Thursday Night Hikes: Lake of the Isles Hike Architecture Notes, Part 1


Observations on Architectural Styles, Part 1

Lake of the Isles Hike

Assembled by

Lawrence A. Martin

Webpage Creation: April 10, 2003

General.

The Lake of the Isles was named for its islands (now two, but formerly four, as mapped in the Andreas Atlas in 1874.) The island to the north is called Mike's Island, and the island to the south is Raspberry Island. The other two were located in a marshy area to the south that has now been filled in, so that they are now part of the mainland. They were jointly called Maple Islands. The lake was originally a large wetland. Extensive dredging occurred during the period 1889-1911 to create the lake. The access to Lake Calhoun was created in 1911. The lake covers 102 acres, with 2.86 miles of shoreline. The maximum depth of the lake is 54 feet. The sport fish community in the lake consists of bluegill, black crappie, green sunfish, pumpkinseed, hybrid sunfish, largemouth bass, northern pike, tiger muskellunge, walleye, and yellow perch. Lake of the Isles has been stocked every third year with tiger muskellunge since 1994. Northern pike, walleye, and largemouth bass were low in abundance. Northern pike size was good. Bowfin (dogfish,) black bullheads, common carp, and white suckers are also located in the lake.

Nearby Lake Calhoun was originally known as "Mde Mdoza" or "Lake of the Loons." It was renamed by Army surveyors sent by then Secretary of War, John C. Calhoun, to map the western lands in 1817. John Caldwell Calhoun was also the Vice-President of the United States from 1825 to 1832. Missionaries Samuel Pond and Gideon Pond arrived in 1834 on the eastern shore of the marshy lake at the large village "Marh'piya Wicasta," the village of Dakota chief Cloud Man. In 1911, the Park Board dug the channel linking Lake Calhoun, Lake of the Isles, and Cedar Lake.

The Kenwood section of Minneapolis, in which Lake of the Isles is located, was originally a suburb, and today is one of the most affluent neighborhoods in the city.

Some interesting examples of Prairie Style architecture and the designs of architect William Gray Purcell also are located on Lake of the Isles Parkway and on nearby streets.

An 1874 city map indicates that only six people owned the property around Lake of the Isles, with John Green owning the land on the north end of the lake, __?__ Reed and __?__ Goodrich owning the land on the northeast portion of the lake, R. P. Purcell owning the land on the southeast portion of the lake, Thomas Haleran owning the land on the west portion of the lake, __?__ Barber owning the land on the northwest portion of the lake, and S. H. Smith owning the land on the north northwestern portion of the lake.

Specific Structures. The following presents available information on the housing styles of specific structures located along the hike:

1917 Logan Avenue South: St Paul's Parish; Built in 1958. The structure is a three story, 53048 square foot, building. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. A. L. Searle resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Augustus L. Searle resided at this address. Augustus L. Searle was an Asian art collector who donated works to the Minneapolis Institute of Arts. Augustus Leach Searle (1863-1955,) the son of Seth C. Searle, a grain mill owner, and Rosabella (Leach) Searle, was born in Lyons, Wayne County, New York, moved with his family to Grand Rapids, Michigan, received a public and high school education in Michigan, was employed in a mill in 1878, married Elizabeth Finkler of Grand Rapids, Michigan, in 1882, moved to Minneapolis in 1882, then moved to Battle Lake, Minnesota, was in the in grain buying business, moved to Mapleton, North Dakota, in 1885, was in the in grain buying business, returned to Minneapolis in 1889, was associated with A. J. Sawyer & Company from 1889 until 1893, became the superintendent of the Monarch Elevator Company, associated with F. H. Peavey & Company, in 1893, was the vice president and general manager of the Globe Elevator Company after 1898, was a member of the board of directors of F. H. Peavey & Company, was the president of the National Elevator Company, was the president of the Searle Grain Company, was the president of the Searle Securities Company, was the president of the Saskatchewan Elevator Company, was the president of the Home Grain Company, was the president of the Port Arthur Elevator Company, was the president of the Liberty Grain Company, was the vice president of the Security Elevator Company, was the vice president and general manager of the Peavey-Duluth Terminal, was a member of the board of directors of the Midland National Bank, was a member of the board of directors of the Minneapolis Chamber of Commerce, was a member of the Duluth, Minnesota, Board of Trade, was a member of the Chicago Board of Trade, was a member of the New York Produce Exchange, was a member of the Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, Exchange, was a member of the Minneapolis Chamber of Commerce, married Helen S. Gardner of Minneapolis in 1914, was a member of the Minneapolis Club, was a member of the Minikahda Club, was a member of the Lafayette Club, was a member of the Minneapolis Automobile Club, was a member of the Kitchi Gammi Club of Duluth, Minnesota, and was a member of the Manitoba Club of Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. Augustus Leach Searle and Elizabeth Finkler Searle were parents of three children, Rosabelle Searle (Mrs. Norman L.) Leach, of Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, Florence Searle (Mrs. James M.) Gilchrist, of Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, and Stewart Augustus Searle. There was an Augustus L. Searle Fund for Experimental Research at the University of Minnesota. The current owner is St. Paul Episcopal Parochial. [See note for Andrew Jackson Sawyer for Park Avenue and 26th Street.] [See note for Frank Hutchinson Peavey for 2205 Park Avenue South.] [See note for the Minikahda Club for 702 Fairmount Avenue.]

1940 Knox Avenue South: Built in 1941. The structure is a two story, 3780 square foot, ten room, four bedroom, five bathroom, house. The property was last sold in 1991 by George V. Doerr, Jr., to P. Corrigan and M. Ingalls for $525,000 and in 2004 by Patrick Corrigan to Zenas Hutcheson III for $1,495,000. The current owner of record is Susanne Hutcheson and the current taxpayers of record are Susanne Hutcheson and Zenas Hutcheson III. Zenas Hutcheson is the Senior Managing Director for Vesbridge Partners, a venture capital firm, whose focus is on Enterprise IT Infrastructure, including web services, security and storage. Susanne Hutcheson is a current board member of the Minnesota Women's Campaign Fund, a Minneapolis-based group created in 1982, and is the chair of Planned Parenthood of Minnesota, North Dakota, and South Dakota. Susanne Hutcheson is the daughter of David Lilly and Perrin Lilly. Perrin Lilly was one of the founders of the Minnesota Women's Campaign Fund. Susanne Hutcheson and Zenas Hutcheson were financial supporters of Family & Children's Service in 2004. Susanne Lilly Hutcheson, a homemaker, was a contributor to the Howard Dean for President campaign and to the Democratic National Committee in 2004, listing 1916 Knox Ave South as her address. Zenas W. Hutchinson, III, was a contributor to the Howard Dean for President campaign in 2004, listing 1916 Knox Ave South as his address.

1950 Knox Avenue South: Built in 1949; Archie Walker House. The structure is a two story, 4106 square foot, 11 room, three bedroom, five bathroom, house. The house was built for Archie Dean Walker, a grandson of Thomas B. Walker, a lumber baron and the founder of the Walker Arts Center. Archie Dean Walker (1882-1971,) the youngest and longest-surviving child of T. B. Walker and Harriet G. Walker, graduated from Minneapolis Central High School in 1901, began higher education at the College of Engineering at the University of Minnesota, transferred to Cornell University in 1904, married Bertha Willard Hudson (1882-1973) in 1906, was the secretary of the Red River Lumber Company from 1908 until 1933, replaced Willis Walker as company president in 1933 to appease creditors and was president until 1956, was president of the Barlow Realty Company from the 1930's until the 1960's, was also involved in the Industrial Investment Company, was also involved in the Pacific Investment Company, was also involved in the Penwalk Investment Company, was also involved in the Walker-Pence Company and its subsidiaries, was also involved in the Walker-Burton Company, was also involved in the Four Walkers, was also involved in the Walker Associates, was also involved in the Walker Brothers family partnerships, was also involved in the Foote Lumber & Coal Company, was also involved in the Globe Lumber Company, was also involved in the Waland Lumber Company, was also involved in the Hennepin Paper Company, was also involved in the Lincoln National Bank, was also involved in the Lincoln Trust & Savings Bank, was also involved in the Minneapolis Central City Market Company, was also involved in the Minneapolis Land & Investment Company, was also involved in the Minneapolis, Northfield & Southern Railway Company, was also involved in the Northwest Warehousing Company, was also involved in the Superior Land Company, was also involved in the Kicherer Motor Company, was also involved in the Lake Hassel Gun Club, Inc., was also involved in the Northome, Minnesota, Improvement Association, and was also involved in Northome, Minnesota, Private Roads, Inc., was a member of the Minneapolis Civic and Commerce Association, was a member of the Hennepin Avenue Improvement Association, was the president of the city library board, was the chairman of the board of trustees of Hennepin Avenue Methodist Episcopal Church from 1955 to 1958, was the president of the Walker Methodist Home, was a trustee and the president of the T. B. Walker Foundation, Inc. from 1929, established the Archie D. and Bertha H. Walker Foundation, was a member of the Mu Chapter of the Psi Upsilon Fraternity, was a member of the Minneapolis Club, was a member of the Minikhada Club, was a member of the Minnetonka Yacht Club, and resided at 419 Groveland Avenue in 1917. Bertha Willard Hudson was a daughter of the Minneapolis jeweler Josiah Bell Hudson, and the couple had six children: Hudson D. Walker (1907-1976,) Louise Walker (1915- ,) Phillip H. Walker (1917-1969,) Stephen A. Walker (1910- ,) Walter W. Walker (1911- ,) and Archie D. Walker, Jr. (1920- .) The 1909 city directory indicates that Archibald D. Walker, the secretary of the Red River Lumber Company, resided at 419 Graveland Avenue. Archie Walker (1882-1971) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Hulet, and died in Hennepin County. Thomas Barlow Walker ( -1928) died in Hennepin County. The property was last sold in 1990 by Barbara E. Fitzmaurice to R. Bellafronto and D. Bellafronto for $660,000 and in 1996 by R. Bellafronto and D. Bellafronto to Michael J. Peterman and D. A. Wilson for $497,000. The current owner of record is Michael J. Peterman and the current taxpayers of record are Michael J. Peterman and D. A. Wilson. Michael J. Peterman and David A. Wilson were financial supporters of the Walker Art Center in 2001 and 2003 and of the Friends of the Minneapolis Public Library in 2005. Peterman currently co-chairs, with Jennifer Case-Phelps, the Walker Collector's Group, which meets once a month to visit private studios, collections, or galleries, learn how art is made, and speak to artists involved in exhibitions at the Walker. Wilson and Peterman also are collectors, and their house has been redesigned to feature their collection of contemporary works. [See the note for Platt B. Walker, Thomas B. Walker, and the Walker family for 1046 Summit Avenue.] [See note for the Minneapolis, Northfield & Southern RailRoad.] [See the note for the Minneapolis Civic & Commerce Association, the Citizens Alliance of Minneapolis, and the Minneapolis Commercial Club for 2200 Pillsbury Avenue South.] [See note for the Minikahda Club for 702 Fairmount Avenue.]

2009 East Lake of the Isles Parkway: The property is a vacant lot owned by the Minneapolis Park And Recreation Board.

1719 Franklin Avenue West: Built in 1997. The structure is a two story, 5342 square foot, 12 room, four bedroom, seven bathroom, house with three garage stalls on a 32,037 square foot lot. The property is owned by K. N. Dayton and J. W. Dayton. In 1994, R. S. Trenkmann and M. E. Trenkmann sold the property to K. N. Dayton and J. W. Dayton for $940,000. Julia W. Dayton of 730 2nd Avenue South, Apartment #419, Minneapolis, is the taxpayer of record and the owner of record of this property. Julia "Judy" Winton Dayton and Kenneth N. Dayton (1923-2003) were financial supporters of long standing of the Walker Art Center and the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden. Julia W. Dayton was a financial supporter of Graywolf Press in 2004, of the Guthrie Theatre in 2004, of the Minnesota Zoo in 2004, of the Minnesota Children's Museum in 2005, of the Minneapolis Public Library in 2004, of the Arctic Transect 2004, of Urban Stewards/Ecoeducation in 2004, of Community Programs in the Arts (COMPAS) in 2004, of Twin Cities RISE in 2004, of Twin Cities Public Television in 2004, of the Minneapolis Institute of Arts in 2004, and of the University of Minnesota in 2004. Julia W. Dayton was a member of the International Council of the Tate Galleries in Britain in 2002-2004. Julia W. Dayton, a retiree, was a contributor to the Howard Dean for President campaign, to the John Edwards for President campaign, to the John Kerry for President, and to the Democratic National Committee in 2004. Kenneth N. Dayton, a retiree, was a contributor to the John Kerry for President campaign in 2004. Kenneth N. Dayton retired as CEO of the Dayton Hudson Corporation in 1976, left the company's board in 1983, and died in Minneapolis of complications from refractory anemia. The Oakleaf Foundation, founded by Kenneth N. Dayton, was the third-largest Minnesota grantmaker to the arts in 1997, according to the Minnesota Council on Foundations. Kenneth N. Dayton was a primary funder of the Minnesota Symphony Orchestra and was a significant influence in the building of Orchestra Hall, which opened in 1974. Kenneth N. Dayton graduated from the Blake School in 1940 and Julia Winton Dayton graduated from the Blake School in 1945. Kenneth N. Dayton was the founding chairman of American Public Radio, was awarded the Edward R. Murrow Award in 1992, and was a member of the President's Task Force on Private Sector Initiatives in 1981.

2100 East Lake of the Isles Parkway: The structure is a two story, 3900 square foot, five bedroom, five bathroom, house. William I. Gray, associated with W. I. Gray & Company, electrical contractors, and the president of the Belden-Porter-Gray Company, heating and plumbing engineers, resided at the former nearby 2102 Lake of the Isles Parkway according to the 1909 and 1917 city directories. The 1917 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. S. Hart and their daughter all resided at the former nearby 2002 Lake of the Isles Parkway and that Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Easthagen resided at the nearby former 2012 Lake of the Isles Parkway. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. H. G. Frank, their daughters, H. O. Frank, Jr., and Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Loomis all resided at the former nearby 2002 Lake of the Isles Parkway and that Mr. and Mrs. W. I. Gray and Mrs. F. A. Welles all resided at the former nearby 2102 Lake of the Isles Parkway. William I. Gray and George K. Belden were electrical contractors in 1909. William Irving Gray (1865- ,) the son of Alexander Gray and Mary Dingwall Gray, was born at Lake City, Wabasha County, Minnesota, graduated from the Lake City, Minnesota, High School in 1888, graduated with a bachelor's degree in engineering from the University of Minnesota in 1892, was a member of the Theta Delta Chi fraternity, organized W. I. Gray & Company, an electrical engineering contracting firm in 1894, graduated from the University of Minnesota with a master's degree in engineering in 1898, owned the Wheaton Electric Light Company of Wheaton, Minnesota, was president of the Kirlin-Gray Electric Company of Watertown, South Dakota, organized the Schumacher-Gray Company, Limited, of Winnipeg, Canada, in 1913, was a member of St. Paul's Episcopal Church, was a member of the Rotary Club, was a member of the Minneapolis Athletic Club, was a member of the Professional Men's Club, was a 32nd degree Scottish Rite Mason belonging to the Minneapolis Consistory and to the Zuhrah Temple of the Mystic Shrine, was president of the University of Minnesota General Alumni Association, was a member of the Minneapolis Commercial Club, was the first vice president of the Minneapolis Electrical Contractors' Association, was the president of the Minneapolis Builders Exchange, was the treasurer of the Northwestern Graduate Association in 1901, was a member of the Engineers Club of Minneapolis, resided at 95 Spruce Place in 1902, resided at 1619 Park Avenue in 1907, officed at 704 South Fifth Street in 1907, and was the president of the State Board of Electricity from 1899 until 1909. William I. Gray married Isabelle W. Welles, a graduate of Carleton College, in 1899 and the couple had two children, Welles Alexander Gray and Franklin Dingwall Gray. George K. Belden (1870-1953) was a son of Judge Henry C. Belden, was a halfback on the University of Minnesota Golden Gopher football team in 1889, was the Minneapolis Millers minor league (American Association) baseball team owner and a civic leader, was a member of the heating contracting firm of the Belden-Porter-Gray Company, was the president of the Minneapolis Automobile Club, was president of the Minneapolis Citizens Alliance in 1938, and is buried at Lakewood Cemetery. Henry C. Belden (1841- ,) the son of Haynes W. Belden and Lydia P. Blake Belden, was born in Burke, Caledonia County, Vermont, was educated in the common schools of Burke, Vermont, and the Burke, Vermont, Academy, read the law in the law offices of Thomas Bartlett in Lyndon, Vermont, from 1861 until 1864, married Carrie H. Kimball in 1865, was admitted to the practice of law in Vermont, practiced law in Lyndon, Vermont, moved to St. Johnsbury, Vermont, and practiced law in the firm of Belden & Ide from 1873 until 1884, was a member of the Vermont State Senate from 1876 until 1880, was a delegate from Vermont to the Republican National Convention in 1880, moved to Minneapolis in 1884, was a member of the law firm of Gilfillan, Belden & Willard from 1885 until 1894, was a Minneapolis district court judge from 1895 until 1897, was a member of the law firm of Belden, Jamison & Shearer, was a member of the Minneapolis Commercial Club, and was a member of the Minnesota Club. Henry C. Belden and Carrie H. Kimball Belden were the parents of five children, Mary Belden, George Belden, Helen Belden, Agnes Belden, and Harry Belden. The Mary Place Realty Company, a real estate holding company subsidiary of the Pacific, was incorporated in 1916 by George K. Belden, W. W. Heffelfinger, and C. W. Elston. William I. Gray ( -1931) died in Hennepin County. Edward E. Easthagen ( -1923) died in Hennepin County.

2100 James Avenue South: Built in 1900. The structure is a two story, 2514 square foot, seven room, three bedroom, three bathroom, house. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. M. F. Schutt and their daughter all resided at this address. The property was last sold in 1999 by the Estate of E. Schutt to James D. Priest and Ilona G. Priest for $395,000. The current owners of record are James D. Priest and Ilona G. Priest. James D. Priest, M.D., is a retired orthopedic surgeon who graduated from Carlton College, Northfield, Minnesota, in 1960 and from the University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, in 1967, served during the Vietnam War until 1971, studied orthopedics at Stanford University, returned to Minneapolis to practice in 1975, and, upon retirement, became the author and publisher of the fantasy trilogy Kirins, The Flight of the Ain, Secret of the Hanging Stones, and The Spell of No'an. Priest also is a contributing editor for America Online's "Bonjour Paris," and a senior correspondent for "Victoria Brooks' Greatest Escapes Travel Webzine."

2115 East Lake of the Isles Parkway: Built in 1921. The structure is a two story, 3845 square foot, five bedroom, five bathroom, ten room, single family dwelling, with a partially finished basement. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. L. L. Long and their daughters all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Todd W. Lewis resided at this address. The property was last sold in 1992 by F. B. Lewis and D. K. Lewis to its current owners, Andrew S. Duff and Lucia Duff, for $707,500. Before February, 2002, Andrew S. Duff was the president and CEO of U.S. Bancorp Piper Jaffray and the vice chairman of U.S. Bancorp. In 2003, Piper Jaffray became an independent publicly traded company, and that Andrew S. Duff became president and chief executive officer of the new independent company. Andrew Duff received total compensation of $3.09 million in 2004, $2.18 million in 2005, and $3.1 million in 2006. Piper Jaffray had net income of $13.4 million, or $0.74 per share, for the first quarter of 2007. Duff is a 1976 graduate of the Blake School and has a bachelor degree in economics from Tufts University in Medford, Massachusetts, and attended the Advanced Executive Program at the J. L. Kellogg Graduate School of Management. Duff currently serves on the board of directors of the Securities Industry Association, the SIA Regional Firms Committee, and the Walker Art Center, and is on the Board of Trustees of the Minneapolis Foundation. Andrew Duff made political contributions to Michael V. Ciresi, to the U.S. Bancorp Piper Jaffray Inc. Federal PAC, and to Rodney Dwight Grams in 2000, to the National Republican Congressional Committee in 2002, to Mark Raymond Kennedy in 2003 and 2004 and to Mark Raymond Kennedy and to Dr. Ford W. Bell in 2005. Todd W. Lewis (1881-1963) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Mc Ilrath, and died in Hennepin County.

2119 East Lake of the Isles Parkway: Emil C. Kischel House; Built in 1922. The structure is a two story, 5198 square foot, five bedroom, four bathroom, 13 room, single family dwelling, with a partially finished basement. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Kischel, E. L. Zonne, and daughter all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Emil C. Kischel resided at this address. The previous owners were Walter B. Saunders and Patty Saunders and the current owners are Darryle L. Owens and Dawn Owens of 2900 Thomas Avenue South, Apartment #1825. In 2008, Walter B. Saunders sold the property to Darryl L. Owens for a purchase price of $2,775,000. Walter B. "Barney" Saunders is a retired Vice Chairman of the board of Cargill, was a member of the Chicago Board of Trade from 1977 to 1979, and is a member of the board of Hamline University, St. Paul. Patricia Bratnober Saunders is a member of the board of trustees of the Minneapolis College of Art & Design and she and Barney Saunders were financial supporters of the Minneapolis College of Art & Design. Patricia Saunders and Barney Saunders were recent financial supporters of Penumbra Theatre, the McPhail Center, the Walker Art Museum expansion, the Minnesota Historical Society, Twin City Public Television, and the Minneapolis Public Library expansion. Walter B. Saunders, a retiree, was a contributor to the George W. Bush for President campaign in 2004. Patricia Bratnober Saunders, an artist, was a contributor to the Democratic National Committee in 2004. Darryle L. Owens is an attorney with Proskauer Rose LLP. Emil Carl Kischel ( -1949) died in Hennepin County. The 1917 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. H. B. Hudson and their daughters and D. K. Hudson resided at the former nearby 2120 Lake of the Isles Parkway. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mrs. H. B. Hudson resided at the former nearby 2120 Lake of the Isles Parkway and that Mr. and Mrs. F. W. Reed resided at the former nearby 2124 Lake of the Isles Parkway. Harry B. Hudson (1892-1971) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Newcomb, and died in Blue Earth County, Minnesota. [See note for Horace Bushnell Hudson and the Hudson Map Company for 2120 West Lake of the Isles Parkway.]

2121 James Avenue South: Built in 1958. The structure is a 1.5 story, 3049 square foot, eight room, three bedroom, five bathroom, single family dwelling. The property was last sold in 1993 by Mary E. Hughes to John L. Thomson for $530,000. The current owner of record is John L. Thomson. John L. Thomson is a graduate (B.S. and MBA degrees) of the University of South Dakota, is a partner of Norwest Equity Partners, joining the firm as a vice president in 1984, and is a trustee of the John Lubar Thomson Trust. The 1917 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. F. W. Reed resided at the former nearby 2124 Lake of the Isles Parkway.

