. Warren. The Poor's Directory of RailRoad Officials, published by the Poor's RailRoad Manual Company in 1898, indicates that the officers of the railroad were Samuel Hill, president, T. P. Wilson, vice president, A. S. Chase, secretary and treasurer, and T. W. Hoopes, general manager, that the members of the railroad's board of trustees were A. S. Chase, Samuel Hill, Thomas Lowry, A. L. Ordean, and Thomas P. Wilson, that the general office of the railroad was in Duluth, Minnesota, that the railroad operated six miles of rail trackage, and that the railroad owned six horses, 101 mules, and 18 rail cars. In 1899, the railroad had a strike, in which it prevailed and none of the strikers were rehired upon its conclusion. According to Poor's Manual of the RailRoads of the United States, Volume 33 by Henry Varnum Poor in 1901, the railroad operated 49.22 miles of rail trackage, owned two grip rail cars, 66 motor cars, and two trail cars, also operated the property of the Motor Improvement Company and the Lakeside Railway Company, went into receivership in 1898, had $300,000 in capital stock, had as its officers L. Mendenhall, president and receiver, G. G. Hartley, vice president, T. W. Hoopes, secretary and treasurer, and Herbert Warren, general manager, and had as its board of directors John H. Davis, E. V. Douglas, W. P. Douglas, Charles B. Dunn, G. G. Hartley, Charles S. Hinchman, Thomas Lowry, L. Mendenhall, and Joseph Selwood, and had its general office in Duluth, Minnesota. The Poor's Directory of RailRoad Officials, published by the Poor's RailRoad Manual Company in 1905, indicates that the officers of the railroad were C. G. Goodrich, president, S. L. Reichert, secretary and auditor, L. Mendenhall, treasurer, and Herbert Warren, general manager and general superintendent. In 1906, the railroad was the result of a 1900 consolidation of the Duluth Street Railway Company, the Woodland Railway Company, the Lakeland Railway Company, and the Superior Rapid transit Railway Company, had an operating agreement with the Duluth-Superior Bridge Company, and had its capital stock of $1,500,000 owned by the Duluth-Superior Traction Company. In 1906, the electric railroad operated 72.49 miles of rail trackage, owned 104 motor cars, had its general office in Duluth, Minnesota, had power and repair stations in both Duluth, Minnesota, and Superior, Wisconsin, had as its officers C. G. Goodrich, president, S. L. Reichert, secretary and auditor, L. Mendenhall, treasurer, and John Carson, chief engineer, and had as its board of directors C. G. Goodrich, G. G. Hartley, T. W. Hoopes, Thomas Lowry, L. Mendenhall, M. D. Munn, S. L. Reichert, Joseph Sellwood, and Herbert Warren. In 1912, the street railroad operated 80 miles of rail trackage, Herbert Warren was the general manager, and the railroad had a strike which turned violent on more than one occasion, the railroad hired strikebreakers after the initial occurrence of strike violence, the strikers were enjoined from interfering with the operations of the street railroad, and, late in the year, the strike was called off by the union and strikers who were not involved in any strike violence were rehired. The McGraw electric railway manual: the red book of American street railway, published in 1914, indicates that the railroad had a traffic agreement with the Duluth-Superior Bridge Company to utilize its bridge between the two cities, had capital stock of $2,000,000, operated 82.43 miles of electrified rail trackage, owned 130 rail cars, had as its officers C. G. Goodrich, president, Herbert Warren, vice president and general manager, S. L. Reichert, secretary and treasurer, S. MacDonald, auditor, had power stations and repair facilities in both Duluth, Minnesota, and Superior, Wisconsin, and had its general office in Duluth, Minnesota. By 1916, the street railroad also had purchased rail cars from the Twin City Rapid Transit Company. The 1918 McGraw Transit Directory indicates that the railroad was owned by the Duluth-Superior Traction Company, that it operated 103.88 miles of rail trackage in Duluth, Minnesota, Smithville, Minnesota, Morgan Park, Minnesota, Gary, Minnesota, New Duluth, Minnesota, and Superior, Wisconsin, that it owned 147 passenger motor car and 19 other motor cars, had as its officers A. M. Robertson, president, Herbert Warren, vice president and general manager, S. L. Reichert, secretary and treasurer, and W. Dwyer, auditor, purchased its energy from the Great Northern Power Company and the Duluth Edison Electric Company, had substation equipment on Park Point from the 1917 acquisition of the Park Point Traction Company, and had repair shops in Duluth, Minnesota, Park Point, Minnesota, and Superior, Wisconsin. [See note for Samuel Hill for 240 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Thomas Wilson for 761 Goodrich Avenue.] [See note on Marcus D. Munn for 607 Goodrich Avenue.] [See note for Calvin G. Goodrich and Calvin Gibson Goodrich for 1827 La Salle Avenue.] [See note on Thomas Lowry and Horace Lowry for 670 Goodrich Avenue.]

