Thursday Night Hikes: Irvine/Cherokee Park Hike Architecture Notes, Part 2


Thursday Night Hikes: Irvine/Cherokee Park Hike Architecture Notes, Part 2

Observations on Architectural Styles

Irvine Park to Cherokee Park Hike

Assembled by

Lawrence A. Martin

Webpage Creation: June 14, 2001

221 South Exchange Street: Built in 1979. The one story, 7840 square foot, structure is a commercial building. The current owner of record of the property is PZA LLC, located at 211 West Seventh Street. The 1879 city directory indicates that Augusta Elmquist was a domestic at the nearby former 206 South Exchange Street, that William Foote, a fireman, boarded at the nearby former 183 Exchange Street, that Joseph L. Forepaugh, a partner with Jasper B. Tarbox in Forepaugh & Tarbox, a boot and shoe jobber and manufacturer located at 129-131 East Third Street, resided at the nearby former 223 Exchange Street, that Jacob Jansen resided at the former nearby 203 Exchange Street, that Margaret Kinnane was a domestic at the former nearby 223 Exchange Street, that Edward Lundblad was a coachman at the former nearby 211 Exchange Street, that John N. Matheis, employed by John Matheis, resided at the nearby former 201 Exchange Street, and that Elizabeth Minea was a domestic at the former nearby 206 Exchange Street. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Jens Sorenson (1852-1909,) the husband of Karine Kristine Sorenson, who was born in Denmark to parents also born in Denmark and who died of cancer of the liver and the stomach, resided at the nearby former 208 South Exchange Street in 1909. The records of the 1919-1920 Minnesota World War I Soldier's Bonus Board (#18803) indicate that Albert R. Tursso (1892- ,) a 1918 draftee and a Private in Company C of the Third Pioneer Infantry, who was born in St. Paul, had brown eyes, black hair, and a dark complexion, was 5' 1 1/2" tall, was a laborer at induction, served in the American Expeditionary Force in France, including Meuse and Argonne, was a laborer employed by the City of St. Paul after the completion of service, and was married, resided with his wife, Nonziata Tursso, at the nearby former 206 Exchange Street South. The 1920 city directory indicates that Benjamin Abrahamson, a helper, boarded at the former nearby 190 South Exchange Street, that Lorenza Bunjawani, a weaver employed by Myer Dorfman, boarded at the nearby former 204 South Exchange Street, that Mary Burns, a clerk, boarded at the nearby former 225 South Exchange Street, that Minnie Erb, a machine operator, boarded at the former nearby 225 South Exchange Street, and that Peter Erb resided at the former nearby 225 South Exchange Street. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Betty Jean Rickert (1923-1923,) the infant daughter of Halford R. Rickert, who was born in Minnesota to parents born in the United States and who died of toxaemia, resided at the nearby former 130 South Exchange Street in 1923. The 1930 city directory indicates that 190 South Exchange Street was vacant, that the L. Eisenmenger Meat Company garage was located at the former nearby 199 South Exchange Street, that John T. Johnson, a painter, resided at the former nearby 204 South Exchange Street, that John Jubo, a laborer employed by the Bohn Refrigerator Company, resided at the former nearby 206 South Exchange Street, that Cecelia Anderson, the widow of Oscar Anderson, and Patrick A. Mogan, a laborer employed by the City of St. Paul Department of Public Works, and his wife, Lillian Mogan, resided at the former nearby 208 South Exchange Street, that Louis La Croix, a laborer, and his wife, Jemima La Croix, resided at the former nearby 210 South Exchange Street, that Patrick Capece, the owner of a restaurant at 142 West Seventh Street, and his wife, Tillie Capece, resided at the former nearby 218 South Exchange Street, and that Frank J. Topic, a sign painter employed by the F. A. Marko Sign Company, and his wife, Florence Topic, resided at the former nearby 204 South Exchange Street. In 1882, Mrs. J. B. Tarbox was ill with congestion of the lungs and was recuperating in Albuquerque, New Mexico. In 1883, Eve Goodhue Lamprey, a daughter of James M. Goodhue and the widow of Morris J. Lamprey, a lawyer, married Jasper Tarbox. Jasper B. Tarbox (1838-1903,) the son of __?__ Tarbox and Frances Grace Tarbox ( -1901,) was born in Rushville, Pennsylvania, initially moved to Toledo, Ohio, then moved to Chicago and was a traveling salesman, moved to St. Paul in 1865, entered the tanning business with Hiram Rogers, married Emma Rogers ( -1883,) the daughter of Hiram Rogers, then engaged in the wholesale boot and shoe business with Joseph L. Forepaugh as Forepaugh & Tarbox, then as J.B. Tarbox & Company, and finally as Tarbox, Schiek & Company, located at 228-232 East Third Street in 1901, was a pioneer jobber, married Eve Goodhue Lamprey in 1885, subsequently was in the insurance business, resided at 137 West College Avenue in 1901, and died of heart disease at the City Hospital in St. Paul. Jasper B. Tarbox and Emma Rogers Tarbox were the parents of two children, Frances Tarbox and Frederick Tarbox. In 1884, J. B. Tarbox was a vestryman in the Christ Episcopal Church in St. Paul. In 1887, J.B. Tarbox & Company, located at 179-185 East Third Street, were manufacturers and jobbers of boots and shoes in St. Paul and issued tri-fold New Years greeting trade cards. In 1889, Cass Gilbert designed an H. H. Richardson-inspired Shingle style summer cottage for Jasper Tarbox on the exclusive Manitou Island in White Bear Lake, Minnesota, at 2517 Manitou Island. Tarbox was a one-time tenant of the Gilbert Estate and the Endicott Rantoul Warehouse, set up a shoe factory in South Park, and also subdivided residential property in South St. Paul, where a subdivision bears his name. In 1889, Jasper B. Tarbox was the partner of Charles H. Schlieck in Tarbox, Schlieck & Company, wholesale jobbers and manufacturers of boots and shoes located at 228-240 East Third Street, resided at 137 West College Avenue. In 1889, Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Tarbox participated, with Governor and Mrs. William Merriam, Mayor Robert and Miss Smith, General and Mrs. Ruger, Judge and Miss Nelson, Judge and Mrs. James Gilfillan, Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Deane, Mr. and Mrs. George R. Finch, Mr. and Mrs. T. L. Schurmeier, Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Tarbox, Mr. and Mrs. F. Driscoll, Sr., Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Baker, Col. and Mrs. D. A. Montfort, Mr. and Mrs. C. Livingstone, and Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Norton, in a full dress reception at the Hotel Ryan for the delegates to the International American Conference. In 1892, in Althen v. Tarbox, 50 NW 1018, recovery on a mechanics lien for the construction of a foundation by Fred Althen on land sold solely Eve Tarbox to a third party, invalid because J. B. Tarbox did not join in the contract, was upheld by the Minnesota Supreme Court because the Married Woman's Property Act, General Laws of Minnesota 1887, Chapter 207, requiring a husband's execution of any married woman's property conveyance, could not invaliadate a mechanics lien for construction work on the property after the execution of the invalid contract. In 1901, J. B. Tarbox entered into a contract with the Minnesota State Prison at Stillwater, Minnesota, to purchase boots and shoes manufactured by prisoners at the prison. Florence Lamprey, the daughter of Mrs. J. B. Tarbox, married George Phelps Robbins of New York in Minneapolis in 1897. James M. Goodhue (1810-1852) was born in New Hampshire, graduated from Amherst College in 1832, studied law, moved to Wisconsin, practiced law for a number of years, became the editor of the Wisconsin Herald, moved to St. Paul in 1849, brought the first printing press and the first printing type to the Minnesota Territory, issued the first paper printed in the Minnesota Territory, the Pioneer, once criticized two office holders, Col. Mitchell and Judge Cooper, which brought on a gun and knife fight with Cooper's brother, ran the first ferry boat in St. Paul at the end of Lamb's Island, and resided at the corner of Third Street and St. Peter Street. Lewis Baker (1832-1899) was born in Belmont County, Ohio, was an apprentice printer in Perry Township, Tuscarawas County, Ohio, married Ruth Amanda Fordyce (1842- ,) the daughter of John Fordyce and Ruth Greg Fordyce, resided in Ohio County, West Virginia, in 1870, was a West Virginia state senator from 1871 until 1872, moved to Minnesota in 1885, purchased the St. Paul Globe in 1885, representing a syndicate of Democrats, and operated it until 1893, was chair of the Minnesota Democratic Party in 1892, was Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to Nicaragua, Costa Rica and Salvador from 1893 until 1897, died in Washington, D. C., and was buried in the Greenwood Cemetery in Wheeling, West Virginia. Lewis Baker and Ruth Amanda Fordyce Baker had five children, John Baker, Mary Baker, Harry Baker, Anna Baker, and Jennie Baker. Morris J. Lamprey (1827-1879,) the son of David Marston Lamprey (1801-1868) and Sally Stearns Lamprey (1805- ) and a brother of Uri Locke Lamprey, was born in Deerfield, New Hampshire, graduated from Dartmouth College in 1851, was principal of Hampton Academy from 1854 to 1855, moved to St. Paul in 1855, became a lawyer in St. Paul, drafted the legislation that reorganized the University of Minnesota along the model of the University of Michigan in 1868, married Eve Goodhue in 1869, was a regent of the University of Minnesota from 1874 until 1879, resided in a limestone house at 137 West College Street, was a collector of world art, allegedly owned a chest of his great great great great grandmother that purportedly contained her weight in gold, and died in St. Paul. Eve Lamprey and other survivors of Morris Lamprey successfully sued Uri L. Lamprey and his wife, Jeannette Robert Lamprey, over a prior real estate sale that Uri L. Lamprey and Jeanne R. Lamprey did not fulfill within the specified two year period in Eve Lamprey et al v. Uri L. Lamprey and wife, 29 Minn. 151 (1882.) Uri Lamprey (1842-1906) was the father of the Minnesota game conservation movement. Karen Kirstine Sorenson ( -1920) died in Freeborn County, Minnesota. Louis A. Eisenmenger ( -1931) died in Ramsey County. Patrick A. Mogan ( -1949) died in Hennepin County. Patrick Capece (1887-1971) was born outside of Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. Frank J. Topic ( -1946) died in Ramsey County. [See note on the Eisenmenger Meat Market for 1935 Portland Avenue.] [See note on Joseph L. Forepaugh for 276 South Exchange Street.] [See note for Uri L. Lamprey for 175 Sherman Street.]

226-234 South Exchange Street: Panama Flats/Stoddard Block/Exchange Street Apartments; Built in 1886 (1880 according to Ramsey County tax records;) Queen Anne style rowhouse; Orff Brothers, architects; Taylor & Craig, builders. The structure was built for William Stoddard at a cost of $20,000. For 20 years, the Panama Flats were known as the Stoddard/Stoddart Block, but the name was changed in 1907 in honor of the Panama Canal. The name "Panama Flats" was formally changed to Exchange Street Apartments in 1926, but the name "Panama Flats" has persisted. In 1971, the building was scheduled for demolition in the planned widening of Chestnut Street, but controversy over highway routes stayed the razing. The brick building was redeveloped in 1978-1979 into condominiums. 226 S. Exchange Street has three living units and two garages. 226 S. Exchange Street Unit B is 900 square feet in area, and has four rooms, one bedroom, one bathroom, and one half-bathroom, which last sold in 2005 for $222,500, and which was previously owned by Timothy E. Frye and is currently owned by Andrew K. Hromyak. 226 S. Exchange Street Unit J is 900 square feet in area, and has four rooms, one bedroom, one bathroom, and one half-bathroom, which last sold in 1999 for $115,500, and which is currently owned by George S. Curtis. 226 S. Exchange Street Unit P is 900 square feet in area, and has four rooms, one bedroom, one bathroom, and one half-bathroom, which last sold in 1996 for $118,000, and which is currently owned by Beverly A. Madden Bishop and David W. Bishop. 226 S. Exchange Street Unit G13 is a detached one car brick garage, built in 1880, which last sold in 1999 for $85,900, and which is currently owned by Traci M. Tonnessen, who resides at 228 Exchange Street, Unit I. 226 S. Exchange Street Unit G15 is a detached one car brick garage, built in 1880, which is currently owned by Carol M. Richter, who resides at 228 Exchange Street, Unit D. 228 South Exchange Street has three units. 228 South Exchange Street Unit A is 750 square feet in area, and has four rooms, two bedrooms, and one bathroom, which last sold in 1994 for $54,300, and which is currently owned by Carol M. Richter. 228 South Exchange Street Unit I is 750 square feet in area, and has four rooms, two bedrooms, and one bathroom, which last sold in 1999 for $85,900, and which is currently owned by Tracy M. Tonnessen. 228 South Exchange Street Unit N is 750 square feet in area, has five rooms, two bedrooms, and two bathrooms, and has a one car detached garage, which last sold in 2006 for $335,000, and which was previously owned by Mark H. Westin and is currently owned by David A. McEachern. 230 South Exchange Street has three units. 230 South Exchange Street Unit B is 750 square feet in area, has three rooms, one bedroom, and one bathroom, and has a one car detached garage, which is currently owned by Roxanne Johnson. 230 South Exchange Street Unit C is 750 square feet in area and has four rooms, two bedrooms, and one bathroom, which last sold in 2001 for $116,900, and which is currently owned by William J. Meehan, Jr. 230 South Exchange Street Unit M is 750 square feet in area, has six rooms, two bedrooms, and two bathrooms, which last sold in 1995 for $116,000, and which is currently owned by Dale R. Swenson and Deborah K. Swenson. 232 South Exchange Street has three units. 232 South Exchange Street Unit B is 750 square feet in area and has four rooms, two bedrooms, and one bathroom, which last sold in 1999 for $82,000, and which is currently owned by Noelle C. Lowrie. 232 South Exchange Street Unit G is 750 square feet in area and has three rooms, one bedroom, and one bathroom, which last sold in 1993 for $52,900, and which is currently owned by Kathleen M. Martin and Richard K. Risch. 232 South Exchange Street Unit L is 750 square feet in area and has six rooms, two bedrooms, and two bathrooms, which is currently owned by Joseph D. Lacey-Gotz and Lizabeth E. Lacey-Gotz. 234 South Exchange Street has three units. 234 South Exchange Street Unit A is 750 square feet in area and has four rooms, two bedrooms, and one bathroom, which last sold in 1996 for $58,900, and which is currently owned by Andrea M. Myers. 234 South Exchange Street Unit C is 750 square feet in area and has six rooms, two bedrooms, and two bathrooms, which is currently owned Karen O. Brown and Scott L. Brown. 234 South Exchange Street Unit F/G2 is 750 square feet in area and has three rooms, one bedroom, and one bathroom, which is currently owned Robert G. Mairs. The 1879 city directory indicates that James Gilfillan, the chief justice of the Minnesota Supreme Court, resided at the nearby former 239 South Exchange Street. During the late 1880's, Thomas Newson, city pioneer, newspaper editor, writer, and foreign service attache to Spain, lived at the Stoddard Block. The 1889 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. William Stoddart and Miss Eliza Stoddart resided at 226 South Exchange Street. The 1891 city directory indicates that William Stoddard and his daughter resided at 226 South Exchange Street, that Mrs. Ann Holmes, her daughters, Joseph Holmes, James Holmes, and E. B. Holmes all resided at 230 South Exchange Street, that Mrs. S. E. Aarseth and her daughter both resided at 232 South Exchange Street, and that the Honorable and Mrs. T. M. Newson, their daughters, T. M. Newson, Jr., J. M. Smith, S. D. Brower, and H. J. Openshaw all resided at 234 South Exchange Street. The 1893 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. William Stoddart and their daughter all resided at 226 South Exchange Street, that Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Sander and Jacques Zimmerman all resided at 232 South Exchange Street, and that the Honorable and Mrs. T. M. Newson, their daughters, T. M. Newson, Jr., J. M. Smith, and S. D. Brower all resided at 234 South Exchange Street. The 1895 city directory indicates that William Stoddart and his daughter both resided at 226 South Exchange Street and that Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Sander, A. B. Sander, and J. M. Smith all resided at 232 South Exchange Street. The records of the 1919-1920 Minnesota World War I Soldier's Bonus Board (#21256) indicate that Herbert Schoonover (1892- ,) a 1918 draftee and a Corporal in the Casual Detachment of the Guard & Fire Companies, who was born in St. Paul, had blue eyes, light brown hair, and a fair complexion, was 5' 7 1/2" tall, was a city firefighter at induction, was a firefighter employed by the St. Paul Fire Department Engine Company #8 after the completion of service, and was unmarried, resided with his mother, Mrs. A. Chandler, at 228 South Exchange Street. The 1920 city directory indicates that Henry A. Burke, an operator of a billiards parlor located at 611 West Exchange Street, resided at 226 South Exchange Street, that Ernest Camaday, a laborer, roomed at 230 South Exchange Street, that May A. Diven, an operator, resided at 230 South Exchange Street, that Ernest Canaday, a clerk, resided at 230 South Exchange Street, that David Degere, a trucker employed by the Union Depot Company, boarded at 228 South Exchange Street, that Arthur L. Dougal, a fireman employed by the Northern States Power Company, resided at 226 South Exchange Street, that Leo E. Fairbanks, a driver employed by the St. Paul Milk Company, resided at 226 South Exchange Street, and that Lionel Fairbanks, a laborer, resided at 226 South Exchange Street. The 1930 city directory indicates that Pierre Blackbird and Leslie E. McKinney, a pressman employed by the Dispatch-Pioneer Press Company, and his wife, Hazel McKinney, resided at 226 South Exchange Street, that Frank Struss, an auto mechanic, his wife, Ethel Struss, Thomas H. Thake, a janitor employed by the St. Paul Milk Company, and his wife, Mary J. Thake, resided at 228 South Exchange Street, that Charles Kuckler, a laborer employed by the Ashco Corporation, Charles Autrey, and Joseph Caticchio all resided at 230 South Exchange Street, that 232 South Exchange Street was vacant, and that Mrs. Belle McAnally, the widow of John McAnally, and Edward Dalton both resided at 234 South Exchange Street. Thomas McLean Newson (1827-1893) was born in New York City, New York, settled in St. Paul in 1853, was a newspaper publisher, was the assistant quartermaster for the Union Army during the American Civil War, was the Commissary of Subsistence for the Department of Minnesota of the U. S. War Department for the troops that were retained in Minnesota to guard the frontier following the Dakota Conflict of 1862, was a member of the expedition to the Vermillion Lake Region in NorthEast Minnesota of the Mutual Protection Gold Miner's Company in 1865, was the U. S. Consul in Malaga, Spain, and died in Malaga, Spain. Thomas M. Newson is reported to have been a Captain in the Eighth Minnesota Regiment, although he does not appear in the State Adjutant General's reports for 1861-1865. Thomas McLean Newson was the editor of the MinnesotaWeekly Times and of the Independent Farmer and Fireside Companion, a foreign service attachee to Spain, and the author of Thrilling Scenes Among the Indians: With a Graphic Description of Custer's Last Fight with Sitting Bull, published in 1889 by Belford Clarke, of Pen pictures of St. Paul, Minnesota: and biographical sketches of old settlers, from the earliest settlement of the city, up to and including the year 1857, of Thrilling scenes among the Indians, Drama of life in the Black Hills, published in Saint Paul by Dodge & Larpenteur in 1878, Saint Paul illustrated: the past, the present, the future: the commercial and railroad center of Minnesota: at the head of navigation on the Mississippi River, midway between the two oceans: with a great empire beyond to feed its resources, published in 1879 in St. Paul by John Jay Lemon, Indian legends of Minnesota lakes, published in Minneapolis by A. S. Dimond in 1881, and of Pilot Knob: The Oldest Stone Dwelling in the State of Minnesota: Erected in 1836: Still Standing at Mendota, published in St. Paul in 1887. The Independent Farmer and Fireside Companion in 1879 until the early 1900's, along with the Minnesota Farmer and Gardener from 1860 to 1862, the Farmer's Union from 1867 to 1873, the Minnesota Monthly from 1869 to 1870 and the Minnesota Farmer from 1877 to 1896, were agricultural periodicals published early in Minnesota history. James Gilfillan (1829-1894,) the son of James Gilfillan and Janet Agnes Gilfillan, was born in Bannockburn, Stirlingshire, Scotland, emigrated with his family to the United States in 1830, moved to New Hartford, Onieda County, New York, with his family in 1830, attended country district schools, studied the classics and higher mathematics privately, read the law in Chenango County, New York, and at Ballston Spa, Saratoga County, New York, was admitted to the practice of law in New York in 1850, practiced law in Buffalo, New York, moved to St. Paul in 1857, was a Captain in the Seventh Minnesota Regiment and a Colonel of the Eleventh Minnesota Regiment during the American Civil War, participated in the battle against the Dakota at Wood Lake, Minnesota, in 1862, participated in the Sibley Expedition against the Dakota in the Dakota Territory in 1863, was a Republican, was an Episcopalian, married Martha McMasters, the daughter of Rev. Sterling Yancey McMasters, in St. Paul in 1867, was a member of the Acker Post of the Grand Army of the Republic, was the lawyer for the Vermillion Falls, Minnesota, Gold Company, was chief justice of the Minnesota Supreme Court, filling a vacancy, from 1869 until 1870, was the chief justice of the Minnesota Supreme Court from 1875 until 1894, and died in St. Paul. James Gilfillan and Martha McMasters Gilfillan had seven children, James S. Gilfillan, Martha McMasters Gilfillan (Mrs. Webster) Wheelock, Mary Gilfillan, Caroline Gilfillan (Mrs. Trevor) McClurg, Katherine Gilfillan (Mrs. Samuel) Gilbert, Russell Gilfillan, and Perry K. Gilfillan (1873- .) Sterling Yancey McMasters, D.D., L.L.D. (1813-1875,) a son of John McMasters and Charrity McMasters, was born at Guilford Court House, North Carolina, graduated from the University of North Carolina, married Catherine Montgomery ( -1847) in 1839, was a missionary in Granville and Halifax Counties, North Carolina, in 1844, converted from Methodism to Episcopalianism, was an Episcopal clergyman, was the rector of the Church of the Holy Innocents at Henderson, North Carolina, in 1844, was a pastor at St. Paul's Church in Alton, Illinois, from 1846 until 1851, married Julia Russell Bowers in 1848, was a professor at the Western Military Institute in Kentucky from 1851 until 1852, returned to North Carolina, was the author of A biographical index to the history of England published by the Courier Office in 1854, and of A Methodist in Search of the Church, published by the Claremont Manufacturing Company in Claremont, New Hampshire, in 1862, was the president of St. Paul's College in Palmyra, Missouri, from 1858 until 1863, was chaplain of the 27th Illinois Regiment during the American Civil War, came to Minnesota in 1863, was rector of Christ Church for 1863 until 1875, was a member of the executive committee of the Minnesota Historical Society, was a Mason, was a member of the board of the Minnesota State Normal School from 1871 until 1873, was the Minnesota State Commissioner to the Vienna Exposition in 1873, and died in St. Paul. Frances Windisch, the daughter of Frank H. Windisch (1858- ,) married Herbert Schoonover. Thomas H. Thake ( -1935,) Edward Dalton ( -1936,) Albin Sander ( -1938,) James Perry Holmes ( -1940,) William R. Stoddard ( -1942,) James A. Holmes ( -1951,) and Joseph Holmes ( -1954) all died in Ramsey County. Jacques Zimmerman ( -1938) and Charles R. Autrey ( -1947) both died in Hennepin County. Pierre Blackbird (1872-1955) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Paul, and died in Ramsey County. Frank H. Struss (1898-1971) was born outside of Minnesota and died in Todd County, Minnesota. William Stoddart ( -1966) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Holland, and died in Hennepin County. Charles Kuckler (1898-1970) was born in Minnesota and died in Hennepin County. Edward Dalton (1887-1973) was born in Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. Edward John Dalton (1911-1985) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Lefto, and died in Ramsey County. George W. Orff and Fremont D. Orff were the principals of Orff Brothers, Minneapolis architects. George W. Orff supplied the plans for two buildings on the National Register of Historic Places, the Adams-Pickering Block, in Bangor, Penobscot County, Maine, a late Victorian building, and the Samuel Kidder Whiting House, in Ellsworth, Hancock County, Maine, a Second Empire-style building. Fremont D. Orff designed the 1901 Alexandra/Albert Block, 227-237 McDermot Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, built on behalf of James S. Tupper and William J. Tupper, two lawyers who represented the Canadian Pacific Railway and the Hudson's Bay Company, and Walter Suckling, a Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, real estate developer. Fremont D. Orff practiced from 1879 to 1912 and designed more than one hundred school buildings and county court houses. Fremont D. Orff also designed the Perham, Minnesota, City Hall in 1906, the Wells, Minnesota, High School in 1899, and the Big Stone, Minnesota, County Courthouse, a building on the National Register of Historic Places. The 1879 city directory indicates that Charles W. S. Henry, a clerk employed by the Boston One Price Clothing House, resided at the nearby former 235 South Exchange Street. The 1885 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Moss resided at the former nearby 239 South Exchange Street, and that Mr. and Mrs. H. R. Bigelow, their daughter, Lewis Bigelow, and Horace E. Bigelow all resided at the former nearby 239 South Exchange Street. The 1887 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Moss resided at the former nearby 239 Exchange Street South, that Mr. and Mrs. H. R. Bigelow, their daughter, Lewis S. Bigelow, and Horace E. Bigelow all resided at the former nearby 249 Exchange Street South, and that Mr. and Mrs. Edmund Rice, Jr., resided at the former nearby 256 Exchange Street South. The 1906 Jubilee Manual of the House of Hope Presbyterian Church indicates that James H. A. Hirst, a member of the church since 1901, and Nellie B. (Mrs. J. H. A.) Hirst, a member of the church since 1881, resided at the nearby former 264 South Exchange Street and that Amanda Moss, a widow and a member of the church since 1857, resided at the former nearby 239 South Exchange Street. The 1920 city directory indicates that Willard E. Ames, a laborer employed by the Wells Brothers Construction Company, resided at the former nearby 262 South Exchange Street, that Claude Brewster, a cook employed by Fred Hoadley, boarded at the nearby former 254 South Exchange Street, that John Brewster, an electrician employed by the Tri-State Telephone & Telegraph Company, resided at the nearby former 262 South Exchange Street, and that John Brewster, a cafe worker, boarded at the nearby former 256 South Exchange Street. The 1920 city directory indicates that Nettie Cordin, a matron employed by the F. W. Woolworth Company, resided at the former nearby 237 Exchange Street South, that the Dahlquist Machinery Company, John L. Dahlquist, proprietor, was located at the former nearby 240 South Exchange Street, and that Roscoe E. Dolen, a coremaker employed by the South Park Foundry & Machine Company, boarded at the nearby former 262 South Exchange Street. The 1930 city directory indicates that John L. Dahlquist was an elevator manufacturer located at the former nearby 240 South Exchange Street and resided in White Bear Lake, Minnesota, that Frederick Rickard resided at the former nearby 244 South Exchange Street, that Mrs. Mary Jansen resided at the former nearby 250 South Exchange Street, that Mrs. Anna Ethen, Mrs. Lela Mishler, and Peter W. Mishler all resided at the former nearby 244 South Exchange Street, and that Mrs. Florence A. Fransen, Dennis Scanlon, a laborer, his wife, Gladys Scanlon, Mrs. Ella Thorne, the widow of William Thorne, and Mrs. Clara Wilson, the widow of Fred Wilson, all resided at the former nearby 262 South Exchange Street. The 1897 Catalogue of the Legal Fraternity of Phi Delta Phi, edited by George Anthony Katzenberger and published by the Inland Press of Ann Arbor, Michigan, indicates that Lewis Sherrill Bigelow attended the Law Department of the University of Michigan from 1884 until 1885 and graduated from Yale University in 1887. Lewis Sherrill Bigelow was a competitive rower in 1891 and 1892. Lewis Sherrill Bigelow was a Mayflower descendant. Lewis Sherrill Bigelow, an attorney, journalist, and literature specialist, was a friend of poet Robert Frost in Andover, Massachusetts. Lewis S. Bigelow was the author of The 1913 Flood And How It Was Met By A Railroad, published in 1913 by the Pennsylvania RailRoad, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Lewis Sherrill Bigelow, Jr., was a student at Yale University in 1927. Fred Rickard ( -1932,) Mary Jansen ( -1938,) John Louis Dahlquist ( -1941,) and Peter William Mishler ( -1945) all died in Ramsey County. Anna R. Ethen ( -1943) died in Stearns County, Minnesota. [See note for the St. Paul Union Depot Company.] [See note on the Canadian Pacific RailRoad.] [See note for Edmund Rice for 194 McBoal Street.] [See note for Horace Ransom Bigelow for 281 Walnut Street.] [See note for Tri-State Telegraph & Telephone Company for 596 Portland Avenue.]