2201 East Lake of the Isles Parkway: Built in 1911. The structure is a 2.2 story, 5294 square foot, four bedroom, three bathroom, 11 room, single family dwelling, with a partially finished basement. The 1914 and 1918 city directories indicates that Mr. and Mrs. M. B. Kerr resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. E. W. Backus resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Edward W. Backus resided at this address. Mrs. Elizabeth Backus resided at this address in the 1930's and was a member of the Minneapolis Meditation Group. Milton B. Kerr was the sales manager for the Northwestern Knitting Company according to the 1917 city directory. Edward Wellington Backus (1860-1934,) the son of Abel Backus, was a stone mason and farmer of modest means, and Anna Anderson Backus, was born at Jamestown, Chautauqua County, New York, grew up at Red Wing, Minnesota, where his parents moved when he was two years old, was educated in the Red Wing, Minnesota, public schools and in the Featherstone, Minnesota, public schools, and was educated at the University of Minnesota, where he enrolled at age 17, and where he also worked at the University Farm in St. Paul, was hired, at $9 per week, as a bookkeeper for Lee & McCulloch, a new lumber company with a small mill with circular saws located in Northeast Minneapolis, in 1882, was largely in charge of the firm by 1883, decided to purchase Alexander McCulloch's share of the business in 1883, borrowing $3000 to swing the deal, bought Judson Lee's interests in 1886, named his concern E. W. Backus & Company, sold the circular sawmill, rated at one million feet per season, and bought two other plants that in 1892 produced 76 million feet. In 1893, a fire that swept a large part of the sawmill district destroyed both of the Backus plants along with 60 million feet of lumber. The Backus firm survived and rebounded the following year with the purchase of a large North Minneapolis mill from the C. A. Pillsbury interests. Under Backus' leadership, five major lumber companies then formed a syndicate to acquire extensive timberlands in an area north of Brainerd, Minnesota, to assure a supply for their mills. Along with the timber purchase came plans for a railroad to haul the logs to the mills, the Minnesota & International Railway, which reached International Falls, Minnesota, in 1907. Some 60 miles of track were laid northward from Brainerd, Minnesota, in 1894. In 1899, Backus acquired a partner, William F. Brooks (1863-1928,) a mechanical engineer formerly associated with one of Backus' competitors. The new firm was incorporated in 1902 under the name Backus-Brooks Company. It became the parent company for numerous subsidiaries that developed International Falls, Minnesota, Fort Frances, Ontario, and Kenora, Ontario. Brooks moved to Minneapolis in 1875, was educated in the Minneapolis public school system, graduated from the Worcester Institute of Technology, Worcester, Massachusetts, in 1884, was treasurer and carried numerous executive responsibilities in the Backus-Brooks Company, married Caroline Langdon, was a Republican, was elected in 1918 to represent his Minneapolis district (District 31) in the State Senate, and served until his death. Backus-Brooks sawmill operations in Minneapolis continued until 1906, when the remaining mill was sold. In the middle 1920's, Backus was a director of the Northern Pacific RailRoad, the Northwest National Bank of Minneapolis, and several other firms in addition to being president of the Backus-Brooks Companhy. Backus built the Koochiching Falls, Minnesota, dam between 1905 and 1910, with delays in acquiring riparian rights on the international boundary waterway, and the Falls paper mill. The International Lumber Company sawmill was erected on the riverfront just east of the Falls, and it started up in 1911, with its peak in 1917, when it sawed the timber harvest of 23 logging camps in Koochiching, Itasca and St. Louis counties. Backus-owned lumber operations in the 1920's included the Spooner, Minnesota, mill, which Backus acquired from a Shevlin firm. Backus organized the Minnesota, Dakota & Western Railway, a common carrier connecting with the Minnesota & International Railway at the Falls and the Duluth, Winnipeg & Pacific Railway at Ranier Junction, Minnesota. Backus also began manufacturing insulation from paper mill byproducts, called Universal Insulite. Backus built a paper and insulation mill in Karhula, Finland, in 1930. Backus purchased the Keewatin Lumber Company in 1906, acquired the Norman dam in 1913, acquired the Kenora, Ontario, municipal dam in 1920, built the Fort Frances, Ontario, paper mill in 1912-1914, built the International bridge across the Rainy River in 1912, built the Kenora pulp and newsprint mill in the 1920's, became affiliated with the Great Lakes Paper Company and built a large, modern mill at Fort William (mergered with Port Arthur and renamed Thunder Bay,) Ontario. Backus' plans for hydro-electric development in the Rainy Lake watershed, with a planned series of power and storage dams stretching eastward from Lac La Croix to increase and stabilize power generation at Koochiching dam and prevent flooding, were blocked by the Quetico-Superior Council, formed in 1928 by Ernest C. Oberholtzer, a Rainy Lake resident and dedicated conservationist, Frank Hubacheck of Chicago, Sigurd Olson of Ely, and other wilderness advocates, and by the passage of the Shipstead-Nolan Act in 1930, prohibiting further power developments in the Superior National Forest in Minnesota. Edward W. Backus was a partner in E. W. Backus & Company from 1886 until 1894, was a partner in E. W. Backus Lumber Company from 1894 until 1900, was the president of Backus-Brooks Company, was the president of the Koochiching Company, was the president of the First National Bank of International Falls, Minnesota, was the president of the Rainy River Improvement Company, was the president of the Columbia Gold Mining Company, was the president of Keewatin Lumber Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Rainy River Lumber Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Northwestern National Bank of Minneapolis, was a member of the board of directors of the Minnesota & International Railway Company, was a member of the Minnesota Club, was a member of the Lafayette Club, was a member of the Minikhada Club of Minneapolis, was a Republican, and was a presidential elector from Minnesota in 1904. In 1907, Edward W. Backus resided at 75 Oak Grove Street. In 1931, the Minnesota & Ontario Paper Company, the principal Backus company, was forced into receivership after defaulting on a large obligation. In the subsequent reorganization of the company, Backus, as the principal common stock owner, lost an estimated $50 million. Backus died of a heart attack in New York. Backus' biographers were not always not entirely complimentary of him and his approach, indicating that he could be brutal, remorseless, ruthless, and not always ethical at times and at other times that he was exactly the opposite. E. W. Backus married Elizabeth Horr (1862-1956) and the couple had two sons, Edward Raymond Backus ( -1912,) who graduated with honors from Yale University before he lost his life in a hunting accident on Rainy Lake, and Seymour W. Backus, who joined the Backus-Brooks organization in 1916 and became vice president with various executive responsibilities at the Minneapolis headquarters and for the mill towns. Elizabeth S. "Lizzie" Horr, the daughter of Augustus E. Horr (1838- ) and Emily Elizabeth Leavitt Horr (1841- ,) was born in Maine, married Edward Wellington Backus in Minnesota, died in Minnesota, and was buried in Lakewood Cemetery. Their son, Seymour W. Backus ( -1936,) married Ruth Towle. Backus' Rainy Lake dam proposal would have affected 14,500 square miles, an area larger than Massachusetts, Connecticut and Rhode Island combined, and it contained within it the Superior National Forest and the areas that were to become Voyageurs National Park, the Quetico Provincial Park, and the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness. Water levels would be raised significantly above natural. It was estimated that Little Vermilion Lake would be raised by 80 feet, Loon Lake would be raised by 33 feet, Lac La Croix Lake would be raised by 16 feet, and Lake Saganaga and Crooked Lake would be raised by 15 feet. Backus had a habit with the previously constructed Rainy River dam of raising and lowering the lake's water level to maximize his mill's production and those tactics had already destroyed a significant amount of property and natural features that lined the lake. Backus' paper mills were the world's second-largest in terms of total production in the 1920's. Backus attempted to thwart conservation efforts by using his influence to affect the content of newspaper editorials, stall legislative bills in committee and influence legislators. Seymour Backus owned preferred stock in the St. Louis & San Francisco RailRoad in 1923. Edward Backus died in his rooms at the Vanderbilt Hotel in New York City. Artist Brian Romangnoli created the Edward Wellington Backus Mural, the first heritage mural in Fort Frances, Ontario, that depicts industrialist E. W. Backus. Backus, Minnesota, a city in Cass County, in the Brainerd metro area, latitude 46.820N and longitude -94.516W, had an estimated population of 317 in 2003, was named for Edward W. Backus. Edward W. Backus resided at 75 Oak Grove Street and was associated with the Koochiching Realty Company, the Minnesota & Ontario Power Company, and the International Lumber Company according to the 1917 city directory. Augustus E. Horr (1838-1908,) the son of Philip Horr (1812- ) and Catherine Estes (1814- ,) was born at Waterford, Oxford County, Maine, enlisted in Company G, First Maine Volunteer Infantry in 1861, and saw active service with that regiment in 1861 and with Companies A and H of the 14th Maine Volunteer Infantry in 1864 and 1865, contracted the malignant measles, was one of the pioneer leaders in the lumber and logging industry in Minnesota, came to St. Anthony, Minnesota, in 1865, immediately after the close of the American Civil War, was a member of the Rawlins Post No. 126 of the Grand Army of the Republic at Minneapolis, was a member of the old lumbering firm of Leavitt, Horr & Company until 1878, when an association with John Sargent Pillsbury and others was formed under the name of the Gulf River Lumber Company, as its treasurer, married Emily Elizabeth Leavitt (1841-1932,) became interested, with his son-in-law, E. W. Backus, in the Backus-Brooks Company, as vice president, was the treasurer and a member of the original board of directors of the Columbia Gold Mining Company in 1897, was also a trustee of the First Congregational Church of Minneapolis, and died in Minneapolis after an illness of more than two years. Augustus E. Horr was survived by his widow, Emily Leavitt Horr, a daughter of Josiah Leavitt, and by Elizabeth S. Horr (Mrs. E. W.) Backus (1862-1956) and Renselaer Leavitt Horr (1875-1954.) Renselaer Leavitt Horr married Helen Randolph Stuart (1876-1978) in 1897 and died in Kandiyohi County, Minnesota. Renselaer Leavitt Horr and Helen Horr had one child, Harlan Stuart/Stewart Horr (1901-1968.) William F. Brooks (1863-1928) was born in Battle Creek, Michigan, moved to Minneapolis with his family in 1873, graduated from the Central High School of Minneapolis in 1880, graduated from the Polytechnic Institute of Worcester, Massachusetts, in 1884, engaged in the lumber business in Minneapolis in 1886, married Caroline Langdon in 1887, was a Republican, became the treasurer of the Backus-Brooks Company in 1900, was the treasurer of the Minnesota & Ontario Paper Company, was the treasurer of the International Lumber Company, was a former partner of Nelson-Tenney & Company, was a member of the Minnesota Senate from District 31 from 1918 until 1928, was vice president and director of the Western Golf Association, was the president and director of the Trans-Mississippi Golf Association, was the chairman of the Nortwest Section of the Greens Association, was the president and director of the Minnesota State Golf Association, was a member of the Senior Golfer's Association of the United States, was the General Chairman of the Tounament Committee of the Minikahda Club, was twice the president of the Minikahda Club, was a member of the Republican National Committee. Caroline Langdon Brooks and William F. Brooks had one son, Robert L. Brooks. The Northwestern Knitting Company Factory was located at 718 Glenwood Avenue. The Northwestern Knitting Company was founded in 1886 by George D. Munsing, Edward Tuttle, and Frank Page, graduates of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, who developed a new textile application that involved the plating of silk and wool and eliminated the itch of wool. During the 1890's, they advertised women's underwear in The Ladies' Home Journal, a scandalous marketing strategy in an age when underwear was viewed as an "unmentionable," and the Company became a major player in the lingerie business. In 1891, the Northwestern Knitting Company introduced the one-piece, full-length union suit, also known as "long johns." In 1897, a dye department was added and the public was offered a choice of underwear colors. In 1912, the Northwestern Knitting Company acquired the Vassar Swiss Underwear Company, a high-priced full-fashioned underwear manufacturer. Clinton Morrison, son of Minneapolis' first mayor, Dorilus Morrison, was the president of the company before his death in 1913, when he was succeeded by Frederick Moody Stowell, an employee of the company since 1890. By 1914, Page & Tuttle's enterprise employed 1,700 and was the largest employer of women in Minnesota. During World War I, the Northwestern Knitting Company supplied nearly all the union suits worn by the U.S. armed forces. In 1919, Page & Tuttle's Northwestern Knitting Company changed its name to The Munsingwear Corporation. In 1923, Munsingwear became the first Minnesota company to be listed on the New York Stock Exchange and introduced silk hosiery and artificial silk (rayon) hosiery in stocking sizes that accounted for leg shape as well as length. In 1932, the Company introduced elastic girdles. The company acquired Rollins Hosiery Mills, Inc. in 1945. In 1947, nylon tricot and men's stretch briefs were introduced. In 1955, Munsingwear introduced the knit golf shirt, with the famous Penguin® emblem. In 1958, the Company introduced Slenderella hosiery for women. Munsingwear was acquired in 1996 by Supreme International. In the late 1990's, Munsingwear became PremiumWear, Inc. In mid-2000, PremiumWear, Inc. became a wholly owned subsidiary of New England Business Service, Inc. In 2005, the Company was acquired by The John Forsyth Shirt Company LTD. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. And Mrs. A. A. Beltz and their daughter all resided at the former nearby 2204 Lake of the Isles Parkway and that Mr. and Mrs. G. V. Thomson resided at the former nearby 2212 Lake of the Isles Parkway. Alfred A. Beltz was a grain merchant at the Corn Exchange Building according to the 1917 city directory. George V. Thomson was a lawyer located at New York Life Building according to the 1917 city directory. The predecessor to the Minnesota, Dakota & Western Railway was organized in 1910, was acquired by the International Bridge & Terminal Company in 1912 while still under construction, was renamed the Minnesota, Dakota & Western Railway, was intended to connect International Falls, Minnesota, to Montana, actually opened a 14 mile extension from Nakoda Junction, Minnesota, to Loman, Minnesota, to its original four mile line from International Falls, Minnesota to Ranier, Minnesota, but abandoned the extension, was acquired by the Boise Cascade Corporation in 1965, and was acquired by the Watco Companies, Inc., in 2006. The Minnesota, Dakota & Western Railway (MDW) currently has five locomotives, 1,312 box cars, and 99 flat cars, serves the paper mills in International Falls, Minnesota, and Fort Frances, Ontario, transports about 7,000 rail cars annually, hauling paper, wood pulp, pulpwood, and paper making industry chemicals, interchanges with the Canadian National RailRoad on both sides of the U. S. border, and operates an intermodal facility. The railroad was assigned by the Burlington Northern Santa Fe RailRoad 165.2 miles of overhead trackage rights over the Rainy Subdivision of the Duluth, Winnipeg and Pacific Railway between Duluth, Minnesota, and Ranier, Minnesota. Alfred Austin Beltz ( -1927) died in Hennepin County. In 1909, Beltz resided at 2204 West Lake of the Isles Parkway and was a grain merchant located at the Corn Exchange Building. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. A. A. Beltz resided at the former nearby 2204 Lake of the Isles Parkway and that Mr. and Mrs. G. V. Thomson resided at the former nearby 2212 Lake of the Isles Parkway. Clinton Morrison (1842- ) was born in Livermore, Maine, came to Minnesota in 1854 with his parents, and has since resided in Minneapolis, was a banker, engaged in mercantile, lumber and banking enterprises, was vice president and manager of the Minneapolis Harvester Works, and was president of the Farmers' and Mechanics' Savings bank from 1876 until 1905. George V. Thomson (1887-1986) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Matthews, and died in Hennepin County. The last sale of the property occurred in early 1984, with a sale from the First Trust Company to G. D. Peterson and, in late 1984, from G. D. Peterson to its current owner, Virgil Thomas Fallon, for $511,500. Virgil T. Fallon, M.D., is an oncology physician in Minneapolis. [See note for the Minikahda Club for 702 Fairmount Avenue.] [See note for Dorilus Morrison for 2400 Third Avenue South.] [See note on the Northern Pacific RailRoad.] [See note on the Minnesota, Dakota & Western Railway.] [See note on the International Bridge & Terminal Company.] [See note on the Minnesota, Dakota & Western Railway.] [See note on the Canadian National RailRoad.] [See note on the Burlington Northern Santa Fe RailRoad.] [See note on the Duluth, Winnipeg and Pacific Railway.]

2217 East Lake of the Isles Parkway: Built in 1928. The structure is a 2 1/2 story, 9546 (7291 according to Hennepin County property tax records) square foot, seven bedroom, six bathroom, two half-bathroom, 20 room, single family dwelling, with a partially finished basement and five fireplaces. The 1930 city directory indicates that Daniel F. Bull resided at this address. In 1950, Daniel F. Bull, was the president of the Cream of Wheat Company of Minneapolis and was a member of the board of directors of the Northern Pacific RailRoad, along with A. M. Anderson, Chairman of J. P. Morgan, of New York City, Francis H. Brownell of New York City, Walter H. McLeod, President of Missoula Mercantile, of Missoula, Montana, Norton Simon, Chairman of Hunt Foods, of Los Angeles, Samuel A. Welldon, Director of the First National Bank of New York, of New York City, Charles E. Denney, retired president of the Northern Pacific RailRoad, of New York City, W. E. S. Griswold, Sr., Chairman of W. and J. Sloane, of New York City, Philip L. Ray, Chairman of the First National Bank of St. Paul, of St. Paul, Harry W. Zinmaster, President of Zinmaster Baking, of Duluth, Minnesota, Edward Brooks, President of Brooks-Scanlon, of Minneapolis, Clarence Francis, Chairman of General Foods, of New York City, George P. Jewett, Chairman of Potlatch, of Lewiston, Maine, Robert S. Macfarlane, President of the Northern Pacific RailRoad, of St. Paul, and Leslie F. Miller, President of Russell-Miller Milling, Minneapolis. Daniel F. Bull was the son of George Bull. Emery Mapes, George Bull ( -1897) and George Clifford, who owned a small flour mill, the Diamond Flour Mill, in Grand Forks, North Dakota, fought successfully to keep their business alive during the 1893 panic, and were approached by either Frank Amidon or Tom Amidon, the plant's head miller, in 1895 to pitch a "breakfast porridge" that he had developed from the "middlings," the part of wheat that produces the highest-grade flour, that he had been using at home, and that he thought might be packaged and marketed to others. They called the cereal "Cream of Wheat" and the name stuck. When samples were sent to New York City, the product flourished and demand for Cream of Wheat was so great that the milling company, then the North Dakota Milling Company, outgrew its Grand Forks, North Dakota, plant by 1897. The company then moved to Minneapolis, which offered the best source of necessary raw material and was a good shipping point with advantageous freight rates, and renamed itself the Cream of Wheat Mill. In 1929, the company was reorganized as The Cream of Wheat Corporation and its stock listed on the New York Stock Exchange. Daniel Bull led the Cream of Wheat Corporation from 1919 to 1960, when his son, David Bull, became CEO. In 1962, the Cream of Wheat Corporation was purchased by Nabisco Holdings Corporation, then known as National Biscuit Company, and David Bull was named Vice President of the company. Thomas D. Campbell ( 1966,) a son-in-law of George Bull, was the owner of the world's largest privately owned wheat farm, was an authority on mechanized agriculture, was a Brigadier General during World War II and invented the "fire bomb" using petroleum jelly. The property was sold in 2002, in a transaction between Robert K. McFerrin, Jr., and Steven Koutroupas and Agnes Koutroupas, with a sale price of $3.3 million and in 2007 by Steven Koutroupas to John L. Higgins with a sale price of $3,281,250. The property had been on the market since late 2006, with an initial asking price of $4.8 million and a subsequent asking price of $3,995,000.00. The current owners of record are John L. Higgins and Amy K. Higgins. John L. Higgins was appointed to the board of the Techne Corporation in May, 2009, serving as a member of Techne's Audit, Compensation and Nominations and Governance Committees. John L. Higgins was previously a member of the executive management team at BioCryst Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a biopharmaceutical company, and now is a member of the board of directors of BioCryst and serves as chair of its Audit Committee. Robert Keith "Bobby" McFerrin, Jr., is a musician and entertainer. In 1994, McFerrin joined the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra's artistic team as the Resource Trust Creative Chair. In 1995, McFerrin helped launch the SPCO's new music education program CONNECT, designed to re-infuse music learning into Minneapolis and St. Paul public schools. Steven Koutroupas, M. D., is a graduate of the Medical College Of Ohio, was an intern and a resident of the University of Minnesota Hospitals, began practice in 1982, and is an otolaryngologist for Allina Medical Clinic. Steven Koutroupas was an expert in Gloria Tuttle v. Lorillard Tobacco Company, et al., which was unsuccessful tort litigation over oral cancer suffered by William Tuttle, a former baseball player. William Robert "Bill" Tuttle (1929-1998,) a centerfielder, was born in Elwood, Illinois, attended Bradley University, batted right, threw right, was 6' 0" tall, weighed 190 lbs., was signed by the Detroit Tigers as an amateur free agent in 1951, debutted in 1952, was traded to the Kansas City Athletics in 1957, was traded to the Minnesota Twins in 1961, was released in 1963, was a .259 career hitter, was a .978 career fielder, and died in Anoka, Minnesota. Tuttle used chewing tobacco and the habit cost him five major operations, two years of therapy, his cheekbone, his appearance, his teeth, his tastebuds, his appetite and part of his hearing. Tuttle was an advocate for the National Spit Tobacco Education Program (NSTEP,) making the rounds to warn current players of the consequences, accompanied by his wife, Gloria Tuttle, and his longtime friend, Joe Garagiola, the NSTEP national chairman. Harvey Kuenn, a teammate in Detroit, inadvertently gave Tuttle his first chew, leading to a habit of using chewing tobacco for 10-12 hours a day. Baseball banned spit tobacco for all minor league teams in 1994. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Emery Mapes and their daughter resided at the former nearby 2218 Lake of the Isles Parkway and that Mr. and Mrs. F. M. Mapes resided at the former nearby 2224 Lake of the Isles Parkway. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mrs. Emery Mapes resided at the former nearby 2218 Lake of the Isles Parkway and that Mr. and Mrs. F. M. Mapes resided at the former nearby 2224 Lake of the Isles Parkway. Emery Mapes was the secretary for the Cream of Wheat Company according to the 1917 city directory. Frank M. Mapes was associated with the real estate firm of Mapes & Ertsgaard as a partner of Rudolph Erstgaard according to the 1917 city directory. Daniel Frank Bull ( -1920) died in Hennepin County. Daniel F. Bull (1886-1970) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of McBride, and died in Hennepin County. [See note on the Northern Pacific RailRoad.] [See the note for the Zinsmaster Baking Company for 340 Robie Street West.] [For information on Edward Brooks, see 2201 East Lake of the Isles Parkway.]