Duluth Superior Bridge Company: The railroad was organized in 1893/1894, was a subsidiary of the Great Northern RailRoad, owned the Interstate Bridge between Duluth, Minnesota, and Superior, Wisconsin, connecting Rice's Point, Minnesota, to Connors Point, Wisconsin, operated until 1901, and was succeeded by the Eastern Railway Company of Minnesota. Construction of the bridge was authorized by the Minnesota Legislature and by the Wisconsin Legislature, effective in 1896. The Duluth/Superior Bridge Company completed work on the Interstate Bridge in 1897, the first bridge to connect Duluth, Minnesota, and Superior, Wisconsin. The bridge consisted of two humback sections and a long swingspan between them that was thought to be the largest of its kind in the world in 1897. The swingspan was destroyed in 1906, when an operator fell asleep on the job and did not open it quickly enough for the steamship "Troy" to pass through, and reconstruction was not completed until 1908. In 1953, a new bridge, the John A. Blatnik Bridge, was approved to replace the Interstate Bridge and the Interstate Bridge was locked into the open position in 1961. The majority of the Interstate Bridge was torn down during the 1970's. Guilford G. Hartley was the receiver of the Duluth-Superior Bridge Company in 1899.

Duluth, Superior & Michigan RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated under Wisconsin law in 1886 by James Bardon, Elmer Barton, J. G. Deforest, General John H. Hammond, W. V. Nood and F. H. Weeks, was intended to construct a 125 mile rail line from Duluth, Minnesota, or West Superior, Douglas County, Wisconsin, across Northern Wisconsin, and into the Upper Peninsula, to a point on the Montreal River, in Ashland County, Michigan, meeting the Marquette, Houghton & Ontonagon RailRoad rail lineproceeding westward from Nestoria Junction, Michigan, south of L'Anse, Michigan. The railroad had capital stock of $6,500,000. John H. Hammond was the president of the railroad in 1886 and E. E. Barton was the secretary of the railroad in 1886. The railroad apparently did not build any rail trackage and was succeeded by the Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic RailRoad in 1887. [See note on John Henry Hammond for 276 South Exchange Street.]

Duluth Superior Traction Company/Duluth & Superior Traction Company: The railroad was incorporated in 1894 by Frank Bergen, John H. Davis, and Edward J. Douglas to construct and operate an electric street railway in Duluth, Minnesota, and Superior, Wisconsin. In 1894, the railroad had capital stock of $2,000,000. The railroad was incorporated as a Connecticut corporation in 1900, was not an operating company in 1906, and owned the entire capital stock of the Duluth Street Railway Company. It had capital stock of $5,000,000 and its general office was in Duluth, Minnesota. In 1906, the officers of the corporation were C. G. Goodrich, president, and L. Mendenhall, secretary & treasurer and the board of directors were C. G. Goodrich, Lynde Harrison, Paul W. Harrison, Walter Hinchman, Horace Lowry, Thomas Lowry, L. Mendenhall, M. D. Munn, and James E. O'Connor. The McGraw electric railway manual: the red book of American street railway, published in 1914, indicates that the railroad was incorporated in Connecticut in 1897, owned all of the stock of the Duluth Street RailRoad, suffered a two month trainman's strike in 1912, was engaged in a dispute with the Wisconsin Rail Road Commission over the fares chargeable in Superior, Wisconsin, had capital stock of $5,000,000, operated 82.7 miles of rail trackage, had as its officers C. G. Goodrich, president, A. E. Ames, vice president, Herbert Warren, vice president and general manager, and S. L. Reichert, secretary, treasurer, and auditor, had as its board of directors A. E. Ames, F. H. Deacon, W. H. Goadby, C. G. Goodrich, Horace Lowry, L. Mendenhall, and Edmund Zacher, and had its general office in Duluth, Minnesota. [See note for Calvin G. Goodrich and Calvin Gibson Goodrich for 1827 La Salle Avenue.] [See note on Thomas Lowry and Horace Lowry for 670 Goodrich Avenue.]