265 South Exchange Street: Alexander Ramsey House: Built in the period 1868-1872 (1872 according to Ramsey County property tax records,) Second Empire/Italianate in style, mansard roof; exterior of native limestone; Monroe Sheier (Sheire according to the Historic American Buildings Survey,) of the firm of M. Sheire & Brother, architect; Leonard & Sheire, foundation builder, John Summers, masonry contractor, Matthew Taylor, master capenter and construction supervisor, and J. F. Tostevin, fireplace designer and builder. The house is a 2 1/2 story (three stories according to Ramsey County property tax records,) 10256 square foot, square structure with a mansard eight-dormered slate roof and with a rectangular two story rear wing that has a gabled roof. The house features carved walnut woodwork, marble fireplaces, crystal chandeliers and many original furnishings. The foundation is made up of rubble limestone set on bedrock which is unfaced on the interior and with an exterior surface of quarry-faced limestone/coursed ashlar. The floors are a sandwich of rough 1" tongue and groove subflooring covered by three inches of lime mortar and broken rock grout to provide acoustic and thermal insulation and topped with finished 3 1/4" Minnesota white pine flooring, all supported by 3" x 12" floor joists. The house has a one-story, three-bay, covered porch across the front. There also is a three story rear porch and a small one-bay porch at the center of the northeast side of the structure. It has seven chimneys, three decorative and pedimented brick ones on the main block of the house, two on the southwest side of the house, one on the northeast side of the house, and one at the rear of the building. Excavation for the foundation cost $2,500, the construction of the walls and the roof cost $13,500, and the construction of the balance of the house cost $10,000, for a total cost of $26,000. The foundation is of blue limestone. The house was originally heated by a No. 24 Lawson's coal furnace. It also had gas piped into various parts of the first and second floors for gas lights. The house utilizes a wide central hall with flanking rooms. The first floor has a large parlor with a reception room, a library, and a secondary hall. The first floor of the rear wing has a dining room, a kitchen and a pantry. The second floor has four bedrooms, two on each side of the center hall. The second floor of the rear wing has two bedrooms and two large bathrooms. The third floor is a large nursery and three servants' rooms. The main stairway is black walnut and is flared at the bottom and has one landing. A winder stairwell connects the basement, first floor, and second floor in the rear wing. Most of the trim in the house is also black walnut. The original gas brass and crystal light fixtures have been electrified. The house used a central hot water heating system and the fireplaces were solely decorative. The parlor contains two extremely elaborate white marble fireplace mantles containing round arch openings with richly carved spandrels, keystones, and angular pilaster trim with high relief fruit and and foliate carvings. There was a large gray frame barn on the property that was demolished in 1912, but a replica has been constructed and serves as the visitor center and gift shop for the Minnesota Historical Society. The replica barn, built in 1970, is 1200 square feet in size and is one story in height. Ramsey purchased the site in 1850 and built a house on the site in which he lived until 1868. In 1868, the first house was moved across the street to permit the construction of the mansion. The mansion was willed to the Minnesota Historical Society in 1964, upon the death of Ramsey's grandaughter, Marion Ramsey Furness (1853-1935), who had lived in the house until her death in Ramsey County. Ramsey had lived in the house from 1872 until 1903. The 1880 federal census records indicate that Alexander Ramsey (1815- ) was the federal Secretary of War, was born in Pennsylvania to parents who also were born in Pennsylvania, was married, and was the head of a household in Washington, District of Columbia. The Washington, D.C., Ramsey household in 1880 included his wife, Anna Ramsey (1827- ,) who was born in Pennsylvania to parents who also were born in Pennsylvania, was married, and was a house keeper, a female African-American servant, Mary Davis (1819- ,) who was born in Virginia of parents who also were born in Virginia, a male African-American servant, John Black (1852- ,) who was born in Maryland to parents who also were born in Maryland, and another female servant, Lillie Black (1856- ,) who was born in Virginia of parents who also were born in Virginia. The 1880 federal census records also indicate that Alexander Ramsey (1815- ) was the ex-Governor of Minnesota, was the U. S. Minister of War, and was the head of a household in St. Paul. The St. Paul Ramsey household in 1880 included Anna Ramsey (1827- ,) of an undisclosed relationship to Alexander Ramsey, who was born in Pennsylvania, who had a father who was born in Pennsylvania and a mother who was born in New Jersey, and who was married, Hannah Croach (1825- ,) Ramsey's sister-in-law, who was born in Pennsylvania, who had a father who was born in Pennsylvania and a mother who was born in New Jersey, and who was a widow, Sophie Carlson (1841- ,) a female servant who was born in Sweden, who had parents who were both born in Sweden, and who was single, Hilda Carlson (1845- ,) a female servant who was born in Sweden, who had parents who were both born in Sweden, and who was single, Augusta Carlson (1857- ,) a female servant who was born in Sweden, who had parents who were both born in Sweden, and who was single, and John Palmer (1853- ,) a male servant who was born in Sweden, who had parents who were both born in Sweden, and who was single. The 1885 city directory indicates that Alexander Ramsey and Mrs. M. R. Furness resided at this address. The 1887 and 1889 city directories indicate that Hon. Alexander Ramsey and Mrs. Charles E. Furness resided at this address. The 1891 city directory indicates that the Honorable Alexander Ramsey, Mrs. Charles E. Furness, and Mrs. Hannah J. Cranck resided at this address. The 1893 and 1895 city directories indicate that the Honorable Alexander Ramsey and Mrs. Charles E. Furness both resided at this address. The 1906 Jubilee Manual of the House of Hope Presbyterian Church indicates that Marion (Mrs. C. E.) Furness, a member of the church since 1874, resided at this address. The 1916 and 1918 city directories indicate that Mrs. C. E. Furness and her daughters resided at this address. In 1916, Mrs. Charles E. Furness was a member of the Minnesota Historical Society and resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mrs. C. E. Furness and her daughters, Miss Anna E. R. Furness and Miss Laura Furness, all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. M. R. Furness resided at this address. Church of the Latter Day Saints genealogical records indicate that Alexander Ramsey was the son of Thomas Ramsey and Elizabeth Kelker and married Anna Earl Jenks in 1845 in St. Paul. Alexander Ramsey (1815-1903) was born in Hummelstown, near Harrisburg, Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, the son of William Ramsey (circa 1745-1811) and Margaret Burd Ramsey (circa 1745-1833,) was first employed as a clerk in the office of the register of deeds, attended Lafayette College in Easton, Pennsylvania, studied law at Dickinson College, Carlisle, Pennsylvania, in 1839, and was admitted to the bar in 1840, began the practice of law in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, campaigned for the Whig Party ticket of William Henry Harrison and John Tyler in 1840, was rewarded for that service by an appointment as the secretary of the Pennsylvania electoral college in 1840, served as chief clerk in the Pennsylvania General Assembly in 1841, was a Whig member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Pennsylvania's 14th District (Dauphin, Lebanon, and Schuykill counties) from 1843 to 1847, was the Whig Party Chairman and chief campaigner for Zachary Taylor and Millard Fillmore in 1846, was appointed by President Taylor as the first Governor of the Minnesota Territory from 1849 to 1853, practiced law and was president of the Baldwin School, now Macalester College, from 1853 to 1855, was the mayor of St. Paul in 1855, was elected the second Governor of the State of Minnesota from 1860 to 1863, negotiated land treaties with the Dakota indians, was charged with fraud in the Indian negotiations, but was subsequently exonerated by the U.S. Senate, was U.S. Senator from Minnesota from 1863 to 1875, was appointed by President Rutherford B. Hayes as U. S. Secretary of War from 1879 from 1881, was chairman of the Utah/Edmunds commission appointed to deal with the problem of polygamy from 1881 to 1886, was president of the Minnesota Historical Society from 1849 to 1863 and again from 1891 to 1903, was a delegate to the centennial celebration of the adoption of the Federal Constitution in 1887, was president of the Germania Bank of St. Paul 1889, laid the cornerstone of the current state Capitol building in 1901, and died in St. Paul. As Secretary of War in the Hayes Administration, in 1880, Ramsey was able to put principle above political convenience, when the only black cadet at West Point was found bound and beaten, demonstrating the rampant racism at the institution, and Ramsey ordered an investigation into the incident and later delivered a strong reprimand in a speech to the graduating class of 1880. No member of that graduating class, however, was denied graduation or a commission as a result of the incident. The 1880 West Point graduating class included John Y. Fillmore Blake, who served initially against Geronimo, Chatto, and the other Apache warriors in the Southwest and later became a colonel in charge of the "Irish Brigade," a group of 200 Irish miners, during the South African Boer War, John Loomis Chamberlain (1858-1948,) Inspector General of the United States Army from 1917 to 1921 and the last surviving member of his U.S. Military Academy class, Elias Chandler, Warren H. Cowles, Quartermaster of the 16th U. S. Infantry, Samuel W. Dunning ( -1915,) an intelligence officer in Hawaii in 1907, George Washington Goethals (1858-1928,) the chief engineer of the Panama Canal project, Hugh Jocelyn McGrath (1856-1899), a Wisconsonite who won the Medal of Honor for heroics during the Spanish-American War at Calamba, Luzon, Phillipine Islands, George Horace Morgan (1855-1948,) a Canadian appointed from Minnesota and a Medal of Honor winner for heroics during the 1882 Indian Wars in Arizona, Frank H. Peck, Henry Granville Sharpe (1858-1947,) a Quartermaster General of the army who supervised the buildup for World War I, Charles B. Vogdes, Benjamin S. Wever, and Johnson Chesnut Whittaker. Alexander Ramsey, the son of Thomas Ramsey and Elizabeth Kelker Ramsey and grandson of Henry Kelker and Elizabeth Greenawalt Kelker, was a member of the Minnesota Society of the Sons of the American Revolution by virtue of grandfather Alexander Ramsey, a First Lieutenant of the Fourth Pennsylvania Regiment, and great grandfathers Anthony Kelker, a Lieutenant in the Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, Associators, and Philip Lorentz Greenawalt, a Colonel in the Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, Militia, during the Revolutionary War. Anna Earl Jenks Ramsey (1826-1884) was born in Newton, Bucks County, Pennsylvania, was the daughter of Michael H. Jenks (1795-1867), who was a Pennsylvania Congressman, and Mary Ridgway Earl Jenks, married Alexander Ramsey, came to Minnesota in 1849, did sanitary work during the Civil War, and was a member of the Board of Managers of the House of Foundlings from 1877 to 1884. The couple had two sons who died in infancy and one daughter who survived childhood, Marion Ramsey (Mrs. Charles Eliot) Furness. Marion Ramsey Furness married Charles Eliot Furness (1844-1909) in 1875 and the couple had three children, Alexander Ramsey Furness (1877-1916), Anna Elliott/Earl Ramsey Furness (1876-1964,) and Laura Furness (1882-1959.) Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Alexander Ramsey Furness (1878-1916,) the married son of Marion Ramsey Furness, who was born in Pennsylvania to parents born in the United States, died in St. Joseph, Missouri, of cerebro syphilis and was buried in the Ramsey family plot in a cement vault with his head facing South. When her mother, Anna Ramsey died, Marion Ramsey Furness moved back into the mansion. Marion Ramsey Furness served on the Board of Managers of the House of Foundlings after her mother's death. The Furness daughters, Laura Ramsey Furness and Anna Ramsey Furness, lived in the house until their deaths in Ramsey County. Governor Ramsey's daughter and two granddaughters were members of The National Society of The Colonial Dames of America in Minnesota. Charles Eliot Furness received a bachelors degree from Harvard University in 1909. Charles E. Furness ( -1909) died in Olmsted County. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Charles Eliot Furness (1844-1909,) the husband of Marion R. Furness, who was born in Pennsylvania to parents born in the United States and who died of heart failure in Rochester, Minnesota, once resided at this address. President Rutherford B. Hayes was a guest in the house in 1878, upon the opening of the Minnesota State Fair. Adlai E. Stevenson, Sr., who was the Vice President under the second administration of President Grover Cleveland, also was a guest in the house in 1899. Adlai Ewing Stevenson (1835-1914) attended Illinois Wesleyan University in Bloomington, Illinois, and Centre College in Kentucky, was an Illinois lawyer who served in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1874 to 1877 and from 1878 to 1881, was First Assistant Postmaster General in President Grover Cleveland's First Administration, from 1885 to 1889, and was Vice President of the United States from 1893 to 1897. Adlai E. Stevenson, Jr., the elder Stevenson's son, was the Governor of Illinois and was the unsuccessful Democratic candidate for president in 1952 and 1956 who ran twice against Dwight David Eisenhower. John J. Summers ( -1917) died in Ramsey County. Laura Furness (1882-1959) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Furness, and died in Ramsey County. Anna Elliott Ramsey Furness (1876-1964) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Ramsey, and died in Ramsey County. The House of Foundlings was established by the Ladies Christian Union in 1869, was renamed the Protestant Home of St. Paul in 1935, and is now the Wilder Residence East, located at 735 East 7th Street in the Dayton's Bluff neighborhood. The Protestant Home of St. Paul received significant financial support from the Mardag Foundation, derived from the fortune of Agnes Ober (1887-1969) and Edgar Buchanan Ober. Edgar Buchanan Ober was a president of the Minnesota Mining & Manufacturing Company (3M) and Anna Oberg was born in poverty and was adopted when her father was unable to support her and her several siblings. The Ramsey burial plot at Oakland Cemetery includes Alexander Ramsey (1815-1903,) Anna Earl Ramsey (1826-1884,) Alexander Joules Ramsey (1846-1850,) William Henry Ramsey (1850-1851,) Charles Eliot Furness (1844-1909,) Marion Ramsey Furness (1853-1935,) Alexander Ramsey Furness (1877-1916,) Laura Furness (1832-1853,) Anna E. Ramsey Furness (1876-1904,) and Justus Cornelius Ramsey (1821-1881.) James F. Tostevin (1823- ) was born on the Isle of Jersey, Channel Islands, was educated at Exeter, Devonshire, England, moved to London, England in 1844 and learned the marble business, married Isabella/Sibylla Smallridge in 1844, emigrated to the United States in 1849, initially settled in Buffalo, New York, as superintendent of a large marble works, then settled in St. Paul in 1855, established the first marble works in Minnesota, the Minnesota Steam Marble Works, initially located at the corner of Robert Street and Seventh Streeet, and then located at 452 Robert Street in 1860, was a member of the Market Street Methodist Church in 1856, built a steam saw mill at Frontenac, Minnesota, in 1873, established the Dresbach Sandstone Company in 1881, was a trustee of the Jackson Street Methodist Episcopal Church in 1880, and was a member of the Minnesota Territorial Pioneers in 1901. The current owner of record of the property is Minnesota Historical Society. The 1930 city directory indicates that Pasquale Di Re, a laborer, his wife, Roccodalla Di Re, Cosmo Di Re, a laborer, Gaetan Di Re, a salesman, and George Di Re, a laborer, resided at the former nearby 270 East Exchange Street.