2225 East Lake of the Isles Parkway: Keyes House; Built in 1904 (1922 according to Hennepin County property tax records; Craftsman/Queen Anne transitional in style; Adam Lansing Dorr, architect. The structure is a 2.2 story, 1938 square foot, three bedroom, two bathroom, seven room, single family dwelling. The house was designated an individual landmark by the Minneapolis Heritage Preservation Commission in 1998. The 1908 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. F. Keys and Mrs. L. C. Keys all resided at this address. The 1909 city directory indicates that Charles F. Keyes, associated with Helliwell, Keyes & Carroll, a law firm with partners Arthur L. Helliwell and Walter N. Carroll officing at the Palace Building, resided at this address. The 1910, 1912, 1914 and 1918 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. C. F. Keyes resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. F. Keyes, their daughters, and H. E. Keyes all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Charles F. Keyes resided at this address. Charles F. Keyes was a lawyer with Arthur L. Helliwell in the law firm of Helliwell & Keyes, located at the Palace Building, according to the 1917 city directory. The 1917 Catalogue of the Beta Theta Pi Fraternity, published by James T. Brown of New York, indicated that Charles Frederick Keyes received a bachelors degree in 1896 and a law degree in 1899 from the University of Minnesota and was a lawyer at the Palace Building in Minneapolis. Charles F. Keyes was the president of the University of Minnesota Alumni Association from 1919 until 1921, became a member of the Minnesota Historical Society from Hennepin County in 1922, served on the Parents and Teachers Council, served on the Citizens Committee on Public Health, was a member of the faculty of the University of Minnesota in 1925, and was a 1953 inductee to the University of Minnesota Alumni Association Hall of Fame. Charles Frederick Keyes (1874- ) was one of six children (five sons and one daughter) of Charles Willard Keyes (1841- ) and Mary Louisa Collins Keyes. His siblings were Mary Keyes (1867- ,) Edward Collins Keyes (1869- ,) Willard Keyes (1872- ,) Willard Collins Keyes (1876- ,) and Allen Collins Keyes (1878- .) Ruth Elizabeth Eddy (Mrs. Charles Frederick) Keyes (1871-1933,) an Associate of the American Ornithologists' Union, was born at Ithaca, New York, a daughter of Dr. Henry Turner Eddy (1844-1921) and of Sebella Elizabeth Taylor Eddy ( -1921,) of Minneapolis, attended the University of Cincinnati, graduated from Vassar College in 1893, attended the Graduate School of the University of Minnesota, married Charles F. Keyes in 1900, was a member of the Minneapolis Audobon Society, and died in Minneapolis. Dr. Henry T. Eddy, the eldest son of Henry Eddy, a Congregational minister, physician, farmer, and inventor, and of Sarah Torrey Eddy, a graduate of Mount Holyoke Seminary, was born at Stoughton, Massachusetts, received a bachelor's degree from Yale University in 1867 and subsequently a master's degree and a doctorate in engineering from Yale's Sheffield scientific school, taught mathematics and Latin at the University of Tennessee for a year, taught mathematics and civil engineering at Cornell University from 1869 until 1873, earned a C.E. and a Ph.D. in pure and applied mathematics from Cornell, taught mathematics at Princeton University from 1873 until 1874, became involved in the new University of Cincinnati from 1874 until 1890, teaching mathematics, astronomy, and civil engineering, studied at the University of Berlin, the Physikalische Institute in Berlin, the Sorbonne, and the Collége de France in Paris while on leave from 1879 until 1880, was President of Rose Polytechnic Institute at Terre Haute, Indiana, from 1891 until 1894, taught engineering and mechanics at the University of Minnesota, where he also was the first president of Sigma Xi, was the first Dean of the Graduate School, and was Dean Emeritus, was a member of the Society for Promotion of Engineering Education, was a member of the American Mathematical Society, was a member of the American Physical Society, was a member of the American Philosophical Society of Philadelphia, and was a member of the Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, was a director in the St. Anthony Falls Bank, was a director of the Barnard-Cape Manufacturing Company, Minneapolis, authored Analytical Geometry in 1874, Researches in Graphical Statics in 1878, Thermodynamics in 1879, Neue Constructionen aus der Graphischen Statik in 1880, and Maximum Stresses Under Concentrated Loads in 1890, and wrote, with C. A. P. Turner, Concrete Steel Construction in 1914. Dr. Henry T. Eddy resided at 916 Sixth Street S. E. in Minneapolis in 1899. Henry Turner Eddy (1844-1921,) the son of Rev. Henry Eddy and Sarah Hayward Torrey Eddy/Cordelia Wood Eddy, was born at Stoughton, Massachusetts, graduated with a bachelor's degree from Yale University in 1867, graduated with a bachelor's degree from the Sheffield Scientific School in 1868, was an instructor in field work at the Sheffield Scientific School from 1867 until 1868, was an instructor in Latin and mathematics at the University of East Tennessee from 1868 until 1869, was an assistant professor of mathematics and civil engineering at Cornell University from 1869 until 1873, graduated with a master's degree from Yale University in 1870, graduated with a C.E. degree from Yale University in 1870, married Sebella Elizabeth Taylor (1844-1921,) the daughter of Horace Addison Taylor, a clergyman, and Hannah Elizabeth Coan Taylor, at New Haven, Connecticut, in 1870, graduated with a doctorate degree from Cornell University in 1872, was an educator, was an adjunct professor mathematics at Princeton University from 1873 until 1874, was a professor of mathematics, astronomy, and civil engineering at the University of Cincinnati from 1874 until 1890, was the dean of the academic faculty at the University of Cincinnati from 1874 until 1877, studied at the University of Berlin and at the Physikalische Institute in Berlin, Germany, in 1879, studied at the Sorbonne and at the Collége de France in Paris, France, in 1880, was the dean of the academic faculty at the University of Cincinnati from 1884 until 1889, was the acting president and president-elect at the University of Cincinnati in 1890, was the president of the Rose Polytechnic Institute/Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology at Terre Haute, Indiana, from 1891 until 1894; graduated with a law degree from Center College in 1892, was a professor of engineering and mechanics at the University of Minnesota after 1894, was the dean of the Graduate School at the University of Minnesota after 1905, was a member of the American Philosophical Society, was a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, was the vice president for mathematics and physics of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 1884, was a member of the American Mathematical Society, was a member of the American Physical Society, was a member of the Society for Promotion of Engineering Education, was the president of the Society for Promotion of Engineering Education in 1896, was a member of the Phi Beta Kappa college fraternity, was a member of the Sigma Xi college fraternity, was the author of Analytical Geometry (1874,) Researches in Graphical Statics (1878,) Thermodynamics (1879,) and Maximum Stresses under Concentrated Loads, was the author of numerous scientific and technical papers, retired from the University of Minnesota in 1912, authored Concrete Steel Construction with Claude A. P. Turner in 1914, was the namesake of Eddy Hall at the University of Minnesota, officed at the University of Minnesota in 1907, resided at 916 Sixth Street S. E. in 1907, and died in Minnesota. Henry Turner Eddy and Sebella Elizabeth Taylor Eddy were the parents of five children, Horace T. Eddy (1874- ,) Ruth Elizabeth (Mrs. Charles F.) Keyes (1871- ,) Esther Mabel (Mrs. Clive) Hastings (1876- ,) Beatrice Emogene (Mrs. Charles H.) Patek (1886- ,) and Helen Frances (Mrs. J. B.) Frear (1888- .) Sebella Elizabeth Taylor Eddy was a graduate of Miss Button's School for Young Ladies. Ruth Elizabeth Eddy was born at Ithaca, New York, and was a graduate of Vassar in 1893. Horace Taylor Eddy was born at Princeton, New Jersey, was a graduate of the University of Minnesota with degree B. E. E. in 1895, and married Carol Whitbeck in 1901. Esther Mabel was born at Cincinnati, Ohio, and was a graduate of the University of Minnesota in 1898. Beatrice Emogene Eddy was born at Cincinnati, Ohio, and graduated from the University of Minnesota in 1910. Helen Frances Eddy was born at Guilford, Connecticut, and graduated from the University of Minnesota in 1910. Charles Keyes and Ruth Keyes were active civic leaders in Minneapolis for many years and were involved in Tax Payers Associations and the Sanitary Commission. Ruth Eddy Keyes and Charles F. Keyes had three children, Charlotte Keyes Clark, of Carmel, California, Marjory Keyes Remington, of Glen Ellyn, Illinois, and Henry Eddy Keyes, of Atherton, California. Charles F. Keyes successfully represented the Minneapolis Photo Engraving Company in Berman v. Minneapolis Photo Engraving Company, 174 N. W. 735 (1919,) which was Minnesota Supreme Court litigation over the failure of a trial court to issue an injunction pendente lite in connection with a dispute over the issuance of stock and its disposition. Charles F. Keyes (1874-1955) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Collins, and died in Hennepin County. Leona Carolyn Keyes (-) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Pagenkopf, and died in Itasca County, Minnesota. Walter N. Carroll ( -1937) and Arthur L. Helliwell ( -1941) both died in Hennepin County. Arthur L. Helliwell resided at 740 East 16th Street according to the 1909 city directory. Arthur L. Helliwell (1870- ,) the son of George F. Helliwell and Weltha Ann Hall Helliwell, was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, moved to Minnesota in 1884, graduated from the Minneapolis Central High School in 1890, graduated from the University of Minnesota in 1895, graduated from the University of Minnesota Law School in 1896, received an advanced legal degree in 1898, participated in the founding of the Alumni Association of the University of Minnesota, married Harriet P. Plummer, practiced law in Minneapolis, was associated with Charles F. Keys since 1899 in the law firm of Helliwell & Keys, was a Republican, was a member of the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Hennepin County (District 41) from 1903 until 1905, was a lecturer at the University of Minnesota Law School on the "Examination of Titles," was the president of University of Minnesota Law School Alumni Association from 1906 until 1907, was a member of the Roosevelt Republican Club, was a member of the Minneapolis Club, and was a member of the B'eta Theta Pi Fraternity, resided at 1605 Second Avenue South in 1907, and officed at the New York Life Building in 1907. Arthur L. Helliwell was the author of A Treatise on Stock and Stockholders, Covering Watered Stock, Trusts, Consolidations and Holding Companies, publisheed by Keefe-Davidson Company in 1904. In 1893, Estelle Sins'heimer and Arthur L. Helliwell won the Pillsbury prize, established by the heirs of John S. Pillsbury for the best work in the rhetoric department and public oration. In 1895, Arthur L. Helliwell took second place in an intrastate oratory league competition. In 1899, Harriet L. Helliwell was awarded third prize for her essay on "The Services of the Jesuits" and, in 1905, Arthur L. Helliwell was awarded first prize for an essay on "English Puritanism" by the Gilfillan prizes, which were established the John B. Gilflllan. Arthur L. Helliwell (1870-1941) married Harriet Putnam Plummer (1878-1946) in 1902 and the couple had one child, George Albert Plummer Helliwell (1903- .) George Albert Plummer Helliwell married Eleanor McAfree (1907- .) Walter N. Carroll also was the president of the Northwestern Lumber & Wrecking Company and resided at 2000 Irving Avenue South according to the 1909 city directory. Adam Lansing Dorr (1854-1928) was a native of New York, came to Minneapolis in 1882, was employed as a draftsman with the firms of Plant & Whitney and the Orff Brothers until 1886, started his own practice with a partner, William D. Powell, subsequently was a partner with architect William P. Appleyard, established an independent architectural firm in 1890, and designed over 100 buildings, primarily private residences in South Minneapolis, commercial blocks, rowhouses, apartment buildings, offices, churches, and warehouses. Dorr's most notable commissions in addition to this residence include the West 15th Street Rowhouses in 1886 and the Ogden Apartment Hotel in 1910. Walter N. Carroll (1863- ,) the son of T. Nicholas Carroll and Hannah Clarke Carroll, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, attended the public schools of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and Village Creek, Iowa, was the cashier of the Bank of De Smet, South Dakota, and of its successor, the First National Bank of De Smet, South Dakota, from 1882 until 1887, was in charge of the voluntary liquidation of the Twin City National Bank of New Brighton, Minnesota, from 1890 until 1892, was the assignee of and the receiver for stockholder interests for the Citizen's Bank of Minneapolis from 1893 until 1899, married Elizabeth Brownell in 1895, received three law degrees from the University of Minnesota Law School (L.L.B. in 1895, L.L.M. in 1896, and D.C.L. in 1902,) was admitted to the practice of law in 1890, was chairman of the Transportation Committee of the Minnesota Endeavor Union in 1896, was a member of the American Bar Association, was a member of the Minnesota State Bar Association, was a member of the Minneapolis Commercial Club, was a member of the Home Protection League, was a member of the National Municipal League, was a member of the American Civic Association, was a member of the University of Minnesota Alumni Association, was the president of the Minnesota Congregational Club, resided at 2000 South Irving Avenue in 1907, and officed at the Security Bank Building. The current owner of the house is Leo Paul Burd. June Burd and Paul Burd have resided at this address since 1959 according to a November, 2005, Hill & Lake Press story about the demise of a 101 year old oak tree at the residence. Leo/L. Paul Burd is an intellectual property attorney. L. Paul Burd was a member of the Minnesota Inventors Hall of Fame in 2007. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. F. E. Wheaton and G. F. Wheaton all resided at the former nearby 2232 East Lake of the Isles Parkway, that Dr. and Mrs. A. O. Lillehei resided at the former nearby 2288 East Lake of the Isles Parkway, and that Mr. and Mrs. H. R. Weesner and their daughter all resided at the former nearby 2296 East Lake of the Isles Parkway. Fred E. Wheaton was the Supreme Keeper of the Records and Seal of the Knights of Pythias, located at the Security Building, according to the 1917 city directory. Grier F. Wheaton resided at the former nearby 2232 East Lake of the Isles Parkway according to the 1917 city directory. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Andrews and Mrs. Clara T. Gerrish all resided at the former nearby 2232 East Lake of the Isles Parkway, that Mr. and Mrs. S. G. Palmer and G. B. Palmer all resided at the former nearby 2256 East Lake of the Isles Parkway, that Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Massie resided at the former nearby 2262 East Lake of the Isles Parkway, that Mr. and Mrs. E. F. Zelle resided at the former nearby 2280 East Lake of the Isles Parkway, that Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Jacobsen resided at the former nearby 2288 East Lake of the Isles Parkway, and that Mr. and Mrs. H. R. Weesner resided at the former nearby 2296 East Lake of the Isles Parkway. Aver O. Lillehei was a dentist according to the 1917 city directory. Harvey R. Weesner was the president and treasurer of the Wabash Screen Door Company according to the 1917 city directory. Grier F. Wheaton (1893- ,) the son of Fred E. Wheaton, secretary of the Minnesota Knights of Pythias, and Grace Merrill Wheaton, daughter of Carl A. Merrill, was born in Minneapolis, attended the public schools of Minneapolis, graduated from the Minneapolis West High School, attended the University of Minnesota for two years, then was employed by the National Carbon & Ribbon Company, was self-employed in a direct advertising agency in the McKnight building for one year, then was employed by the National Sales & Service Company until 1917, entered the Officers Training Camp at Fort Snelling and was commissioned a first lieutenant of the artillery in 1917, was ordered to Camp Funston, Kansas, then stationed at Camp Jackson, Columbia, South Carolina, was trans­ferred to Camp Wadsworth, South Carolina, then was shipped to France with the Fifth Corps, Artillery Park, was honorably discharge from the Army in 1919, returned to Minneapolis, became secretary and treasurer of the Minneapolis Electric Lamp Company upon its organization, was a member of the Knights of Pythias, was an Episcopalian, played golf, tennis and handball, fished and hunted. In 1917, Grier F. Wheaton married Claudia Elizabeth Hunt, a daughter of Thomas A. Hunt, a prominent Minneapolis insurance man, in Minneapolis, and the couple were the parents of one son, David Hunt Wheaton (1921- .) Fred Elmer Wheaton ( -1927,) Fred E. Wheaton ( -1922,) and Grier Franklin Wheaton ( -1950) all died in Hennepin County. Dr. Axel O. Lillehei (1876-1959) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Hollekin, and died in Hennepin County. Harvet Roscoe Weesner ( -1949) died in Hennepin County. Harvey R. Weesner (1866- ) was born at Wabash, Indiana, the son of Clark W. Weesner and Anna E. Leeson Weesner, took a business course at Eastman's Business College, Poughkeepsie, New York, was an assistant in the office of the clerk of the circuit court, was employed with the firm of B. Walter & Company, manufacturers of table slides, entered the service of the Wabash Screen Door Company in 1888 in the capacity of bookkeeper and shipping clerk before becoming an officer of the company, and was made president and treasurer in 1915. The Wabash Screen Door Company was established at Wabash, Indiana, in 1884, moved to Rhinelander, Wisconsin, in 1891, and was reorganized and recapitalized as a Minnesota corporation in Minneapolis in 1902, after a fire destroyed the Rhinelander, Wisconsin, plant. In 1887, Weesner married Ollie A. Hoover of Wabash, Indiana, and the couple had three children, Beulah W. Weesner (Mrs. Frank E.) Struthers of Minneapolis, Louise Weesner (Mrs. Harold G.) Huey, of Minneapolis, and Donald Weesner. Weesner was a Mason and was a member of the Minneapolis Club, the Manufacturers Club, the Interlachen Country Club, the Automobile Club, the St. Anthony Commercial Club, and the Civic & Commerce Association. He was one of the founders of the East Side State Bank formed in 1906, which was during 1916 consolidated with the St. Anthony Falls Bank, the latter being taken over by the First National Bank in 1922, was a director of the First National Bank of Mineapolis, and was a director of the Minneapolis Trust Company. Clark W. Weesner was engaged in the practice of law at Wabash, Indiana, was clerk of the circuit court for two terms, and was the Wabash, Indiana, mayor for one term. Grier F. Wheaton (1893-1950,) a son of Frederick Elmer Wheaton and Grace Merrill Wheaton, was born in Minneapolis, attended the public schools of Minneapolis, graduated from Minneapolis West High School, attended the University of Minnesota for two years, studied law in night school for one year, was employed by the National Carbon & Ribbon Company for 15 months, then operated a direct advertising agency in the McKnight building for one year, then was employed by the National Sales & Service Company until 1917, entered the Officers Training Camp at Fort Snelling and was commissioned a First Lieutenant of the artillery, served in the Fifth Corps, Artillery Park, in France, received his honorable discharge in 1919, then returned to Minneapolis and became secretary and treasurer of the Minneapolis Electric Lamp Company upon its organization, is a member of the Knights of Pythias, Lodge No. 1, of Minneapolis, is an Episcopalian church, and engaged in the hobbies of golf, tennis fishing, hunting, and handball. Grier F. Wheaton married Claudia Elizabeth Hunt (1893-1992,) a daughter of Thomas Abijah Hunt (1864-1938) and Eugenia McKnight Hunt ( -1945,) in Minneapolis in 1917 and the couple two sons, David Hunt Wheaton (1921- ) and Philip Eugene Hunt. Mrs. Grier F. Wheaton provided financial aid to Orlando Fals-Borda, who authored Peasant Society in the Colombian Andes: A Sociological Study of Saucio, published by the University of Florida Press in 1962. Fred E. Wheaton (1863-1922) was born in Machias, Maine, came to Minneapolis in 1881, was a prominent member of the Knights of Pythias, was the secretary of the Minnesota organization of the Knights of Pythias, subsequently was the supreme secretary for the Knights of Pythias of America for 12 years, was the editor of the monthly Pythian Advocate, chaired the Minnesota Democratic State Central Committee during the Woodrow Wilson administration, was the unsuccessful Democratic Party candidate for Minnesota Governor in 1918, losing to the Republican candidate, Joseph A. A. Burnquist, and was a member of the Democratic Party National Committee from Minnesota in 1920. Frederick, Minnesota, was a proposed townsite in Wolford Township, section 34, that was surveyed by owners Fred E. Wheaton of Minneapolis and W. J. Pilkey of St. Paul about 1917, but its establishment was rejected by the Crow Wing County, Minnesota, Board of Commissioners. Grace Merrill Wheaton was a daughter of Carl A. Merrill, who was active in the insurance business in Iowa and Minnesota. The Order of Knights of Pythias is an international, non-sectarian fraternal order, established in 1864 in Washington, D.C., by Justus T. Rathbone and was the first fraternal order to be chartered by an Act of Congress. The organization embraces more than 2,000 subordinate lodges in the United States and Canada, with a total membership of over 50,000 in 2003, its primary object of the fraternal organization is to promote friendship among men and to relieve suffering, and it is based on the friendship of Damon and Pythias, who were historical characters living in Greece about four hundred or more years before the beginning of the Christian era. The order's membership was originally restricted to white males, but the racial requirement for membership was dropped in the 1950's. Minnesota politicians who were members of the Order include Ray Park Chase (1880-1948,) Minnesota State Auditor and a member of Congress, Theodore Christianson (1883-1948,) a Minnesota Governor, Hubert Horatio Humphrey, Jr. (1911-1978,) a Minneapolis Mayor and a U. S. Senator, and Thomas Erwin Latimer (1879-1937,) a Minneapolis Mayor.

2309 East Lake of the Isles Parkway: Built in 1915. The structure is a 2 1/2 story, 5107 square foot, six bedroom, three bathroom, 14 room, single family dwelling, with a partially finished basement. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. H. M. De Laittre and their daughters and H. H. De Laittre all resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. H. M. De Laittre and their daughters all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Dara P. DeLaittre resided at this address. Howard M. De Laittre was the president of the Bovey-De Laittre Lumber Company and Horace H. De Laittre was the vice president of the De Laittre-Dixon Lumber Company and both resided at this address according to the 1917 city directory. Howard M. De Laittre ( -1927) died in Hennepin County. Howard M. De Laittre (1923-1995) graduated in 1944 from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Electrical Engineering. Horace Howard DeLaittre (1891-1979) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Coggins, and died in Hennepin County. Howard M. DeLaittre (1846-1927) was born in Maine, was educated in the Ellsworth, Maine, Common Schools, was a lumberman, moved to Minnesota in 1869, settled in Minneapolis, was a resident of Minnesota for the 1880 United States Census, and was a Republican member of the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Hennepin County (District 31) from 1895 until 1897. Dora P. DeLaittre (1849- ) was born in Maine, was the wife of Howard M. Delaittre, and was a resident of Minnesota for the 1880 United States Census/Minnesota. Grace M. DeLaittre (1876- ) was born in Minnesota, was the daughter of Howard M. Delaittre and Dora P. Delaittre, and was a resident of Minnesota for the 1880 United States Census/Minnesota. Joseph A DeLaittre (1879- ) was born in Minnesota, was the son of Howard M. Delaittre and Dora P. Delaittre, and was a resident of Minnesota for the 1880 United States Census. William H. DeLaittre (1844- ) was born in Maine, was the brother of Howard M. Delaittre, and was a resident of Minnesota for the 1880 United States Census. John L. DeLaittre (1854- ) was born in Maine, was the brother of Howard M. Delaittre, and was a resident of Minnesota for the 1880 United States Census. Other DeLaittres who resided in Minnesota according to Social Security records were Arthur Bradford Delaittre (1903-1967,) who died in Kanabec County, Minnesota, Donald A. Delaittre (1942-1994,) who died in Hennepin County, Doneth DeLaittre (1926-1993,) who died in Nebraska, Earle DeLaittre (1916-1977,) who died in Minneapolis, Edward Cecil DeLaittre (1893-1976,) who died in Duluth, St. Louis County, Minnesota, Betty DeLaittre (1916-2000,) who died in Minneapolis, Carolyn DeLaittre (1941-1991,) Irene DeLaittre (1909-1986,) who died in Eden Prairie, Hennepin County, Minnesota, Margot DeLaittre (1913-1997,) who died in Minneapolis, Mary DeLaittre (1902-1978,) who died in Duluth, St. Louis County, Minnesota, and Olive DeLaittre (1917-1987,) who died in Crow Wing County, Minnesota. Minnesota death records indicate that Arthur Lewis DeLaittre ( -1967) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Leighton, and died in Kanabec County, Minnesota, that Donald A. DeLaittre (1942-1994) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Carrol, and died in Hennepin County, that Doneth G. De Laittre (1926-1993) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Tathum, and died in Pine County, Minnesota, that Earle B. DeLaittre (1916-1977) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Foley, and died in Hennepin County, that Edward Cecil DeLaittre (1893-1976) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Ross, and died in St. Louis County, Minnesota, Elizabeth T. DeLaittre (1916-2000) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Foley, and died in Hennepin County, that Irene A. DeLaittre (1909-1986) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Lundin, and died in Hennepin County, that Margot Vivian DeLaittre (1913-1997) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Richards, and died in Hennepin County, that Mary S. DeLaittre (1902-1978) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Barr, and died in St. Louis County, Minnesota, and that Olive DeLaittre (1917-1987) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Johnson, and died in Itasca County, Minnesota. The property was last sold in 1994 by E. P. Gillette and J. M. Gillette to Judson Bemis, Jr., and Carol V. Bemis, for $675,000 and in 2005 by Lisa B. Fitzmaurice and Matthew O. Fitzmaurice for $2,500,000. Judson Bemis, Jr., is the Chairman of the Board and CEO of Solv Technology, LLC, which recently changed its name from Outsell, LLC. Solv Technology, LLC, is a provider of intelligent customer interaction management software and services. Prior to 1992, when he purchased Outsell, LLC, Bemis was a marketing and sales manager for several divisions of the Bemis Company Inc. Bemis is also active with the Minnesota Orchestral Association, is on the board of the National Center for Social Entrepreneurs, and is a contributor to the Guthrie Theatre and the Walker Art Center. Judson Bemis, the owner of Solo Tech, was a contributor to the George W. Bush for President campaign in 2004. Judson Moss Bemis, Sr. (1833-1921,) founded the Bemis Company, which was a manufacturer of burlap bags and related products based in Minneapolis and with other offices and plants in Boston, Buffalo, St. Louis, and Vancouver, Washington. Christies, a sound recording studio, is also located at this address. Lisa B. Fitzmaurice and Matthew O. Fitzmaurice previously resided at 2681 East Lake of the Isles Parkway. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. William Eurich resided at the former nearby 2322 East Lake of the Isles Parkway. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. William Eurich resided at the former nearby 2322 East Lake of the Isles Parkway. William Eurich was the president of the Hillside Cemetery Association according to the 1917 city directory. [See note on Lisa B. Fitzmaurice and Matthew O. Fitzmaurice for 2681 East Lake of the Isles Parkway.]

2323 East Lake of the Isles Parkway: Built in 1926. The structure is a 2.2 story, 4896 square foot, six bedroom, six bathroom, 16 room duplex. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Minnie F. Atkinson and Dr. Alvin J. Kistler resided at this address. The current owner of record of the property is Beulah C. O'Brien and the current taxpayer of record of the property is Jan O'Brien Sweet of 5517 12th Avenue South. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. P. M. Starnes resided at the former nearby 2340 East Lake of the Isles Parkway, that Mr. and Mrs. G. R. Martin resided at the former nearby 2368 East Lake of the Isles Parkway, and that Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Gluek and Mr. and Mrs. Karl Gluek all resided at the former nearby 2374 East Lake of the Isles Parkway. Pleasant M. Starnes was the vice president and treasurer of the American Timber Holding Company and the Western Finance Company according to the 1917 city directory. Gerald R. Martin was the secretary of the Brooks Elevator Company according to the 1917 city directory. Alvin C. Gluek was the brewmaster at the Gluek Brewing Company and resided at the former nearby 2374 East Lake of the Isles Parkway according to the 1917 city directory. Karl G. Gluek was the assistant treasurer of the Gluek Brewing Company and resided at 1005 Mount Curve Avenue according to the 1917 city directory. Alvin Charles Gluek, Jr., was the author of Minnesota and the Manifest Destiny of the Canadian Northwest: A Study in Canadian-American Relations published in Toronto, Ontario, by the University of Toronto Press in 1965. Alvin Charles Gluek, Jr., was formerly Professor of History and Director of Canadian Studies at Erindale College. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. F. L. McDonald resided at the former nearby 2402 East Lake of the Isles Parkway. Frank L. McDonald was the department manager for the McDonald Brothers Company and resided at 2400 West Lake of the Isle Parkway according to the 1917 city directory. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Appleyard resided at the former nearby 2340 West Lake of the Isle Parkway, that Mr. and Mrs. M. A. Kohen, their daughter, and H. G. Kohen all resided at the former nearby 2358 West Lake of the Isle Parkway, that Mr. and Mrs. A. D. Hirschfelder and their daughter all resided at the former nearby 2364 West Lake of the Isle Parkway, that Mr. and Mrs. G. R. Martin resided at the former nearby 2368 West Lake of the Isle Parkway, that Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Gluck resided at the former nearby 2374 West Lake of the Isle Parkway, and that Mr. and Mrs. F. L. McDonald resided at the former nearby 2400 West Lake of the Isle Parkway. Alvin C. Gluek ( -1952) died in Hennepin County. [See the note for the Gluek Brewery/Gluek Riverside Park for 2004 Marshall Street NE.]