Duluth & Superior Transfer RailRoad Company: In 1898, J. D. Finn was the general superintnendent of the railroad and the railroad was headquarterd in Duluth, Minnesota.

Duluth-Superior Transit Company: The Duluth- Superior Transit Company was incorporated in 1933 and became operational in the same year when all of the properties of the Duluth Street Railway Company were transferred. The company operated from 1933 until 1966. In 1963, the company changed its name to Northern Enterprises, Inc., and created a subsidiary corporation, the Duluth-Superior Transit Company, which held all of the company’s transit assets. The Duluth-Superior Transit Company operated the prior streetcar system until it was replaced by motor buses. The transit system's mixed fleet in 1933 consisted of 110 streetcars, two electric trolley busses, and nine gasoline-powered buses. Streetcars stopped operating in Superior, Wisconsin, in 1935 and the last rail line in Duluth was abandoned when the Incline Railway was dismantled in 1939. The Duluth- Superior Transit Company acquired an interest in Florida land companies in 1958, comprising a shift in the company’s activities as wholly a transit company. In 1968, Northern Enterprises, Inc., merged with Kodiak, Inc. In 1968, the Securities and Exchange Commission issued an order that that Northern Enterprises, Inc., was not an investment company. The Duluth Transit Authority was formed in 1970 when the City of Duluth acquired the privately owned Duluth-Superior Transit Company. The Minnesota Legislature subsequently formed the Duluth Transit Authority. The DTA is a public authority corporation of the city of Duluth whose nine-member citizens Board of Directors are appointed by the mayor and approved by the city council. The Board is accountable for transit policy and overseeing the management of the DTA, and the City Council is responsible for overall budget control. In addition, the DTA provides the City of Superior with service on a contractual basis. Superior has one full voting member on the DTA Board. Operations are guided through a five-year operational and capital plan called the Transit Development Program.

Duluth, Superior & Western RailRoad: The railroad was organized by Great Northern RailRoad interests in 1896, was owned by the Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic RailRoad and the Canadian Pacific RailRoad, took over the foreclosed properties of the Duluth & Winnipeg Railroad Company, was acquired by the Great Northern RailRoad in 1897, operated the 100 miles of rail line acquired from the Duluth & Winnipeg Railroad Company, until 1898 or 1899, was initially succeeded by the Duluth, Superior & Western Terminal RailRoad, and was then purchased and succeeded by the Eastern Railway Company of Minnesota in 1898. The corporation was dissolved in 1928.

Duluth, Superior & Western Terminal Company: The railroad was organized in 1897, succeeded the Duluth, Superior & Western RailRoad, operated until 1903, was initially succeeded by the Eastern Railway Company of Minnesota, and was ultimately succeeded by the Great Northern RailRoad.