276 South Exchange Street: Forepaugh-Hammond House, Built in 1870; Italianate in style; two story former house. The structure is 8,833 square feet in area and is three stories in height. The structure currently is a restaurant with ten dining rooms, the Alexander Ramsey Room, the F. Scott Fitzgerald Room, the Floyd B. Olson Room, the Governors Room, the Johnson Room, Joseph's Parlour, the Mary Lanpher Forepaugh Room, the Pillsbury Room, the Sibley Room, and the William R. Marshall Room. Originally, it was the home of Joseph Lybrandt Forepaugh (1834-1892) and Mary Alden Lanpher Forepaugh (1843-1929.) Joseph Forepaugh ran a dry goods business which supplied military troops during the Civil War, leaving him wealthy enough to retire from the business at the age of 34. The house was built at the cost of $10,000. In 1889, he built a brick mansion at 302 Summit Avenue and moved out of this home. Joseph L. Forepaugh, the son of William Frederick Forepaugh and Mary W. Harman Forepaugh, and Mary Forepaugh had five children, Mary Lanpher Forepaugh (Mrs. Henry Sibley) Johnson (1864-1945,) Alice M. Forepaugh (1866-1946,) William Frederick Forepaugh (1871-1938,) Joseph Louis Forepaugh (1873- ,) and Edith Forepaugh (1878-1908.) General John Hammond, who had been General William Tecumseh Sherman's chief of staff during the Civil War, bought the home in 1886 and died here. In 1892, Joseph L. Forepaugh took his own life, plagued by a severe depression. The house was divided into numerous apartments, and by 1972 was considered to be beyond saving when it was purchased in 1976, was gutted and refurbished into a restaurant. The 1885 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Forepaugh and their daughters all resided at this address. The 1887 city directory indicates that Gen. and Mrs. J. H. Hammond and their daughters all resided at this address. The 1889 city directory indicates that General and Mrs. J. H. Hammond and their daughter, Ogden H. Hammond, and John J. Hammond, Jr., all resided at this address. The 1891 and 1893 city directories indicate that Mrs. J. H. Hammond and her daughters, O. H. Hammond, and J. H. Hammond all resided at this address. The 1895 city directory indicates that Mrs. J. Hammond and her daughters, J. H. Hammond, Dr. and Mrs. Burnside Foster, and Mrs. Lincoln MacVeagh all resided at this address. The 1906 Jubilee Manual of the House of Hope Presbyterian Church indicates that Sophia W. Hammond, a widow and a member of the church since 1884, and Harriet K. Hammond, a member of the church since 1891, resided at this address. The 1916 city directory indicates that F. J. Hale resided at this address. The records of the 1919-1920 Minnesota World War I Soldier's Bonus Board (#14711) indicate that Leonard Cook (1889- ,) a 1918 draftee and a Private in 351st Infantry, who was born in Olenea, Russia, moved to Minnesota in 1912, had blue eyes, dark hair, and a ruddy complexion, was 5' 4 1/8" tall, was a butcher at induction, was issued one bronze Victory button, was naturalized as a citizen in 1918, was a butcher employed by the G. J. McMillan Company after the completion of service, and was unmarried, resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Charles H. Bergren, a clerk, Edith Bergren, a hatmaker employed by Robinson Straus & Company, a wholesale millinery firm, located at Wacouta and Fifth Street, and Harry Bergren, a clerk employed by the St. Paul Book & Stationery Company, all boarded at this address and that Leonard Cook, a butcher, roomed at 276 Exchange Street South. The 1930 city directory indicates that this address was vacant. The 1906 Jubilee Manual of the House of Hope Presbyterian Church indicates that Ogden Hammond, a member of the church since 1884, resided at Superior, Wisconsin. John Henry Hammond (1833-1890) was born in New York City, was a Captain (in 1862, at the battle of Shiloh), was promoted to Major, was an Assistant Adjutant-General in the U. S. Volunteers assigned to the staff of General William T. Sherman at the Chickasaw Bayou and during the winter of 1862-1863, and was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel and then as a Brevet Brigadier General in the U. S. Volunteers in 1864. A brevet rank is an honorary title, awarded for gallant or meritorious action in time of war, but does not convey the authority, pay or prestige of the real rank. An adjutant-general was responsible for administrative details of a regiment. Brevet Brigader General John H. Hammond commanded the First Brigade of the Seventh Division of the Fourth U. S. Cavalry at the Battle of Franklin, Tennessee, on November 30, 1864, and at the Battle of Nashville, Tennessee, on December 15-16, 1864. John Henry Hammond eventually became the president of a bank in Chicago, but the Panic of 1873 forced the bank to close. President Hayes then appointed General Hammond as Inspector of Indian Agencies in 1876. John Hammond was known as "the father of Superior, Wisconsin" for his role in transforming swampland in Wisconsin into a thriving city. Hammond's wife was Sophie/Sophia Wolfe, the daughter of Nathaniel Wolfe, a former Attorney General for the State of Kentucky, and the couple had six children. In Superior, Wisconsin, General Hammond plotted early land allotments, built the first important office buildings, and brought major railways to the city to better use the natural harbor at the western end of Lake Superior. Revenue from General Hammond's real estate dealings in Superior Wisconsin, were considerable and he died leaving an estate that was valued at over one-half million dollars. Mary Wolf Hammond (1866-1920) was a daughter of General and Mrs. John Henry Hammond and was the first wife (married in 1887) of Lincoln Macveagh (1858-1929.) Ogden Haggerty Hammond (1869-1956) was born in Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky, was the son of John Henry Hammond and Sophia Vernon Wolf Hammond (1842- ,) attended Philips Exeter Academy in Exeter, New Hampshire, and Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut, was a first lieutenant in the Wisconsin National Guard, was elected alderman for the sixth ward of the City of Superior twice, married Mary Picton Stevens (1885-1915), of Hoboken, New Jersey, in 1907, operated an insurance business in Superior, Wisconsin, with Phil Stratton, moved to New York, New York, in 1908, also procured a forty-seven room New Jersey "summer cottage," was the father of Mary Hammond (1908-1958,) Millicent Hammond Fenwick (1910-1992,) the four-term New Jersey congresswoman, and Ogden H. Hammond, Jr., (1912-1976,) married Margaret/Marguerite "Daisy" McClure Howland in 1917, was the stepfather of McClure "Mac" Meredith Howland, was either a Presbyterian or a Roman Catholic, was a Republican, initially was an insurance broker, then was in the real estate business, was the president of the Broadway Improvement Company, was the president of the Hoboken Terminal Railway Company, was the vice-president of the Hoboken Land and Improvement Company, owned by his maternal grandfather, was a director of the First National Bank of Jersey City, was secretary of the New York Times, was a director of the Standard Plunger Elevator Company, served on the Bernardsville, New Jersey, Borough Council from 1912 to 1914, was a member of New Jersey state House of Assembly from 1914 to 1917, was a delegate to Republican National Convention from New Jersey in 1916 and an alternate in 1924, was treasurer of the New Jersey Republican State Committee in 1920, was appointed by President Coolidge as the U. S. Ambassador to Spain from 1925 to 1929, ran a pro-Franco committee during the Spanish Civil War and was awarded the "Sacred Heart of Jesus" medal by Ferdinand Franco. Ogden Hammond survived, but Mary P. Stevens Hammond perished, on the Lusitania when it was torpedoed and sunk by the Germans in an attack that led to American participation in World War I. Mary Hammond decided to sail on the Lusitania depite receiving a warning not to sail on the ship from her aunt, who was a friend of German Ambassador to the United States, Count Johann von Bernstorff. Both Ogden Hammond and Mary Hammond were in a lifeboat as the Lusitania began to sink, but an unccordinated effort in lowering the lifeboat caused both to be thrown into the sea, where Mary Hammond drowned and from which Ogden Hammond was rescued by the steamer Flying Fish. Ogden Hammond was the vice-chairman of the New Jersey State Board of Charities and Corrections and the vice-chairman of the Prison Inquiry Commission, headed by Dwight Morrow, father of Anne Morrow Lindbergh, was the chairman of the United States Food Administration for Somerset County, New Jersey, during World War I, and was appointed by Woodrow Wilson to chair a presidential committee formed in 1919 to reorganize the foreign service. In 1925, the Mixed Claims Commission considering claims against Germany for the sinking of the Lusitania awarded Ogden Hammond $17,970 as a Lusitania survivor, his children $5,000 each for the death of their mother, and Mary Hammond's estate $31,143. Ogden Hammond was buried at the Oakland Cemetery in St. Paul. Mary Stevens Hammond, a daughter of John Stevens ( -1895) and Mary Marshall McGuire Stevens ( -1904,) was born in Hoboken, New Jersey, met Ogden Hammond through one of his Yale University friends and married him in 1907, and was a member of the Colony Club. John Henry Hammond, Jr., was a senior member of the law firm of Hines, Rearick, Dorr & Hammond, was a partner in the firm of Brown Brothers & Company, bankers, and was a director of ten corporations who married Emily Thorn Vanderbilt Sloane (1874- ), the daughter of William Douglas Sloane (1845-1915), the furniture man, and the granddaughter of William H. Vanderbilt. John Henry Hammond, Jr., and Emily Hammond had five children, Emily Hammond (Mrs. John Merryman) Franklin, Adele Hammond, Alice Frances Hammond, Rachel Hammond, and John Henry Hammond II. John Henry Hammond II (1910-1987) became a theatrical producer, was the Columbia A&R executive who brought Bessie Smith, Billie Holiday, Big Joe Turner, Bob Dylan, and Bruce Springsteen to public attention, and was the father of the musician John Hammond. Mary "Ma" Hammond married Count Ghino Roberti, a diplomat from Italy to Mexico, in 1931. Mary Hammond died of a radiation overdose while being treated for cancer. Millicent Vernon Hammond married aviator Hugh McLeod Fenwick in 1932, after his divorce from Dorothy Ledyard, the daughter of the president of the New York Stock Exchange, in 1931, but her parents did not approve of her marrying a divorced man, and the couple separated in 1938 and then divorced in 1945, after two children. Millicent Hammond Fenwick eventually purchased the Bernardsville, New Jersey, mansion. Millicent Hammond Fenwick attended Foxcroft School, Middleburg, Virginia, from 1923 to 1925, sold to Yale University previously lost/missing Lewis and Clark papers from John Hammond's desk that had been stored in the attic at Sophie Vernon Hammond Foster's residence in St. Paul after extended federal court litigation, attended Columbia University and the New School for Social Research in New York City, in 1933 and 1942, wrote for Vogue magazine for 14 years, was a member of the board of education of Bernardsville, New Jersey, from 1938 to 1947, was a member of the Bernardsville, New Jersey, Borough Council from 1958 to 1964, was a member of the New Jersey Committee of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights from 1958 to 1974, became involved in the Civil Rights movement in the 1960's, was a member of the New Jersey General Assembly from 1970 to 1973, served as the director of the New Jersey Consumer Affairs Department from 1973 to 1974, was elected to Congress at the age of 64, but later lost a bid for the U. S. Senate seat from New Jersey, and was the ambassador to the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization from 1983 to 1987. Ogden Hammond, Jr., was educated at St. Paul's School in Concord, New Hampshire. Burnside Foster (1861-1917) was the author of "Leprosy and the Hawaiian Annexation" in the North American Review in September, 1898, and of "Some problems of preventive medicine" in 1903. Dr. Burnside Foster (1861-1917) was born in Worcester, Massachusetts, the son of the Honorable Dwight Foster (1828-1884) and Henrietta Perkins Baldwin Foster (1830-1910,) graduated from Yale University in 1882, received a medical degree from Harvard University in 1886, interned at the Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, studied in Vienna, London, Paris, and Dublin in 1887, married Sophie Vernon Hammond (1868- ) in 1894 in St. Paul, was the president of the Ramsey County Medical Society in 1906, was a member of the Minnesota State Medical Association, was a member of the American Medical Association, was a member of the American Dermatological Association, was the editor of the St. Paul Medical Journal from 1899 until 1917, was a clinical professor of dermatology and a lecturer on the history of medicine at the University of Minnesota Medical School, and officed at the Lowry Arcade in 1907. Burnside Foster and Sophie Vernon Hammond Foster had three children, Harriet Burnside Foster (1895-,) Elizabeth Hammond Foster (1899- ,) and Roger Sherman Foster (1901- .) Sophie Vernon Hammond Foster (1867- ,) the daughter of General John H. Hammond and Sofia Vernon Wolfe Hammond, was born in Cillicothe, Missouri, was educated at Sarah Porter's School in Farmington, Connecticut, was involved in the Homes of Hope, was a member of the board of trustees of the Protestant Orphan Asylum, was a Presbyterian, was a member of the Colonial Dames, was a member of Women's Welfare Society, was a member of the Century Club, was a member of the St. Paul Town & Country Club, resided at 117 Farrington Avenue in 1915, and was listed on the Woman's who's who of America: a biographical dictionary of contemporary women of the United States and Canada in 1915. Dwight Foster, of Worcester, Massachusetts, graduated from Yale College in 1848, and was admitted to the bar in 1849, was the Massachusetts state attorney general from 1861 to 1864, and was a justice of Massachusetts state Supreme Court from 1866 to 1869. Lincoln MacVeagh (1858-1929) was the second son of Wayne MacVeagh and Letty Lewis MacVeagh, was married twice, practically deserted his first wife and their children, who dropped the MacVeagh name, and was supported financially by his father and by his brother, Charles MacVeagh (1860-1931.) Lincoln MacVeagh (1890-1972) was born in Narragansett Pier, Rhode Island, was the son of Charles MacVeagh and Fanny Davenport Rogers MacVeagh, graduated from the Groton School in 1909 and Harvard University, magna cum laude, in 1913, studied languages at the Sorbonne from 1913 to 1914, married Margaret Charlton Lewis ( -1947) in 1917, was a member of the American Expeditionary Force in World War I, was a director of the Henry Holt Company from 1918 to 1923, founded the Dial Press in 1923, was the author, with Margaret MacVeagh, of Greek Journey, was a diplomat serving as Minister to Greece from 1933 to 1941, United States Minister to Iceland in 1941, Minister to the Union of South Africa in 1942, Ambassador to the exiled Greek and Yugoslav Governments in Cairo from 1943 to 1944, Ambassador to Greece from 1944 to 1947, Ambassador to Portugal from 1948 to 1952, and Ambassador to Spain from 1952 to 1953, married Mrs. Virginia Ferrante Coats in 1955, conducted excavations beneath the Acropolis and made archeological contributions to the National Museum in Athens, and died at Adelphi, Maryland. Wayne MacVeagh (1833-1917) was a graduate of Yale University, was a lawyer in West Chester, Pennsylvania, married Letty Lewis, was Chester County, Pennsylvania, district attorney from 1859 to 1864, was the ambassador to the Ottoman Empire, was U.S. attorney general under Garfield from 1880 to 1881, and was ambassador to Italy from 1894 to 1897. The Hammond burial plot at Oakland Cemetery includes John H. Hammond (1833-1890,) his wife, Sophia Wolfe Hammond (1842-1923,) his daughter, Ella Ross Hammond (1873-1873,) Ogden H. Hammond (1869-1956,) and Hamet K. Hammond (1875-1974.) Joseph Louis Forepaugh (1873- ,) the son of Joseph L. Forepaugh and Mary Forepaugh, graduated from the Sheffield Scientific School of Yale University in 1896, was a railway official, entered the railway service in 1896 as a clerk to the auditor of disbursements of the Great Northern RailRoad at St. Paul, was a timekeeper and material clerk employed by the Eastern Railway of Minnesota at West Superior, Wisconsin from 1897 until 1898, was the assistant to roadmaster of the Cascade division of the Great Northern Railroad at Everett, Washington, in 1898, was a special clerk employed by the Montana Central RailRoad at Great Falls, Montana, from 1898 until 1899, was the chief clerk to the assistant general superintendent employed by the Montana Central RailRoad at Great Falls, Montana, in 1899, was the chief clerk to the general superintendent of the Great Northern RailRoad at St. Paul from 1899 until 1900, was the assistant division superintendent of the Great Northern RailRoad at Grand Forks, North Dakota from 1900 until 1902, was the division superintendent of the Great Northern RailRoad at Breckenridge, Minnesota after 1902. The current owner of record of the property is Restaurants No Limit Inc., located Minnetonka, Minnesota.