2405 East Lake of the Isles Parkway: Built in 1887; Queen Anne in style. The structure is a 2 1/2 story, 3522 square foot, four bedroom, three bathroom, 11 room, single family dwelling, with a partially finished basement. The house has a grand front bay. The 1890 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. W. P. Douglass resided at this address. The 1892 and 1894 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. E. M. Mabie resided at this address. The 1896 and 1898 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. George E. Maxwell and their daughters all resided at this address. The 1902, 1904, 1906, 1908, and 1910 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Kenkel resided at this address. The 1909 city directory indicates that Herman H. Kenkel was a grain commissioner and resided at this address and that John Kenkel was a clerk for F. H. Peavey & Company and boarded at this address. The 1912, 1914 and 1918 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Regan and their daughter resided at this address. In 1912, Miss Agnes Regan, who eventually became Rev. Mother Regan, Order of the Sacred Heart, resided at this address and was a guest at the wedding of Boetius Henry "Bo" Sullivan, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Roger C. Sullivan, and Mary Loretta "Loretta" Connery, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James P. Connery, in Chicago, Illinois. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. W. M. Babcock, W. M. Babcock, Jr., and Mr. and Mrs. John J. Reagan and their daughter all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that John J. Regan resided at this address. George E. Maxwell, the son of Benjamin Maxwell and Clarissa Munson Maxwell and the grandson of Benjamin Maxwell and Mary Cheney Maxwell, was a member of the Minnesota Society of the Sons of the American Revolution by virtue of great grandfather Benjamin Maxwell, a Lieutenant in the Hampshire County, Massachusetts, Militia during the Revolutionary War. John J. Regan was the president of the Regan Chemical Company and was the vice president of Regan Brothers, wholesale bakers, and resided at Minnetonka Beach according to the 1909 city directory. John J. Regan was the vice president of the Regan Brothers Company according to the 1917 city directory. In a letter to Yellowstone Park officials dated March 3, 1913, John Regan of Regan Brothers wholesale bread bakers in Minneapolis requested 75 to 100 pairs elk horns to make into chandeliers for a new Elks club, in a response letter dated March 6, 1913, park officials said it would be practicable for him to get the 75 to 100 elk horns after the elk have shed them, providing he could get the authority to take them from Washington, D. C., and paid for the shipping, and in a subsequent letter dated March 10, 1913, Mr. Regan said that he would take the matter up with his representative in Congress and with the Department of the Interior to get permission to get that many elk horns. John J. Regan, A. E. Morrison, and Albert E. Floan, were plaintiffs in a lawsuit against Charles M. Babcock, Commissioner of Highways, and the State of Minnesota, as an intervenor, in the Minnesota Supreme Court in 1935 in the capacity of qualified contractors alleging a violation of the statutory requirement for letting contracts. William M. Regan, who resided at 86 North 17th Street, and Joseph M. Regan, who resided at 1623 Laurel Avenue, were the president and the secretary-treasurer of Regan Brothers respectively according to the 1909 city directory. Kenkel & Company was a grain dealer served by the St. Paul & Duluth RailRoad in Minneapolis in 1891. George E. Maxwell was a troubleman for the Minneapolis General Electric Company and resided at 1518 Nicollet Avenue according to the 1909 city directory. George E. Maxwell ( -1927) died in Hennepin County. The Minneapolis General Electric Company was the corporate successor of Minnesota Brush Electric Company, which in 1882 had built the first hydroelectric central station in the United States at St. Anthony Falls. An explosion destroyed the Minneapolis General Electric Company Main Street Power Station at St. Anthony Falls in 1911 and was replaced by the Riverside Power Plant farther upstream. The Minneapolis General Electric Company also built the waterpower generating station at St. Croix Falls in 1903. The Minneapolis General Electric Company leased the Coon Rapids, Minnesota, dam and hydroelectric power station, built by the Mississippi River Electric Power Company, from the Northern States Power Company, which purchased the facility in 1916. The Minneapolis General Electric Company later merged with Northern States Power Company. The structure was sold twice in the past few years, with a sale in 2000 from Charles Q. Chrisman to Mark R. Platt and Regina M. Platt for $1,651,000 and with a sale in 2002 from Mark R. Platt to its current owner, Thomas O'Connell, for $2,395,000. Gina Platt is an agent for the Casa Manatee vacation rental property on Captiva Island, Florida. [See note for Frank Hutchinson Peavey for 2205 Park Avenue South.] [See note on the Northern States Power Company for 21-27 South St. Albans Street.]

2409 East Lake of the Isles Parkway: Catherine Gray House. Built in 1907 or 1908; Prairie School in style; William Gray Purcell, architect. The structure is a two story, 4586 square foot, five bedroom, six bathroom, 12 room, single family dwelling, with a partially finished basement. The 1909 city directory indicates that Catherine Gray, the widow of William G. Gray, resided at this address. The 1910 city directory indicates that Mrs. W. C. Gray, Miss A. M. Zieglert, and George Feick, Jr., all resided at this address. The 1912, 1914 and 1918 city directories indicate that Mrs. W. C. Gray and Miss A. M. Zeigler both resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Carl E. Sager resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that John R. Ridgway resided at this address. In 2003, Minnesota Public Radio purchased the property from former Valspar Corporation CEO C. Angus Wurtele and Margaret Wurtele for $1.7 million. Catherine Garns Gray was the wife of William Cunningham Gray who established a reputation as an artist in Chicago by teaching drawing and hosting china painting parties. Urban Geography Professor David A. Lanegran, of Macalester College, suggests that the fact that the house was built before Elmslie joined the architectural firm with Purcell explains the lack of items of interest in the design of the house. William Gray and Catherine Gray were the grandparents of William Gray Purcell (1880-1965). Purcell's grandfather, William Cunningham Gray, died in 1901, and in 1907, his grandmother, Catherine Gray, moved from Chicago to Minneapolis to be closer to her grandson. William Cunningham Gray (1830-1901) was born in Butler County, Ohio, attended Farmer's College at College Hill, Ohio, studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1852, discontinued his law practice shortly thereafter, became a journalist, then became a farmer and then a journalist, editor, and printer at The Elm Street Publishing Company in Cincinnati, and finally at a Presbyterian weekly newspaper called The Interior in Chicago. The Interior was ultimately purchased by Gray's benefactors, harvester magnate Cyrus Hall McCormick and his wife, Nettie Fowler McCormick. William Cunningham Gray married Catherine Garns in 1856 and the couple had two children, Frank Sherwood Gray (1857- ) and Anna Catherine Gray (1861-1914.) Frank S. Gray wed Alice Baker, and the couple had a son and two daughters before separating, and Anna Catherine Gray, at 18, married commodities broker Charles A. Purcell (1854-1931.) Annie Ziegler was a long time companion of Catherine Gray. The Catherine Gray house, Purcell's first built example of a progressive structure, was to be a home for both of them. It was also an important work for the fledgling progressive architecture firm of Purcell and Feick. Purcell's future partner, George Elmslie, advised the young architect during the design process. The rectangular, two-story structure closely resembled Frank Lloyd Wright's 1907 Ladies' Home Journal design for a "Fireproof House for $5000." Purcell defined and varied the monolithic exterior by using brick on the first floor and by using natural-colored stucco on the second floor. The firm incorporated progressive features in the building, such as casement windows and an asymmetrical entry, that eventually became standard in the subsequent homes it designed. A partially open floor plan and a system of interior wood trim throughout the rooms unified the interior. The house has been altered significantly over the years, including the removal in 1918 of a screened pavilion to the south. Annie M. Ziegler ( -1953) died in Hennepin County. The 1909 city directory indicates that William G. Purcell, associated with Purcell & Feick, resided at 2311 Humboldt Avenue South and the architectural firm with George Feick, Jr., was located at the New York Life Building. A recent owner was Margaret Von Blon Otis. Margaret Von Blon Wurtele, a 1967 Smith College graduate, suffered the death of her 22-year-old son, Philip J. Otis, in a 1995 climbing accident during a rescue attempt in Mount Rainier Park and now divides her time between Minneapolis and California's Napa Valley. Margaret Wurtele is the wife of Angus Wurtele and is the daughter of Joanne Von Blon. The Wurteles donated a "significant portion" of the $1.7 million sale price to MPR's capital campaign. The Wurteles are longtime supporters of MPR, the Guthrie Theater, and the Walker Art Center, among other local arts organizations. The house was renovated, with new furniture, rugs, window treatments, paint, plants and outdoor furniture with donations from Valspar, Schneiderman's Furniture and other local businesses, but no structural changes, and was put on the market as part of MPR's new capital fund-raising campaign. Angus Wurtele, a 1956 graduate of Yale University, became Valspar's CEO after the death of his father, Valentine Wurtele, when Angus Wertle was 27. Valspar is the successor to the Valentine & Company, an early American varnish maker that made its reputation manufacturing the varnish for the spars of clipper ships. The Valspar Corporation is the fifth largest North American manufacturer of paints and coatings. C. Angus Wurtele, Chairman & CEO of Valspar and resident at this address in 2004, was a contributor to the Democratic National Committee in 2004. Michael S. Gilliland purchased the property in early 2005 from Minnesota Public Radio for $1,560,000 and sold it later in 2005 to its current owners, Brian J. Longe and Mary Longe, for $1,670,250. Michael S. Gilliland (1950- ) was born in Pipestone, Minnesota, graduated from the University of Minnesota in 1972, the University of Minnesota Law School in 1976, received a L. L. M. from the New York University in 1980, and is a real estate lawyer with the law firm of Malkerson Gilliland Martin LLP in Minneapolis. Brian Longe previously was senior vice president of Business Development for First Image Management Company, a subsidiary of First Data Corp, previously was president of Bell and Howell, joined Wolters Kluwer Financial Services in 2005 from Paragon Corporate Holdings, where he was chief executive officer, and president and chief executive officer of its largest unit, AB Dick Company, and currently is president and chief executive officer for Wolters Kluwer Financial Services. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. M. Stafford and the Reverend Henry Russell Stafford resided at the former nearby 2412 Lake of the Isles Parkway. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. M. Stafford and their daughter resided at the former nearby 2412 Lake of the Isles Parkway and that Mr. and Mrs. Marc Frazer resided at the former nearby 2416 Lake of the Isles Parkway. Charles M. Stafford was a lumber broker who officed at the Lumber Exchange Building according to the 1917 city directory and Reverend Russell H. Stafford was the pastor of the Morningside and Open Door Congregational Churches according to the 1917 city directory. Rev. Russell H. Stafford received an Honorary Doctor of Laws from Oglethorpe University in 1929. Rev. Russell H Stafford, DD, was pastor of Pilgrim Congregational Church in St. Louis, Missouri, in 1925. [See note on Purcell, Feick, and Elmslie for 2022 Summit Avenue.]

2419 East Lake of the Isles Parkway: Built in 1916. The structure is a two story, 5156 square foot, five bedroom, five bathroom, 16 room, single family dwelling, with a partially finished basement. The 1909 city directory indicates that Plumleigh A. Rogers, the manager and editor of the Daily Market Record, resided at this address and that George D. Rogers, a student, boarded at this address. The 1910 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. P. A. Rogers resided at this address. The 1912 and 1914 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. P. A. Rogers and G. D. Rogers, Jr., all resided at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. P. A. Rogers resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Hauschild resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that John H. Hauschild resided at this address. George D. Rogers was the proprietor of the Daily Market Record, was the general counsel of the Chamber of Commerce, and resided at 2655 Grand Avenue according to the 1909 city directory. Plumleigh A. Rogers was the manager and editor of the Daily Market Record according to the 1917 city directory. Plumleigh A. Rogers ( -1935) and George D. Rogers ( -1947) both died in Hennepin County. John Henry Hauschild (1880-1965) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Stremel, and died in Hennepin County. The 1912 and 1914 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Hauschild resided at 2320 Lake Place. John H. Hauschild, chairman of the board of the Great Northern Insurance Company, donated 200 acres in 1956 for the establishment of the Frontenac State Park. The Legislature finally established Frontenac Park in 1957, but actual development did not begin until 1964 when a road was built to the top of Garrard Bluff and camping and picnicking facilities were constructed. Frontenac was classified under the 1975 Outdoor Recreation Act (ORA) as a natural state park, which means that the land should be preserved for biological values rather than recreational development. The state park, which now encompasses approximately 2,600 acres, was established in 1957. The initial proposal for a state park at Frontenac was presented to legislative committees in the mid-1930s. This proposal suggested establishing a state park so that a Civilian Conservation Corps camp could be located within it. The proposal was rejected because it was decided that Goodhue County did not have enough relief labor available to warrant a CCC camp. In 1954, the Frontenac State Park Association was formed to lobby for a state park. The first bill was presented to the legislature in 1955, but met with citizen opposition. In its continuing pursuit of a state park, the Frontenac State Park Association purchased the 160-acre Munro Estate in 1955. The Daily Market Record was published from 1880 to 1984. George D. Rogers ( -1984) also was the author of the article "History of flour manufacture in Minnesota" in the Collections of the Minnesota Historical Society, Volume 10, part 1, published in St. Paul in 1905. The property was sold times in the last several years, with a sale in 1984 from P. W. Moss and S. R. Moss to M. L. Jackson and C. P. Jackson for $324,000, in 1996 from M. L. Jackson and C. P. Jackson to M. A. Ernst and A. T. Ernst for $582,500, in 1998 from M. A. Ernst and A. T. Ernst to James White and Maria White for $875,000, in 1999 from James White and Maria White to Paul A. Magers and Kathryn R. Magers for $1,801,822, in 2006 from Paul A. Magers to Julie Halbower for $2,550,000, and in 2007 from Julie Halbower to the Sara H. Ridder Living Trust for $2,730,000. In 2000, Paul A. Magers was granted a special permit by the City of Minneapolis to relocate a garage on the property. Paul Magers joined KARE-TV 11 in 1983, and was the co-anchor of the 5:00 p.m., 6:00 p.m., and 10:00 p.m. weekday newscasts. He is a native of Washington state and has worked as a reporter at KGTV-TV in San Diego and at KATU-TV in Portland, Oregon. He began his broadcasting career at KSTP in Saint Paul as a sound technician, dispatcher and field producer. Magers received a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Washington and a Juris Doctor degree from the Hamline University School of Law. Majors became an anchor for a Los Angeles television station, KCBS, in 2004. Sara H. Ridder has an MBA from the University of Michigan and was a financial supporter of The Henry Carter Adams Society in 2008. Sara Ridder is the wife of Par Ridder, of the Ridder family newspaper bloodline, who was recently dismissed as the publisher of the Star Tribune who previously was the the St. Paul Pioneer Press and was found quilty of violating a "no compete" contract claues with the St. Paul Pioneer Press.

2427 East Lake of the Isles Parkway: Built in 1911; Frederick Soper, architect. The structure is a two story, 7271 square foot, four bedroom, five bathroom, 15 room, single family dwelling. The house is noted for its second story terrace and its colonnade. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Buholz resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mrs. A. F. Buholz and Dr. K. J. Lee all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Anna F. Ruholz and Dr. J. K. Lee all resided at this address. Charles Ahlers Buholz/Buchholz (1869-1934) was the president of the Western Biological Supply Company and resided at this address according to the 1917 city directory. The Charles Ahlers Buholz duplex, at 1023 University Avenue, Minneapolis, was built in 1909 and is now the Kappa Kappa Gamma Sorority house at the University of Minnesota. Frederick R. Soper ( -1954) died in Hennepin County. Anna Buholz ( -1947) died in Hennepin County. The property was sold in 1987 by F. D. Hirschbach to E. R. Glore for $370,000, was sold in 1988 by Charles Glore and Edward Glore to Elizabeth Hyatt for $465,000, was sold in 1990 in a transaction between Elizabeth Hyatt and Henry Hyatt and Edward R. Bazinet, with a sale price of $1,950,000, and was last sold in 2004 by Edward R. Bazinet to Thomas C. Wicka for $4,000,000. Edward R. Bazinet is a businessman who was the former president and CEO of Dept. 56, a giftware company that is known for its small holiday village houses. Tom Wicka is a 1990 graduate of St. John's University, was a sales person for Banta Direct Marketing for 11 years in New York and in Minneapolis, and, since 2002, is an owner and the Executive Vice President of Sales for The Instant Web Companies, recently renamed IWCO Direct, in Chanhassen/Chaska, Minnesota. IWCO Direct was founded as Instant Services by Frank Beddor in 1969, changed its name to Instant Web after installing the first web press in 1976, acquired United Mailing in 1977, acquired Victory Envelope in 1981, added a manufacturing facility in Little Falls, Minnesota, in 1985, hired Jim Andersen as president and Peter Karle as executive vice president and chief financial officer in 1999, saw the retirement of Frank Beddor in 2004, and was purchased in 2005 by Andersen, Karle, Wicka, and Citigroup Venture Capital Equity Partners (CVC,) based in New York City. The Minneapolis Star Tribune gossip columnist, C. J., contends that Tom Wicka is a noted local fashionisto. Tom Wicka and Angie Wicka have a son, Nash Wicka, who suffers from Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and a daughter, Coco Wicka. Angie Wicka is a former model and owns Casabella Designs. The Minneapolis Zoning Board of Adjustment, in 2005, approved a request from Matt Wilkens, on behalf of Tom and Angie Wicka, for a variance to reduce the front yard setback from 60 ft. to 38 ft. to allow for a terrace, steps wider than 6 ft. and a hot tub, and a variance to reduce the side yard setback from 6 ft. to 3 ft. to allow for a hot tub. The 1910-1911 Directory of the University of Minnesota indicates that Willoughby M. Babcock, Jr., a student, resided at the former nearby 2504 East Lake of the Isles Parkway. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Judd resided at the former nearby 2501 East Lake of the Isles Parkway and that Mr. and Mrs. W. M. Babcock and W. M. Babcock, Jr., resided at the former nearby 2504 East Lake of the Isles Parkway. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mrs. L. W. Morse and her daughter resided at the former nearby 2500 East Lake of the Isles Parkway and that Mrs. H. L. Judd resided at the former nearby 2501 East Lake of the Isles Parkway. The 1930 city directory indicates that Fred Ranke resided at the former nearby 2501 East Lake of the Isles Parkway. Harold L. Judd officed at the McKnight Building according to the 1917 city directory. Willoughby M. Babcock was a lawyer who officed at Temple Court and resided at the former nearby 2504 East Lake of the Isles Parkway according to the 1917 city directory. The Charles Gates house, a three-story, 40 bedroom, air-conditioned, stone residence, designed by Chicago architects Marshall & Fox, that was intended to be a "palace of Italian Renaissance grandeur," was located at the nearby former 2501 East Lake of the Isles Parkway from 1914 to 1956. Charles G. Gates ( -1914) was the millionaire heir of John Warne "Bet-a-Million" Gates. John W. Gates was the president of the Illinois Steel Company in 1894, was an organizer of the Republic Iron & Steel Company, was an organizer of the Texas Company, and invested in the Spindletop Oil Strike. Charles G. Gates was the son of John W. Gates and Dellora Baker Gates and founded the stock brokerage firm of C. G. Gates & Company, one of the largest speculative houses on Wall Street.

2500 East Lake of the Isles Parkway: The property is owned by the Minneapolis Park Board.

2505 East Lake of the Isles Parkway: Built in 1958. The structure is a one story, 6386 square foot (6,500 square foot according to realtor,) five bedroom, seven bathroom, nine room, two fireplace, single family dwelling on a 1.27 acre site. The current owner of record is Fred N. Isaacs and the current taxpayer is Rhea Isaacs. The property is currently listed for sale with an asking price of $5,750,000.00. The late Fred Isaacs was the chairman of the board of American Iron, which currently processes 20,000 tons of scrap a month along three blocks of Pacific Street on the western bank of the Mississippi River, 2.5 miles north of downtown. Abraham Isaacs founded American Iron in 1885, then his son, Harry Isaacs, became president of the company during World War I, and then Fred Isaacs (1922-2005,) the son of Harry Isaacs, became the president of the company in the 1950's, John Isaacs, Fred Isaacs' son, was the president and CEO until 20032, when Rhea Isaacs, Fred Isaacs' wife, and Mindy Odegaard, Fred Isaacs' daughter, were added to the American Iron board and the board terminated John Isaacs and promoted Rhea Isaacs. Fred Isaacs' grandfather, a Russian immigrant to Minneapolis, started hauling scrap by horse and wagon in 1885. Fred Isaacs joined his father, Harry Isaacs, in the business, American Iron & Supply Company, in the 1930's when he was 15, and started working there full time after high school. Rhea Isaacs, CEO of American Iron, made political contributions in 2005 and 2006 to Amy Klobuchar, the Minnesota Grassroots Victory Committee, Paul Ostrow, and Mike Erlandson. American Iron is one of only two scrap yards in the Twin Cities with a union workforce, with United Electrical Workers Local 1139 having represented workers at the company for the past 50 years. American Iron is the source of the "Kondirator" issue in North Minneapolis, having purchased the giant metal shredder from Lindemann of Dusseldorf, Germany, and litigation has resulted from city and neighborhood concerns about the noise and pollution potential of the Kondirator since 1991. Although American Iron now has a negotiated settlement of its litigation and permission to proceed with the Kondirator, scrap market and shredder market conditions have changed and the Kondirator is on hold. Fred Isaacs, Fred A. Ossanna, Benson M. Larrick, Harry H. Isaacs, Earl A. Jeffords, James H. Towey, Theodore Landy, and Isadore "Kid Cann" Blumenfield were prosecuted in 1960 in criminal mail and wire fraud, fraudulent property transportion in interstate commerce and conspiracy litigation related to the sale of a large amount of Twin City Rapid Transit rolling stock, track, and related property as scrap to American Iron & Supply Company and American Salvage & Supply Company in 1951, with the resulting convictions affirmed by the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals in 301 F.2d 706 (1962). Officials of the former Twin City Rapid Transit Company were said to have accepted payoffs for selling company scrap metal, cable, and 400 miles of track at below market prices and also defrauded the company of more than $250,000 in the sale of 91 TCRT streetcars to Mexico City. The Isadore "Kid Cann," "Ferguson," or "Fergie Bloom" Blumenfeld gang was an extension of the Meyer Lansky crime syndicate out of Miami and Kid Cann controlled the Twin Cities rackets in the 1930's and 1940's. Isadore Blumenfeld (1900-1981,) the son of Phillip Blumenfeld and Eva Blumenfeld, was born in Rumnesk, Romania, came to the United States in 1902, drifted into gang fights on the streets of Minneapolis's "Newspaper Row" around 4th Street on the North Side, became the boss, with his brothers Harry Blumenfeld and Jacob "Yiddy Bloom" Blumenfeld, of one of the most powerful factions of North Minneapolis's Jewish Mafia, and ran much of his operation from Minneapolis' West Hotel and his criminal activities included bootlegging, racketeering, labor raqueteering, pimping, and prostitution. Kid Cann owned 16 percent of the stock of the Twin City Rapid Transit Company before its demise in 1954. Kid Cann was convicted on prostitution charges in 1959 and, after his release from prison, moved to Miami Beach with his best pal, Meyer Lansky, where he led a quiet retirement of stock fraud, money laundering, and shady real estate deals that left him a fortune of ten million dollars after his death of heart disease. Kid Cann was buried at Adath Yeshurun Cemetery in Edina, Minnesota. Abraham Isaacs ( -1945) and Harris Isaacs ( -1938) both died in Hennepin County. The 1918 city directory indicates that Dr. and Mrs. H. F. Marston resided at the former nearby 2508 East Lake of the Isles Parkway and that Mr. and Mrs. L. H. Joss resided at the former nearby 2520 East Lake of the Isles Parkway. The 1924 city directory indicates that Dr. and Mrs. H. F. Marston resided at the former nearby 2508 East Lake of the Isles Parkway and Mr. and Mrs. L. H. Joss resided at the former nearby 2520 East Lake of the Isles Parkway. Harold F. Marston was a dentist at the Donaldson Building and Louis H. Joss was a partner with John N. Ohman in the law firm of Joss & Ohman according to the 1917 city directory.