Duluth Terminal RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1887 by M. R. Baldwin, William W. Billson, Asa Daily, Josiah D. Ensign, C. H. Graves, G. G. Hartly, Alex McDougal, L. Mendenhall, J. R. Meyers, R. S. Munger, William M. Phelps, Charles E. Shannon, J. B. Sutphin, J. H. Triggs, and A. J. Whiteman, Duluth businessmen who were interested in improving the freight transportation facilities in Duluth, Minnesota, was organized in 1887/1888, and built and operated about two miles of largely elevated trackage from the Northern Pacific RailRoad bridge to the Duluth Union Depot. The railroad had capital stock of $2,000,000 and had its principal place of business in Duluth, Minnesota. In 1887, the president of the railroad was A. N. Miller. The railroad had effective control transferred to the Eastern Railway Company of Minnesota in 1890, had all of its property sold to the Great Northern RailRoad, continued in operation until 1928, and was succeeded by the Great Northern RailRoad. In 1893, the railroad owned no locomotives or rail cars, had 23 employees, and had 1.78 miles of railway trackage. In 1893, the officers of the railroad were W. A. Alexander, president, W. C. Farrington, vice president and treasurer, D. G. Cash, secretary, C. H. Warren, comptroller, and F. A. Merrill, general superintendent, and the members of its board of directors were W. S. Alexander, D. G. Cash, W. P. Clough, W. C. Farrington, M. D. Grover, G. G. Hartley, A. N. Miller, Edward Sawyer, and J. B. Sutphin. In 1904, the officers of the railroad were Louis W. Hill, president, R. I. Farrington, vice president, E. Sawyer, secretary-treasurer, John G. Drew, comptroller, and J. M. Davis, superintendent, and the members of the board of directors were J. W. Blabon, R. I. Farrington, M. D. Grover, Louis W. Hill, and E. Sawyer. According to Poor's Manual of the RailRoads of the United States, Volume 33 by Henry Varnum Poor in 1901, as of 1899, the railroad was organized in 1887, operated 5.35 miles of rail trackage, had as its officers Samuel Hill, president, E. Sawyer, treasurer and secretary, and R. I. Farrington, comptroller, and had its general office in St. Paul. In 1904, the railroad had capital stock of $50,000, had 11 employees in Minnesota, owned one bridge, owned one trestle, and operated 1.82 total miles of railway trackage, all in Minnesota. In 1913, the railroad had as its officers E. C. Lindley, president, J. M. Gruber, vice president, L. E. Katzenbach, secretary and treasurer, G. R. Martin, comptroller, and G. H. Emerson, general manager, had as its board of directors R. Budd, J. M. Gruber, R. A. Jackson, E. C. Lindley, and L. E. Katzenbach, had as its principal place of business St. Paul, had total capital stock of $400,000, had 1.82 miles of track in Minnesota, and had 16 total employees. The railroad ceased operation in 1921 and the corporation was dissolved in 1930. The railroad was succeeded by the Soo Line and by the Great Northern RailRoad. [See note on William Pitt Clough for 500 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Louis Warren Hill for 260 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Edward Sawyer for 461 Holly Avenue.] [See note on Robert I. Farrington, Thayer B. Farrington, and John D. Farrington for 457-459 Portland Avenue.]

Duluth Transfer RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1890, was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1890, built a 9.06 mile rail line from Duluth, Minnesota, to Spirit Lake, Minnesota, from 1891 until 1893, was reorganized and reincorporated in 1902, and operated until 1902. In 1902, the railroad had 24.00 total miles of railway trackage, all in Minnesota. The railroad was succeeded by the Northern Pacific RailRoad in 1902.

Duluth Transfer Railway Company: The railroad was organized in 1887 and was chartered in 1890. According to Poor's Manual of the RailRoads of the United States, Volume 33 by Henry Varnum Poor in 1901, as of 1899, the railroad operated 25 miles of rail trackage from Duluth, Minnesota to New Duluth, Minnesota, along the industrial waterfront in Duluth, Minnesota, and, through the Duluth Superior Belt Line Railway Company, to Superior, Wisconsin, owned three locomotives and 20 freight cars, had $2,000,000 in capital stock, had as its officers John Eliot Bowles, receiver, vacant presidency, Thomas S. Krutz, first vice president, J. A. Willard, second vice president, R. P. Gogin, auditor, and P. A. Mitchell, general superintendent, had as its board of directors C. C. Cuyler, T. G. Hillhouse, Thomas S. Krutz, O. H. Simonds, J. L. Washburn, and John A. Willard, and had its general office in Duluth, Minnesota. The railroad was owned by Edwin W. Winter in 1890, operated until 1902, and was succeeded by the Duluth Transfer RailRoad. The railroad was purchased in 1902 by order of the federal court under foreclosure for $1,180,000 by the bondholders of the railroad, represented by John G. Williams, an attorney. [See note on Edwin Wheeler Winter for 415 Summit Avenue.]