284 South Exchange Street: Knox-Austin-Rogers House, built in 1885 (1874 according to Ramsey County tax records;) Queen Anne in style, James Knox Taylor and Mathew/Matthew Craig, architects. The building is a two story, 4130 square foot, ten room, three bedroom, three bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Henry M. Knox resided at this address from 1886 to 1890. This was the second home of Henry Martin/Martyn Knox (1830/1831-1904,) the son of John Jay Knox, and Charlotte B. "Lottie" Cozzens/Cozzenz Knox (1857-1904) in the Irvine Park neighborhood, with the first at 26 Irvine Park. The 1887 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. H. M. Knox and their daughter all resided at this address. The 1887 and 1889 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. H. M. Knox and their daughter all resided at this address. The 1891 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Horace Austin, their daughter, H. W. Austin, and Mr. and Mrs. H. M. Knox all resided at this address. In 1892, former Governor Horace Austin and his wife, Lena Morrill Austin, came to live with the Knoxes. In 1895, William Edward Rogers bought the house. The 1893 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. T. Ozmun resided at this address. The 1895 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Rogers, H. V. Rogers, N. P. Rogers, Dr. J. T. Rogers, and E. B. Graves all resided at this address. The 1902 University of Minnesota Alumni Record indicates that John T. Rogers, an 1891 Medical School graduate and a physician and surgeon, resided at this address. The 1909 University of Minnesota Catalogue indicates that John T. Rogers, M.D., resided at this address. The 1916 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Rogers and their daughter all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Josephine Landaas resided at this address. John T. Rogers, M.D., was a clinical instructor in surgery of the University of Minnesota in 1899, was a member of the Minnesota Medical Association in 1921, and retired as an associate professor of surgery from the University of Minnesota in 1936. Henry Martin Knox (1830-1904) was born in New York, graduated from Hamilton College in Clinton, New York, in 1851, became an employee of the Bank of Vernon, New York, in 1854, became an employee of the Merchants Bank on Wall Street in New York City, moved to Minnesota in 1857, married Charlotte Cozzens in 1857, was the assistant postmaster in St. Paul from 1858 until 1860, became the cashier of the First National Bank of St. Paul, was a member of the House of Hope Presbyterian Church, was the secretary of the Minnesota state Presbyterian convention in 1867, was an organizer and early promoter of Macalester College, and was a delegate to the Presbyterian Council at Edinborough, Scotland, in 1877. Henry M. Knox was a partner of John Jay Knox, Jr. (1828-1892,) a future Comptroller of the Currency, in the private banking firm J. Jay Knox & Company in St. Paul. Charlotte Knox and Henry Knox moved to Minneapolis later that year and they eventually left Minnesota. Henry M. Knox was the vice president of the Security Bank of Minnesota, established in Minneapolis in 1878. Henry Martyn Knox and Charlotte B. Cozzens Knox had three children, Carolyn Knox, Henry Cozzens Knox, and John Paul Knox. In 1894, Henry M. Knox was a delegate to the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in Saratoga, New York, and was a signatory of a minority report on a proposal to allow the General Assembly to veto the election of trustees or directors. Henry M. Knox was appointed the Public Examiner of Minnesota from 1878 until 1888 and gave an address, "The Office of Public Examiner, a Minnesota notion," before the American Bankers’ Association at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in 1887. The Office of the Public Examiner was created by Laws of Minnesota 1878, Chapter 83, was appointed by the governor for a three-year term, was required to be an accountant, was charged with supervising the books and financial accounts of the state's public, educational, charitable, penal, and reformatory institutions, was empowered to enforce a correct and uniform system of bookkeeping by state and county treasurers and auditors, and was required to visit, without prior notice, the banking, savings, and other moneyed corporations created under the laws of the state and examining their financial condition. The public examiner was made ex officio superintendent of banks by Laws of Minnesota 1887, Chapter 183. The obligation for the visitation and examination of state banks and other financial institutions was separated from the public examiner's office by Laws of Minnesota 1909, Chapter 201. A Department of the Public Examiner was created by Laws of Minnesota 1913, Chapter 555, and its powers were expanded to include supervision over the accounts of public offices, institutions, properties, industries and improvements of the state, counties, cities, school districts, towns, and villages, supervision over the financial records and transactions of public boards, associations, and societies supported by public funds, and supervision over corporations and companies required to pay state taxes on gross earnings. Under Laws of Minnesota 1939, Chapter 431, the public examiner’s department and the board of audit were combined. The powers of the public examiner relating to audits of cities, villages, towns, counties, school districts, and other local governmental units were transferred to the state auditor and the powers relating to the state and its departments, agencies, boards, and commissions were transferred to the legislative auditor by Laws of Minnesota 1973, Chapter 492. William Edward Rogers (1835- ) was the son of Nathaniel Purviance Rogers (1807-1863) and Nancy A. Moran Rogers (1813-1846,) was born in Cane Ridge, Bourbon County, Kentucky, was educated at Bethany College, Virginia, and was one of the founders of the Central Christian Church. His wife, Margaret Kerfoot Varnon/Vernon Rogers, was president of St. Paul's first woman's suffrage organization. Margaret Kerfoot Varnon/Vernon Rogers (1840- ) was born in Paris, Kentucky, was the daughter of Hubbard Vernon/Varnon and Elizabeth Spears Vernon/Varnon, married William Edward Rogers in 1857, moved to St. Paul in 1887, and was a temperance worker. The couple had eight children, Hubbard Vernon/Varnon Rogers (1858- ,) Benjamin F. Rogers (1860-1890,) Elizabeth Moran Rogers (1862- ,) Nathaniel P. Rogers (1864- ,) John T. Rogers (1867- ,) William E. Rogers (1869-1892,) Maggie Kate Rogers (1872-1873,) and Francis Holt Rogers (1874-1877.) Benjamin F. Rogers married Kate Newton Wallace, who was the daughter of John B. Wallace and Lucy Simms Wallace. Elizabeth Moran Rogers married Samuel Magoffin, who was the son of Kentucky Governor Beriah Magoffin and Ann Shelby Magoffin. John T. Rogers was educated at Kentucky University, graduated with honor from the Medical Department of the University of Minnesota in 1890, took special courses in surgery at Edinburgh and Vienna, and became a prominent surgeon in St. Paul. Beriah Magoffin was Kentucky Governor 1859-1862, a Southern sympathizer who disagreed with secession, refused requests for troops from both U. S. President Abraham Lincoln and C. S. A. President Jefferson Davis, and declared the state to be neutral. Nathaniel P. Rogers (1864- ,) the son of William Edward Rogers and Margaret K. Vernon/Varnon Rogers, was born in Georgetown, Kentucky, married Harriette H. Hodges in 1906, was educated in the public schools of Versailles, Kentucky, from 1875 until 1878, attended Crenshaw's Private School, Versailles, Kentucky, from 1878 until 1882, graduated from Kentucky University in 1886, was involved in real estate in St. Paul from 1886 until 1888, taught school in St. Paul in 1888, was a commission merchant, operated a live stock commission business at South St. Paul after 1888, was the secretary and treasurer of Rogers & Rogers, live stock commission merchants, after 1888, was a member of the board of directors of the St. Paul Cattle Loan Company, was the city assessor of South St. Paul from 1889 until 1892, was a member of the Board of St. Paul School Inspectors from 1903 until 1906, was a member of the St. Paul Commercial Club, was a member of the St. Paul Town & Country Club, resided at 89 Kent Street in 1907, and officed in South St. Paul in 1907. James Knox Taylor was the Supervising Architect of the U. S. Treasury Department between 1897 and 1912 and was primarily responsible for a return to classicism in designs for public buildings. Mathew Craig was born in Scotland in 1812, came to St. Paul in 1854, was a carpenter, builder and house mover for 32 years. Mathew Craig married Agnes Craig and they had seven children. Horace Austin (1831-1905) was born in Canterbury, Windham County, Connecticut, was a Republican politician and a lawyer, settled in St. Peter, Minnesota, in 1854, married Mary Lena Morrill/Angeline Morrell, daughter of Asa Morrell (1799-1867) and Cynthia Dow Morrell (1805- ) in Augusta/Manchester, Maine, in 1859, was a Captain in the First Regiment of the Minnesota Mounted Rangers during the Civil War, was a district court judge in Sixth Minnesota Judicial District from 1865 until 1869, was Governor of Minnesota from 1870 until 1874 as an anti-Ramsey faction Republican, defeating Ignatius Donnelly at the 1870 Republican Convention, then beating George L. Otis, a St. Paul lawyer and Democrat, in 1870, and subsequently Democrat Winthrop Young in 1872, was appointed by President Grant as Third Auditor of the United States Treasury in the mid-1870's, was appointed by Governor A. R. McGill a member of the Minnesota Railroad & Warehouse Commission in 1877, was appointed register of the United States land office in Fargo, Dakota Territory, engaged in mining in California, resided on Lake Minnetonka at the end of his life, died in Hennepin County, and was buried in Oakland Cemetery after cremation. In 1871, Governor Austin vetoed a bill that would have divided up between the various railroads in the State one half million acres of land which had been given by the federal government to finance internal improvements. In 1873, $112,000 in State funds were found missing from the State General Fund, known as the Great Defalcation, largely related to a loan that Emil Munch, a former State Treasurer, had made to himself and which were treated as cash by his successor and his father-in-law, William Seeger, who eventually tried to resign, at Austin's urging, but was ultimately impeached, convicted, and removed from office, but no criminal prosecution was made. Munch's bondsmen, including Horace Thompson, the president of the First National Bank of St. Paul, Charles Scheffer of St. Paul, president of the First National Bank of Stillwater, and Maurice Auerbach, of the wholesale dry goods firm of Auerbach, Finch & Scheffer, eventually made the treasury whole. Horace Austin and Angeline Austin had six children, Helen Horace Austin (a teacher at Central High School, St. Paul,) Leonora Austin (eventually Leonora Hamlin,) Alice Austin, Ida W. Austin ( -1888,) Herbert Austin (1869-1953,) and Mabel Austin (married to Dr. Ernest Southard, a professor at the Harvard Medical College, Boston.) Herbert Austin was a purchasing agent for the city of St. Paul in 1916 and 1934 and for the state of Minnesota in 1925 and 1931 and was also employed by the Northern Pacific Railway Company during his career. The Austin burial plot at Oakland Cemetery includes the graves of Horace Austin (1831-1905,) Lena Morrill Austin (1835-1910,) Alice Austin (1862-1933,) Ida Austin (1865-1888,) Helen H. Austin (1875-1961,) and Herbert W. Austin (1869-1953.) John T. Rogers (1868-1938) was educated at the Kentucky University, was graduated with honor from the Medical Department of the University of Minnesota, was a member of the Minnesota Valley Medical Association, was president of the Minnesota Academy of Medicine, was a president of the Minnesota Medical Association, was a president of the Ramsey Medical Association, was a fellow in the American College of Surgeons, was the chief of the medical staff of the Charles T. Miller Hospital in St. Paul, was a clinical instructor in surgery at the University of Minnesota Medical School in 1899, and was an Associate Professor of Surgery at the University of Minnesota Medical School who retired in 1936. Herbert W. Austin ( -1953) died in Ramsey County and Horace William Austin ( -1950) died in St. Louis County, Minnesota. Emil Munch ( -1925) died in Ramsey County. The last sale of this property was in 1993 and the sale price was $199,000. The current owners of record of the property are Calvin W. Clark and Phyllis J. Clark. The 1885 city directory indicates that Hon. and Mrs. James Gilfillan resided at the former nearby 287 South Exchange Street. The 1887 city directory indicates that Hon. and Mrs. James Gilfillan and James S. Gilfillan all resided at the former nearby 287 Exchange Street South. The 1902 University of Minnesota Alumni Record indicates that James Stirling Gilfillan, an 1897 Medical School graduate and a physician, resided at the former nearby 287 South Exchange Street. The 1906 Jubilee Manual of the House of Hope Presbyterian Church indicates that Webster Wheelock, a member of the church since 1885, resided at the nearby former 287 South Exchange Street. The 1909 University of Minnesota Catalogue indicates that James S. Gilfillan, M.D., a clinical instructor in medicine, resided at the former nearby 287 South Exchange Street. The records of the 1919-1920 Minnesota World War I Soldier's Bonus Board (#32304) indicate that Frank M. Jelacic (1892- ,) a 1918 draftee and a Private in the 55th Infantry, who was born in Stampfen, Hungaria, moved to Minnesota in 1915, had blue eyes, brown hair, and a light complexion, was 5' 8" tall, was a lumber scaler at induction, served in the American Expeditionary Force in France, was an order clerk employed by Farwell, Ozmun, Kirk & Company after the completion of service, and was married, resided at the nearby former 287 South Exchange Street. The 1920 city directory indicates that Susie Beisang, the widow of Alf J. Beisang, resided at the former nearby 287 South Exchange Street and that William Cardin, a laborer, boarded at the former nearby 287 South Exchange Street. The 1930 city directory indicates that Andrew Jensen and Albert Zaspel, a repairman employed by the Minnesota Transfer RailRoad, and his wife, Suzie Zaspel, all resided at the former nearby 287 South Exchange Street. Elizabeth Jelacic was the wife of Frank Jelacic in 1918. James S. Gilfillan was an associate professor of medicine at the University of Medicine in 1898 and was James J. Hill's personal physician. [See note on James Knox Taylor.] [See note on Farwell, Ozmun, Kirk & Company for 406 Maple Street.] [See note on Dr. James S. Gilfillan for 708 Goodrich Avenue.] [See note for Minnesota Transfer RailRoad.]

288 South Exchange Street: George Hess House; Built in 1904 (1905 according to Ramsey County tax records); Queen Anne/Mildly Italianate in style. The building is a two story, 2084 square foot, nine room, three bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, frame house. This house replaced a house on this site built by Hiram Rogers in 1858 and moved to another site in 1881. From 1881 to 1885, this site was then part of the Forepaugh formal garden. The lot was bought by George Henry Hess (1873-1954) in 1904, who built this two story frame house on the property, as well as a one and one-half story stable for the six horses which he used in his coal business. The 1930 city directory indicates that George Hess, his wife, Frances Hess, and Agnes Jansen, a stenographer, all resided at this address. Jim Steven resided at this address in 1999. George Hess, a St. Paul accountant, grew up in Omaha, Nebraska, was the comptroller of the Great Northern Railway Company from 1920 to 1946, was the trustee of the bankrupt Nelson Mining Company, an iron mining company, from 1936 to 1941, was associated with the Cottonwood Coal Company, a Great Northern RailRoad subsidiary located in Montana,and was a member of the Dime Novel Round-Up's Happy Hour Brotherhood from 1938 until 1954. George Henry Hess, Jr., made a bequest of a collection of 50,000 "five and dime" novels, story papers, series books, pulps and comic books to the University of Minnesota Library in 1954. The George H. Hess collection, a division of the University of Minnesota Library's Special Collections, includes an assortment of 19th-century dreadfuls, bloods, weeklies, and halfpenny parts from the period between 1840 and the early 20th century. The Hess Collection has grown with additional donations by Charles Messecar, Charles Bragin, Herbert Leirstein, and Edward LeBlanc and currently contains approximately 100,000 items. The University of Minnesota Library also has a three volume travelogue containing a detailed story of a Summer, 1928, vacation automobile trip written by Worth G. Read and George H. Hess, Jr., typed by John A. Tauer, with a picture section made by Virginia Peterson, and bound and distributed by Vernon P. Turnburke. George H. Hess ( -1954) died in Ramsey County. His wife, Cora Riland Hess (1898-1946,) had an interest in astrology. His brother, Fred E. Hess (1871-1946,) was a civil engineer in Texas. His brother-in-law, James L. Riland (1857/1864-1936/1944,) was involved in journalism and in mining in Colorado. James L. Riland was born in Pennsylvania, was a printer for the Dubuque Herald, moved to Colorado in 1876, was the foreman and a reporter for the Leadville Herald and for the Leadville Democrat, was a compositor on the Colorado Springs Gazette in 1877, began collecting what is considered to be the finest mineral collection amassed in Colorado in the 19th Century, founded the Glenwood Echo in 1885, operated the White River Review in Meeker, Colorado, from 1902 to 1934, and died of a heart attack. James Monroe Riland was the father of Cora Riland Hess, James L. Riland, Ida May Riland, and six other children, left Iowa, moved to Colorado to be a miner, was murdered in 1888 in Colorado, and is buried in the Linwood Cemetery in Glenwood Springs, Colorado, the same cemetery in which John Henry "Doc" Holliday (1851-1887) is buried. Rilandite, a mixture of aluminum, chromium, silicon, hydrogen, and oxygen, was named for James L. Riland. Hiram Rogers (1806-1879,) the son of Hezekiah Rogers, was born near Doylestown, Pennsylvania, apprenticed in the tanning and currying business in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, moved to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1827 and engaged in the Morocco leather dressing business, married Hannah Dice ( -1974) in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1827, moved to Zanesville, Ohio, in 1836 and engaged in the wholesale boot and shoe trade, returned to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1855, and established a wholesale boot and shoe business, moved to St. Paul in 1856, erected a warehouse in Wabasha, Minnesota, in 1857, invested in real estate, operated a wholesale boot and shoe business, was associated with other business interests, was a Baptist, was a member of the St. Paul Chamber of Commerce, was the treasurer of the Chamber of Commerce in 1877, and died in St. Paul. Hiram Rogers and Hannah Dice Rogers were the parents of four children, William D. Rogers, Mrs. C. L. Wood, Mrs. J. B. Tarbox, and Mrs. D. W. Wellman. Hiram Rogers was the son of Hezekiah Rogers, a Scotch immigrant, who settled in Plumstead Township, Bucks County, Pennsylvania, before 1800. William D. "Billy" Rogers (1830- ,) the son of Hiram Rogers and Hannah Dice Rogers, was born in Zanesville, Ohio, moved to St. Paul in 1856, was associated with his father's businesses, was a mail agent on the Duluth road, was the secretary of the St. Paul Chamber of Commerce for two terms, was an inn keeper, was a Pullman car conductor, and eventually moved to California. The property was last sold for $188,500 and that sale occurred in 1998. The current owners of record of the property are James G. Stevens and Ruth E. Stevens. The 1887 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. N. P. Langford resided at the former nearby 291 Exchange Street South. The 1916 city directory indicates that Mrs. Clara W. Langford resided at the former nearby 291 Exchange Street South and that George Regelsberger resided at the former nearby 299 Exchange Street South. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mrs. Clara W. Langford resided at the former nearby 291 Exchange Street South, that Mr. and Mrs. L. W. Dohm resided at the former nearby 297 Exchange Street South, and that George Regelsberger resided at the nearby former 299 South Exchange Street. The 1920 city directory indicates that Walter F. Benson, a draftsman employed by Brown & Bigelow, Inc., Charles Bryant, Clinton R. Bryant, a barber employed by Frank Hess, John Chenery, a foreman employed by the St. Paul Hotel, and Melvin Cheney, a machinist employed by the Joerns Mohr Corporation, all resided at the former nearby 297 Exchange Street South and that John Cheney boarded at the former nearby 297 Exchange Street South. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mrs. C. W. Langford resided at the former nearby 291 Exchange Street South. The 1930 city directory indicates that John Irestone, his wife, Rose Irestone, and Mildred Irestone, a helper, resided at the Montana Apartments located at the former nearby 297 South Exchange Street and that William E. Pickens resided at the former nearby 299 South Exchange Street. John Irestone ( -1930) and John Irestone ( -1933) died in Ramsey County. William E. Pickens ( -1950) died in Todd County, Minnesota. [See note for the Nathaniel Pitt Langford for 30 Irvine Park.]

300 South Exchange Street: Built in 1884. The frame building is a multi-unit condominium structure. Unit 1/00001 is 1056 square feet in area and has four rooms, two bedrooms and one bathroom, which last sold in 1996 for $83,000, and which is currently owned by Kristi M. St. Germain. Unit B1 is 1076 square feet in area and has one bedroom and one bathroom, which last sold in 2006 for $155,000, which was previously owned by Patrice M. Polta, and which is currently owned by Tina M. LeMay. Unit 3 is 1875 square feet in area and has four rooms, two bedrooms, and one bathroom, which last sold in 1999 for $128,000, and which is currently owned by Patrice M. Polta. The 1930 city directory indicates that George F. Eitel, an engineer, and his wife, Pearl Eitel, resided at the former nearby 301 South Exchange Street. George F. Eitel (1880-1955) was born outside of Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. Pearl Mary Eitel (1887-1964) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Nobel, and died in Ramsey County.