2525 East Lake of the Isles Parkway: Built in 1951. The structure is a 1 1/2 story, 5362 square foot, three bedroom, five bathroom, ten room, single family dwelling, with a partially finished basement. The property has been sold twice in the last six years, in 1997 from Thomas K. Scallen and Billie Scallen to Allender Stanberry for $1.3 million, and in 2002 from Thomas E. Stanberry to the John G. Skogmo Rev. Trust and its current taxpayers, John Skogmo and Thomas Morin, for $1,830,000. Thomas E. Stanberry is the president and chief executive officer of West Bancorporation of West Des Moines, Iowa, the parent company of West Des Moines State Bank. Stanberry previously was a Managing Director and a senior investment banker in the Fixed Income Division of U.S. Bancorp Piper Jaffray and was a member of the U.S. Bancorp Piper Jaffray Board of Directors. Thomas Morin is a member of the board of BORN, an information technology consulting company, is the retired vice-president of corporate services of Medtronic, Inc., and is a past international president of the Society of Information Management and the Society Board. John G. Skogmo and Thomas Morin were financial supporters of the Philanthrofund Foundation, a resource and community builder for the gay, lesbian, and transexual communities through grants and scholarships. John G. Skogmo also was a financial supporter of the Minnesota Medical Foundation. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. F. Witt and R. A. Witt resided at the former nearby 2530 East Lake of the Isles Parkway, that Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Smith resided at the former nearby 2544 East Lake of the Isles Parkway, that Dr. and Mrs. T. H. Thomas and Mrs. Anna Vickerman resided at the former nearby 2554 East Lake of the Isles Parkway, that Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Briggs and Mrs. Virginia Briggs resided at the former nearby 2566 East Lake of the Isles Parkway, and that Mr. and Mrs. L. N. Greengard resided at the former nearby 2572 East Lake of the Isles Parkway. The 1924 city directory indicates that Dr. and Mrs. A. O. Lillehei resided at the former nearby 2528 East Lake of the Isles Parkway, that Mr. and Mrs. C. F. Witt, A. R. Witt, and K. M. Witt all resided at the former nearby 2530 East Lake of the Isles Parkway, that Mr. and Mrs. G. B. Fletcher resided at the former nearby 2544 East Lake of the Isles Parkway, that Dr. and Mrs. F. H. Thomas and Mrs. Anna Vickerman resided at the former nearby 2554 East Lake of the Isles Parkway, that Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Brin resided at the former nearby 2566 East Lake of the Isles Parkway, and that Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Kempe resided at the former nearby 2572 East Lake of the Isles Parkway. Charles F. Witt was the proprietor of Witt's Meat Market and Roy A. Witt was assistant manager at C. F. Witt according to the 1917 city directory. Thomas H. Thomas was a dentist located at 328 East Hennepin Avenue and Anna Vickerman was the widow of Isaac Vickerman according to the 1917 city directory. George F. Briggs moved to Winnepeg, Manitoba, according to the 1917 city directory. Louis N. Greengard was the proprietor of the Model Plating Company according to the 1917 city directory.

2601 East Lake of the Isles Parkway: Built in 1931. The structure is a 2 1/2 story, 7569 square foot, eight bedroom, six bathroom, 17 room, single family dwelling, with a partially finished basement. The current owners of the property are Faruk S. Abuzzahab, Sr., and Kathryn Abuzzahab. Faruk Abuzzahab is a geriatric psychiatrist who is the principal investigator for the research conducted at Clinical Psychopharmacology Consultants, P.A., and at the International Anti-Aging Medical Institute, P.A. and passed the certification exam of the American Society of Addiction Medicine in 2005. In 1998, Faruk Abuzzahab, a past president of the the Minnesota Psychiatric Society and a past chair of the Ethics Board at the Minnesota Psychiatric Society, had his medical license suspended when he admitted to the board that he had entered into drug studies disturbed and vulnerable patients who didn't meet the eligibility criteria and kept them in the study after their conditions deteriorated. Dr. Faruk Abuzzahab is board certified in Psychiatry and Neurology, Anti-aging Medicine, Clinical Pharmacology, Addiction Psychiatry and Quality Assurance and Utilization Review, is a Clinical Professor at the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis in the Departments of Psychiatry, Pharmacology, Family Practice and Community Health, and is a lecturer in the Department of Pharmacology at the University of Minnesota and teaches an honors colloquim at the University of Minnesota entitled "Introduction to Psychopharmacology," covering the principles of action of psychoactive drugs, including their use in treatment of psychiatric disorders, their impact on society, treatment of drug abusers, and alternative means of "turning-on" without drugs. Faruk Abuzzahab was born in Beirut, Lebanon, is a naturalized U. S. citizen, graduated from the College do Jeunes Filles, Mission Laique Francaise, Beirut, Lebanon, in 1945, from the International College, Beirut, Lebanon, in 1951, from the School of Arts & Sciences, American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon, with a Bachelor of Science degree in 1955, and from the School of Medicine, American University of Beirut, Beirut, Republic of Lebanon, Doctor of Medicine in 1959, attended McCoy College, Johns Hopkins University, from 1959 to 1962, and attended the Graduate School, University of Minnesota, from 1962 to 1968.

2619 East Lake of the Isles Parkway: Built in 1923. The structure is a 2.2 story, 4351 square foot, five bedroom, five bathroom, 11 room, single family dwelling, with a partially finished basement. The 1896 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. M. Theo. Matson resided at this address. The 1898 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. D. L. Robinson resided at this address. The 1900 and 1902 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. D. L. Robinson and their daughter, Dr. and Mrs. W. F. Jewett, G. H. Read, and L. C. Robinson all resided at this address. The 1904, 1906, and 1908 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. John Cogan resided at this address. The 1910 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. W. V. Newin and their daughters all resided at this address. The 1912 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. John Cogan resided at this address. The 1914 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. John Cogan and Mr. and Mrs. Charles Murray all resided at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Cogan and their daughter all resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mrs. H. R. Lyon resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Pauline C. Lyon resided at this address. John J. Cogan was an insurance agent according to the 1917 city directory. Davis L. Robinson (1841-1906) was born in Massachussets and died in Hennepin County. William Franklin Jewett ( -1951) died in Hennepin County. Charles Murray ( -1918) and John Cogan ( -1935) both died in Hennepin County. The property was last sold in 1997, in a transaction between Diane A. Connor, and the current owners, William H. Kling and Sarah B. Kling, with a sale price of $1,115,000. William H. Kling is the president and CEO of American Public Media Group (APM), Minnesota Public Radio, Southern California Public Radio, and the Greenspring Company. APM is the nonprofit corporate parent of Minnesota Public Radio and of Southern California Public Radio and is the sole shareholder of the Greenspring Company. APMG, a tax-exempt corporation, also owns The MNN Radio Networks, a taxable for-profit company, Minnesota Monthly Publications, a taxable for-profit company, and the Fitzgerald Theater Company, a tax-exempt corporation. Bill Kling was hired in 1966 by Father Coleman Barry, president of St. John’s University in Collegeville, Minnesota, to start a radio station, KSJR, and KSJR led to the development of Minnesota Public Radio, a 39 station, 293 full-time employee, $42.7 million operation. The 1998 sale of the for-profit direct-mail subsidiary, Rivertown Trading, produced a $90 million increase to the Minnesota Public Radio endowment and, controversially, also gave Kling a $2.6 million payout. MPR has approximately 90,000 supporting members and receives about $7 million in membership support. Bill Kling also serves on the board of The St. Paul Companies/St. Paul-Travelers Insurance Company, Irwin Financial Corporation, Wenger Corporation, and The Capital Group American Funds, and serves on the advisory board of the Investment Company of America. Sarah Kling is a public member of the board of directors of the Walker Art Center.

2629 East Lake of the Isles Parkway: Built in 1908; Mediterranean in style. The structure is a 2.2 story, 4253 square foot, four bedroom, three bathroom, 12 room, single family dwelling, with a partially finished basement and multiple porches. The 1909 city directory indicates that John L. Tracy, associated with Brown & Tracy, dealors in stocks, bonds, grain, and provisions officing at the Andrus Building, resided at this address. The 1910 and 1912 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Tracy resided at this address. The 1914 and 1918 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. O. P. Briggs resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Simington resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that William O. Wells resided at this address. In 1902, Otis P. Briggs was the president of the Twin City Iron Works and resided in Minneapolis. Otis P. Briggs was the president of the Northern Motor Car Company according to the 1917 city directory. John L. Tracy ( -1916) died in Hennepin County. Otis P. Briggs ( -1928) died in Hennepin County. The Minneapolis Steel & Machinery Company was founded in Minneapolis by J. L. Record and Otis Briggs in 1902 to manufacture steel components for buildings, bridges, and other steel structures. The Minneapolis Steel & Machinery Company was engaged exclusively in the steel fabrication business until 1910, when the Joy-Wilson Company of Minneapolis was hired to design a tractor which evolved into the famous Twin City "40" tractor, and began the company's successful venture into the tractor business. Later, the Minneapolis Steel & Machinery Company expanded its role in the tractor business by subcontracting to build heavy tractors for other manufacturers like Case Threshing Machine Company, and Bull Tractor Company. Just after World War I, the Minneapolis Steel & Machinery Company shifted to a new line of lightweight tractors, threshing machines, and farm trucks. The lightweight "Twin City" tractors became the basis for the entire Minneapolis-Moline tractor line. When the depressed agricultural economy made it difficult for a short line company like the Minneapolis Steel & Machinery Company to survive on its own, merger negotiations began with the Moline Implement Company of Moline, Illinois, and the Minneapolis Threshing Machine Company of Hopkins, Minnesota, and the three short line companies were amalgamated to form the Minneapolis-Moline Power Implement Company in 1929. J. L. Record was Chairman of the Board of Minneapolis-Moline in 1929. In 1963, Minneapolis-Moline was purchased by White Motors, which dropped the Minneapolis-Moline name in 1974 and went bankrupt shortly thereafter. 7-SIGMA's manufacturing facilities are located in the last standing structure of the historic Minneapolis-Moline Power Implement Company in the Longfellow neighborhood of Minneapolis in a building that was constructed in 1917 by the Minneapolis Steel & Machinery Company. The Twin City truck was built by the Minneapolis Steel & Machinery Company beginning in 1918. The company made 2-ton and 3 1/2-ton versions until 1929. Minneapolis Steel & Machinery Company began making alcohol engines for tractors in 1909, and with increasing demand for alcohol powered farm equipment after World War I, began intensive studies on a more efficient alcohol engine. The Minneapolis Steel & Machinery Company also built bridges, including the first known "Warren through truss" bridge in Montana across the Beaverhead River in Madison County in 1907. The Warren truss is easily recognized by the "W" configuration of the diagonal members of the truss. The simplicity and economy of design of the truss made it appealing to American bridge engineers in the early 20th Century. The property was last sold in 1994 by T. A. Keller and J. Z. Keller to Katharine E. Anderson for $475,000 and in 2001 by Katharine E. Anderson to its current owners, Robert Mittra and Shanti Mittra, for $1.8 million. The property was recently offered for sale for $2,295,000. Robert Mittra received his medical degree from the University Of Pennsylvania and is an ophthalmologist with VitreoRetinal Surgery, is the medical director of the Minnesota Eye Injury Registry, and is a consulting ophthalmologist at the Gillette Children's Hospital. Shanti Mittra is a partner at Primus Venture Partners and is a member of the Guthrie Theatre Education and Community Partnerships Committee. The Gillette Children's Hospital began more than 100 years ago, when a young doctor in St. Paul, Minnesota, Dr. Arthur J. Gillette (1863-1921,) decided to specialize in orthopaedic surgery to correct children's disabilities caused by deformities of bone and muscle and teamed up with Jessie Alice Haskins (1866-1927,) a Carleton College student who had a disability, to persuade the Minnesota Legislature to publicly fund a hospital dedicated solely to the treatment of children with disabilities in 1897. As the Minnesota State Hospital for Indigent, Crippled and Deformed Children, the hospital was a facility built on 23 acres in Phalen Park in St. Paul. Elizabeth McGregor was the superintendent of the Gillette State Hospital for Crippled Children from 1911 to 1926. In 1925, the hospital was renamed Gillette State Hospital for Crippled Children in memory of Dr. Arthur Gillette, then was renamed Gillette Children's Hospital in 1971. Gillette Children's Hospital was the first State supported hospital for the treatment and research of unique pediatric orthopedic disorders in the United States. In 1977, Gillette Children's Hospital moves to its current facility at Regions Hospital in St. Paul, becomes a private nonprofit organization in 1989, and was renamed Gillette Children's Specialty Healthcare in 1996. Arthur J. Gillette ( -1921) died in Ramsey County. [See note on Dr. Arthur Jay Gillette for 1149 Summit Avenue.]

2631 East Lake of the Isles Parkway: Built in 1908. The structure is a 2.2 story, 3800 square foot, six bedroom, three bathroom, 12 room, single family dwelling, with a partially finished basement. The 1910, 1912, 1914, and 1918 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Scriver resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. O. H. Gray and R. E. Gray all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Isadore H. Levin resided at this address. Edward J. Scriver was the president of the Moore & Scriver Company, which dealt in rugs, draperies, pine furniture, upholstering, wall paper, and interior decorating, according to the 1917 city directory. The Levin Brothers, Jacob H. Levin, Isadore Henry Levin (1876- ,) and Herman Harry Levin, and their sister, Sarah Levin, immigrated to the U.S. from Lithuania in the mid-1880's, settled in Minneapolis, and the brothers established a fairly well-known furniture store in the city since at least 1914. All the Levin brothers had a letter "H" middle name because their father's name began with a letter "H." Edward J. Scriver (1863-1958) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Bullock, and died in Hennepin County. Edward J. Scriver and Martha Moser/Mosher Scriver were the parents of Edward Stanleigh/Stanley Scriver (1892- .) Martha Adelaide Scriver ( -1943) died in Hennepin County. E. Stanleigh Scriver died in France in late 1918 of bronchial pneumonia, after enlisting as a sergeant in the motor service of the Quartermaster Reserve Corps in 1917 and leaving for overseas early in 1918. He was survived by his widow, Florence Parke Scriver (1892-1979,) daughter Barbara Scriver, and father and mother, Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. Scriver. Florence Parke Scriver (1892-1979) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Day, and died in Hennepin County. The property was last sold in 1983 by R. B. Tapp and J. L. Tapp to K. J. Wessels and R. J. Wessels for $325,000, in 1988 by Kenneth Wessels and Robin Wessels to Barbara M. Decosse for $700,000, and in 2002 by Barbara M. Decosse to its current owner, Terrence G. McGann, for $1,325,000. Terrence G. McGann is associated with Terry McGann & Associates Inc. Barbara Decosse was a financial supporter in 1993 of Hope Community, Inc., revitalizing the intersection of Franklin Avenue and Portland Avenue in Minneapolis.

2637-2639 East Lake of the Isles Parkway: Harry F. Legg House; Built in 1911; Queen Anne in style; George H. Hoit and Company, architects. The structure is a two story, 2761 square foot, two bedroom, three bathroom, seven room, condominium building. The 1914 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. H. F. Legg, H. G. Legg, and F. C. Legg all resided at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. H. F. Legg and F. C. Legg all resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that J. F. Anderson and Mr. and Mrs. J. V. Dobson all resided at 2639 East Lake of the Isles Parkway. The 1930 city directory indicates that John V. Dobson resided at this address. Harry F. Legg and Dora V. Legg were the owners of H. F. Legg & Company, a dealer in diamonds and precious stones, according to the 1917 city directory. Harry F. Legg resided at this address and Dora V. Legg and Frederick C. Legg, a salesman for H. F. Legg & Company, both boarded at this address according to the 1917 city directory. Harry G. Legg was a solicitor who resided at 1968 Penn Avenue South according to the 1917 city directory. Harry G. Legg, of the Minnikahda Country Club in Minneapolis, was one of Minnesota's most prominent amateur golfers. In 1960, his widow donated to the Northland Country Club two of the many trophies Harry G. Legg had won as the Harry Legg Mr. & Mrs. Championship Trophy. The first amateur to win the state's amateur golf championship, Minikahda's Harry Legg, won the Minnesota State Open Championship at the Interlachen Country Club in 1925. Harry G. Legg, one of Minikahda Country Club's two greatest golfers, won the Trans-Mississippi Championship five times and the Minnesota State Championship ten times. John V. Dobson v. Commissioner, 46 Board of Tax Appeals 770, was appealed to the U. S. Supreme Court, in Dobson v. Commissioner of Internal Revenue, 320 U.S. 489 (1943.) The case, consolidated with three other similar cases, involved corporate stocks that were not registered with the State under the Minnesota Blue Sky Laws and the purchase had been induced by fraudulent representations and, upon settlement of a fraud action ten years later, which did not total his initial investment, the Internal Revenue Service considered the entire settlement proceeds as income, arguing past events upon sale and otherwise had reduced the taxpayer's basis in the securities to zero. The U. S. Supreme Court upheld the Board of Tax Appeals, now known as the Tax Court, which ruled that these bases adjustments were not properly made. Harry George Legg ( -1930) and Harry F. Legg ( -1943) both died in Hennepin County. George H. Hoit (1830-1905) was born in Maine and died in Hennepin County. The structure is a condominium that is currently owned by Harvey Ettinger and Sheri Ettinger. In 1999, 2637 East Lake of the Isles Parkway was sold by Jacquelyn Hanson-Reid to Patrick P. Sullivan for $655,000. 2639 East Lake of the Isles Parkway was sold by A. and M. Hunter in 1985 to Harvey Ettinger and Sheri Ettinger for $240,000. Sheri Ettinger is a Sales Account Executive for Interconnect of the Twin Cities, located in Eden Prairie, Minnesota. The Legg house was first listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1976. [See note for the Minikahda Club for 702 Fairmount Avenue.]

2647 East Lake of the Isles Parkway: Built in 1885. The structure is a 2.2 story, 4020 square foot (5610 square foot according to the realtor,) four bedroom (five bedroom according to the realtor,) three bathroom (five bathroom according to the realtor,) 13 room, single family dwelling, with a partially finished basement and three fireplaces. The 1887 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. R. F. King and Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Ustick all resided at this address. The 1890, 1892, and 1894 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Ustick resided at this address. The 1896 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Ustick and their daughters all resided at this address. In 1897, Miss Elena J. Darling and Miss Emily F. Darling, charter members of the Chalk & Chisel Club, both resided at this address. The 1898 and 1900 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Ustick and their daughters, the Misses Darling, and Miss G. G. Banker all resided at this address. The 1902 city directory indicates that the Misses Darling and Miss G. G. Banker both resided at this address. The 1906 and 1910 city directories indicate that Reverend and Mrs. C. E. Haupt resided at this address. In 1908, Reverend C. Edgar Haupt, Associate Rector of St. Mark's Episcopal Church in Minneapolis, resided at this address. The 1909 city directory indicates that Reverend C. Edgar Haupt, pastor of Wells Memorial House, resided at this address. The 1912 and 1914 city directories indicate that Reverend and Mrs. C. E. Haupt and their daughter all resided at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Short resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Payne resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Clifford C. Hield resided at this address. The Reverend Doctor Charles Edgar Haupt (1854-1942,) the son of Gen. Herman Haupt, was born in Philadelphia, died in St. Paul, and was a Lutheran minister associated with St. Mark's and St. Matthew's Churches in St. Paul who received his Doctor of Divinity degree from the Seabury Divinity School, Faribault, Minnesota, in 1909. In 1910, the officials at the Wells Memorial House, a social services and settlement house administered by St. Mark's Cathedral, were D. M. Baldwin, Jr., the president, W. P. Christian, the secretary, V. H. Van Slyke, the treasurer, and C. E. Haupt, pastor and superintendent. The Wells Memorial House, established in 1908, was a settlement house which maintained a free dispensary, mental clinic, pathology laboratory, and tuberculosis clinic in cooperation with St. Barnabas Hospital, and operated a kindergarten, day nursery, library, employment bureau, and chapel. The Reverend Doctor Charles Edgar Haupt (1854-1942) was born in Philadelphia, died in St. Paul, and was a Lutheran minister associated with St. Mark's and St. Matthew's Churches in St. Paul who received his Doctor of Divinity degree from the Seabury Divinity School, Faribault, Minnesota, in 1909. In 1892, Charles Edgar Haupt was formally called as first Rector of the Messiah Episcopal Church in St. Paul, although he served informally as rector of the church before 1891. Reverend C. Edgar Haupt, before becoming a minister, was a surveyor, a banker, and a sawmill operator and he established St. Matthew's Church as a separate church in the late 1890's and returned to St. Matthew's Church as rector from 1909 to 1931. Charles Edgar Haupt founded the Deaconess Home and Training School in St. Paul. Reverend C. Edgar Haupt also took over the Breck School, founded in 1886, and moved it from the small town of Wilder, Minnesota, in southwestern Minnesota, to a large house in St. Paul's St. Anthony neighborhood, with St. Matthew's as its home parish, before it moved to Luther Seminary, then to Minneapolis in 1956, and then to Golden Valley in 1981. Haupt was associated with the Breck School until his retirement in 1938. Charles Edgar Haupt married Alexandra Dougan Haupt and the couple had a son, Theodore Gilbert Haupt (1902-1990), who was an artist employed by the New Yorker magazine. Reverend Haupt's father was Brigadier General Herman Haupt, who lived at 312 Summit Avenue in St. Paul during his tenure as an official of the Northern Pacific RailRoad in the 1880's. The Wells Memorial House was established in 1908 and was named for Thomas Buchlin Wells, who had served as rector of St. Mark’s Cathedral. In 1922, the rector’s son, Frederick B. Wells, established a designated beneficiary fund to support the work of the Wells Memorial House. Charles Edgar Haupt was the author of Memorial volume and history of St. Mark's parish, Minneapolis, Minn (1908,) Of the freedom of the American Church: An examination of its ecclesiastical polity (1908,) and Two pioneers of the Haupt family (1948.) Warren F. Short was the vice president of E. E. Atkinson & Company according to the 1917 city directory. Clifford Chase Hield (1888-1958) was born in Minneapolis, the son of Willard James Hield (1863-1947) and of Robertena "Ena" Porter Freeman (1863-1939,) the daughter of Reuben G. Freeman and Elizabeth G. Brackett Freeman, was educated in the Minneapolis Public Schools (Emerson School class of 1902 and Central High School class of 1905,) attended the University of Minnesota in 1905-1906 and studied at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Boston, Massachusetts, graduated in 1910 with the degree of Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering (Marine Option,) with a thesis entitled "Speed Trials and Service Test on the steamboat White Bear," was a member of the Phi Gamma Delta fraternity and of the Osiris Senior Society, entered the lumber business in 1910 with Central Warehouse Lumber Company, St. Paul, was employed in 1911 by the Dunham Lumber Company in their Terry, Montana, yard, became the General Manager of the C. W. Adams Lumber Company of St. Paul from 1912 to 1917, operating a line of retail lumber yards in southern Minnesota, entered the first training camp for Army officers in 1917 and became a First Lieutenant of Field Artillery, was ordered to duty with the 337th Field Artillery at Camp Dodge, Iowa, ordered to the School of Fire, Fort Sill, Oklahoma, in 1918 for a course of study and was transfered to the School of Fire as an Instructor, was promoted to Captain and then Major of Field Artillery, was discharged from the Army in 1919, became Division Manager of the American Red Cross in 1919 in Minneapolis, and was employed in Chicago with the Cable Piano Company from 1920 to 1923. Clifford Chase Hield met Lorraine Tuthill in 1920 and married her in 1921, returned to Minneapolis as President of Alemite Company of Minnesota in 1923, was an incorporator, with Willard J. Hield and Ena Freeman Hield, of the Willard J. Hield Corporation in 1923, which was the successor to the F. L. Jackson Coal Company of Minneapolis, bought a one-half interest in Beauticians Supply Company of Minneapolis in 1936, was a partner in 1954 with Merrill Maurer in Beauticians Supply Company, was elected a member of the Minneapolis Club in 1919 and of the Woodhill Country Club in 1953. Lorraine Tuthill (1897-1983,) a daughter of James B. and Winifred Tuthill was born in Chicago, was educated at Ferry Hall, Lake Forest, Illinois, and at Smith College, Northampton, Massachusetts, receiving a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1920, was a member of the Minneapolis Junior League in 1925, died in Pebble Beach, Monterey, California, and was buried in Minneapolis. Clifford Chase Hield and Lorraine Tuthill Hield had two children, James Freeman Hield and Willard Rhodes Hield. James Freeman Hield married Madeleine Palmer Jaffray and had two children, Laurie Jaffray Hield and Peter Chase Hield. Willard Rhodes Hield and his first wife, Gloria Jeanne Barber (1924-1981,) the daughter of John P. Barber, Jr., and Bernice Labrie Barber, had two children, Melissa Barber Hield and Mary Michelle Hield. Willard Rhodes Hield later married Harriet Sutton and the couple had two children, Susan Rhodes Hield and Martha Chase Hield. Clifford C. Hield died in Minneapolis. The property was last sold in 2002 by Jochen Schulte-Sasse to Patrick Kehoe and Beth Kehoe for $930,000 and in 2007 by Patrick J. Kehoe to Douglas T. Moore for $1,460,000. The current owner of record is Douglas T. Moore and the current taxpayers of record are Douglas T. Moore and Therese L. Moore. The Minneapolis Zoning Board of Adjustment, in 2007, approved a request from Patrick Kehoe and Beth Kehoe for a variance to increase the maximum height of a fence from six feet to eight feet for the rear 56 feet of the fence, measured from the rear property line, to allow for a cedar privacy fence in the rear interior side yard. The property was listed in 2006 for sale with a asking price of $1,750,000.00. Jochen Schulte-Sasse, Dr. phil., Ruhr-Universität Bochum, was the Director of Graduate Studies in the Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature Department and the Fesler-Lampert Professor in Humanities at the University of Minnesota. Patrick J. Kehoe is a monetary adviser with the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis. Patrick Kehoe received a B.A. in Mathematics and Russian from Providence College in 1978 and a Ph.D. in Economics from Harvard University in 1986. Douglas T. Moore is an advertising executive with General Mills, Inc. [See note on General Herman Haupt for 312 Summit Avenue.]