Duluth, Twin Cities & Southwestern RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1888 and was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1888 by William H. Shawn, James M. Earle, Benjamin Bowland, J. S. Brown, William H. Fisher, P. S. Harris, James Smith, Jr., and Thomas 0. Conrad to construct or purchase a line of rail road from St. Paul and Minneapolis in a Southwesterly direction to the Southern boundary of the State in Faribault County, Minnesota. The railroad had capital stock of $15,000,000 and its principal place of business was in St. Paul.

Duluth Union Depot Company: The railroad was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1889, was organized in 1890, operated until 1892, and was succeeded by the Duluth Union Depot & Transfer Company. The company built a 0.23 mile rail ine in Duluth, Minnesota, from 1891 until 1892.

Duluth Union Depot & Transfer Company: The railroad was the successor to the predecessor Duluth Union Depot Company, incorporated in 1889, was organized in 1890, and was renamed in 1892. The Duluth Union Depot was built in 1893. The building is one of eight railroad stations that once served Duluth, Minnesota. The Duluth Union Depot & Transfer Company owned 2.793 miles of adjacent track and one hand-me-down Northern Pacific RailRoad locomotive that switched and assembled passenger cars into outbound trains using the Rices Point wye. In 1916, the company had $300,000 in capital stock. In 1917, the depot was used by the Northern Pacific Railway, the Great Northern Railway, the Duluth, Missabe & Northern Railway, and the Duluth & Iron Range Rail Road. The railroad was controlled by the Northern Pacific RailRoad and was succeeded by the Northern Pacific RailRoad. The depot, designed by Peabody & Stearns and built in the French Norman style, is now a train, historical, and art museum as the Saint Louis County Heritage and Arts Center and listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Duluth & Vermilion RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1881 by Charlemagne Tower, associated with George C. Stone, a Duluth, Minnesota, banker, in hopes of obtaining a grant of swamp land from the State of Minnesota. Later in 1881, Minnesota voters approved a constitutional amendment that banned any grant of future state swamplands. The railroad was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1881 by T. L. Blood, A. DeGraff, C. A. DeGraff, J. E. Knowlton, R. C. Mitchell, George C. Stone, and William R. Stone to survey, locate, and construct, a standard guage railway from Duluth, Minnesota, by way of Vermilion Lake, Minnesota, to the Northern boundary of the State. The railroad had $1,500,000 in corporate stock. The principal place of business of the railroad was Duluth, Minnesota.

Duluth, Virginia & Rainy Lake RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated under Minnesota law by a logging company, either Cook & O'Brien or Cook & Turrish, in 1901, was organized in 1901 or 1903, was owned by a holding company, the Rainy Lake Company, incorporated in 1903, owned at least one Shay geared steam locomotive, and was located at Virginia, Minnesota. It was intended to build a rail line from Virginia, Minnesota, Northwest by way of Lake Vermillion, Minnesota, Ash Lake, Minnesota, and Kabetogema Lake, Minnesota, to Koochiching, Minnesota. The railroad actually built a 28 mile rail line from a point four miles North of Virginia, Minnesota, to Cook, Minnesota, from 1901 until 1903. Hansen Evesmith, a Duluth, Minnesota, mining engineer, was the initial secretary-treasurer of the railroad. In 1904, the officers of the railroad were Charles F. Ruggles, president, Eugene Cunningham, first vice president, J. F. Walsh, secretary, David O. Anderson, treasurer, J. L. Washburn, general solicitor, Julius Sabotta, auditor, and M. A. Murphy, superintendent, and the members of the board of directors were David O. Anderson, Albert Cunningham, Eugene Cunningham, Charles F. Ruggles, and J. F. Walsh. In 1904, the railroad had capital stock of $2,000,000, owned seven locomotives, owned one passenger car, owned 149 freight cars, owned one company service car, owned 16 trestles, and had 27.70 total miles of railway trackage from Rainy River Junction, Minnesota to Ashawa, Minnesota. In 1905, the railroad extended its rail line from Virginia, Minnesota, to Koochiching, Minnesota, under a construction contract with the Minnesota Land & Construction Company. The railroad operated until 1905, initially was succeeded by the Duluth, Rainy Lake & Winnipeg RailRoad in 1905, and ultimately was succeeded by the Canadian National RailRoad. G. F. Bristol was the general manager of the railroad in 1905.