302 South Exchange Street: Holcombe-Averill-Jaggard House; Built in the late 1870's (1884 according to Ramsey County tax records,) three story French Second Empire frame house in style, with concave Mansard roof. The frame building is now a multi-unit condominium building. Unit 00001 is 1640 square feet in area and has four rooms, two bedrooms, and two bathrooms, which last sold in 1998 for $130,000, and which is currently owned by Cheryl L. Erickson. Unit 00002 is 1640 square feet in area and has four rooms, two bedrooms, and two bathrooms, which last sold in 1998 for $139,900, and which is currently owned by Margaret A. Hartfel. Unit G1 is a detached one car frame garage which last sold in 1996 for $80,000, and which is currently owned by Tina M. LeMay, who resides at 300 South Exchange Street. Unit G4 is a detached one car frame garage, built in 1884, which is currently owned by Kristi M. St. Germain, who resides at 300 South Exchange Street. Unit G5 is a detached one car frame garage, built in 1884, which is currently owned by Lynda K. Petrie. Unit G7 is a detached one car frame garage, built in 1884, which last sold in 1999 for $127,900, and which was previously owned by John F. McCarthy and which is currently owned by Peyton J. Fleming and Shayna M. Fleming, who reside at 304 South Exchange Street. Unit G8 is a detached one car frame garage, built in 1884, which is currently owned by Kim Dowell. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Edwin V. Holcombe resided at this address from 1882. The house apparently was named, in part, for William Holcombe, in part, for former Congressman John Thomas Averill, and, in part, for Edwin Ames Jaggard. The 1885 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. E. V. Holcombe and their daughters, William S. Holcombe, and Edward R. Holcombe resided at this address. The 1887 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. E. V. Holcombe and their daughter, William S. Holcombe, and Edwin R. Holcombe all resided at this address. The 1889 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. John T. Averill and Mrs. W. H. H. Stowell all resided at this address. The 1891 city directory indicates that Mrs. John T. Averill and her daughter all resided at this address. The 1893 and 1895 city directories indicate that Mrs. John T. Averill, her daughter, and Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Jaggard all resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Caroline H. Bateman, a clerk employed by the Great Northern RailRoad, Edward Berkovitz, a clerk employed by H. C. Boyeson Company, Hyman Berkovitz, a clerk employed by Michaud Brothers, Morris Berkovitz, a helper employed by the American Railway Express, and Marcelle Choquard, a cook, all boarded at this address, that Frank Berkovitz, an elevator operator, and Frank Burkovitz, an elevator operator employed by the Mannheimer Brothers, both resided at this address, and that M. A. Darst, a carpenter employed by the Wells Brothers Construction Company, roomed at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that the residents at the apartment house located at this address were Michael J. Bolin, a glassworker at the Ford Motor Company, and his wife, Ella Bolin, (Apartment #0,) Joseph Kashnick, a cook employed by the Northern Pacific RailRoad, and his wife, Alice Kashnick (Apartment #1,) Mrs. Josephine Davidson, an operator at the Star Garment Manufacturing Company (Apartment #2,) and Arch Abbott (Apartment #5.) The 1930 city directory indicates that Apartments # 3, #4, #6,and #7 were vacant. Edwin Van Buren Holcombe (1834-1899,) the son of William Holcombe (1804-1870) and Martha Wilson Holcombe (1809-183?,) was formerly of Dubuque, Iowa, moved to Minnesota with his parents in 1839, resided in Taylor's Falls, Minnesota, and then in Stillwater, Minnesota, married Sara Odele Soulard (1834- ,) the daughter of James Soulard and Eliza Hunt Soulard, in 1856, moved to St. Paul in 1870, was the captain of a Mississippi River steamboat, then operated a hotel, was the general manager of a line of steamers on the Red River of the North, running to Winnipeg, the Winnipeg & Western Transportation Company, became the head of the Northwest Fuel Company, and died in St. Paul. Edwin V. Holcombe and Sara Odele/Adele Sarah Soulard, of Galena, Illinois, had three children, Edwin Russell Holcombe (1857- ,) Adel Eliza Holcombe (1859- ,) and William Soulard Holcombe (1862- .) Edwin R. Holcombe, the son of Edwin V. Holcombe and Adele Sarah Soulard Holcombe, the grandson of William Holcombe (1804-1870) and Martha Wilson Holcombe (1809-183?,) the great grandson of Emley Holcombe and Mary Skillman Holcombe, and the great grandson of James G. Soulard and Eliza Hunt Soulard, was a member of the Minnesota Society of the Sons of the American Revolution by virtue of great great grandfather of Richard Holcombe, a Private in New Jersey Militia, and great grandfather of Thomas Hunt, a Brigade Major in the Massachusetts Continental Troops, during the Revolutionary War. William Holcombe (1804-1870) was born in Lambertville, New Jersey, was a resident of Stillwater, Washington County, Minnesota, first married Martha Wilson, was the secretary of the first territorial organizing committee, later married Henrietta King Clendenin in 1847, was Receiver of the Land Office at Stillwater, Minnesota, was engaged in steamboating and lumbering, was a member of the Minnesota Constitutional Convention representing Stillwater, Minnesota (District 1,) in 1857, was the Minnesota's first territorial Surveyor General (the government official that oversaw all lumbering activities on the river, settling disputes, counting board feet of lumber and registering log marks,) was the first Lieutenant Governor of Minnesota from 1858 to 1860, was a member of the State Normal School Board, was an organizer of the First Church of Stillwater, was a Mason, was the president of the Minnesota Bible Society, was the president of the Minnesota Sabbath School Association, was mayor of Stillwater in 1870, died in office of apoplexy, and was buried at Fairview Cemetery. John Thomas Averill (1823/1825-1889) was born in Alna, Lincoln County, Maine, a son of John Averill and Harriet Averill, attended Kent Hill College in Maine, graduated from the Maine Wesleyan Seminary at Readfield, Maine, in 1846, moved to northern Pennsylvania in 1852, moved to Minnesota in 1857, settled in Lake City, Wabasha County, Minnesota, was a Minnesota state senator representing Wabasha County (12th District) from 1858 to 1862, was a lieutenant colonel and a colonel in the Sixth Minnesota Regiment from 1862 to 1865, was in lumbering, grain, wholesale paper (as Averill, Carpenter & Company,) and stationery, was a member of the Republican National Committee from Minnesota from 1868 to 1880, moved to St. Paul, was a Republican member of the U. S. Congress from Minnesota from 1871 to 1875 (Second District, 1871-1873, and Third District, 1873-1875,) died in St. Paul, and was interred in Oakland Cemetery. John Averill married Hannah E. Atkinson and the couple had three children, Emelyn Averill (Mrs. William H. H.) Stowell, Mary Ellen Averill Drake, and Anna M. Averill (Mrs. Edwin Ames) Jaggard. William Henry Harrison Stowell (1840-1922) was born in Windsor, Vermont, attended the public schools in Boston, graduated from Boston Latin School in 1860, engaged in mercantile pursuits, moved to Virginia in 1865, was elected as a Republican to the U. S. Congress from 1871 to 1877, was the author of The Stowell Genealogy; A Record of the Descendants of Samuel Stowell of Hingham, Massachusetts, was a delegate to the Republican National Convention in 1876, moved to Appleton, Wisconsin, in 1880, and engaged in paper manufacturing, moved to Duluth, Minnesota, in 1886 and engaged in paper and steel manufacturing, was the president of the Manufacturers Bank of West Duluth from 1889 to 1895, was a correspondent in Paris, France, for various newspapers, moved to Amherst, Massachusetts, in 1914, died in Amherst, and was interred at Woodlawn Cemetery, Bronx, New York. Edwin Ames Jaggard (1859-1911) was born in Altoona, Blair County, Pennsylvania, was the son of Clement Jaggard (1823-1890) and Anna/Annie Jane Wright Jaggard (1822-1895,) prepared for college under Professor Stewart at Hollidaysburg, Pennsylvania, graduated from Dickinson College, Carlisle, Pennsylvania, in 1879, received a master's degree from Dickinson College in 1882, received a law degree from the University of Pennsylvania in 1882, received a doctorate in law from the University of Pennsylvania in 1904, was one of the founders of the Sharswood Law Club, moved to St. Paul in 1882, was admitted to the practice of law in Minnesota, was in an active legal practice until 1898, roomed with architect Cass Gilbert and lawyer William Lightner in downtown St. Paul while a bachelor, was married in 1890 to Anna May Averill, the daughter of General John T. Averill, was a jurist, was a district judge in Minnesota for the Second District (Ramsey County) from 1899 to 1904, was a justice of Minnesota state Supreme Court from 1904 to 1911, succeeded Senator Cushman K. Davis as lecturer in the St. Paul Medical College on medical jurisprudence in 1887, was on the faculty of the University of Minnesota Law School after 1903, was a founder of the North West Alumni Association of the University of Pennsylvania, was a Republican, was a member of the Phi Beta Kappa fraternity, was a member of the Beta Theta Pi fraternity, was a member of the Delta Chi fraternity, was the author of Jaggard on Torts, Jaggard on Taxation in Minnesota and the Dakotas, and Jaggard on Taxation in Iowa, was the author of an article on "False Imprisonment" for the volume of the Cyclopedia of Law and Procedure, was the author of Historical Anomalies of the Law of Libel and Slander, was a member of the Society of Colonial Wars in the State of Minnesota based on an ancestor, Daniel Wills, Sr., who settled in New Jersey in 1677, resided at 302 South Exchange Street in 1907, officed at the State Capitol in 1907, was elected a life member of the Minnesota Historical Society in 1911, was a member of the Minnesota Club, was a member of the St. Paul Town & Country Club, engaged in the hobbies of travel and fishing, officed at the State Capitol in 1907, and died of heart failure, at Hamilton, Bermuda. The 1917 Catalogue of the Beta Theta Pi Fraternity, published by James T. Brown of New York, indicated that Edwin Ames Jaggard received a bachelors degree from Dickinson College in 1879 and a law degree from the University of Pennsylvania in 1882, was a lawyer, and served on the Minnesota Supreme Court. Clement Jaggard was a merchant in Blair County, Pennsylvania. Alice Cecelia Kashnick (1904-2001) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Hammerstrom, and died in Hennepin County. Josephine Davidson (1885-1962) was born in Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Schnittger resided at the former nearby 303 South Exchange Street. The records of the 1919-1920 Minnesota World War I Soldier's Bonus Board (#9177) indicate that Bert Sherrick (1890- ,) a 1917 enlistee and a Sergeant in Company A of Disch. Detch. #2, who was born in Cashton, Wisconsin, moved to Minnesota in 1912, had blue eyes, light hair, and a fair complexion, was 5' 7" tall, was a motorman at induction, was an electrical worker employed by the Twin City Rapid Transit Company after the completion of service, and was unmarried, resided at the nearby former 303 South Exchange Street. The 1920 city directory indicates that George M. Bates, a copy reader employed by the Dispatch and Pioneer Press, boarded at the former nearby 303 South Exchange Street and that Bertha Bohn, the widow of Henry Bohn, resided at the former nearby 303 South Exchange Street. The 1930 city directory indicates that the former nearby 303 South Exchange Street was vacant. [See note on the Great Northern RailRoad.] [See note for the American Railway Express Company for 47 Douglas Street.] [See note for the Mannheimer Brothers for 270 West Seventh Street.] [See note on the Ford Motor Company for 334 St. Clair Avenue.] [See note on the Northern Pacific RailRoad.]

304 South Exchange Street: Built in 1880. The building is a multi-unit frame comdominium building. Unit B1 is 939 square feet in area, has four rooms, two bedrooms, and one bathroom, which last sold in 2003 for $164,500, and which is currently owned by Kim Dowell. Unit 00001 is 967 square feet in area, has four rooms, two bedrooms, and one bathroom, and is currently owned by Lynda K. Petrie. Unit 00002 is 978 square feet in area and has four rooms, two bedrooms, and one bathroom, which last sold in 2004 for $215,000, and which was previously owned by John F. McCarthy and which is currently owned by Peyton J. Fleming and Shayna M. Fleming. The 1920 city directory indicates that Dorothy Erehart, a clerk employed by the Van Sant Trust Company, located at the Endicott Arcade, boarded at the former nearby 305 South Exchange Street. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Elizabeth Iverson resided at the former nearby 305 South Exchange Street. Elizabeth Ruddick Iverson ( -1932) died in Fillmore County, Minnesota. Elizabeth Iverson (1886-1976) was born in Minnesota and died in Wilkin County, Minnesota.

306 South Exchange Street: Rogers-Johnson House; Built in 1881; Augustus Gauger, architect. The structure is a two story, 3384 square foot, 12 room, seven bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, frame building with a detached garage. The 1885 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Johnson and Paul A. Johnson resided at this address. The 1887 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Johnson resided at this address. The 1889, 1891, and 1893 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Johnson resided at this address. The 1885 city directory also indicates that Mr. and Mrs. N. P. Langford resided at the corner of South Exchange Street and Sherman Street. The 1880 federal census records indicates that Nathaniel Langford (1833- ) was a bank examiner, was born in New York, had parents who were both born in New York, was married, and headed a household in St. Paul. The Langford household in 1880 included his wife, Emma W. Langford (1854- ,) who was born in New York, had parents who were both born in New York, and was a house keeper, a servant, Louisa Larson (1857- ,) who was born in Sweden, had parents who were both born in Sweden, and was single, and Susie Backer (1853- ,) who was born in Massachusetts, had parents who were both born in Massachusetts, was single, and was a school teacher. The 1920 city directory indicates that Amelie Alsen, a stenographer, and William F. Felstow, both boarded at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Myrtle E. West, a bookkeeper employed by the Associated Shop Crafts (Northern Pacific RailRoad,) Robert R. McCann, a helper employed by the American Hoist & Derrick Company, his wife, Isabella McCann, Henry L. Gill, a janitor employed at the New York Building, his wife, Anne Gill, Anthony Zimski, a leather worker, his wife, Frances Zimski, an ironer employed by the Co-operative Laundry Company, and Irene Zimski, a clerk, resided at this address. Dick Warwick resided at this address in 1999. Nathaniel Pitt Langford (1832-1911), a Minnesota and Montana pioneer and banker, was a Freemason and delivered an address in Virginia City, Montana, in 1867, and was the author of the Diary of the Washburn Expedition to the Yellowstone and Firehole Rivers in the Year 1870. The Langford family migrated to the Lake Pepin area of Minnesota in 1854. Nathaniel P. Langford was born in Westmoreland, New York, was a cashier in the banking house of (William R.) Marshall & Company, in 1855 and the cashier of the Bank of the State of Minnesota in 1858, was a Montana collector of internal revenue and reported on lawlessness and vigilante activity there during the period 1863 to 1869, was the first superintendent of the Yellowstone National Park from 1872 to 1877, where he hired the first national park ranger, Harry "Rocky Mountain Harry" Yount (1837-1924,) and was a national bank examiner for the Pacific states and the territories from 1872 to 1884. No money was appropriated for Yellowstone Park initially, and the first superintendent, Nathaniel Pitt "National Park" Langford, visited the park only three times during his five-year appointment, including one visit in 1874 to evict a man named Matthew McGuirk, who claimed to own the Boiling River. Langford also climbed the Grand Teton in 1872 with James Stevenson, was removed from the Yellowstone Park superintendency in 1877, was replaced by Philetus W. Norris, returned to St. Paul by 1885, joined with John Knapp to develop the St. Anthony Park section of St. Paul, served as the President of the Minnesota Historical Society from 1905 to 1911, and was a member of the Executive Council of the Minnesota Historical Society for twenty-two years, from 1889 to 1911. Nathaniel Pitt Langford, the son of George Langford and Chloe Sweeting Langford, was a member of the Minnesota Society of the Sons of the American Revolution by virtue of grandfather George Langford, a Corporal in the Massachusetts Troops and of Nathaniel Sweeting, a Lieutenant in the Massachusetts Continental Line, and of great grandfather Lewis Sweeting, a Surgeon in the Massachusetts Troops, during the Revolutionary War. Nathaniel Langford's most famous book, The Discovery of Yellowstone Park, was published in 1905. Mount Langford, in eastern Yellowstone Park, northeast of Eagle Peak and Atkins Peak, was named in 1871 by the United States Geological Survey for Nathaniel Pitt Langford. The name "Mount Langford," as well as "Mount Doane," were originally given by the Washburn Expedition to mountains further to the south, but Dr. Ferdinand Vandeveer Hayden, head of the U.S. Geological Survey of the Territories, either accidentally or purposefully, transferred the names of the mountains in 1871. Subsequent years of protest by Langford failed to correct the misnaming. Langford Residence Hall on the campus of Montana State University was built in 1960 and was named for Nathaniel P. Langford. Nathaniel Pitt Langford died in Ramsey County. Nathaniel P. Langford's son, George Langford, attended Harvard University from 1894 to 1897 and worked for the McKenna Steel Working Company of Joliet, Illinois, from 1898 until the 1940's. George Langford also was an amateur archaeologist, paleontologist, and research associate in the department of anthropology at the University of Chicago from 1930, and excavated and studied prehistoric Indian and fossil sites, largely in Pennsylvania and Illinois, especially Indian mounds near Joliet, Illinois. George Langford, the son of George and Abigail (Elliott) Langford, was born in Clinton, Oneida County, New York, lived for a time in Westmoreland, was one of the first organizers of Hecla Furnace, New York, was cashier of the Oneida Bank, and died in Utica, New York. In 1813, George Langford married Chloe Sweeting and the couple had 13 children, Mary Langford (Mrs. Edward) Curran, of Utica, New York, George Langford, who graduated from Hamilton College, went to Marshall, Michigan, and died of malarial fever, Philip Langford, who died in infancy, Philip Langford, who married Mary Thomas, Chloe Langford (Mrs. James Wickes) Taylor, De Witt Langford, who married Mary Morrison, Abigail Langford (Mrs. William R.) Marshall, who lived and died in St. Paul, Moreau Langford, who died unmarried, Marie Antoinette Langford (Mrs. William) Austin, who lived in St. Paul, Charles C. Langford, who lived in Utica, and married Louise Penfield, of Catskill, New York, Nathaniel P. Langford, who first married Emma Wheaton and then married Clara Wheaton, Augustine G. Langford, who went to St. Paul in 1856, then to Pike's Peak, Colorado, settled in Denver, Colorado, and married Elizabeth Robertson of St. Paul, and Harriet White Langford, who died in infancy. Mary Langford Curran and Edward Curran had five children, George Langford, who married Cornelia Douglas of Utica, New York, Major Henry Hastings Langford, who was killed in battle of the Wilderness, Philip Langford, who died unmarried, Mary Langford (Mrs. Willard) Peck, of Hudson, New York, and John Elliot Langford, who married Lilla Mulford. William Austin was the son of Joshua Austin and Electa (Dean) Spencer, of Utica, New York, married Marie Antoinette Langford, and the couple had four children, Sherwood Day, Charles Langford, who married Margaret Clough, and lived in St. Paul, Edward Curran, and William Austin, who married Lilly White. De Witt Langford and Mary Morrison Langford had four children, Mary M. Langford, Helen D. Langford, George Langford and Gertrude Chloe Langford. Augustine G. Langford and Elizabeth Robertson Langford had three children, Nathaniel Langford, William Langford and George Langford. Abigail Langford Marshall and William R. Marshall had a son, George Marshall, who married Carolyn Rumbough of Ashville, North Carolina, and the couple had a daughter, Alice Marshall. The McKenna Steel Working Company owned and controlled the McKenna patents for renewing old steel rails with a large mill at Joliet, Illinois, in 1893, with a capacity of four hundred tons per day. The Langford burial plot at Oakland Cemetery includes the graves of Nathaniel Pitt Langford (1832-1911,) his wife, Emma Wheaton Langford (1841-1882,) Clara Langford ( -1925,) Nathaniel P. Langford (1872-1940,) Theodosia H, Langford (1880-1951,) Elizabeth R. Langford (1849-1931,) Augustine G. Langford (1834-1885,) Helen S. Langford (1875-1944,) William R. Langford (1874-1941,) Maxine Langford (1916-1994,) and Alan Langford (1909-1997.) Asa Emory Johnson (1825-1906) was born at Bridgewater, Oneida County, New York, studied medicine in 1849 with Dr. Kellog, a homeopathic physician, and with Dr. Erastus King, afterward, attended the State University of New York and graduated in 1851, moved to Beloit, Wisconsin, and practiced there until 1853, then moved to St. Anthony, married Hannah Russel, of Wisconsin, in 1853, was the county physician for one year, was on the board of health two years, was the first president of the Minnesota Academy of Natural Sciences and held the office four years, studied entomology, comparative anatomy, geology and cryptogamic botany, classified and identified eight hundred species in mycological botany, discovered the skeleton of a mound builder at Palmer Lake mound, in Brooklyn, Minnesota, and authored the Report of the Committee on Botany: the Mycological Flora of Minnesota in 1877. Asa Emery Johnson (1825- ,) the son of Martin Johnson, was born in Bridgewater, Oneida County, New York, graduated from Columbia College in 1850, resided in Beloit, Wisconsin, then settled in St. Anthony, Minnesota, in 1853, married Hannah Russel in 1853, discovered a fossil Orthoserus below St. Anthony Falls, Minnesota, in 1856, was the Hennepin County physician in 1858, was a member of the Minneapolis Board of Health, was a member of the Hennepin County Medical Society, was a member of the Minnesota Medical Society, and was a founder and the first president of the Minnesota Academy of Natural Sciences in 1873. Susie Backer ( -1915) and Paul Arnold Johnson ( -1949) died in Ramsey County. Asa E. Johnson (1826-1906) was born in New York and died in Hennepin County. John Knapp ( -1931) died in Ramsey County. Myrtle Evelyn West (1899-1986) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Lundberg, and died in Hennepin County. The current owner of record of the property is Martha J. Hamilton. The 1885 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. T. B. Campbell, Frank G. Campbell, and Frederick H. Campbell all resided at the former nearby 309 Exchange Street, that Mr. and Mrs. Gustav Leue, Mr. and Mrs. William F. Hachmann, and Miss Pauline Leue resided at the nearby former 317 South Exchange Street, that Mr. and Mrs. L. H. Maxfield resided at the nearby former 322 South Exchange Street, and that Mr. and Mrs. H. Sahlgaard resided at the nearby former 324 South Exchange Street. The 1887 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Thwing resided at the former nearby 309 Exchange Street South, that Mrs. Gustav Leue, her daughters, Gustav Leue, and Mr. and Mrs. William F. Hachmann and their daughter all resided at the former nearby 317 Exchange Street South, that Mr. and Mrs. L. H. Maxfield resided at the former nearby 322 Exchange Street South, and that Mr. and Mrs. H. Sahlgaard resided at the former nearby 324 Exchange Street South. The 1906 Jubilee Manual of the House of Hope Presbyterian Church indicates that Amanda Leue, a member of the church since 1900, resided at the nearby former 317 South Exchange Street. The 1916 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. M. W. Barry resided at the former nearby 314 Exchange Street South and that Mrs. Louisa Leue and her daughter resided at the former nearby 317 Exchange Street South. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. M. W. Barry and Wardell Spencer resided at the former nearby 314 South Exchange Street, that Mrs. Gust Leue and her daughter resided at the former nearby 317 South Exchange Street, and that Mr. and Mrs. Martin Brings resided at the former nearby 318 South Exchange Street. The records of the 1919-1920 Minnesota World War I Soldier's Bonus Board (#14279) indicate that August Eckert (1887- ,) a 1918 draftee and a Private First Class in Company E of the 129th Infantry, who was born in South Stillwater, Minnesota, had light brown eyes, black hair, and a ruddy complexion, was 5' 5" tall, was a sawmill employee at induction, served in the American Expeditionary Force in France, including Meuse, Argonne, the Soome, and the Verdun Sector, was gassed on October 5, 1918, was a laborer employed by Booth & Company after the completion of service, and was unmarried, resided at the nearby former 307 South Exchange Street. The 1920 city directory indicates that Samuel Abrahamson, a driver, resided at the former nearby 3?? South Exchange Street. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Louisa Leue (1835-1921,) the widowed mother of Amanda Leue, who was born in Germany to parents born in Germany and who died of lobar pneumonia, resided at the nearby former 317 South Exchange South in 1921. The 1924 city directory indicates that Miss Amanda Leue resided at the former nearby 317 Exchange Street South and that Mr. and Mrs. Martin Brings resided at the former nearby 318 Exchange Street South. The 1930 city directory indicates that Frank A. Haefner, an assistant operator employed by the Northern States Power Company, and his wife, Louise Haefner, resided at the former nearby 307 South Exchange Street, that Peter H. Barthine, a trucker for the St. Paul Union Depot, and his wife, Ida Barthine, resided at the former nearby 309 South Exchange Street, that Morris Woloshin, a furrier employed by Gordon & Ferguson, his wife, Sarah Woloshin, Richard S. Deming, a laborer for the Armour & Company, and his wife, Dorothy Deming, resided at the former nearby 314 South Exchange Street, that Michael J. Boyle and Mary Boyle resided at the former nearby 315 South Exchange Street, and that Amanda Leu resided at the former nearby 317 South Exchange Street. Gustav Leue (1829-1886) was born in Prussia, Germany, moved to St. Paul in 1855, served from 1861 until 1863 as a Second Lieutenant in Brackett's Battalion/Fifth Iowa Cavalry and was was discharged with a disability during the American Civil War, initially was a Republican, was elected fireman during the Republican state constitutional convention, later became a Democrat, was the founder and editor of the Volkszeitung, received a $110 appropriation from the Minnesota Legislature for printing the Governor's message in German in 1875, was an incorporator of the Franklin Building and Loan Society in 1876, operated a piano and organ store at 126 West Third Street in 1879, owned property with John C. Becht in Irvine Park in 1880, and died in St. Paul. Hagbarth Sahlgaard (1844-1892) was born in Kongsberg, Norway, emigrated to the United States in 1866, initially resided in St. Peter, Minnesota, moved to St. Paul in 1869, was the cashier for the St. Paul Savings Bank from 1872 until 1882, was the treasurer of the Capitol Building Society of St. Paul in 1877, married Lucy S. Laupher in St. Paul in 1878, was a partner with Engebreth H. Hobe as Sahlgaard & Hobe in the real estate, farm lands and cabin steamship businesses, and was the vice counsel for Norway and Sweden, officing at 204 East Seventh Street. The Leue burial plot at Oakland Cemetery includes the graves of Louise Leue (1835-1921,) Gustav Leue (1829-1886,) Gustav R. Leue (1867-1898,) William C. C. Hachmann (1883-1914,) and Amanda D. Leue (1874-1969.) Morris Woloshin (1882-1978) was born outside of Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. Richard S. Deming (1901-1988) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Jones, and died in Ramsey County. Dorothy Deming ( -1948,) Michael Boyle ( -1948,) and Mary Boyle ( -1949) all died in Ramsey County. [See note on Armour & Company for 3 Alice Court.] [See note on the Volkszeitung Printing & Publishing Company for 614 North Fountain Place.] [See note on Augustus F. Gauger.]