2655 East Lake of the Isles Parkway: Built in 1906; Victorian in style. The structure is a 2.2 story, 4583 square foot, five bedroom, four bathroom, 14 room, single family dwelling. The 1910 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. H. K. McCleiland and daughters all resided at this address. The 1912 and 1914 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. H. K. McClelland and daughter all resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mrs. K. G. Silverson resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Catherine T. Silverson resided at this address. H. K. McClelland ( -1942) died in Hennepin County. The property was last sold in 1993, in a transaction between J. Clayton and M. Royer, and W. Edward McConaghay and Margaret McConaghay, with a sale price of $612,500, and in 2004 by W. Edward McConaghay to Colin M. Smith for $1,770,000. The property was recently offered for sale for $1,850,000. The current owners are Colin J. Smith and Wendy S. Lovell-Smith. W. Edward McConaghay is the President and Chief Executive Officer of ViA, a provider of mobile wireless technology solutions. Previously, McConaghay was a senior executive with Northern Telecom and held chief executive positions with entrepreneurial public and private technology companies. McConaghay graduated from the U. S. Military Academy at West Point and from the Harvard Business School. Colin J. Smith (1970- ) is the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Investment Officer for Deephaven Capital Management LLC, of Minnetonka, Minnesota, a subsidiary of Knight Capital Group, Inc., of Jersey City, New Jersey, which, with $3.5 billion in assets under management, is one of the country's largest hedge funds for affluent individuals and big institutions and has approximately 100 employees. Prior to joining Deephaven, Colin J. Smith was a Vice President with Peter Schoenfeld Asset Management and Schroder Wertheim. Deephaven was founded in 1994 by Irvin R. Kessler (1955- ,) who retired in 2002. Wendy Lovell-Smith was a member of the board of the Greater Minneapolis Section of the National Council of Jewish Women in 2003, was the secretary of the Jewish Federation of Greater St. Paul in 2004, and is a member of Beth El Synagogue. Wendy Lovell-Smith is a 1992 graduate of the University of Vermont, was Service Projects Coordinator for the Minnesota Literacy Council in 2000, is a member of the steering committee of the Minnesota Literacy Council, and is a reading volunteer at Jenny Lind Elementary School, Minneapolis. Wendy Lovell-Smith and Colin Smith were married in 1997 and have two children, Noah Smith and Maya Smith.

2659 East Lake of the Isles Parkway: Built in 1909. The structure is a 2 1/2 story, 3807 square foot, five bedroom, five bathroom, 12 room, single family dwelling. The 1912 and 1914 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Fairchild and Mrs. A. W. Barkwell all resided at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that H. E. Fairchild resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. L. S. Allen resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Woodbury F. Andrews resided at this address. Herbert E. Fairchild was the president of the State Institute for Savings according to the 1917 city directory. In 1896, Herbert E. Fairchild was the secretary of the Guaranty Savings & Loan Association of Minneapolis. In 1917, Woodbury F. Andrews was a member of board of trustees of the Metropolitan National Bank of Minneapolis. The property was last sold in 1987 by Lake Home Construction to Richard C. Westergaard, for $455,166. The previous owners were Athene L. Westergaard and Richard C. Westergaard and the current owner of record is Richard C Westergaard and the current taxpayer of record is Athene L. Westergaard. Richard C. Westergaard was a financial supporter of the YMCA of Metropolitan Minneapolis in 2001. Athene L. Westergaard and Richard C. Westergaard are also the owners of condominium units for sale at Driftwood Vacation Villas in Vero Beach, Florida, and Athene L. Westergaard also is the agent for another condominium owner with a unit for sale at Driftwood Vacation Villas.

2663 East Lake of the Isles Parkway: The property is zoned for a single family dwelling and is attached to 2667 East Lake of the Isles Parkway.

2667 East Lake of the Isles Parkway: Built in 1907; Tudor in style. The structure is a 2.2 story, 5110 square foot, five bedroom, four bathroom, 14 room, single family dwelling. The 1908 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Robinson resided at this address. The 1910 and 1912 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Robinson, their daughter, and F. H. Robinson all resided at this address. The 1910-1911 Directory of the University of Minnesota indicates that Grace Robinson, a student, resided at this address. The 1914 and 1918 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. F. P. Hopwood resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Rich resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Hubert Kelly resided at this address. Frank P. Hopwood was the president of the Hopwood Investment Company, brokers dealing in mortgage loans, real estate, and insurance located at the McKnight Building, according to the 1917 city directory. Robert G. Hopwood was the vice president and treasurer of the Hopwood Investment Company and resided at 2301 Newton Avenue South and Warren J. Hopwood was associated with the Hopwood Investment Company and boarded at this address according to the 1917 city directory. In 2002, Bruce D. Bolander sold the property to Steven A. Sonnenberg and Karen Sonnenberg for $1,347,000. The property was offered for sale for $1,795,000 in 2005. Its current owner of record is Stanley H. Ryan and the current taxpayers of record are Stanley H. Ryan and Zoe Ryan, in care of Molitor & Associates Inc. of Richfield, Minnesota. Bruce Bolander was the president of Bolander & Sons, a heavy construction firm, from 1996 to 2000 and previously was the president of the Associated General Contractors of Minnesota. Carl Bolander & Sons Company was established in 1924 by Swedish immigrant Carl Bolander and his two sons, Ivar Bolander and Eric Bolander. Since the 1940's, Carl Bolander & Sons Company has been a leader in the demolition industry, becoming the largest demolition firm in Minnesota. Since 1980, Carl Bolander & Sons Company also has been involved in landfill construction and closure, soil remediation and Superfund work, and a strong array of hazardous materials management services. Karen Sonnenberg and Steven Sonnenberg were financial supporters of the Loft Literary Center in 2005. Steve Sonnenberg, president of Rosemount Inc., the Chanhassen, Minnesota, subsidiary of Emerson Process Management, is a member of the Minnesota Business Partnership. Sonnenberg became the president of Rosemount, Inc., in 2001.

2671 East Lake of the Isles Parkway: Hugh Victor Mercer House; Built in 1907. The structure is a 2.2 story, 3526 square foot, five bedroom, three bathroom, 11 room, single family dwelling, with a partially finished basement. The 1910 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. H. V. Mercer resided at this address. The 1912 and 1914 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. H. V. Mercer and Miss Cornelia Crawford all resided at this address. The 1916 University of Minnesota Alumni Directory indicates that Hugh Victor Mercer resided at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. H. V. Mercer resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mrs. J. Warren Little and her daughter all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Nellie C. Little resided at this address. Hugh Victor Mercer (1869- ,) the son of Silas Mercer and Caroline Gaston Mercer, was born in Salem, Illinois, graduated from the law department of the University of Minnesota with a bachelor's degree in 1894, graduated from the law department of the University of Minnesota with a master's degree in 1897, graduated from the law department of the University of Minnesota with a doctorate in 1911, married Edith Huling Crawford of Ohio in 1904, was a lawyer, was initially associated with W. E. Hale, later was associated with the law firm of Hale & Morgan from 1892 until 1893, was associated with the law firm of Shearer & Childs from 1893 until 1894, was admitted to the practice of law, practiced law solo in 1894, was a member of the law firm of Young & Mercer from 1895 until 1897, practiced law alone from 1897 until 1902, was a partner of George P. Wilson, a former Minnesota Attorney General, in the law firm of Wilson & Mercer (later Wilson, Mercer, Swan and Stinchfield, then Mercer, Swan and Stinchfield, then Swan, Stinchfield & Richards, and eventually Jamison, Stinchfield & Mackall) after 1902, was the president of the Minnesota Workmen's Compensation Commission from 1907 until 1911, was the chair of the Minnesota Employes' Compensation Commission and contributed to the Report to Legislature of Minnesota Employes' Compensation Commission in 1911, was a lecturer in Dental department of the University of Minnesota on dental jurisprudence, was a lecturer in the University of Minnesota Law School on equity pleading and practice in federal courts, was the president of the Minneapolis Bar Association in 1911, was a member of the Hennepin County Bar Association, was a member and executive committeeman of the Minnesota State Bar Association, was the president of the Minnesota Bar Association from 1913 until 1914, was the vice president for Minnesota of the National Bar Association, was the author of Constitutionality Of Workmen's Compensation Acts, privately published in Minneapolis in 1909, was the author of Workmen's compensation, Minneapolis? in 1910, was a Uniform Laws Commission commissioner for Minnesota in 1931, was the author of After the war, What? in 1944, was a member of the board of governors of the General Alumni Association of the University of Minnesota, was the president of the Law Alumni Association of the University of Minnesota, was a member of the board of directors of the M C A of Minneapolis from 1895 until 1905, was a member of the Minneapolis Commercial Club, was a member of the Minneapolis Club, was a member of the Minikahda Club, was a member of the Minneapolis Civic Association, was a member of the Minneapolis Commerce Association, and resided and officed at 327 Sixth Avenue S. E. in 1907. Hugh V. Mercer was a lawyer who officed at the Security Building according to the 1917 city directory. Hugh Victor Mercer and Edith Huling Crawford Mercer were the parents of two children, Caroline Gaston Mercer and Victoria Louise Mercer. Hugh V. Mercer ( -1944) died in Hennepin County. Cornelia Earl Crawford (1875-1957) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Chopin, and died in Hennepin County. The previous owner of record was George Alan Cunningham and the previous taxpayers of record were Donna C. Cunningham and George Alan Cunningham and the current owner of record is Charles A. Cunningham and the current taxpayers of record are Ian B. Cunningham and Michelle Cunningham. G. Alan Cunningham is a lawyer who is a graduate of the University of Minnesota, who is the Dean of the International Academy of Trial Lawyers, and who is associated with the International Association of Defense Counsel, the American College of Trial Lawyers, the American Board of Trial Advocates, the International Society of Barristers, the Association of Trial Lawyers of America, the American Bar Association, the Minnesota State Bar Association, and the Minnesota Defense Lawyers Association. Cunningham was involved in the United States v. Reserve Mining Company environmental litigation in the 1970's as counsel for Armco Steel Company. G. Alan Cunningham and Donna Cunningham were financial supporters of the International Association of Defense Counsel in 2004 and of Family & Children's Service in 2004. Reserve Mining Company, through the Northern Land Company and Lake Superior Land Company, began acquiring land near Beaver Bay, Minnesota, in 1945 and, in 1946, began to build a taconite iron ore processing plant on the scenic North Shore of Lake Superior. Reserve Mining Company was initially formed by four steel companies, but by 1950, Armco Steel and Republic Steel each owned half of the company. The name "Reserve" was chosen as the need for taconite was thought at that time to be 20 years into the future. A major stumbling block to mining taconite was high Minnesota mineral taxes, which was addressed by the Minnesota Legislature in the 1941 Taconite Amendment. Clearing of the plant site and town site began early in 1951 and continued night and day for four years until it was substantially completed in 1955. The $350 million Reserve plant was officially dedicated in 1956, and was renamed the E. W. Davis Works. In the 1960's, Reserve was coming under increasing pressure to stop dumping its waste rock into Lake Superior. In 1972, the U.S. Justice Department filed suit against Reserve Mining for violating the Rivers and Harbors Act of 1899, and, in 1977, Reserve was prohibited from any more dumping in Lake Superior and was given permission to build a tailings storage basin seven miles inland from Silver Bay at Mile Post 7. Cyprus Minerals of Denver, Colorado, purchased the plant in 1989, after Reserve filed for bankruptcy and, after spending $30 million for repairs and renovations, the renamed Cyprus North Shore Mining Company began making taconite pellets again. In 1994, Cyprus North Shore Mining was sold to Cleveland Cliffs of Cleveland, Ohio, and now operates as Northshore Mining. Northshore Mining Company, a wholly owned subsidiary of Cleveland-Cliffs Inc., acquired Northshore Mining in 1994. [See note for the Minikahda Club for 702 Fairmount Avenue.]

2675 East Lake of the Isles Parkway: Built in 1903. The structure is a 2.2 story, 3268 square foot, four bedroom, four bathroom, 11 room, single family dwelling, with a partially finished basement. The 1908 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. A. G. Parker and Miss B. E. Johnston all resided at this address. The 1909 city directory indicates that C. A. P. Turner, an engineer for concrete and steel buildings, bridges, and manufacturing plants, resided at this address. The 1910 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. A. P. Turner resided at this address. The 1912, 1914 and 1918 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. C. A. P. Turner resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. A. P. Turner and their daughter all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Claude A. P. Turner resided at this address. The property was sold three times in the past four years, in 1999 from M. E. Levine and C. S. Levine to William P. Larson for $735,000, in 1999 from William D. Larson to Steven A. Sonnenberg and K. S. Sonnenberg for $765,000, and in 2001 from Steven A. Sonnenberg to its current owners, Robyn R. Hanson and John W. Hanson, for $840,000. [See note on Claude Allen Porter Turner.]

2677 East Lake of the Isles Parkway: Built in 1903. The structure is a 2.2 story, 2617 square foot, four bedroom, three bathroom, nine room, single family dwelling. The 1906 and 1908 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. C. A. P. Turner resided at this address. The 1909 city directory indicates that Edward T. Gibbons, the manager of Home Trading Stamp Company, resided at this address. The 1910 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. E. T. Gibbons and their daughter all resided at this address. The 1912 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. B. C. Crangle resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. P. H. Greear resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Norman B. Curtice resided at this address. Norman Burr Curtice (1928-1979) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Risser, and died in Hennepin County. In 2000, Taylor Bennett and Doris Bennett sold the property to Jeffrey D. Hornig and Olivia Hornig for $569,000. The current owner is Jeffrey D. Hornig. Ross Taylor, a retired Minneapolis teacher, was a DFL-endorsed candidate in 2001 for the Minneapolis School Board, was listed by some sources as having this address as his residence, and was subsequently elected to the School Board and served as its representative for a period on the former Minneapolis Teachers Retirement Fund Association. Jeffrey Hornig is a realtor with David A. Hornig Realty, now renamed Hornig Realty. Olivia Hornig is also a realtor with Hornig Realty. Olivia Hornig is the granddaughter of Laurence "Larry" Roehrkasse (1916-2004) of Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

2681 East Lake of the Isles Parkway: Built in 1906. The structure is a 2.2 story, 2469 square foot, four bedroom, two bathroom, nine room, single family dwelling, with a partially finished basement. The 1908, 1910, 1912, and 1914 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. L. A. Hubachek and Miss C. B. Hubachek all resided at this address. The 1909 city directory indicates that Louis A. Hubachek, associated with Welch, Hayne, & Hubachek, resided at this address and Clara B. Hubachek, a teacher at West High School, and Elizabeth Hubachek both boarded at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Miss C. B. Hubachek resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Elizabeth E. Hubachek resided at this address. Frank R. Hubachek and Louis Hubachek were corporation attorneys in Minneapolis, with the law firm of Welch, Hayne, & Hubachek. In 1937, lawyer Frank B. Hubachek ( -1986) contributed hundreds of acres to the U. S. Forest Service for inclusion in the eventual BWCA. Attorney Frank Brookes Hubachek was a member of a Twin Cities group of young business and professional men who were opposed to the plan of Edward W. Backus for damming the Rainy River in northern Minnesota in the 1920's. Hubachek and Charles Kelly were two of the three primary financial supporters of efforts to preserve the Quetico-Superior wilderness of northeastern Minnesota and Ontario. Frank Hubachek, Sr., established the Wilderness Research Center and Foundation of the University of Minnesota. Frank Hubachek was a member of the Minnesota chapter of the Izaak Walton League of America and established the Wilderness Research Center on his Basswood Lake property, which he purchased in 1937 to prevent a stand of 200-year-old pines from being logged, and purchased 2700 acres personally in northern Minnesota, which he donated to the Forest Service. Frank Brookes Hubachek was a 1922 graduate of the University of Minnesota, eventually moved to Chicago, and summered at Basswood Lake, Minnesota. Frank B. "Bill" Hubachek, Jr., was the son of Frank Brookes Hubachek. Frank Hubachek was the author of Annotations on small loan laws, based on the sixth draft of the Uniform small loan law., published in New York by the Russell Sage Foundation in 1938. Mary (née Hubachek) Reynolds (1891-1950,) the sister of Frank Brookes Hubachek, was one of the most important figures of the Surrealist movement. Mary Louise Hubachek Reynolds was born in Minneapolis into a well-to-do family. Her father, Frank Rudolph Hubachek, was a lawyer and her mother, Nellie Brookes Hubachek, was a homemaker. Educated in Minneapolis public schools, Mary Hubachek went east in 1909 to attend Vassar College, from which she received her Bachelor of Arts degree in 1913. After graduation, she moved back to Minneapolis, where she took postgraduate courses at the University of Minnesota. Her only sibling, brother Frank Brookes Hubachek, was also a student there at the time. Mary Hubachek met Matthew Givens Reynolds, the son of a St. Louis judge, and the two were married at her family's country home in 1916. Matthew Reynolds had accepted a position with an English insurance company that specialized in ocean shipping, and he moved to New York. After the wedding, the couple settled in Greenwich Village, the center of Bohemian life in the United States at the time. When the United States entered World War I, Matthew Reynolds enlisted, was commissioned as an officer in 1917, and commanded a battery of field artillery with the famous 33rd Wildcat Division, which was instrumental in breaking through the Hindenburg line, a turning point in the war. Although he survived the horrors of trench warfare, Matthew Reynolds died of influenza in 1919. A young American war widow, Mary Louise Hubachek Reynolds moved to Paris in 1919 and met the circle of artists and writers that formed the Surrealist movement. In July 1923, she met Marcel Duchamp (1887-1968) and began what he called "a true liaison, over many, many years, and very agreeable." Although Duchamp maintained a second apartment for himself, the couple lived for the next two and a half decades in various locales in France. As the artist Marcel Duchamp described her, she "was an eye-witness of the Dadaist manifestations and on the birth of Surrealism in 1924.... [and] was among the 'supporters' of the new ideas." In a close friendship with André Breton, Raymond Queneau, Jean Cocteau, Djuna Barnes, James Joyce, Alexander Calder, Joan Miró, Jacques Villon, and many other important figures of the epoch, she found the incentive to become an artist herself. She decided to apply her talents to the art of bookbinding. In 1929, Mary Reynolds followed this trend and studied bookbinding in the atelier of master French binder Pierre Legrain. Because Legrain was a designer, not a binder, artisans in his atelier realized his designs. Reynolds, therefore, would have studied the craft itself directly with binders in his employ and she learned the language of design, however, from Legrain himself. The bindings preserved in the Mary Reynolds Collection at The Art Institute of Chicago are an eloquent testament to her significance as an artist. Duchamp was a key influence on Mary Reynolds's life and art. For nearly three decades, Reynolds and Duchamp enjoyed a union that was "thought by their friends to be happier than most marriages." Duchamp had long before stopped making art publicly, but continued to be immersed in the "new forms of rebellion" that would lead to Surrealism. Reynolds joined him in this activity, and it is the resulting Surrealist vocabulary, with its wit and surprise, that most informs her work. During the 1920's, Reynolds studied with the Parisian master bookbinder Pierre Legrain (1888-1929) and applied her skills to books given to her by such friends as Max Ernst, Man Ray, Paul Éluard, André Breton, Jean Cocteau, and Salvador Dalí. She chose surprising and unorthodox materials, among them toad skins, corset stays, broken teacup handles, thermometers, sponge rubber, and kid gloves. Although the books were significant among the Surrealist movement, Reynolds did not exhibit any of her bindings, possibly out of modesty or indifference to recognition. Reynolds lived simply on the income from a modest trust established by her parents and her pension as a war widow. Reynolds was active in the French Resistance during World War II, with her home in Paris becoming a safe haven for many of her art-world friends and acquaintances. Choosing to stay in occupied Paris after the border closing, Reynolds came under increasing scrutiny from German invasion forces. When she eventually decided to flee, she had to cross into Spain on foot on her way to catch a neutral vessel from Portugal to the United States. After World War II, she returned to Paris where she lived until her death. From 1945 to 1947, Reynolds was the Paris representative for the avant-garde magazine View, soliciting among her artist and writer friends for the editor Charles Henri Ford. She was "relentlessly bohemian," according to the American composer Virgil Thomson, although according to the art collector Peggy Guggenheim, "she was the only person in bohemia with any money, yet she was always broke because she lent it all away the minute it arrived from America." To many of her European artist-friends, she was a benefactor, assisting them financially when times were rough. By 1950, Reynold's health had deteriorated to the point that she checked into the American Hospital in Neuilly, France, where she was discovered to have cancer of the uterus. After her death, Duchamp, the executor of her estate, sorted through her correspondence and personal possessions, destroying much of what would have provided clues to her somewhat mysterious role in the Parisian art world. Clara B. Hubachek ( -1935) and Elizabeth E. Hubachek ( -1937) both died in Hennepin County. Frank Hubachek (1825-1906) was born in Austria and died in Hennepin County. The owners of the house before 2004 were Dr. William D. Kilbourn, Jr., and Barbara N. Kilbourn. In 2004, Barbara N. Kilbourn sold this property to Deborah A. Mcnulty for $995,000 and in 2006, Deborah A. Mcnulty sold this property to Deborah L. Ward-Ingstad for $1,295,000. The previous owner of record was Deborah A. Hawthorne and the current owner of record is Deborah L. Ward-Ingstad. Clara B. Hubachek ( -1935) died in Hennepin County. William Douglas Kilbourn, Jr., is a retired professor in the Graduate program of the Law School at the University of Minnesota. Professor Kilbourn earned a B.A. degree from Yale University in 1949, studied federal taxation and corporate finance in the Columbia University M.B.A. program, and received an LL.B. degree from Columbia University School of Law in 1953. He has taught at the law schools of the University of Montana, the University of Missouri, Boston University, Duke University, the University of Texas, and Washington University. In 1971, he joined the faculty of the University of Minnesota Law School, where he specialized in the tax aspects of corporate-shareholder transactions, including corporate mergers and acquisitions, and also taught accounting and federal taxation. Deborah A. Hawthorne is a long tenure employee of Health Partners.

2683 East Lake of the Isles Parkway: Built in 1907; Rebuilt in 1998. The structure is a 2.2 story, 2880 square foot (4,032 square foot according to the realtor,) three bedroom, four bathroom (three bathroom according to the realtor,) 13 room, single family dwelling with three fireplaces. The 1909 city directory indicates that William H. Keller, secretary-treasurer of the Washburn Lignite Coal Company, resided at this address. The 1910, 1912, and 1914 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Keller and their daughter all resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Laughlin and their daughter all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Alex McLaughlin resided at this address. In 1978, Emmett F. Carpel, received United States Patent #4122848 for a surgical drape support and was a resident at this address. The property was last sold in 1996 by Joan R. Grossman to James A. Nasby and Joann K. Nasby for $310,000 and in 2007 by James A. Nasby to Mark N. Greene for $1,890,000. The previous owners of record were James A. Nasby and Joann K. Nasby and the current owner of record is Mark N. Greene. The property was recently listed for sale with an asking price of $1,995,000.00. James A. Nasby, D.D.S. M.S.D., is an orthodontist who offices in Burnsville, Minnesota. Mark N. Greene has a bachelor's degree from Amherst College, has masters and doctorate degrees from the University of Michigan, was an economist with the Federal Reserve Board from 1982 until 1988, was an executive with Technology Solutions Company, Berkeley Investment Technologies, and Citicorp from 1988 until 1995, was an executive in the financial services industry segment and software business groups of IBM from 1995 to 2007, is a member of the board of directors of the Capella Education Company, and is the Chief Executive Officer and Director of the Fair Isaac Corporation.