Duluth, Watertown & Pacific RailRoad: The railroad connected to Duluth, Minnesota, in 1884 or 1885 and became a branch of the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba RailRoad. According to the Manual of the RailRoads of the United States, Volume 27 by Henry Varnum Poor in 1895, the railroad operated 73.93 miles of rail trackage from Watertown, South Dakota, to Huron, South Dakota, was organized in 1885, opened operations in 1888, was controlled by the Great Northern RailRoad, which owned all of the railroad's stock and bonds and supplied the railroad's rolling stock, had $730,000 in capital stock, had as its officers W. P. Clough, president, E. Sawyer, secretary and treasurer, C. W. Case, general manager, and C. H. Warren, comptroller, had as its board of directors W. P. Clough, M. D. Grover, J. J. Hill, A. L. Mohler, E. Sawyer, W. A. Stevens, and E. T. Stevenson, and its general office was in St. Paul. According to Poor's Manual of the RailRoads of the United States, Volume 33 by Henry Varnum Poor in 1901, as of 1899, the railroad was organized in 1885, opened in 1888, operated 73.92 miles of rail trackage from Watertown, South Dakota, to Huron, South Dakota, had as its officers W. P. Clough, president, Samuel Hill, vice president, E. Sawyer, secretary and treasurer, and R. I. Farrington, comptroller, and had its general office in St. Paul. The railroad was succeeded by the Great Northern RailRoad in 1907. [See note on William Pitt Clough for 500 Summit Avenue.] [See note on James Jerome Hill for 240 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Edward Sawyer for 461 Holly Avenue.] [See note on Robert I. Farrington, Thayer B. Farrington, and John D. Farrington for 457-459 Portland Avenue.] [See note on William Pitt Clough for 500 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Samuel Hill for 240 Summit Avenue.]

Duluth, Willmar & Sioux Falls RailRoad: The railroad connected to Duluth, Minnesota, in 1884. The last spike of the 146.9 mile rail line from Willmar, Minnesota, to Sioux Falls, Dakota Territory, was driven at Sioux Falls, Dakota Territory in 1888. The railroad became a branch of the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba RailRoad by 1888.

Duluth, Winnipeg & Pacific Railway/Duluth, Winnipeg & Pacific RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated under Maine law by William MacKenzie and Donald Mann in 1909 as a railway, was incorporated under Minnesota law one day later as a railroad in 1909, was organized in 1912, had its common stock owned largely or wholly by the Canadian National RailRoad, and operated until 1975. The Duluth, Winnepeg & Pacific Railway controlled the Duluth, Winnipeg & Pacific RailRoad. The railroad connected with Duluth, Minnesota, in 1912. The railway originally ran from the junction with the Northern Pacific RailRoad at 46th Avenue West in Duluth, Minnesota, In 1913, the railroad had as its officers D. B. Hanna, president, Y. A. Lash, vice president, J. D. Morton, vice president, R. P. Ormsby, secretary, L. W. Mitchell, treasurer, Julius Sabotta, auditor, and M. H. McLeod, general manager, had as its board of directors A. P. Davidson, D. B. Hanna, Y. A. Lash, J. D. Morton, and R. P. Ormsby, had as its principal place of business Toronto, Ontario, Canada, had total capital stock of $6,000,000, had 83.49 miles of main line rail track in Minnesota, had 22 locomotives, had seven passenger cars, had 1,756 freight cars, and had 1,005 total employees. In 1915, the railway operated 185 miles of rail trackage from Duluth, Minnesota, to Virginia, Minnesota, had as its officers D. B. Hanna, president, J. D. Morton, vice president, Z. A. Lash, vice president, R. P. Ormsby, secretary, and L. W. Mitchell, treasurer, had as its board of directors A. D. Davidson, D. B. Hanna, Z. A. Lash, J. D. Morton, and R. P. Ormsby, had $6,000,000 in capital stock, and had its general office at Toronto, Onatario, Canada. In 1919, the railway operated 110.213 miles of rail trackage, owned or leased 24 locomotives, owned or leased 2,062 freight cars, owned two passenger cars, owned or leased 43 work rail cars, and controlled the Duluth & Rainy Lake Railway and the Duluth, Winnepeg & Pacific Railroad. The railway was succeeded by the Canadian National RailRoad in the 1990's.