330 South Exchange Street: Built in 1976 and 1985. The 1976 structure is five stories high and 116,910 square feet in area. The 1985 structure is three stories high and 26,136 square feet in area. The buildings are a skilled nursing care facility, a residential care facility, and an intermediate care facility. The 1887 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. William Coriles, Mr. and Mrs. D. D. Merrill, Jr., Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Ovitz, and Mr. and Mrs. Hiler H. Horton all resided at this address. The 1916 city directory indicates that Mrs. Margaret Boyle, her daughter, and M. J. Boyle all resided at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that M. J. Boyle and Charles Boyle resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Michael J. Boyle, a department manager employed by Finch, Van Slyke & McConville, resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that M. J. Boyle resided at this address. Daniel David Merrill (1834-1895/1896,) the son of Rev. Thomas Ward Merrill (1802-1878,) a Baptist minister, and Sarah Arvilla Oakes Merrill (1809-1843,) was a member of the Minnesota Society of the Sons of the American Revolution by virtue of grandfather Daniel Merrill, a Private in the Massachusetts Continental Line during the Revolutionary War. Daniel David Merrill, Sr. (1834-1896,) was born in Comstock, Michigan, graduated from Kalamazoo College, in Kalamazoo, Michigan, married Alice Almira King (1839- ,) the daughter of Leavitt Holly King, in 1859 in Medina, Ohio, moved to St. Paul in 1855/1859, was a merchant, opened a bookstore, D. D. Merrill & Company, in 1860 which grew, after the merger with White, Stone & Company in 1879, into the extensive business of the St. Paul Book & Stationery Company, published under a 17 year contract with the State of Minnesota all of the textbooks used in the schools of the State outside of St. Paul and Minneapolis, was the unpaid secretary and treasurer of the United States Christian Commission during the American Civil War, was president, deacon and trustee of the First Baptist Church of St. Paul, was the president and the treasurer of the Minnesota Baptist State Convention, was president of the St. Paul Chamber of Commerce, was a director in several banks, was a large holder of real estate, was president in 1879 of the Minnesota Real Estate Agency, located at 84 East Third Street, died in St. Paul, and was buried in Woodlawn Cemetery, New York City, New York. Daniel David Merrill, Sr., and Alice Almira King Merrill had five children, Leavitt King Merrill (1860- ,) Daniel David Merrill (1863-1906,) Alice Louella Merrill (1866-1868,) George Earnest Merrill (1870-1896,) and Harriet Anna Merrill (1874- .) Daniel David Merrill, Jr. (1906- ,) with his father, D. D. Merrill, his brother, L. K. Merrill, and a friend, Francis E. Baker, published textbooks for the State of Minnesota as Merrill & Baker. In 1879, Daniel D. Merrill, manager of the St. Paul Book & Stationery Company, resided on the East side of Hoffman Avenue near Conway Street and that Levitt K. Merrill, a student, boarded on the East side of Hoffman Avenue near Conway Street. In 1893, Merrill & Baker published Ridpath's History of the United States and tried to enter mainstream publishing. In 1904, the firm filed bankruptcy, but it continued to publish Ridpath's History in a variety of formats and styles. Daniel David Merrill (1863-1906) was born in St. Paul, engaged in the book publishing business with his father in St. Paul, then later with his brother L. K. Merrill in New York City, and then for himself in Chicago, married Clara Hatheway Loomis, the daughter of Byron Loomis and Elizabeth B. Cowles Loomis, in 1885 in Suffield, Hartford County, Connecticut, died in Chicago, and was buried in Woodlawn Cemetery, New York, City, New York. Daniel David Merrill and Clara Hatheway Loomis Merrill had two children, Daniel David Merrill and Loomis Merrill. Leavitt King Merrill was born in St. Paul, was educated at Brown University, the University of Michigan, and the Yale University Law School, practiced law in St. Paul, later engaged in the publishing business in New York City and in London, England, and married Ella Dakin Cochran (1861- ,) the daughter of Judge Robert Henry Cochran and Martha Dakin Cochran in 1885 in Toledo, Ohio. Leavitt King Merrill and Ella Dakin Cochran Merrill had two children, Edward Francis Merrill (1887- ) and Leavitt Cochran Merrill (1890- .) In 1910, David Daniel Merrill was a Junior at Cornell University and was elected a member of the Gargoyle Club at Cornell and graduated from Cornell University in 1912 with a bachelor's degree in Architecture. In 1879, John A. Berkey was the vice president and O. E. Terry was the secretary and treasurer of the Minnesota Real Estate Agency. The current owner of record of the property is the Little Sisters of the Poor. The Little Sisters of the Poor, a religious order dedicated to serving the poor, came to Minneapolis in 1889 for the purpose of building and supporting a home for the aged. In June, 1977, the Sisters closed their Minneapolis facility and their patients moved to this facility. In the 1930's, Roseville farmers used to take their produce to the farmer's markets in Minneapolis and in St. Paul, and whatever was left they would give to the Little Sisters of the Poor.

148 Forbes Avenue: Built in 1870. The structure is a one story, 870 square foot, five room, two bedroom, one bathroom, asbestos-sided house. The 1930 city directory indicates that Martha Werner resided at this address. The property was last sold in 2005 with a sale price of $127,400. The previous owner of record of the property was Kathleen Marie Wiebusch, who resided in Newport, Minnesota, and the current owner of record of the property is Richard J. Sherman III. The 1879 city directory indicates that Theresa Frey resided at the nearby former 99 Forbes Avenue, that Louis G. Koch, an operator of a saloon located at 54 West Third Street, resided at the nearby former 62 Forbes Avenue, that William Koch, a printer, resided at the former nearby 102 Forbes Avenue, that Bernard Kuhl, a partner with John Haggenmiller in Haggenmiller & Kuhl, a wholesale wine and liquor dealer, resided at the former nearby 64 Forbes Street, that David H. McCloud, a bookkeeper employed by G. L. Farwell, resided at the nearby former 44 Forbes Avenue, that John J. McCloud, a clerk employed by the Farmers & Mechanics Bank, boarded at the nearby former 44 Forbes Street, that Michael McMahon, a pressman employed by the Pioneer Press, resided at the former nearby 106 Forbes Street, that Ida Manke was a domestic at the former nearby 44 Forbes Avenue, that Charles H. Mead, a messenger employed by the American Express Company, resided at the nearby former 24 Forbes Avenue, that Frank B. Moore, a foreman in the news room of the Pioneer Press, resided at the former nearby 52 Forbes Avenue, that Bernhard Moorman, a bootmaker employed by C. Gotzian & Company, resided at the former nearby 20 Forbes Avenue, that Henry Morris, a deputy U. S. marshal, resided at the former nearby 11 Forbes Avenue, that William H. Neal, an engineer employed by the St. Paul & Sioux City RailRoad, resided at the former nearby 112 Forbes Street, that Frank P. O'Brien, a traveling agent employed by Beaupre, Allen & Keogh, resided at the nearby former 12 Forbes Street, that James O'Brien, a clerk employed by J. Farnen, boarded at the nearby former 12 Forbes Street, that Mary O'Brien boarded at the former nearby 12 Forbes Street, and that Emma Youngblood was a domestic at the former nearby 74 Forbes Street. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Frederick O. Heymel (1822-1892,) of German heritage who died of pneumonia, resided at the former nearby 152 Forbes Avenue in 1892. The 1920 city directory indicates that Albert G. Clements, a laborer, boarded at the former nearby 155 Forbes Avenue and that William W. Dailey, a clerk employed by Frank Dailey, and Mrs. Pearl B. Daley, both resided at the former nearby 145 Forbes Avenue. The 1930 city directory indicates that Harry L. Olson, a packer employed by the Northern Jobbing Company, resided at the former nearby 145 Forbes Avenue, that John J. Plumbo, a machinist employed by the St. Paul Hydraulic Hoist Company, and his wife, Virginia Plumbo, resided at the former nearby 151 Forbes Avenue, that the former nearby 152 Forbes Avenue was vacant, that Joseph J. Plumbo, the traffic manager of the St. Paul Hydraulic Hoist Company, and his wife, Mabel Plumbo, resided at the former nearby 155 Forbes Avenue, that Mary A. Maher, a teacher, resided at the former nearby 156 Forbes Avenue, and that Harry H. Stevenson, a janitor employed by the Great Northern RailRoad, and his wife, Martha Stevenson, resided at the former nearby 159 Forbes Avenue. Frank H. Heymel was the son of Frederick O. Heymel. In 1879, Frank H. Heymel, a clerk employed by G. L. Farwell, boarded at 9 Smith Street and Frederick Heymel, a plasterer, resided at 9 Smith Street. The 1879 city directory indicates that John Logue, a carpenter, resided at the former nearby 28 Forbes Street. The Heymel burial plot at Oakland Cemetery includes the graves of Frederick Heymel (1872-1898,) Margaretha Heymel (1833-1901,) Mary A. Heymel ( 1880-1925,) and Conrad W. Heymel (1847-1925.) Bernard Kuhl once had a mansion at the site of Bethesda Hospital, North of the third State Capitol building, which was later owned by Frank O'Meara. John E. Haggenmiller (1831- ) was born in Germany, moved to Detroit, Michigan, in 1854, moved to St. Paul in 1855, worked on a steamboat on the Mississippi River, then was employed by a restaurant, was a member of the St. Paul volunteer fire department from 1857 until it became a paid department and was the first assistant foreman of the Pioneer Hook & Ladder Company in 1863, was a delegate to the city Democratic Party nominating convention in 1859, then operated a liquor store, became a partner with Bernard Kuhl in a wholesale liquor business, sold his interest in the wholesale liquor business to Bernard Kuhl in 1880, became a partner with George Benz in 1881, dissolved the partnership with George Benz in 1884, married Laura Presley. Frank H. Heymel ( -1924) died in Ramsey County. John J. Plumbo (1903-1994) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Delesio, and died in Ramsey County. Joseph J. Plumbo (1915-1987) was born in Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. Joseph J. Plumbo (1897-1989) was born in Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. Mabel H. Plumbo (1898-1989) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Linden, and died in Dakota County, Minnesota. Virginia A. Plumbo (1912-1987) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Streasick, and died in Ramsey County. Harry H. Stevenson ( -1942) and Mary Agnes Maher ( -1945) both died in Ramsey County. [See note on the St. Paul & Sioux City RailRoad.] [See note on the Great Northern RailRoad.] [See note for the American Railway Express Company for 47 Douglas Street.] [See note on the St. Paul Hydraulic Hoist Company for 773 East Sixth Street.] [See note on George G. Benz for 668 Greenbriar Avenue.] [See note on Conrad Gotzian and the Conrad Gotzian Shoe Company for 505 Summit Avenue.]

160 Forbes Avenue: The property is a vacant residential lot. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Christiana Wooding (1822- ,) the widowed mother of Enos Wooding, who was born in England to parents who were also born in England and who died of senility, resided at this address in 1904. The 1930 city directory indicates that Michael Nash, a helper employed by the American Hoist & Derrick Company, and his wife, Blanche Nash, resided at this address. Enos Wooding ( -1930,) Michael Nash ( -1941,) and Michael Nash ( -1944) all died in Ramsey County. Michael E. Nash (1892-1977) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Looby, and died in Ramsey County. Michael J. Nash (1893-1982) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Hart, and died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is Jolynn Carol Martin, who resides at 55 Wilkin Street. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Mary Kuby (1828-1898,) of German extraction who died of uterine cancer, resided at the former nearby 159 Forbes Avenue in 1898. The 1930 city directory indicates that Nicholas M. Triemert resided at the former nearby 161 Forbes Avenue. Emil M. Kuby was the son of Mary Kuby. Nicholas Norman Triemert (1896-1984) was born in Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. [See note for the American Hoist & Derrick Company for 2010 Summit Avenue.]

162 Forbes Avenue: Built in 1880. The structure is a one story, 739 square foot, five room, two bedroom, one bathroom, asbestos-sided bungalow, with a detached garage. The 1930 city directory indicates that Charles Stang and his wife, Anna Stang, resided at this address. The last sale of the unit occurred in 1993 at a sale price of $39,900. The current owner of record of the property is Janelle T. Lewis. The 1885 city directory indicates that M. E. Jenness and Mrs. U. M. Stickney both resided at the former nearby 163 Forbes Avenue. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Emil M. Kuby resided at the former nearby 163 Forbes Avenue in 1898. The 1920 city directory indicates that John L. Carlton, a driver employed by A. W. Lemke, boarded at the former nearby 163 Forbes Avenue and that Frank Fedenheyer, a pipeman with St. Paul Fire Department Engine Company No. 2, resided at the nearby former 162 1/2 Forbes Street. The 1930 city directory indicates that Edward R. Rock resided at the former nearby 162 1/2 Forbes Avenue, that Emil M. Kuby, a merchandise broker at the Bremer Arcade, resided at the former nearby 163 Forbes Avenue, and that Alois Drassel, a laborer for the St. Paul Department of Parks, and his wife, Elizabeth Drassel, resided at the former nearby 165 Forbes Avenue.

166 Forbes Avenue: Built in 1883. The structure is a one story, 916 square foot, six room, two bedroom, one bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Mrs. Margaret Heymel resided at this address in 1892 and that Charles Sitta and Petronela Sitta (1850-1893,) who died in childbirth, husband and wife, resided at this address in 1894. The 1930 city directory indicates that Joseph Langman, his wife, Cila Langman, Benjamin Langman, a helper, and Edward Langman, a baker employed by Meyer Herman, all resided at this address. Carl T. Sitta (1842-1905) was born in Austria and died in Ramsey County. Joseph Langman ( -1949) died in Ramsey County. Edward Jay Langman (1910-1992) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Rabinowitz, and died in Ramsey County. Meyer M. Herman (1891-1982) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Schwartz, and died in Hennepin County. The last sale of this property was in 1994 and the sale price was $35,000. The current owner of record of the property is Robert C. Janecek. The 1930 city directory indicates that Oscar Stenholm and his wife, Louise Stenholm, resided at the former nearby 166 1/2 Forbes Avenue. Oscar Stenholm (1894-1964) was born in Minnesota and died in Stearns County, Minnesota.

168 Forbes Avenue: Built in 1890. The structure is a two story, 1680 square foot, nine room, three bedroom, two bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided house. The 1920 city directory indicates that Joseph J. Cary, a clerk employed by the Golden Rule, boarded at this address and Fred W. Croft, a partner with Leo Greening in the Comfort Artificial Limb Company, a manufacturer of artificial limbs and braces, resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Rudolph Breyer, a machinist employed by St. Paul Hydraulic Hoist Company, and Livia Breyer, a stenographer, and Fred W. Croft, associated with the Comfort Artificial Limb Company, and his wife, Nellie Croft, resided at this address. Rudolph Julius Breyer (1879-1957) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Johnson, and died in Ramsey County. Frederick Croft (1886-1967) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Croft, and died in Cook County, Minnesota. Fred W. Croft (1920-1994) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Swanson, and died in Ramsey County. Nellie Croft (1897-1962) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Nelson, and died in Ramsey County. The property was last sold for $49,000 and that sale occurred in 1994. The current owner of record of the property is Joseph J. Corbett, who resides in Minneapolis. The 1920 city directory indicates that Edward Chaulsett, a clerk, resided at the former nearby 171 Forbes Avenue. The 1930 city directory indicates that Clifford P. Bedeil and Walter Hoeft, a laborer employed by the Twin City Brick Company, and his wife, Hazel Hoeft, resided at the former nearby 171 Forbes Avenue. Walter William Hoeft (1899-1967) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Klingbile, and died in Mille Lacs County, Minnesota. Walter Ludwig Hoeft (1905-1991) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Wagner, and died in Goodhue County, Minnesota. [See note on St. Paul Hydraulic Hoist for 773 East Sixth Street.] [See note for the Twin City Brick Company for 797 Goodrich Avenue.]