2687 East Lake of the Isles Parkway: Built in 1907. The structure is a 2.7 story, 3507 square foot, three bedroom, two bathroom, seven room, single family dwelling, with a partially finished basement. The 1909 city directory indicates that William B. Dickerson, a seller of shoes, resided at this address. The 1910 city directory indicates that Miss G. A. Peck resided at this address. The 1912 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Woodward resided at this address. The 1914 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Ritchie, their daughter, and Mrs. A. M. Grove all resided at this address. W. H. Ritchie married Nellie M. Miller of Mansfield, Ohio, in 1884. William H. Ritchie ( -1921) and William Dickerson ( -1953) both died in Hennepin County. The property was last sold in 1996 for $362,000 by Caroline Watson to the current owner of the property, Beth Lindahl-Urben. Beth Lindahl-Urben is a real estate agent for Coldwell Banker Burnet Realty.

2691 East Lake of the Isles Parkway: Built in 1907. The structure is a 2.2 story, 3036 square foot, six bedroom, three bathroom, ten room, single family dwelling, with a partially finished basement. The 1910 and 1912 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. H. J. Watt resided at this address. The 1914 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. E. English resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mrs. A. M. Grove, Mrs. W. H. Ritchie, and her daughter all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Charles E. English resided at this address. Hugh J. Watt ( -1910) and Charles Ethelbert English ( -1954) both died in Hennepin County. J. R. and H. N. Peters sold the property to Robert D. Zimmerman in 1994 for $325,000 and, in 2006, Robert D. Zimmerman sold the property to Daniel A. Buettner for $1,580,000. The previous owners were Robert D. Zimmerman and Lars H. Peterssen and the current owner of record is Daniel A. Buettner. Lars H. Peterssen graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in Physics from Carleton College and a Masters in Architecture from the University of Minnesota, is an Adjunct Assistant Professor in the School of Architecture at the University of Minnesota, teaches computing courses and architectural design, is a consultant to architecture firms on computer-related issues, and is a firm principal, with Deborah Everson, at Domain Architecture & Design, located at the Uptown location once occupied by Condom Kingdom. R. D. Zimmerman is a mystery novelist who wrote The Cross and the Sickle (1984,) The Red Encounter (1986,) Blood Russian (1987,) Murder Most Artful (1987,) Mindscream (1989,) Deadfall in Berlin (1990,) Death Trance (1992,) Blood Trance (1993,) Red Trance (1994,) Closet (1995,) Tribe (1996,) Hostage (1997,) Outburst (1998,) and Innuendo (1999.) R.D. Zimmerman has been nominated for two Edgars, two Lambda Literary Awards, and an Anthony. R. D. Zimmerman and Lars Peterssen were financial supporters of the Walker Art Center in 2004 and of the Loft Endowment for Writing and Literature in 2005. The house reportedly was featured on HGTV's cable show "Dream Drives" in 2002. Daniel Buettner is the founder of Blue Zones and is a world renowned explorer.

2697 East Lake of the Isles Parkway: Built in 1900; Victorian in style; Martha Yunker, renovation architect. The structure is a 2.2 story, 2880 square foot, three bedroom, four bathroom, eight room, stucco-sided, single family dwelling with a double detached garage. The house was renovated in 1993. The living room features ten foot ceilings, coffered beams, and French doors opening into the front foyer and the library. The dining room features classic square Victorian bay windows, a crystal chandelier, and crown moldings. The library has an original marble fireplace and walls of restored bookcases. The 1900 and 1902 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. L. M. Chamberlain and Mr. and Mrs G. H. Towler all resided at this address. The 1903 Delta Upsilon Decennial Catalogue indicates that George Hutchins Towler (1873- ,) the son of Silas H. Towler and Mary J. Lounis Towler, graduated from Minneapolis Central High School, attended the University of Minnesota from 1893 until 1895, was employed as a bookkeeper by the Minneapolis Steam Laundry, married Mary Shepard in 1897, and resided at this address. The 1904 and 1906 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. D. L. Robinson, Dr. and Mrs. W. F. Jewett, L. C. Robinson, and G. H. Mead all resided at this address. The 1908 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. D. L. Robinson and Dr. and Mrs. W. F. Jewett all resided at this address. The 1909 city directory indicates that Elizabeth S. Ransier, the widow of William H. Ransier, boarded at this address. The 1910 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Davies and their daughter all resided at this address. The 1912 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Davies, their daughter, and Captain and Mrs. E. W. Davies all resided at this address. The 1914 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Davies and their daughter, E. C. Davies, and Captain and Mrs. E. W. Davies resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that E. F. Davies, Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Davies, and Mr. and Mrs. O. H. Sanaker resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that William H. Davies resided at this address. John C. Read and Alexandra Read were the current taxpayers of record and Timothy Gokey was the previous owner of record. In 1990, William Hempel and Kay Hempel sold the property to John J. Read for $465,000, in 2002, John C. Read sold the property to Timothy Gokey for $1,225,000, and in 2004, Timothy Gokey sold the property to R. Craig Bednar for $1,422,500. Tim Gokey was a consultant with the Minneapolis office of McKinsey & Company and was appointed, in 2004, president of the Tax Services Business Unit of H & R Block. R. Craig Bednar is the president of Tiger Oak Publications, Inc., and is the publisher of Minnesota Bride magazine, of Seattle Bride magazine, of Arizona Bride magazine, and of the Minnesota Bride Resource Guide. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Martin resided at the former nearby 2700 East Lake of the Isles Parkway.

2701 East Lake of the Isles Parkway: Built in 1900. The structure is a 2.5 story, 3956 square foot, five bedroom, five bathroom, 14 room, single family dwelling, with a partially finished basement. The 1890 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Morgan, Mr. and Mrs. William Donaldson, and L. S. Donaldson all resided at this address. The 1892 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Morgan, their daughters, J. H. Morgan, Mr. and Mrs. William Donaldson, and L. S. Donaldson all resided at this address. The 1896 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Wade, George M. Wade, and Mr. and Mrs. M. R. Taylor all resided at this address. The 1898 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. F. A. Plummer resided at this address. The 1900 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. O. K. Earle and Mrs. M. A. Ludblum all resided at this address. The 1906 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Corson and their daughters all resided at this address. The 1908 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Corson, their daughters, and R. H. Abraham all resided at this address. The 1910 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Peterson, Mrs. S. E. Cavan, W. H. Cavan, and Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Van Duzee all resided at this address. The 1912 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Peterson, Mrs. S. E. Cavan, W. H. Cavan, and Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Van Duzee all resided at this address. The 1914 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Van Duzee, Mrs. S. E. Cavan, W. N. Cavan, and H. O. Van Duzee all resided at this address. The 1917 Catalogue of the Beta Theta Pi Fraternity, published by James T. Brown of New York, indicated that Harold Oliver Van Duzee, a member of the class of 1915 at the University of Minnesota and a musician, resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. T. J. Skellet, their daughters, and G. J. Skellet all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Guy A. Wyman resided at this address. L. S. Donaldson owned the Glass Block Department Store in Minneapolis. In 1909, Guy A. Wyman was the treasurer of Smith & Wyman Company, a manufacturer of sash doors and blinds. William Donaldson (1849-1899) was born in Scotland, immigrated to the United States in 1877, moved to Minnesota in 1881, was a partner with his brother, Lawrence S. Donaldson, and owned and operated one of the largest mercantile establishments in Minneapolis. Lawrence Steadman Donaldson (1856/1858-1924) was born in Scotland, immigrated to the United States in 1878, moved to Minneapolis in 1882, and established the Glass Block Department Store with his brother, William Donaldson. The Donaldsons department store was founded in 1882. In 1884, the Glass Block, a domed and extensively windowed flagship store was erected. Guy Addison Wyman ( -1947) died in Hennepin County. Thomas Morgan (1831-1907) was born in Kentucky and died in Hennepin County. Thomas W. Morgan ( -1913,) Thomas Michael Morgan ( -1922,) and John H. Morgan ( -1933) all died in Hennepin County. William Donaldson ( -1920) and William Donaldson ( -1925) both died in Hennepin County. William E. Wade ( -1912,) Lawrence Stadman Donaldson ( -1924,) and Fred A. Plummer ( -1926) all died in Hennepin County. Oliver K. Earle ( -1932) died in Hennepin County. Hicks H. Corson (1894-1957) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Hillyer, and died in St. Louis County, Minnesota. Ralph Paul Herbert Abraham ( -1921) died in Sibley County, Minnesota. William Nelvin Cavan ( -1951) died in Hennepin County. James B. McComb is the owner of record for this rental property. James McComb is the founder of The McComb Group, which is a retail consulting firm in Minneapolis. James B. McComb is a 1961 graduate of Macalester College and created a sholarship at the school in 1997 in honor of Arthur R. Upgren, the former F. R. Bigelow Professor of Economics at Macalester College from 1957 through 1965. James B. McComb was a financial supporter of the Urban Land Institute Foundation in 2002. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. James DeVoy resided at the former nearby 2706 East Lake of the Isles Parkway. [See note for the fifth entry after the entry for 1605 Summit Avenue for information on Macalester College.]

2715 East Lake of the Isles Parkway: Built in 1911. The structure is a 2.2 story, 3812 square foot, six bedroom, four bathroom, 11 room, single family dwelling, with a partially finished basement. The 1914 city directory indicates that Mrs. M. P. Harrison and her daughter all resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Durst resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that William A. Durst resided at this address. William Arthur Durst (1870- ,) the son of Henry Durst and Louise Jackson Durst, was born in Monroe, Green County, Wisconsin, was educated in Monroe, Wisconsin, came to Minneapolis in 1887, was employed by the Minnesota Loan & Trust Company in 1887, married Clara J. West in Monroe, Wisconsin, in 1893, eventually was the president of Minnesota Loan & Trust Company, located in Minneapolis, was a Republican, was a member of the Capital Issue Committee of the Ninth Federal Reserve District, was a member of the executive committee of the Minneapolis Liberty Loan organization during World War I, was a member of the the board of trustees of the Minneapolis Club, was a member of the the board of trustees of the Minikahda Club, was a Mason, and was a member of the Plymouth Congregational church. William Arthur Durst and Clara J. West Durst had one child, Burdette H. Durst. In 1985, A. H. Macgregor sold the property to its current owners, Robert L. Kane and Rosalie A. Kane, for $350,000. Robert L. Kane is a professor and Minnesota Chair in Long-term Care and Aging in the School of Public Health at the University of Minnesota. Robert Kane received a bachelors degree from Columbia College, New York, and a medical degree in preventive medicine from the Harvard Medical School, Boston, and served his internship and residency at the University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington, Kentucky. Robert Kane is a member of the World Health Organization Expert Advisory Panel on the Health of Elderly Persons and is the president of the Minnesota Gerontological Society. Rosalie A. Kane is a professor in the Health Services Research and Policy Department in the School of Public Health at the University of Minnesota and is also a faculty member of the Center for Biomedical Ethics, School of Social Work, and the Center on Aging at the University of Minnesota. Rosalie Kane received a bachelors degree in History and English Literature from the University of Toronto, a Masters degree in Social Work from Simmons College, and a doctorate from the University of Utah. [See note for the Minikahda Club for 702 Fairmount Avenue.]

2721 East Lake of the Isles Parkway: Built in 1903. The structure is a 2.2 story, 4026 square foot, four bedroom, four bathroom, 12 room, single family dwelling. The 1908 city directory indicates that Reverend and Mrs. G. H. Hills and their daughters resided at this address. According to the Memorial Volume and History of Saint Mark's Parish, Rev. G. Heathcote Hills was an associate rector at St. Mark's. The 1910 city directory indicates that Reverend and Mrs. G. H. Hills and P. H. Hills all resided at this address. The 1912 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Mulliken and F. B. Mulliken all resided at this address. The 1914 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Mulliken and F. G. Mulliken all resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Mulliken resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that John H. Mulliken resided at this address. In 1885, George Heathcote Hills was the assistant to the rector of St. Mary's, Burlington, New Jersey. In 1893, Rev. G. Heathcote Hills was the rector of the Protestant Episcopal Church of the Holy Trinity in Westchester, Pennsylvania. In 1910, Rev. G. Heathcote Hills was the rector of St. Mark Episcopal Church in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. In 1920, Rev. George Heathcote Hills, D. D., of Cincinnati, Ohio, was the General Chaplain of the Society of the Sons of the Revolution in the District of Columbia. George Heathcote Hills (1862- ,) the son of George M. Hills, was a graduate of Trinity College of Hartford, Connecticut, in 1884, was ordained in 1887, married Carrie Louise Pearson (1862- ,) the daughter of James B. Pearson and Ellen Josephine Ferre Pearson, was assistant minister at St. James Episcopal Church, New York City, from 1887 until 1888, was the rector of Christ Church, Riverton, New Jersey, from 1888 until 1891, once resided at 1516 27th Street West in Minneapolis, and was the author of Church in the house: Fifteen short sermons in 1902. George Heathcote Hills and Carrie Louise Pearson Hills were the parents of Beatrice H. Hills (1888- ,) Pearson H. Hills (1889- ,) and Violo H. Hills (1891- .) The property has been sold five times in the last 22 years, in 1985 by J. Grossman to D. L. Avchen and L. P. Avchen for $280,000, in 1993 by D. L. Avchen and L. P. Avchen to Michael C. Corcoran for $478,500, in 1999 from Michael Corcoran and Chris Corcoran to Glenn J. Satty for $1,050,000, in 2001 from Glenn J. Satty to David L. Dunn and K. Bullard for $1,375,000, and in 2005, by David L. Dunn to its current owner of record, David E. Moore, Jr., for $1,650,000. Glenn J. Satty is the Chief Operating Officer of Knight Securities and is a member of the Board of Governors of the Pacific Exchange. David L. Dunn, M.D., Ph.D., is the Jay Phillips Professor and Chairman Chief in the Division of General Surgery, the Program Director and Director of Graduate Studies, and the Head of Surgical Infectious Disease at the University of Minnesota. Dunn received his bachelors degree in zoology from the University of Michigan, his medical degree from the University of Michigan, and his doctorate in microbiology from the University of Minnesota, served his residency at the University of Minnesota, and served his fellowship in transplantation at the University of Minnesota.

2727 East Lake of the Isles Parkway: Built in 1915. The structure is a 2 1/2 story, 4721 square foot, five bedroom, three bathroom, 12 room, single family dwelling. The 1917 Catalogue of the Beta Theta Pi Fraternity, published by James T. Brown of New York, indicated that Everett Ward Olmsted, with a Ph. B. from Cornell University in 1891 and a Ph. D. from Knox College in 1897, and head of the Romance Language Department at the University of Minnesota, resided at this address. The 1917 Catalogue of the Beta Theta Pi Fraternity, published by James T. Brown of New York, indicated that Ward Hubbell Olmsted, a member of the class of 1918 at the University of Minnesota, resided at this address. In 1918, Professor Everett W. Olmsted, a recipient of 1891 Ph.B. and 1897 Ph.D. degrees from Cornell University and a professor of Romance languages at the University of Minnesota, and his sons, Ward H. Olmsted, a Marine, and Richard H. Olmsted, S. A. T. C. (University of Minnesota,) resided at this address. The records of the 1919-1920 Minnesota World War I Soldier’s Bonus Board (#3592) indicate that Ward Hubbell Olmsted (1897- ,) a 1917 enlistee and a Second Lieutenant in the Marine Corps Reserves, who was born in Buffalo, New York, moved to Minnesota in 1914, had brown eyes, light brown hair, and a ruddy complexion, was 5' 10 1/2" tall, was a student at induction, was a bond salesman employed by First Loan & Securiries Company after the completion of service, and was unmarried, resided with his father, Professor E. W. Olmsted, at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Professor and Mrs. E. W. Olmsted resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that John Junell resided at this address. In 1907, Everett W. Olmsted was a professor of French at Cornell University, advocated against co-education in colleges, and retired as Professor Emeritus Romance Languages from the University of Minnesota in 1937. Everett Ward Olmsted edited Gustavo Adolfo Bécquer's Legends, Tales and Poems, published by Ginn and Company, Boston, in 1907, Moliere's Le Malade Imaginaire, published by Ginn and Company, Boston, in 1905, and Pierre Carlet de Chamblain de Marivaux's A Selection from the Comedies of Marivaux", The MacMillan Company, New York, in 1901, co-edited with Edward H. Sirich First Spanish Reader, published by Holt and Company, New York, in 1924, with Raymond L. Grismer First Spanish Grammar, published by The Macmillan Company, New York, published in 1933, and with Francis Brown Parton French Composition And Conversation, published Henry Holt and Company, New York, in 1926, and was the author of A Practical French Grammar, published by the Macmillan Company, New York, in 1933, First course in French, published by Henry Holt and Company, New York, in 1918, and Elementary French Grammar, published by Henry Holt and Company, New York, in 1915. Everett W. Olmsted was a participant, with 21 other academics, in a 1919 symposium entitled "Has the War Proved That Our Methods of Teaching Modern Languages in the Colleges Are Wrong?" published in The Modern Language Journal, Vol. 4, No. 1 (Oct., 1919.) John Junell was the lead partner for the predecessor of the Dorsey & Whitney law firm in trial practice in the 1920’s and 1930’s. John Junell unsuccessfully represented the Brooks-Scanlon Corporation in the Supreme Court case Brooks-Scanlon Corporation v. U S, 265 U.S. 106 (1924), a challenge to the Emergency Shipping Act of 1918 over the compensation for a requisitioned vessel. Junnell unsuccessfully represented the lumber company in Fullerton-Krueger Lumber Co. v. Northern Pacific Railway Company, 266 U.S. 435 (1925), a statute of limitations challenge to a recovery of unpaid transportation charges. John Junell, with Joseph H. Colman and Clark R. Fletcher, unsuccessfully represented First Bank Stock Corporation in First Bank Stock Corporation v. State of Minnesota, 301 U.S. 234 (1937), an alleged denial of due process by the State in requiring a Minnesota domiciled Delaware corporation to pay a property tax laid by Minnesota upon shares of stock in Montana and North Dakota state banking corporations. In 2002, L. Raij and S. Raij sold the property to its current owners, Alan Auckenthaler and Claire D. Auckenthaler, for $757,000. Alan Auckenthaler is a lawyer, is a member of the Hennepin County Bar Association, was an inaugural member of the Society of Corporate Compliance and Ethics, and is vice president of Inmarsat Ventures Limited. Claire Auckenthaler was a financial supporter of Graywolf Press and was on the committee for the 2001 Antiques Show and Sale. Claire Auckenthaler, a homemaker and unemployed teacher, was a contributor to the John Kerry for President campaign in 2004. John Junell ( -1949) died in Hennepin County. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Henry Simons, G. A. Simons, H. P. Simons, and L. R. Simons all resided at the former nearby 2730 East Lake of the Isles Parkway.

2731 East Lake of the Isles Parkway: The property is a vacant side lot owned by Alan Auckenthaler, who resides at 2727 East Lake of the Isles Parkway.

2735 East Lake of the Isles Parkway: Built in 1905; Prairie School in style. The structure is a 2.2 story, 2975 square foot, three/four bedroom, three/five bathroom, eight room, single family dwelling. The 1906, 1908, 1910, and 1912 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Hutchins resided at this address. The 1909 city directory indicates that Charles C. Hutchins, a miner, and Charles D. Hutchins, a machinist, resided at this address. The 1910-1911 Directory of the University of Minnesota indicates that R. L. Cooper, a student, resided at this address. The 1914 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Cooper resided at this address. The records of the 1919-1920 Minnesota World War I Soldier's Bonus Board (#13219) indicate that Roy Lee Cooper (1887- ,) a 1918 draftee and a Private First Class in Company C of the 129th Infantry, who was born in Britton, South Dakota, moved to Minnesota in 1904, had blue eyes, brown hair, and a dark complexion, was 5' 4" tall, was a lawyer at induction, served in the American Expeditionary Force in France, including the Meuse-Argonne Offensive, the Somme, Verdun, Teayon, and Marchville, was gassed on October 23, 1918, was a lawyer officing at the New York Life Building after the completion of service, and was unmarried, resided with his father, E. A. Cooper, at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Cooper C. N. Cooper, and Mr. and Mrs. S. D. Kell all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Eugene Cooper resided at this address. Roy Lee Cooper (1887- ) was the son of Eugene A. Cooper (1860-1937) and Hilda __?__ Cooper (1863-1920.) Eugene A. Cooper, the son of Charles Nelson Cooper (1833- ) and Mary J. Thompson Cooper (1838- ,) was born in Rock County, Wisconsin, settled in Victor Township, Marshall County, South Dakota, was the first school teacher in Britton, South Dakota, was appointed the clerk of the Marshall County, South Dakota, District Court in 1885, was a real estate agent, was a Justice of the Peace, in Britton, South Dakota, was the president of the Britton, South Dakota, town board, in 1905, resided in Minneapolis in 1910, and died in Hennepin County. Eugene A. Cooper ( -1937) died in Hennepin County. The property was sold in 1993 by R. H. Kaplan and S. S. Kaplan to R. A. and M. P. Stauffer for $480,000, in 1998 by R. A. Stauffer and M. P. Stauffer to Wendi J. Chanen for $580,000, and in 2005 by Wendi Jo Chanen to Michael J. Krelitz for $1,195,000. The current owners are Michael J. Krelitz and Linda Krelitz. Michael Krelitz is the chair of the Minneapolis Ben Gurion Society. The Ben Gurion Society is a division of the National Young Leadership Cabinet and offers young men and women the opportunity to develop leadership skills and to create a network of professional and personal relationships. Linda Krelitz and Michael Krelitz were Annual Meeting Co-Chairs of the Minneapolis Jewish Federation, are members of Beth El Temple, and were financial supporters of the National Council of Jewish Women, Greater Minneapolis Section, and of the Minnesota Aids Project in 2005. Linda Krelitz is a member of the Blake School Parent Association and ran in the 1999 Get In Gear 10K race. [See note on the Meuse-Argonne Offensive/Argonne Front for 366 St. Clair Avenue.] [See note on the Blake School for 1600 Emerson Avenue South.]

2737 East Lake of the Isles Parkway: Built in 1903. The structure is a 2.2 story, 4463 square foot, six bedroom, five bathroom, 14 room, single family dwelling, with a partially finished basement. The 1930 city directory indicates that Wesley J. Kelly resided at this address. The property was last sold in 1983 by D. M. Lilly, Jr., and D. P. Lilly to David L. Stussy and L. J. Stussy, for $217,500. The current owner is David L. Stussy. Dr. David L. Stussy is a chiropractic medicine practitioner, graduated with academic honors from Northwestern Chiropractic College in 1972, and founded Kenwood Chiropractic Arts in 1982. David L. Stussy also graduated from the Spine Research Institute of San Diego in its Low Speed Rear Impact Auto Crash Reconstruction program. Charles E. Bateman, Sr., a baker supplying two Minneapolis bakeries and five Minneapolis restaurants, resided at the former nearby 2739 East Lake of the Isles Parkway and Charles E. Bateman, Jr., a newspaper carrier for the Minneapolis Tribune, boarded at the former nearby 2739 East Lake of the Isles Parkway according to the 1909 city directory. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Bateman, their daughter, and C. A. Bateman all resided at the former nearby 2739 Lake of the Isles Boulevard, that Mr. and Mrs. Frank Boutin and their daughters all resided at the former nearby 2740 Lake of the Isles Boulevard, and that Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Devaney resided at the former nearby 2774 Lake of the Isles Boulevard.

28th Street and East Lake of the Isles Parkway: The Minneapolis West High 35th year Reunion Memorial Park Bench.