Duluth & Winnipeg RailRoad: The railroad was incorporated in 1878 and was organized in 1878 or 1888. Grading work on the railroad line began in 1881 or 1882, but was suspended because of restrictions related to its Canadian terminus. In 1883, the officers of the railroad were William W. Spaulding, president, and H. J. Boardman, secretary. In 1885, investor Oliver W. Barnes of New York City, New York, communicated to the Duluth, Minnesota Chamber of Commerce that he would be willing to construct the Duluth & Winnipeg RailRoad if the Minnesota counties along the railroad’s route made adequate contributions to the endeavor, with the expected contribution from Duluth, Minnesota, and St. Louis County, Minnesota, being $600,000. Oliver W. Barnes, a railroad engineer associated with the Vanderbilt railroads, had apparently negotiated with Boston, Massachusetts, financial interests who controlled the Duluth & Winnipeg RailRoad. In 1888, the railroad contracted with Foley Brothers for the construction of 65 miles of rail line. In 1888, the officers of the railroad were A. W. Wright, president, W, H, Fisher, vice president and general manager, and G. W. Welles, secretary-treasurer. Also in 1888, surveyors under Charles Harlowe of St. Paul were palnning a rail line route from Cloquet, Minnesota, along the West bank of the Cloquet River. The railroad was reorganized in 1892, became controlled by the Canadian Pacific RailRoad in 1893, and was operated during construction by the North Star Construction Company in 1893. In 1893, the officers of the railroad were E. N. Morrison, president, C. G. Heim, secretary, Benjamin Whitely, treasurer, C. H. Fischer, acting auditor, and W. H. Fischer, general manager, and the members of the board of directors were B. N. Baker, H. J. Boardman, Samuel A. Duncan, W. H. Fisher, Donald Grant, Jesse Hillis, Johns Hopkins, George C. Jenkins, E. N. Morrison, R. C. Munger, J. H. Upham, and C. W. Wells. In 1893, the railroad had 108.00 miles of railway trackage, owned five bridges and 60 trestles, had 128 employees, owned five locomotives, had six passenger cars, owned 60 freight cars, and owned five company service cars. In 1893, H. J. Boardman, by paying the Minneapolis Trust Company $600,000 in gold, prevented the acquisition of the railroad by the Great Northern RailRoad, when the North Star Construction Company took out a loan from a St. Paul bank to complete construction of the railroad, the St. Paul bank assigned the loan lien to the Minneapolis Trust Company, and the Minneapolis Trust Company sought appointment of a receiver. In 1893, H. J. Boardman was the president of the railroad, William H. Fisher was the general manager of the railroad, and Benjamin Whiteley was the secretary-treasurer of the railroad. The railroad was forced by the Panic of 1893 and the loss of a lease of its railway following an expansion by the Duluth, Missabe & Northern RailRoad of its own railway into Duluth, Minnesota, into bankruptcy and receivership in 1894. The railroad was reorganized by William C. Van Horne in 1895. The State of Minnesota unsuccessfully sued the Duluth & Winnipeg RailRoad Company, the Guaranty Trust & Safe Deposit Company, the North Star Construction Company, the Safe Deposit & Trust Company of Baltimore, and William C. Van Horne (1843-1915,) the general manager of the Canadian Pacific Railway, over an alleged over payment of capital assets of the railroad to the North Star Construction Company in 1895 in State of Minnesota v. Guaranty Trust & Safe Deposit Company, 73 F. 914 (1896.) The railroad operated until 1896 or 1898, was initially succeeded by the Eastern Railway Company of Minnesota, then was succeeded by the Duluth, Superior & Western RailRoad, and was ultimately succeeded by the Great Northern RailRoad. The railroad was formed in 1878, had its general office in Marquette, Michigan, laid its first rail trackage in 1888, extended rail trackage 82 miles from Cloquet, Minnesota, by 1890, completed 12.7 miles of rail trackage East from Cloquet, Minnesota, to Short Line Park, Minnesota, and had an agreement with the St. Paul & Duluth RailRoad in 1891 to utilize its main line from Short Line Park, Minnesota, 11.6 miles to Duluth, Minnesota. The Duluth & Winnipeg RailRoad rail line was built by the North Star Construction Company. Also in 1891, the railroad entered into an agreement with the Superior Belt Line & Terminal Railway to use 12 miles of that railroad’s rail trackage from New Duluth, Minnesota, to Allouez, Wisconsin, where the Duluth & Winnipeg RailRoad planned to build an ore shipping dock. In 1892, the Duluth, Missabe & Northern RailRoad built a rail line from Mountain Iron, Minnesota, to the Duluth & Winnipeg RailRoad rail line at Stony Brook Junction, Minnesota, where the Duluth & Winnipeg RailRoad would transport the Duluth, Missabe & Northern RailRoad iron ore tonnage to the ore boat shipping docks at Allouez, Wisconsin. In 1893, the Duluth, Missabe & Northern RailRoad built a rail line and ore shipping docks in Duluth, Minnesota, ending its prior ore transportation arrangement with the Duluth & Winnipeg RailRoad. Before 1893, James J. Hill purchased much of the debt of the Duluth & Winnipeg RailRoad, hoping to acquire the railroad in a foreclosure action, but the Canadian Pacific purchased the Duluth & Winnipeg RailRoad outright in 1893. In 1893, William F. Fitch became the general manager of the railroad and H. J. Payne became the chief engineer of the railroad. The railroad was adversely affected by the Panic of 1893. In 1894, the Duluth & Winnipeg RailRoad went into receivership and William F. Fitch was appointed the receiver. The railroad was reorganized as the Duluth, Superior& Western RailRoad in 1896. Halsey J. Boardman (1834- ,) a lawyer, was also a member of the board of directors of the Central Iowa Railway Company in 1888, was an investor in the Toledo, Cincinnati & St. Louis RailRoad, was the president of the Evans Coal Company in Pennsylvania, was a member of the Massachusetts House of Representatives from 1883 to 1885, and was the president of the Massachusetts Senate from 1887 to 1888.