172 Forbes Avenue: Built in 1905. The structure is a two story, 2360 square foot, nine room, five bedroom, two bathroom, frame house. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Mary Heymel resided at this address in 1922. The 1930 city directory indicates that Fred Behrn and Walter Dufour, a cook, and his wife, Marie Dufour, resided at this address. The Heymel burial plot at Oakland Cemetery includes the graves of Frederick Heymel (1872-1898,) Margaretha Heymel (1833-1901,) Mary A. Heymel ( 1880-1925,) and Conrad W. Heymel (1847-1925.) Mary Heymel ( -1925) died in Washington County, Minnesota. The property was last sold in 1994 with a sale price of $43,000. The current owners of record of the property are Rita G. Faue and Wesley M. West. The 1916 and 1918 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Higgins resided at the former nearby 177 Forbes Avenue. The 1920 city directory indicates that Arch L. Colbeth, a manager employed by the White Sewing Machine Company, and Bertram Colbeth, a clerk, both boarded at the former nearby 177 Forbes Avenue. The 1930 city directory indicates that the residents at the apartment at the former nearby 177 Forbes Avenue were John T. Vollmer, a laborer employed by Armor & Company, and his wife, Pearl Vollmer (Apartment #1,) John Higgins, a salesman, and his wife, Elizabeth Higgins (Apartment #2,) James Stout, a helper, and his wife, Elizabeth Stout (Apartment #3,) and Clyde H. Doran, a switchman for the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad, and his wife, Frances Doran (Apartment #4.) Elizabeth M. Higgins (1876-1957) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Healy, and died in Ramsey County. James W. Stout ( -1936) died in Ramsey County. [See note on Philip Danforth Armour and Armour & Company for 3 Alice Court.] [See the note for the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad.]

178 Forbes Avenue: Built in 1870. The structure is a one story, 1098 square foot, four room, two bedroom, one bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided house, with a detached one car garage. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Anna Wilson, the widow of Daniel Wilson, resided at this address. The last sale of the unit occurred in 1997 at a sale price of $24,500. The current owner of record of the property is Gregory Faue. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Ellen J. Henton resided at the nearby former 184 Forbes Avenue in 1905. The 1920 city directory indicates that Eleanor Barck, a stenographer employed by G. Sommers & Company, boarded at the former nearby 184 Forbes Avenue. The 1930 city directory indicates that the residents at the apartment at the former nearby 184 Forbes Avenue were Harvey J. Henton, a conductor, his wife, Bertha Henton, and Helen Henton, a clerk (Apartment #1,) Harry Henton, a musician (Apartment #3,) Mrs. Irene L. Harrington, a clerk employed by Artcraft Studios, Inc. (Apartment #4,) Orville Walterstorff, a salesman employed by the Cleland-Hughes Motors Company, and his wife, Winnifred Walterstorff (Apartment #5,) and Walter L. Neal (Apartment #6.) In 1930, Apartment #2 at the former nearby 184 Forbes Avenue was vacant. Harvey J. Henton ( -1951) Bertha Henton ( -1954) died in Ramsey County. Helen Mariah Henton ( -1941) died in Rock County, Minnesota. Helen S. Henton (1901-1986) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Brenner, and died in Kandiyohi County, Minnesota. Irene Lucille Harrington ( -1951) died in Hennepin County. [See note on the G. Sommers & Company for 9 South St. Albans Street]

186 Forbes Avenue: Built in 1970. The structure is a one story, 12243 square foot, automotive service station. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Mrs. Henrietta K. Mann resided at the nearby former 184 Forbes Avenue in 1889. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Thomas T. Mann ( -1890) and Henrietta K. Mann, husband and wife, resided at the former nearby 184 Forbes Avenue in 1890 and that Cyrus A. Henton, Sr., resided at the former nearby 184 Forbes Avenue in 1904. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Elizabeth L. Gardner resided at this address in 1894. Cyrus A. Henton, Jr., was the son of Cyrus A. Henton, Sr. Thomas T. Mann (1816-1890) died of a cerebral hemorrhage. Clarence B. Gardner (1864-1894,) the son of Elizabeth L. Gardner, died of tuberculosis. T. T. Mann (1816-1890) was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, came to St. Paul in 1852, was a physician, and died in St. Paul. The current owner of record of the property is Allina Health System, located in Minneapolis. Allina Hospitals & Clinics is a not-for-profit network of hospitals, clinics and other health care services, providing care throughout Minnesota and western Wisconsin. The company has 22,500 employees, 5,000 physicians and 2,500 volunteers at 11 hospitals, 39 Allina Medical Clinic locations, 22 hospital-based clinics, 15 community pharmacies, and four ambulatory care centers. Richard "Dick" Pettingill has been president and chief executive officer (CEO) of Allina Hospitals & Clinics since 2002. Patricia Jones is the chief administrative officer and leads systemwide administrative functions for Allina, including Human Resources, Marketing and Communications, Audit Services, Compliance and Library Services. The 1930 city directory indicates that John H. Hoffman, a contractor, officed at the former nearby 188 Forbes Avenue and resided at 1404 Lincoln Avenue.

196 Forbes Avenue: Built in 1967. The structure is a one story, 7185 square foot, automotive service station. The current owner of record of the property is Anthony J. Michienzi, who resides in Lindstrom, Minnesota. The 1930 city directory indicates that the former nearby 201 Forbes Avenue was vacant. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Isabel Juliet Sheldon (1908-1909,) the daughter of Dwight D. Sheldon, who was born in St. Paul to parents born in the United States and who died of diptheria, resided at the nearby former 201 Forbes Avenue in 1909. The 1920 city directory indicates that Leonard Anderson, a driver, resided at the former nearby 201 Forbes Avenue. Isabel Julissle Sheldon ( -1909) died in Ramsey County.

203 Forbes Avenue: Built in 1883. The structure is a two story, 11763 square foot, retail commercial building. The lintel over the front door indicates that the building once contained the municipal court, criminal division. The previous owner of record of the property was Del Co, located at P. O. Box 17075 in St. Paul, and the current owner of record of the property is Kraus-Anderson Construction Company, located in Minneapolis. The Kraus-Anderson Construction Company was founded in 1897 and has been privately owned and managed by the Engelsma family for more than 65 years. Kraus-Anderson was founded in 1897 by James L. Robinson, who was the builder of several Minneapolis landmarks. In 1929, Robinson retired and sold the company to two employees just months before the stock market crash. Mathew Kraus and Amos Anderson changed the name and labored through the Great Depression, building mostly gas stations and sidewalks. In 1933, Kraus and Anderson hired Lloyd Engelsma as office manager and estimator. Engelsma purchased the company's very modest assets in 1937 and led the company for 60 years. In 1997, his son, Bruce Engelsma, became Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of the company. The 1930 city directory indicates that James Colburn, a clerk for the Chicago Great Western RailRoad, his wife, Helen Colburn, and Adolph D. Pesicka all resided at the former nearby 235 Forbes Avenue and that Marie E. Nagle resided at the former nearby 236 Forbes Avenue. James Colburn ( -1941) died in Brown County, Minnesota. Marie Etta Nagle (1880-1958) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Rudolph, and died in Ramsey County. [See note on the Chicago Great Western Railway.]

237 Forbes Avenue: Built in 1900. The structure is a two story, 1384 square foot, eight room, three bedroom, one bathroom, frame house. The 1930 city directory indicates that Frank W. Hennessy, assistant cashier employed by the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad, resided at this address. Frank W. Hennessy ( -1948) died in Ramsey County. The last sale of this property was in 2005 and the sale price was $215,000. The previous owner of record of the property was Steven R. Johnson, who resided in Eagan, Minnesota, and the current owner of record of the property is James R. Smith, who resides in Isanti, Minnesota. The records of the 1919-1920 Minnesota World War I Soldier's Bonus Board (#15203) indicate that Aloysius W. Kasmirski (1896- ,) a 1918 draftee and a Sergeant in the Quartermaster Corps, who was born in St. Paul, had brown eyes, brown hair, and a ruddy complexion, was 5' 7 1/2" tall, was a clerk at induction, was issued one bronze Victory button, was a shipping clerk employed by Druck Brothers after the completion of service, and was unmarried, resided with his mother, Helen Kasmirski, at the nearby former 242 Forbes Avenue. The 1930 city directory indicates that Paul P. Welo, his wife, Anna Welo, Jubel I. Welo, a clerk employed by the St. Paul Book & Stationery Company, Judith Welo, a clerk, and Mathilda Welo, a teacher, all resided at the former nearby 242 Forbes Avenue. Paul Welo ( -1942) died in Ramsey County. [See the note for the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad.] [See note for the St. Paul Book & Stationery for 629 North Street.]

245 Forbes Avenue: Built in 1910. The structure is a two story, 2742 square foot, 11 room, seven bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided house, with a detached garage. The 1916 and 1918 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. Frank Funk resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Frank Funk, an inspector employed by the City of St. Paul Department of Public Works, and his wife, Anna Funk, resided at this address. Frank John Funk (1892-1990) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Kadlec, and died in Hennepin County. Anna Funk ( -1943) and Anna M. Funk ( -1954) both died in Ramsey County. Anna V. Funk (1895-1957) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Pitz, and died in Dakota County, Minnesota. The previous owner of record of the property was Mortgage Electronic Registration System/Ins Equity One of Marlton, New Jersey, and the current owner of record of the property is SEI LLC of Roseville, Minnesota. The Mortgage Electronic Registration System was created by the mortgage banking industry to streamline the mortgage process by using electronic commerce to eliminate paper. The Mortgage Electronic Registration System is a process that is intended to simplify the way mortgage ownership and servicing rights are originated, sold and tracked and is intended to eliminate the need to prepare and record assignments when trading residential and commercial mortgage loans. The 1930 city directory indicates that Albert E. Mamlock, a salesman, and his wife, Genevieve Mamlock, resided at the former nearby 248 Forbes Avenue. Albert E. Mamlock ( -1938) died in Ramsey County. Genevieve L. Mamlock (1893-1983) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Wieland, and died in Sherburne County, Minnesota.

251 Forbes Avenue: Built in 1908. The structure is a 1 3/4 story, 1097 square foot, six room, three bedroom, one bathroom, asbestos-sided house. The 1920 city directory indicates that Arthur E. Faulkner, a clerk employed by the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad, resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that John P. Johnson, an auto mechanic, and his wife, Eunice Johnson, resided at this address. The most recent sale of the property occurred in 2005 and the sale price was $151,900. The previous owner of record of the property was Ocwen Federal Bank FSB of Orlando, Florida, and the current owner of record of the property is Lindsey Wetterhahn. The 1916 and 1918 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Fetsch resided at the former nearby 258 Forbes Avenue. The records of the 1919-1920 Minnesota World War I Soldier's Bonus Board (#18469) indicate that Claude D. Fetsch (1897- ,) a 1918 draftee and a Corporal in the 55th Company of the 14th Battalion of the 116th D. B., who was born in St. Paul, had brown eyes, dark brown hair, and a medium complexion, was 5' 7" tall, was a chauffeur at induction, was a cattle salesman employed by the J. R. Kirk Commission Company after the completion of service, and was unmarried, resided with his father, A. J. Fetsch, at the nearby former 258 Forbes Avenue. The 1920 city directory indicates that Claude C. Fetsch, a yardman employed by the J. R. Kirk Commission Company, resided at the former nearby 258 Forbes Avenue. The 1930 city directory indicates that Nicholas Marrone, a laborer, his wife, Lena Marrone, Joseph P. Diblase, a laborer, and his wife, Florence Diblase, all resided at the former nearby 256 Forbes Avenue, that Adolph J. Fetsch resided at the former nearby 258 Forbes Avenue, and that Steph Novak, a helper employed by the St. Paul Hydraulic Hoist Company, his wife, Josephine Novak, Frances M. Novak, an operator employed by Kurzen Brothers, Marian Novak, an operator employed by Cowden Manufacturing Company, and Thomas Novak, a metal worker employed by the St. Paul Corrugating Company, all resided at the former nearby 259 Forbes Avenue. Cowden Manufacturing was a producer of blue jeans and other denim goods that was founded in Salina, Kansas, by Jay Cowden, in 1919. In 1964, International Shoe Company acquired Cowden Manufacturing Company of Lexington, Kentucky, a manufacturer of men's and boy's clothing, and International Shoe Company became Interco Inc. in 1966. In 1993, Interco Inc. emerged from bankrutpcy and restructured, selling off its clothing businesses to focus on shoes and furniture. Nicholas Marrone (1892-1970) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Marrone, and died in Ramsey County. Adolph J. Fetsch ( -1941) died in Ramsey County. Frances M. Novak (1891-1977) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Lederer, and died in Ramsey County. [See the note for the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad.] [See note on St. Paul Hydraulic Hoist for 773 East Sixth Street.]

267 Forbes Avenue: Built in 1885. The structure is a two story, 1632 square foot, seven room, two bedroom, one bathroom, one half-bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided house. The previous owners of record of the property were Dorie A. Johnson and Kenneth G. Johnson, who resided at 309 Harrison Avenue, and the current owners of record of the property are Elena K. Claros and Giovan O. Claros, who reside in Apple Valley, Minnesota.

271 Forbes Avenue: Built in 1889. The structure is a two story, 1840 square foot, eight room, four bedroom, two bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided house, with a detached garage. The property was last sold for $129,900 and that sale occurred in 2000. The current owners of record of the property are Sarah Mary Gleason and Malick Maria.

276 Forbes Avenue: Built in 1879. The structure is a one story, 728 square foot, seven room, four bedroom, one bathroom, frame bungalow, with a detached one car garage. The property was on the city vacant house list in 2007. The property was last sold in 1996 with a sale price of $47,000. The current owner of record of the property is Pamela M. Jaworski.

279 Forbes Avenue: Built in 1875. The structure is a two story, 1856 square foot, nine room, three bedroom, two bathroom, asbestos-sided house, with a detached garage. The last sale of the unit occurred in 1995 at a sale price of $26,000. The current owner of record of the property is Julie A. Thomas.

280 Forbes Avenue: Built in 1882. The structure is a two story, 1410 square foot, eight room, four bedroom, two bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided house. The last sale of this property was in 2000 and the sale price was $103,000. The previous owner of record of the property was Kenneth Johnson, who resided at 309 Harrison Avenue, and the current owners of record of the property are Elena K. Claros and Giovan O. Claros, who reside in Apple Valley, Minnesota.

281 Forbes Avenue: Built in 1900. The structure is a one story, 813 square foot, four room, one bedroom, one bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided house, with a detached garage. The property was last sold for $150,000 and that sale occurred in 2004. The current owners of record of the property are Barbara M. Johnson and Robert W. Johnson.

283 Forbes Avenue: Built in 1884. The structure is a two story, 1684 square foot, ten room, four bedroom, two bathroom, frame house. The property was on the city vacant house list in 2007. The property was last sold in 2001 with a sale price of $80,000. The previous owner of record of the property was Kenneth G. Johnson, who resided at 309 Harrison Avenue, and the current owner of record of the property is the trustee for the US Bank National Association of San Diego, California.

284 Forbes Avenue: Built in 1874. The structure is a two story, 2380 square foot, ten room, four bedroom, three bathroom, frame house. The property was on the city vacant house list in 2007. The last sale of the unit occurred in 1995 at a sale price of $69,589. The previous owner of record of the property was Kenneth G. Johnson, who resided at 309 Harrison Avenue, and the current owner of record of the rental property is Thomas D. Weist, who resides in Shakopee, Minnesota. Thomas Weist was an Assistant Hennepin County Attorney in 2004.

286 Forbes Avenue: Built in 1884. The structure is a one story, 1000 square foot, six room, three bedroom, one bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided house, with a detached garage. The last sale of this property was in 1993 and the sale price was $39,900. The current owners of record of the property are are Dorie A. Frazier and Kenneth G. Johnson, who reside at 309 Harrison Avenue.

287 Forbes Avenue: Built in 1925. The structure is a one story, 720 square foot, five room, two bedroom, one bathroom, stucco house. The property was on the city vacant house list in 2007. The previous owner of record of the property was Steven R. Johnson, who resided at 576 Bay Street, and the current owner of record of the property is the trustee for the Mortgage Electronic Registration System, Incorporated, of San Diego, California.

288 Forbes Avenue: Built in 1879. The structure is a two story, 3444 square foot, apartment building. The previous owner of record of the property was Kenneth G. Johnson, who resided at 309 Harrison Avenue, and the current owner of record of the rental property is Jeffery Lamkins, who resides in Apple Valley, Minnesota.

292 Forbes Avenue: Built in 1927. The structure is a one story, 1310 square foot, nine room, two bedroom, one bathroom, one half-bathroom, frame bungalow. The property was on the city vacant house list in 2007. The property was last sold for $285,000 and that sale occurred in 2004. The previous owner of record of the property was Mary Gorham and the current owner of record of the property is Marie A. Arver. William G. Gerga, a Private First Class in the USMCR, the son of Frank J. Gerga, was a World War II casualty and resided at the former nearby 303 Forbes Avenue in the early 1940's.

241 Goodhue Street: Built in 1885. The building is a one story, 1114 square foot, seven room, three bedroom, two bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided house, with a detached garage. The house was built by Neil Darrah, an engineer, at the rear of a lot and behind the house where he lived. The 1889 city directory indicates that J. J. Regan resided at this address. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Neil Darrah (1853-1891), of Scottish extraction who died of tuberculosis, resided at this address in 1891. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Mark Hole (1812-1899,) of English extraction who died of old age, and Mary Hole, husband and wife, resided at this address in 1899. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Crescenta M. Gaisbauer resided at this address. James J. Regan (1867- ,) the son of William Regan and Mary Flannigan Regan, was born at Coothill, County Roscommon, Ireland, was educated in national schools in Ireland, was engaged in teaching school until 1883, moved to Montreal, Quebec, Canada, in 1883, was employed by a Montreal hotel from 1883 until 1885, moved to St. Paul in 1885, was employed by the St. Paul National Bank in 1885, was employed by the Second National Bank from 1885 until 1903, married Mary Nolan in 1892, was engaged in an engineers' supplies business, established and was the president of the Engineers Supply Company, a steam power business, was a member of the St. Paul City Council from 1904 until 1907, was the St. Paul city street superintendent after 1907, was the state president of the Ancient Order of Hibernians of America in 1903, was the national vice president of the Ancient Order of Hibernians of America in 1906 and 1907, was the national president of the Ancient Order of Hibernians of America in 1910, was a charter member of the St. Paul Chapter of the Knights of Columbus, resided at 777 Iglehart Street in 1907, and officed at 360 Jackson Street in 1907. The Ancient Order of Hibernians of America was established concurrently in the anthracite coal-mining region of Schuylkill County of Pennsylvania and in New York City, New York, in 1836, was headquartered in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1907, had 50 state boards in 1907, had 2,465 divisions in 1907, and had 217,000 members in 1907. The early Ancient Order of Hibernians in America was a defensive secret society restricted to Irish-born that also assisted Irish immigrants in obtaining jobs and social services. In America, the division is the basic unit of the Order and Divisions are combined into County Boards, which are in turn governed by State Boards, and an overall National Board elected every two years. Annual dances, concerts, and parades sponsored at all levels of the Order raise millions of dollars for charity. The organization also works for the total independence of a united 32-county Ireland by all means constitutional and lawful. The organization is now headquartered in Ronkonkoma, New York. Josephine Darrah ( -1909) died in Ramsey County. Louise C. Darrah ( -1978) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Szalay, and died in Ramsey County. James J. Regan ( -1945) died in Ramsey County. The St. Paul Banner & Sign Company is located at this address. The current owner of record of the property is John C. Domonkos, Jr. In 1879, Robert Nolan, a drayman employed by Beaupre, Allen & Keogh, resided at the former nearby 92 Goodhue Street. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Albert N. Nelson (1884-1926,) the husband of Margie Nelson, who was born in Minnesota to parents who were born in Norway and who died of pulmonary tuberculosis, resided at the nearby former 242 Goodhue Street in 1926. The 1930 city directory indicates that Harry P. Berman resided at the former nearby 241 1/2 Goodhue Street. Bruno Beaupre (1823- ) was a French Canadian who was born in Kingston, Ontario, Canada, moved to Oswego, New York, in 1837, moved to St. Paul in 1853, became a partner in the wholesale and retail grocery business of Temple & Beaupre, which then became Beaupre & Kelly, became McQuillan, Beaupre & Company in 1875, then became Beaupre, Allen & Keogh in 1877, and was Beaupre, Keough & Company in 1886. Bruno Beaupre married Margaret Amelia Bamford in 1853 and the couple had four children.

245 Goodhue Street: Built in 1885 (1886 according to Empson.) The building is a two story, 2190 square foot, 11 room, five bedroom, two bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided house, with a detached garage. Catherine Morrissey built the house. The 1920 city directory indicates that Sidney F. Wall, a clerk for the St. Paul Fire & Marine Insurance Company, boarded at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Anna Murname, the widow of James C. Murname, and Sidney F. Wall both resided at this address. John Morrissey and Catherine Morrissey resided in this neighborhood in the 1860's. The 1879 city directory indicates that Catherine Morrissey, the widow of John Morrissey, and Patrick Morrissey, a feeder employed by the Pioneer Press, both resided on the South side of Goodrich Avenue between Wilkin Street and Forbes Street and that Dennis Morrissey and Michael Morrissey both boarded on the South side of Goodrich Avenue between Wilkin Street and Forbes Street. Sidney Wall ( -1935) died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is Mark A. Masanz. [See note on the St. Paul Fire & Marine Insurance Company for 297 Bates Avenue.]