2801 East Lake of the Isles Parkway: Built in 1910. The structure is a 2 1/2 story, 6378 square foot, five bedroom, three bathroom, 12 room, single family dwelling. The 1912 and 1914 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. George C. Stiles resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. G. C. Stiles resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that John E. Fritsche resided at this address. George C. Stiles ( -1945) died in Hennepin County. In 1992, the current owners, Robert Nierman and Gail Nierman, purchased the property from Allan Fingerhut and Rose Fingerhut for a purchase price of $810,000. Bob Nierman is the executive vice president of marketing and business strategy at UGS Corp., a spin-off from EDS and a leading product lifecycle management vendor. Robert M. Nierman formerly was the executive vice president and chief operating officer at Structural Dynamics Research Corporation and joined EAI, a producer of enterprise-wide visual process management, collaboration, analysis and communication solutions, as chief operating officer and executive vice president in 1999. Allan Fingerhut was the owner of the Minneapolis nightclub, First Avenue, a former Greyhound bus station, until late 2004, when $170,000 in overdue real estate taxes and sliding club revenue under the management, first, of Fingerhut's childhood friend and longtime accountant, Byron Frank, and then of Steve McClellan and Jack Meyers, forced the club into closure and Chapter 7 bankruptcy. First Avenue, initially known as the Depot in 1970, was a Minneapolis institution and helped launch the careers of artists Prince and the Replacements. Allan Fingerhut and Rose Fingerhut moved to Marin County, California, in 1988 after starting new businesses, a fine-art publishing company, Fingerhut Group Publishers Inc., in San Rafael, California, founded in 1976, and an art gallery in Sausalito, California. Frank, McClellan, and Meyers formed a partnership and purchased the First Avenue assets for a mere $200,000 and reopened the club. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Palmer resided at the former nearby 2806 Lake of the Isles Boulevard.

2809 East Lake of the Isles Parkway: Built in 1908. The structure is a 2 1/2 story, 3296 square foot, four bedroom, three bathroom, 11 room, single family dwelling. The 1909 city directory indicates that Edward J. Davenport, a lawyer and probation officer who officed at the Court House, and Murray T. Davenport, a reporter for the Minneapolis Tribune, Margaret Quail, a teacher at the Douglas School, and John Trevor, a contractor who officed at 713 Third Avenue South, all boarded at this address. The 1910 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. H. B. Lake, Mr. and Mrs. John Trevor, Mrs. A. B. Lawrence, and W. C. Lawrence all resided at this address. The 1912 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. William Byron, Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Ransom, and Miss Sara Reese all resided at this address. The 1914 city directory indicates that Mrs. L. M. Oster and Mrs. Amelia Rein both resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mrs. E. M. Jones and her daughter all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Thomas F. Armstrong resided at this address. Edward J. Davenport (1852-1930) was born in Middlebury, Vermont, graduated from Middlebury College, moved to Minnesota in 1871, was admitted to the practice of law in 1874, married Janie H. Taylor, the granddaughter of President William H. Harrison and the first cousin of President Benjamin Harrison, was the Deputy Clerk of the Hennepin County District Court from 1871 to 1874, was the Clerk of Minneapolis Municipal Court from 1874 to 1877, was the Clerk of the Hennepin County District Court from 1880 to 1888, resided in Minneapolis, and was a Republican member of the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Hennepin County (District 30) from 1889 until 1890. M. B. Fisher and N. R. Fisher sold the property to its current owners, Michael Erlandson and Dawn Erlandson, for $397,500 in 1998. Mike Erlandson was a member of the Minneapolis Democratic Farmer Labor Party Central Committee in 2004, was the Chairman of the Minnesota DFL Party in 2004, was the chief of staff for former Minnesota Fifth District Congressman Martin Olav Sabo, and was an unsuccessful candidate for Sabo's seat upon his retirement in 2006. Dawn Malerich Erlandson is a 1987 graduate of Hamline University and a 1999 alumna of the Humphrey Institute at the University of Minnesota, is a member of the Minneapolis DFL Central Committee, is Senior Director of Public Affairs for North Woods Advertising, previously served as Senior Director at the Minnesota public affairs firm Himle Horner, previously was the executive director of the Great Plains Institute for Sustainable Development, and also started the Center for a Sustainable Economy. The 1924 city directory indicates that Dr. and Mrs. G. M. Haywood and Mrs. Caroline Empens all resided at the former nearby 2810 Lake of the Isles Boulevard.

2815 East Lake of the Isles Parkway: Built in 1904. The structure is a 1.7 story, 1602 square foot, two bedroom, one bathroom, eight room, single family dwelling. The 1914 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Demarais resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that George H. Whellon resided at this address. Lucille Miller is the current owner of record of the property. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. P. Halverson resided at the former nearby 2816 Lake of the Isles Boulevard.

2821 East Lake of the Isles Parkway: Built in 1900. The structure is a 2.2 story, 3036 square foot, three bedroom, four bathroom, 10 room, single family dwelling, with a partially finished basement. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Julia Hurd resided at this address. Julia Hurd ( -1954) died in Hennepin County. In 1996, Stephane A. Johnson sold the property to its current owner, Thomas J. Abood, for a purchase price of $376,500. Thomas J. Abood is secretary and general counsel for Dougherty & Company LLC and is a donor to Milkweed Editions. Abood also ran in the 2002 Grandma's Marathon, the 2002 Get In Gear 10K Race, and the 2003 Get In Gear 10K Race. Thomas Abood, an attorney for Dougherty Financial Group Llc., was a contributor to the George W. Bush for President campaign and to the Republican National Committee in 2004.

2825 East Lake of the Isles Parkway: Built in 1909. The structure is a two story, 3018 square foot, four bedroom, one bathroom, 13 room, single family dwelling, with a partially finished basement. The 1910 and 1912 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Hallstrom resided at this address. The 1914 city directory indicates that Mrs. J. R. Adams and Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Dashiell all resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. A. S. Harland resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that George C. Stiles resided at this address. George C. Stiles was associated with John Patrick Devaney, an eventual Chief Justice of the Minnesota Supreme Court, in Stiles & Devaney after 1907 until the firm was dissolved in 1916. George C. Stiles was a solo practitioner in 1933. Michael L. Oliver sold the property to its current owners, M. A. Stockburger and Carla P. Pavone, in 1994, for a purchase price of $369,000. Bernard H. Hermsen resided at this address in 2007, when three year old Bradley Hermsen inadvertently released the parking brake on a dinner guest's automobile before jumping out of the car, but causing it to roll into the lake and snarling traffic as Minneapolis police and fire squads began a dragging operation and then used skin divers to locate the submerged vehicle. Mark Stockburger is the director of Implantable Tachy Devices at the Angeion Corporation in St. Paul. Founded in 1986, Angeion Corporation designs, manufactures and distributes non-invasive cardio-respiratory diagnostic systems and related software for the management and improvement of overall health and fitness. Carla Pavone is Vice President for Products and Business Development at American Express Financial Advisors. Carla P. Pavone is a Ph.d. candidate in the Strategic Management and Organization Department of the Carlson School of Management at the University of Minnesota. The 1924 city directory indicates that Dr. and Mrs. C. D. Harrington and Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Kellogg all resided at the former nearby 2827 East Lake of the Isles Boulevard.

2829 East Lake of the Isles Parkway: Built in 1922; Georgian in style; The structure is a 1.2 story, 2806 square foot, five bedroom, three bathroom, eight room, duplex condominium. The 1916 University of Minnesota Alumni Directory indicates that John Lars Hallstrom resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. W. M. Rand, E. E. Nash, his daughters, and W. J. Hopwood all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Elizabeth Burg and William M. Rand both resided at this address. John Lars Hallstrom was an 1899 graduate of the University of Minnesota Law School, was admitted to the practice of law in Minnesota in 1899, and was a lawyer. Mona W. Brown sold Unit #1 to Marilyn Ann Bockley, the current owner, in 2002 for a purchase price of $615,000 and sold Unit #2 to John P. Moore in 2000 for a purchase price of $435,000. John P. Moore sold Unit #2 to Rhonda Kuehl for $845,000 in 2005. John P. Moore and Damon F. Nelson were the previous owners of Unit #2 and David Hoiland is the current owner of record and David Hoiland and Rhonda Kuehl are the taxpayers of record. Mona Brown was a member of the First Unitarian Society of Minneapolis in 1999. Marilyn Bockley was a financial supporter of "Lake Street USA," an exhibit of photographs of Minneapolis' Lake Street by Wing Young Huie, of the Friends of the Minneapolis Public Library in 2003, and was a donor in kind to the Minneapolis Midtown Greenway project in 2002. John P. Moore, Jr., was the Past Chair of Family & Children's Service and was a financial supporter of the Minnesota Aids Project in 2002. In 1999, John P. Moore, Jr., was the corporate secretary for Northern States Power Company (NSP,) subsequently renamed Xcel Energy. Damon Nelson is a realtor with Coldwell Banker Burnet. John P. Moore, a self-employed business owner, was a contributor to the John Kerry for President campaign in 2004.

2833 East Lake of the Isles Parkway: Built in 1922. The structure is a one story, 2354 square foot, three bedroom, two bathroom, six room, duplex condominium. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. O. Gregg and Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Gregg all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Charles W. Cartwright and William H. Stokes, Jr., both resided at this address. In 1987, W. and A. Collins sold Unit #1 to W. J. Bolan and A. G. Bolan for $180,000. The current owners of Unit #1 are Richard S. Bolan and Nancy Johnston. In 1991, Richard S. Bolan and Nancy Johnston sold Unit #2 to the John Ackerman and Helen S. Ackerman for $200,000. John Ackerman is the current owner of record of Unit #2 and Helen S. Ackerman is the taxpayer of record of Unit #2. Richard S. Bolan was a Professor of Planning and Public Affairs and Director of the Master of Planning Program at the Humphrey Institute, University of Minnesota, in 1997, is an emeritus professor of planning and public affairs at the Humphrey Institute at the University of Minnesota, and is an adjunct faculty member in the College of Human Ecology at the University of Minnesota. There is a Richard Stuart Bolan scholarship at the Humphrey Institute at the University of Minnesota. Nancy Johnston is the Director of Graduate Studies for the College of Human Ecology at the University of Minnesota. Richard S. Bolan and Nancy Johnston were financial supporters of the Nonviolent Peaceforce, an organization dedicated to build a trained, international civilian peaceforce committed to third-party nonviolent intervention, in 2004. John Ackerman and Helen Ackerman were financial supporters of the American Refuge Committee in 2001, 2002, and 2003 and of the Minneapolis Midtown Greenway in 2001. John Ackerman is the retired minister at the Bryn Mawr Presbyterian Church and is a spiritual director, retreat leader and author of several books and articles, including Listening to God: Spiritual Formation in Congregations, published by the Alban Institute. Helen Ackerman was a financial supporter of the Center for the Victims of Torture in 2001. Richard S. Bolan, a retiree, was a contributor to the Democratic National Committee in 2004.

2837 East Lake of the Isles Parkway: Built in 1922. The structure is a one story, 2333 square foot (2,794 square foot according to the realtor,) three bedroom (four bedroom according to the realtor,) one bathroom (three bathroom according to the realtor,) nine room, duplex condominium with two fireplaces. The 1930 city directory indicates that D. Phelps Gamble and Kenneth E. Goit resided at this address. Kenneth Goit was the Toro Company sales manager in the 1930's and was named president of the Toro Company in 1945, after the Toro Company was purchased by D. Lilly, B. Gibson and W. Miller. David Lilly replace Goit as president in 1948. Ken Goit was the president of the Minneapolis Chapter of the Commodores Barbershop Harmony Society in 1944. The Barbershop Harmony Society was formerly the Society for Preservation and Encouragement of Barbershop Quartet Singing in America (SPEBSQSA.) B. M. Martin sold Unit #1 to P. M. Fleetham in 1986 for $136,000, Bonnie M. Martin sold Unit #1 to William H. Quick and Delia D. Quick in 1997 for $170,000, William H. Quick and Delia Quick sold Unit #1 to Robert F. Houck in 2000 for $685,000, and Robert F. Houck sold Unit #1 to Carol Berg O'Toole in 2004 for $650,000. Bonnie M. Martin sold Unit #2 to H. B. Crowell for $179,900 in 1986, Helen B. Crowell sold Unit #2 to Melendez, Quick, and Crowell for $209,000 in 1989, and William H. Quick and Delia Quick sold Unit #2 to Robert F. Houck for $685,000 in 2000. Unit #1 is currently owned by Carol Berg O'Toole. Unit #2 is currently owned by Robert F. Houck. Unit #2 is currently listed for sale with an asking price of $849,000.00. Carol Berg O'Toole (1943- )is the daughter of Doris Berg and Homer Berg, was born in Hot Springs, South Dakota, received a masters in Industrial Relations, a doctorate in Philosophy and Educational Administration, and a law degree, married and raised two daughters, divorced in 1992, is a lawyer in private practice, is a professor of Industrial Relations at the University of Minnesota, is the chair to the St. Joan of Arc Parish Council, is a licensed pilot, and is a runner. Carol A. O'Toole, an attorney in the office of the Hennepin County Attorney, was a contributor to the John Kerry for President campaign in 2004. Robert Houck is a vice-president and a euro trader with Wells Fargo.

2841 East Lake of the Isles Parkway: Built in 1907. The structure is a 2.2 story, 1882 square foot, four bedroom, one bathroom, nine room, single family dwelling, with a partially finished basement. The 1909 city directory indicates that Dexter S. Bacon, a dentist who officed at the Donaldson Building, resided at this address. The 1910 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Berquist resided at this address. The 1912 city directory indicates that Dr. and Mrs. D. S. Bacon resided at this address. The 1914 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Collins resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. G. E. Horne resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Walter W. Halstead resided at this address. The property was last sold in 1991 by J. R. Otteson and C. M. Otteson to Marcos A. Herrera for $217,500. The current owner of record is Saleem Karmaliani and the current taxpayers of record are Saleem Karmaliani and Salima Mithani. Marcos Herrera, M.D., is a radiologist who received his medical degree from the Universidad National Autonoma De Mexico, Mexico City, Mexico, and who completed his residency in diagnostic radiology and a fellowship in cardiovascular and interventional radiology at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis. Dr. Herrera is board certified in Radiology by the American Board of Radiology. Saleem Karmaliani is a business integration architect employed by Hennepin County.

2845 East Lake of the Isles Parkway: Lake of the Isles Off-Leash Dog Recreation Area. The 1909 city directory indicates that Thomas F. Yerxa, vice president of the Yerxa Brothers Company, resided at this address. The Yerxa Brothers Company, with T. E. Yerxa of Los Angeles, California, president, T. F. Yerxa, vice president, and H. R. Yerxa, secretary-treasurer, were wholesale and retail grocers and meat dealers in the early 20th Century. [See the note for Thomas F. Yerxa for 2847 East Lake of the Isles Parkway.]

2847 East Lake of the Isles Parkway: Built in 1907. The structure is a 2 1/2 story, 2474 square foot (3,085 square foot according to the realtor,) five bedroom, three bathroom (four bathroom according to the realtor,) 12 room, single family dwelling, with a partially finished basement and three fireplaces. The 1910 and 1914 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. T. F. Yerxa resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that August A. Borgerson resided at this address. The firm of Yerxa Brothers was engaged in the grocery trade. The Minneapolis Yerxas were probably related to a group of Yerxas who left New Brunswick, Canada, for Minnesota around 1880. Thomas Yerxa resided at 1373 Summit Avenue in 1890. In 1988, Joseph McChristian sold the property to William K. Elwood and Elizabeth R. Allis for a purchase price of $208,000. Elizabeth R. Allis is the current owner of record of the property and William K. Elwood and Elizabeth R. Allis are the taxpayers of record of the property. The Minneapolis Zoning Board of Adjustment, in 2006, approved a request from William Elwood for a variance to reduce the south side yard setback from six feet to no distance to allow for an egress window at this address. The property was recently listed for sale with an asking price of $874,000.00. Bill Elwood is a consultant for Michaels Stores, Inc., and previously was a member of the board of trustees of the First Universalist Church of Minneapolis. Elizabeth Allis was a financial supporter of the YWCA in 2005. Betsy Allis is a member of the Advisory Council of the Social Justice Program for the Prairie Star District of the Unitarian Universalist Church, a member of the Association of Universalist Women of the First Universalist Church of Minneapolis, and a member of the Metro Unitarian Universalist Social Justice Alliance.

2851 East Lake of the Isles Parkway: Built in 1979. The structure is a two story, 2276 square foot, four bedroom, two bathroom, 11 room, single family dwelling, with a partially finished basement. The 1909 city directory indicates that William W. Bartlett, a lawyer who officed at the Andrus Building, resided at this address. The 1910, 1912, and 1914 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Bartlett resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. A. A. Bergerson resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that this address was vacant. William W. Bartlett (1860- ,) the son of Wallace R. Bartlett and Sarah F. Towne Bartlett, was born in Vassar, Michigan, was educated in the public schools of Vassar, Michigan, and Omaha, Nebraska, became a clerk in a U. S. Internal Revenue Service office in 1876, then learned the printer's trade, was a reporter, editor, publisher, and contributing writer, began the study of law in 1878 in Michigan and Nebraska, was admitted to the practice of law in Nebraska in 1880, married Rosalind Wiese of St. Petersburg, Russia, in 1881, moved to Minneapolis in 1883, practiced law in Minneapolis, officed at the Sykes Building, and married Nellie Willis in 1895. William Wallace Bartlett ( -1934) and Nellie W. Bartlett ( -1942) both died in Hennepin County. Connie Baillie, the Junior Programs and Scholarships Coordinator for the Westside Football Club, resides at this address. Constance S. Baillie and James L. Baillie were the previous owners of record for the property and Constance S. Baillie is the current owner of record of the property. James L. Baillie is a lawyer with the law firm of Frederikson & Byron, P. A., and practices in the areas of bankruptcy, business litigation, debtor/creditor remedies, and commercial law. He previously was the chairperson of the Bankruptcy Section of the Minnesota State Bar Association, is a fellow of the American College of Bankruptcy, and is a past president of the Hennepin County Bar Association. Constance S. Baillie is an attorney with Central Minnesota Legal Services, is a member of the Hennepin County Bar Association, and ran in the 2004 Jingle Bell 5K Race.

2855 East Lake of the Isles Parkway: Built in 1972. The structure is a three story, 2880 square foot, three bedroom, four bathroom, eight room, single family dwelling, with a partially finished basement and a tuck-under garage. The 1909 city directory indicates that Samuel I. Latimer, a clerk employed by C. B. Olson, resided at this address and that Gertrude Baden, a clerk, and Mrs. Rosa J. Ross, a travel agent for the Minneapolis Journal, both boarded at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. H. C. Alden resided at this address. The property was sold in 1988 by David and C. J. Fellman to Martin H. Adson, for $326,000. The previous owners were Martin H. Adson and Tina Marie Frontera and the current owner of record is Tina Marie Frontera. David Fellman is the president of David Fellman & Associates, which is a sales & marketing consulting firm serving the graphic arts industry. Martin H. Adson, M. D., is a plastic and reconstructive surgeon. He has a bachelors degree from Colorado College and a medical degree from the University of Minnesota Medical School. He served his general surgery residency at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, and his plastic surgery residency at the University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan. Tina Frontera was the Senior Director for Administration and Client Relations for Patient Choice, which was located in Minnetonka, Minnesota, and which was acquired by Medica, a large regional health plan, in 2004, and Tina Frontera-Adson is now the Vice President for Marketing and Account Management for Preferred One in Minneapolis.

2859 East Lake of the Isles Parkway: The current structure was built in 1933. The structure is a two story, 1712 square foot, eight room, four bedroom, two bathroom, single family residence. The 1900 and 1902 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. R. F. McIntosh resided at this address. In 1987, Gerard G. D'Amour sold the property to L. M. Gores et al for $255,000.

2863 East Lake of the Isles Parkway: Henry Waldron/Harry B. Waldron House; Built in 1900; Vernacular Queen Anne in style with Mission style exterior; John W. Lindstrom, designer. The structure is a 1 1/2 story, 1611 square foot, two bedroom, two bathroom, eight room, frame stucco single family dwelling. The house has a "Juliet" balcony, a red roof, and arched front porch openings. The house was initially located at 2867 East Lake of the Isles Parkway, was built for $500, and was moved to this address in 1911 to make room for the Charles Waldron House. The house initially was 24' by 25', was built by George Cook, a contractor, initially had a clapboard exterior, had a rear addition and replacement windows in 1936, had another rear addition and altered dormers in 1948, and had its porch altered, with arched openings, and was stuccoed by the PermaStone Company of Minneapolis in 1949. The 1914 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. L. A. McKay resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. F. N. Furber resided at this address. In 1925, Charles Waldron and Eva Waldron sold the property to Fred N. Furber, a lawyer, and Dorothy Furber. In 1929, John C. Jacobson, an engineer with the Water Power Company, and Hilda Jacobson purchased the property. The 1930 city directory indicates that Otto J. Morrow resided at this address. George W. Meyers ( -1956,) a railroad or streetcar conductor, and his wife, Manita Meyers ( -1987,) purchased the house in 1936. The house was transferred after 1987 to a family member, Bernita Meyers, and was sold to Christopher Horty, in 2002. In December, 2008, the Minneapolis Heritage Preservation Commission approved an application to allow for the demolition of the structure at this address. Horty apparently is proposing to build an addition on to his residence at 2867 East Lake of the Isles Parkway. Harry B. Waldron (1864-1919) and his brother, Charles J. Waldron (1867- ,) operated a grocery store at 2256 Lyndale Avenue South. The Waldron brothers were both born in Ohio. Harry Waldron was married to Harriet Waldron ( -1909) and Charles Waldron was married to Eva Waldron. Charles Waldron, Eva Waldron, and Harry Waldron moved to Fruit Valley in Klickitat, Washington, in 1909 and, in 1910, owned a fruit farm. George Cook was born in Canada, arrived in the United States in 1880, started his construction company in 1885 with partner, Willard Pike, lived at 2400 Colfax Avenue South between 1900 and 1920, resided at 2400 Bryant Avenue South in 1930, completed several important projects in Minneapolis, including the Lakewood Cemetery Memorial Chapel (1908,) the Dunwoody Institute (1916 and 1923,) and the Hennepin Avenue Methodist Church (1913.) In 1940, George F. Cook, one of George Cook’s sons, incorporated the firm and the George F. Cook Construction Company is presently located in Golden Valley, Minnesota. Christopher A. Horty, who resides at 2867 East Lake of the Isles Parkway, is the current owner of the nonhomesteaded property for which there is no indication of a rental license.

2867 East Lake of the Isles Parkway: Charles Waldron House; Built in 1911. The structure is a 1.2 story, 1958 square foot, three bedroom, one bathroom, seven room, single family dwelling. The 1902 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Harry B. Waldron resided at this address. The 1904 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. H. B. Waldron resided at this address. The 1906 and 1908 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. C. J. Waldron resided at this address. The 1909 city directory indicates that Anna G. Rayson, the widow of Joseph Rayson, resided at this address and Robert Rayson, a fireman for the Chicago, Minneapolis & St. Paul RailRoad, boarded at this address. The 1917 Catalogue of the Beta Theta Pi Fraternity, published by James T. Brown of New York, indicated that Charles Morton Denny, Jr., a member of the class of 1917 at the University of Minnesota and associated with the Denny Land Company, resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. G. A. Burke resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that George A. Burke resided at this address. In 1911, Charles Waldron and Eva Waldron returned from Klickitat, Washington, to Minnesota, obtained a permit to move the house at 2867 East Lake of the Isles Parkway to the neighboring lot at 2863 East Lake of the Isles Parkway, and constructed a new house at 2867 East Lake of the Isles Parkway. Charles Waldron continued to be a proprietor of a grocery store until 1920, when he became a travel agent. In 1922, Charles Waldron and Eva Waldron moved to Los Angeles, California. The current owner of the property is Christopher A. Horty. Christopher A. Horty was the purchaser in 2001 of a house on Colfax Avenue South from the estate of Bernadine Riske, author of Dee-Dee Chickadee Gets Lost and Dee-Dee Chickadee the Peacemaker, in an unadvertised and improper transaction during a 2001 estate sale that was handled by Ms. Riske's conservator, the Wells Fargo Bank, that failed to comply with all probate requirements, and that was featured in the August 28, 2002, edition of City Pages. In 1968, Christopher Horty was the State Boys' Alpine/Slalom Ski individual champion from Mounds View, Minnesota. Christopher A. Horty is associated with Horty Elving Construction Services, Inc. Christopher A. Horty also owns 2863 Irving Avenue South, 3028 James Avenue South and 3008 James Avenue South.

2920 East Lake of the Isles Parkway: The property is vacant land that is currently owned by the Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board.

Summit Avenue Hikes - Architectural Style Notes

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Information from the University of Minnesota, Northwest Architectural Archives, was used in this webpage.

This webpage was last updated on August 3, 2011.

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