Duluth & Winnipeg Terminal RailRoad: The railroad was organized in 1892, was incorporated under the laws of West Virginia, and was reorganized as the Duluth, Superior & Western Railway Company. The railroad was located in Douglas County, Wisconsin, and was associated with the Allouez Bay, Wisconsin, ore docks. According to railroad stock and bond certificate researcher David Adams, the North Star Construction Company operated the railroad. In 1895, the railroad had 110 miles of rail trackage. In 1895, the railroad was in receivership with assets of $5.3 million and liabilities of $4.9 million. In 1896, the railroad rented its ore docks and rail trackage at Allouez Bay, Wisconsin, to the Duluth, Mississippi River & Northern RailRoad. The railroad was foreclosed upon and sold by U. S. District Court Commissioner Henry S. Butler to the railroad's bondholders and to Peter White, a judgment creditor in St. Paul, in a foreclosure sale in 1897. The railroad company was reorganized in 1897 under West Virginia law. In 1897, the railroad was acquired by the Great Northern RailRoad from the Duluth & Winnipeg Railway Company, which was owned by the North Star Construction Company, a subsidiary of the Canadian Pacific RailRoad.

Duluth & Wisconsin RailRoad was incorporated in 1886 by Elmer E. Barton, Albert S. Chase, William H. Fisher, John H. Hammond, and William V. Noad to build one or more railways in St. Louis County, Minnesota. It had initial capital stock of $500,000 and its principal place of business was Duluth, Minnesota. The railroad was organized in 1886. [See note on John Henry Hammond for 276 South Exchange Street.]

Information from Interstate Commerce Commission records researched by Richard S. Steele, LaBelle Woodworking, Cheyenne, Wyoming, was used in this website.

With questions about this website, contact Larry Martin at l_a_martin@lycos.com.

Links:

Minnesota RailRoads, Part II

Minnesota RailRoads, Part III

Minnesota RailRoads Part IV

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This page was last updated on October 15, 2012.