249 Goodhue Street: Built in 1900 (Built in 1882 according to Empson.) The building is a two story, 1651 square foot, nine room, four bedroom, two bathroom, asbestos-sided duplex, with a detached garage. The house was built for James O'Halloran and Maggie O'Halloran and the couple's daughter, Mary O'Halloran, who moved to this address from Wilkin Street. The house cost $2,000 to build. The 1893 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Treanor resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Hugo Dettbarn, a boilermaker at the Omaha RailRoad shops, and his wife, Selma Dettbarn, and Frank F. Sime, a helper, and his wife, Elizabeth Sime, all resided at this address. John R. Treanor ( -1940) died in Ramsey County. The last sale of this property was in 2002 and the sale price was $191,000. The previous owners of record of the property were Denise R. Berg and Craig H. Snyder and the current owner of record of the property is Denise R. Berg. [See note on the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha RailRoad.]

253 Goodhue Street: Built in 1900 (Built in 1891 according to Empson.) The building is a one story, 1499 square foot, six room, three bedroom, one bathroom, one half-bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided house, with a detached garage. The house was built by Christian Grunewald, a contractor and builder, but Grunewald never resided at this address. The 1893 and 1895 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. H. W. Busse and their daughter all resided at this address. In 1907, Leonard Anderson and his wife, Ida Knutson Anderson, resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that George L. Blenapfl resided at this address. In 1879, Christ Grunewald, a laborer, boarded on Oneida Street between Clay Street and Grace Street. Leonard Anderson (1871- ,) the son of John A. Anderson and Clara Johnson Anderson, was born in Sweden, attended the Red Wing, Minnesota, public schools, in 1888, attended Beeman's Business College in Red Wing, Minnesota, in 1889, married Ida Knutson in 1898, and was the secretary and treasurer of Joseph R. Hanggi & Company, a manufacturer of bank, store, and office fixtures, in 1907. Christ Grunewald ( -1921) died in Stearns County, Minnesota. The property was last sold for $70,000 and that sale occurred in 1999. The previous owners of record of the property were David John Brunner and Lori Ann Williams and the current owners of record of the property are David John Brunner and Lori Ann Brunner. [See note on Josef Hanggi for 200 Summit Avenue.]

257 Goodhue Street: Built in 1882. The building is a one story, 1497 square foot, seven room, three bedroom, two bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. The house was built by Frank Gringiner, a carpenter, for W. J. Gronewald, a contractor. The 1895 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Busse resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that John P. Martinek, a laborer employed the Bohn Refrigerator Company, his wife, Mary A. Martinek, and Ida R. Martinek, a saleswoman employed by Bannons Inc., all resided at this address. William J. Gronewald ( -1925) and John Martinek ( -1943) both died in Ramsey County. William Fredrich Busse ( -1922) died in Nobles County, Minnesota. The current owner of record of the property is Mary Mercedes Erjavec. [For more information on Gebhard Bohn, see 761 Summit Avenue.]

266 Goodhue Street: Built in 1884. The building is a two story, 2122 square foot, nine room, four bedroom, two bathroom, asbestos-sided house. The house was built by Paul Metzger at the cost of $3,500. The 1885 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Paul Metzger resided at this address. In 1895, Stanislous Schneider, the proprietor of the Home Trade Saloon, resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Gunner C. Camp, a millwright, resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Armond W. Bergquist, a driver with the Crescent Creamery Company, and his wife, Blanche Bergquist, Walter S. Bassett, associated with the Capitol City Rug Cleaners, and his wife, Emily Bassett, all resided at this address. In 1879, Paul Metzger resided at the corner of Goodhue Street and Stewart Avenue. The property was last sold in 2002 with a sale price of $185,000. The current owner of record of the property is Margaret A. Nelson, who resides in Minneapolis. [See note for Crescent Creamery Company for 343 Michigan Street.]

267 Goodhue Street: Esch-Skok House/Frank Skok House; Built in 1872; Post-Civil War Italianate in style. The building is a two story, 1776 square foot, eight room, two bedroom, one bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage. The house was built by Michael Esch ( -1873.) Frank Skok was born in Austria, worked as a blacksmith, and had a smithy on West Seventh Street, where he built and repaired wagons for the neighborhood breweries. As many a two dozen people would reside in the house during Frank Skok's tenure, drawn from his family, his apprentices, and his boarders. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Frank Skok and Mrs. Anna Skok both resided at this address in 1887. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Edith Skok (1889-1906,) the daughter of Frank Skok, who was born in the United States to parents born in Germany and who died of pulmonary tuberculosis, resided at this address in 1906. The records of the 1919-1920 Minnesota World War I Soldier's Bonus Board (#6117) indicate that Edward Skok (1894- ,) a 1917 draftee and a Sergeant in the 44th Ordnance Corps, who was born in St. Paul, had brown eyes, brown hair, and a dark complexion, was 5' 9 1/4" tall, was a mechanic at induction, served in the American Expeditionary Force in France, in Aisne-Marne, was in the wagon and auto business employed by Skok Auto & Wagon Company after the completion of service, and was unmarried, resided with his parents, Frank Skok and Anna Skok, at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Frank Skok resided at this address. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Frank Skok (1837-1922,) the husband of Anna Skok, who was born in Austria to parents born in Austria and who died of myocarditis, resided at this address in 1922. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Anna Skok, the widow of Frank Skok, resided at this address. An artist and blacksmith owned the house in 1980, restored it, saved it from destuction in 1976, and erected a frame barn to replace the original barn. Frank Skok ( -1911) and Frank Skok ( -1922) both died in Ramsey County. The previous owner of record of the property is David J. Christofferson and the current owners of record of the property are Catherine Mayo Carlson and David John Christofferson. David Christofferson is an illustrator, a metalsmith, and a boatbuilder. David Christofferson assisted St. Paul potter Peter Deneen in the development of "glaze engraving," an exclusive process in which original studio art is cut directly into the clay and filled with glaze. David Christofferson is no longer able to do silver-smithing because of diminishing vision. David Christofferson and Karen Hultgren have two children, Bruce Christofferson and Brian Christofferson. Graphicreations, a commercial art business, and Catherine Carlson, a graphic designer, are also located at this address.

268 Goodhue Street: Built in 1900 (1902 according to Empson.) The building is a one story, 1243 square foot, seven room, three bedroom, two bathroom, frame bungalow. The house was built for Anna Poppler as an investment from the proceeds of the life insurance policy on her deceased husband, Frank Poppler. The 1930 city directory indicates that Arthur O. Nelson, a carrier, and his wife, Mande Nelson, resided at this address. Frank Poppler ( -1928) died in Carver County, Minnesota, and Frank J. Poppler ( -1947) died in Dakota County. The last sale of this property was in 2004 and the sale price was $121,000. The current owners of record of the property are Cathy J. Peterson and Steven G. Peterson, who reside at 466 Macalester Street.

269 Goodhue Street: Built in 1880. The building is a two story, 1760 square foot, ten room, four bedroom, two bathroom, stucco duplex, with a detached garage. The house was built by Edward Penshorn, the brother of Otto Penshorn. The 1887 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Hardy resided at this address. The 1889 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Julius Herrmann and Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Hardy all resided at this address. The 1891 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Herrmann resided at this address. World War I veteran Edward J. Dion (1891- ), a Private, resided at this address in 1919. The 1920 city directory indicates that Clarence J. Dion, a ruler employed by the Leslie-Donahower Company, Edward J. Dion, a clerk employed by Robinson Cartage & Storage Company, and Clara Berry, the widow of John Berry, all boarded at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Edward G. Penshorn and Mrs. Clara Berry, the widow of John Berry, both resided at this address. Otto E. Penshorn (1879-1961) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Amos, and died in Ramsey County. Edward O. Penshorn ( -1921,) John B. Hardy ( -1928,) Clara A, Berry ( -1947,) and Edward G. Penshorn ( -1953) all died in Ramsey County. Edward J. Dion ( -1937) died in Hennepin County. Clarence James Dion (1892-1957) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Sauter, and died in Hennepin County. The upper portion of this duplex was cited by the City of St. Paul for code enforcement violations in 1997. The last sale of this property was in 2003 and the sale price was $132,900. The current owner of record of the property is David Rychlicki, who resides in Roseville, Minnesota.

272 Goodhue Street: Built in 1880 (1875 according to Empson.) The building is a two story, 1660 square foot, eight room, two bedroom, one bathroom, one half-bathroom, frame duplex, with a detached garage. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Agnes Rose and John E. Kindgren, a salesman employed by the Purity Baking Company, and his wife, Lola B. Kindgren, all resided at this address. Herman Schnell, a partner in Frank & Schnell, dealers in cutters and grinders, resided at this address in the late 1800's. Herman Schnell (1843-1905) was born in Germany and died in Ramsey County. Agnes I. Rose ( -1940) and John E. Kindgren ( -1946) both died in Ramsey County. Lola B. Kindgren ( -1948) died in Nicollet County, Minnesota. The current owner of record of the property is Shirley M. Rodgers. [See note on the Purity Baking Company for 938 Wakefield Avenue.]

273 Goodhue Street: John Hassell/Phillip Fabel/Philip Fabel/Philip Fable House; Built in 1856 (1850's according to Empson; 1864 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Greek Revival/Southern in style. The building is a one story, 1660 square foot, six room, two bedroom, two bathroom, frame bungalow, with a detached garage. When it was built, the house was outside the boundaries of the city. The house features a soapstone sink, birch cabinets, and pine flooring in the kitchen. The house is one of the few houses in the area that remain on its original 80 foot wide lot. The house been subject to past building additions, resulting in an upper floor that utilizes the "railroad train" approach to room design, with passage to one room through another room. In 1869, Orlando Simons, a New York-born lawyer and a Minnesota judge, resided at this address. In 1870, Phillip Fabel (1836-1921,) a shoemaker, resided at this address. In 1872, a $1,100 addition was made to the house. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Philip Fabel resided at this address in 1874. The 1885 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Phillip Fabel resided at this address. The 1887 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Phillip Fable resided at this address. The 1889, 1891, 1893, and 1895 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. Phillip Fable and their daughter and George Fable resided at this address. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Conrad Fabel (1809-1892,) who died of brain softening, resided at this address in 1892. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Henry Fabel (1874-1893,) who died of phthisis, resided at this address in 1893. The 1906 Jubilee Manual of the House of Hope Presbyterian Church indicates that Walter E. Fabel, a member of the church since 1905, resided at this address. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Sophie Fabel (1855-1914,) the wife of Philip Fabel, who was born in New Jersey to parents born in Germany and who died of diptheria, resided at this address in 1914. The 1916 city directory indicates that Phillip Fabel resided at this address. The house was stuccoed in 1920. The 1920 city directory indicates that Phil Fabel, a shoemaker with a shop located at 187 West Seventh Street, resided at this address. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Philip Fabel (1836-1921,) the widower father of Walter E. Fabel, who was born in Germany to parents born in Germany and who died of a cerebral hemorrhage, resided at this address in 1921. The 1930 city directory indicates that Ignatius Ganas, a laborer, his wife, Stella Ganas, Chester Ganas, a helper, Julia Ganas, a clerk employed by Paramount Pies Inc., Martha D. Ganas, a checker employed by the Elk Laundry Company, and Stella Ganas, a sorter, all resided at this address. John Hassell was a St. Paul police officer. Orlando Simons (1824-1890) was born in Lyons, New York, attended the Elmira, New York, Academy, attended the Chester Academy, read the law, moved to St. Paul in 1849, was the law partner of Henry Masterson, was elected justice of the peace over Lot Moffet 192 votes to 39 votes in 1850, was a signer of a petition to U. S. President Millard Fillmore to remove Aaron Goodrich from his position as Minnesota Territorial Supreme Court Chief Justice in 1850, was the first City Justice from 1854 until 1860, was appointed Associate Judge of the Common Pleas Court of Ramsey County in 1875, was a judge of the Second Judicial District from 1876 until 1890, was the subject of a writ of prohibition from the Minnesota Supreme Court for implementing an unconstitutional legislative delegation of authority to the judiciary in ordering the incorporation of the Village of Hamline, Minnesota, in State of Minnesota ex rel. F. W. Luly v. Simons, 32 Minn. 540 (1884,) and died in St. Paul. Philip Fabel was the son of Conrad Fabel and was the founder of the Fabel Shoe Store in the Seven Corners area. Philip Fabel began selling handmade shoes in 1856. In 1879, Philip Fabel, the proprietor of a boot and shoes store located at 110 West Third Street who resided at 28 Goodhue Street, was a member of the board of directors of the German Society of St. Paul. The 1879 city directory indicates that Conrad Fabel, a shoemaker with a shop located at 79 Eagle Street, also resided at 79 Eagle Street, that Edward Fabel, a barber with a shop located at Third Street and Eagle Street, resided on the South side of Eagle Street, two doors East of Exchange Street, and that George Fabel, a clerk employed by Philip Fabel, boarded at 28 Goodhue Street. George Henry Fabel (1896-1964) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Mielke, and died in Olmsted County, Minnesota. John Olaf Hassell (1880-1959) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Johnson, and died in Ramsey County. Philip Fabel ( -1921,) Ignacy Ganas ( -1940,) and Stella Ganas ( -1954) all died in Ramsey County. Walter Edward Fabel (1917-1981) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Roberts, and died in Dakota County, Minnesota. Chester R. Ganas ( -1969) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Schipp, and died in Hennepin County. Henry Fabel was the nephew of Philip Fabel. The property was last sold in 1996 with a sale price of $52,500. The current owner of record of the property is Sean Christian Kershaw. Tim Hawkins and Sean Kershaw have restored the house, including the removal of the stucco exterior. Sean Kershaw, a graduate of Haverford College, is the Executive Director/President of the Citizen's League, after having been a member of the organization since 1996, and is the former Deputy Director for the City of St. Paul's Department of Planning and Economic Development under Mayor Norm Coleman. Kershaw also was a former planning coordinator for the Public Housing Authority in Omaha, Nebraska. Sean Kershaw adopted a son, Aidan Kershaw, in 2000, with his partner, Tim Hawkins, and has subsequently adopted a daughter, Grace. The Citizen's League was founded in 1952, has 1,800 members, involves citizens in studying public issues and developing policy solutions, and focuses on public policy issues at the local, metropolitan and state levels. In its earliest days, the League focused almost exclusively on Minneapolis city government and charter reform. During the 1960's, the League recognized the emergence of the Twin Cities as a metropolitan area, expanded both its membership and programs of study to the regional level, and played a major role in the creation of the Metropolitan Council and proposed tax-base sharing, financing sanitary sewers, acquiring regional park land and establishing Metro State University. In the early 1970's, the League began to emphasize the importance the importance of redesigning the delivery of public services and in shifting functions to the private sector. In the 1980's, the League emphasized the Use of market forces to improve public services. In the 1990's, the League focused on improving public services and public finance systems, reforming Minnesota's major spending systems, and revitalizing a sense of community.

276 Goodhue Street: Built in 1874 (1870 according to Empson.) The building is a one story, 1529 square foot, ten room, six bedroom, two bathroom, asbestos-sided bungalow, with a detached garage. The house was built by John Herzog, a blacksmith. In the early 1880's, Mary Lydon and Bessie Letford, tobacco strippers, both resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Louis O. Carlson, a stagehand, boarded at this address and that Peter Carlson resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Frank B. Kodada, a helper employed at the Omaha Shops, and his wife, Bessie E. Kodada, resided at this address. Bessie E. Kodada (1898-1977) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Peijman, and died in Ramsey County. Frank B. Kodada (1900-1978) had a mother with a maiden name of Buchta and died in Ramsey County. The last sale of this property was in 1994 and the sale price was $28,618. The current owner of record of the property is Virginia A. Walraven. The 1885 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Phillip Fabel resided at the former nearby 278 Goodhue Street. [See note on the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha RailRoad.]

280 Goodhue Street: Built in 1869. The building is a two story, 1176 square foot, six room, three bedroom, one bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided house, with a detached garage. Mr. and Mrs. John W. Janssen, the parents of World War I veteran William August Janssen, resided at this address in 1918. World War I veteran William A. Janssen resided at this address in 1919. The 1920 city directory indicates that John W. Janssen, a carpenter, resided at this address and that William A. Janssen, a clerk for the Great Northern RailRoad, Alvina Janssen, a teller for the First National Bank, Clara L. Janssen, a bookkeeper for Jenkins & Carley, Ida Janssen, a milliner, Irma Janssen, a stenographer, J. Fred Janssen, a mech dentist, and Olga Janssen, a stenographer with Belding Brothers & Company, all boarded at this address. The records of the 1919-1920 Minnesota World War I Soldier's Bonus Board (#16988) indicate that William August Janssen (1892- ,) a 1918 draftee and a Private in Company B of the 344th Machine Gun Battalion, who was born in St. Paul, had grey eyes, light brown hair, and a ruddy complexion, was 6' tall, was a bookkeeper at induction, served in the American Expeditionary Force in France, including St. Mihiel and the Argonne Forest, was gassed in the Argonne Forest, was issued a silver Victory button, was an accountant employed by the Great Northern RailRoad after the completion of service, and was unmarried, resided with his father, John W. Janssen, at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that John W. Janssen and his wife, Bertha Janssen, resided at this address. The Great Northern RailRoad began in 1857 as the Minnesota & Pacific RailRoad Company, when the Minnesota Legislature granted it a charter. In 1862, the St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad Company acquired the rights to the railroad after they had been forfeited to the State. The St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad ultimately was foreclosed upon in 1879, and the properties were reorganized as the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba Railway Company, with St. Paul businessman James J. Hill, the "Empire Builder," as its general manager. By the close of 1885, the system of main and branch lines had grown to 1,470 miles. The completion of the Great Northern RailRoad as a transcontinental line to the Pacific occurred in 1893. Belding Brothers & Company sold dry goods and trimmings, began in the late 19th Century, and was a silk manufacturer around World War I. The Belding Brothers & Company were silk manufacturers in Rockville, Connecticut, with additional mills in Northampton, Massachusetts, Belding, Michigan, San Francisco (Petaluma,) California, and Montreal, Canada. The brothers who owned the business, Hiram H. Belding (1835-1890,) Alvah Norton Belding (1838-1925,) and Milo Merrick Belding (1833-1917,) had extensive business interests in other areas, including the Belding Building Loan Association, the Belding Land Improvement Company, the Hotel Belding, and the Citizens Electric Light Company. In 1860, Hiram H. Belding and Alvah N. Belding began selling manufactured silk from house to house in Ionia County, Michigan, with the silk purchased for them by their older brother, Milo M. Belding, who then resided in Ashfield, Massachusetts. By 1861, the Belding Brothers had extended the scope of their trade so that it required the service of several teams and wagons, and embraced the largest part of the bogging trade of the sections in which they were operating. By 1867, the brothers started manufacturing silk in Rockville, Connecticut, the business rapidly increased, and Belding Brothers & Company became one of the largest silk manufacturers in the world. Belding, Michigan, was named for the brothers in 1871. Belding Brothers & Company established their first mill in Belding, Michigan, in 1887. The Belding Museum is located in the historic Belrockton, the last remaining boarding house of the three provided by the Belding Brothers & Company for its single female workers. The company employed hundreds of young women and earned Belding, Michigan, the title of "Silk City of the World." Following the closing of the company's silk mills in 1935, the "Bel" served as a residential training center for the National Youth Administration. In an example of federally sponsored Work Projects Administration (WPA) art during the Great Depression, Marvin Beerbohm painted "Belding Brothers and Their Silk Industry" in 1943 for the Belding, Michigan, Post Office. The Belding School, located in the Old Irving Park neighborhood of Chicago and built in 1901, was named in honor of Hiram H. Belding, one of the Belding brothers, who moved to Chicago in 1864 to take charge of a wholesale silk house. John W. Janssen ( -1938) and Bertha A. Janssen ( -1944) both died in Ramsey County. William A. Janssen (1892-1978) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Lemke, and died in Ramsey County. Clara L. Janssen (1890-1967) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Lemke, and died in Ramsey County. Ida Janssen (1887-1982) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Lemke, and died in Ramsey County. Olga Margaret Janssen (1899-1981) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Lemke, and died in Ramsey County. Erna E. Janssen (1899-1983) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Lemke, and died in Ramsey County. The property was last sold for $55,000 and that sale occurred in 1996. The current owner of record of the property is Heidi T. Rechtiene. [See note on the Great Northern RailRoad.]

281 Goodhue Street: John Skok House; Built in 1873; Greek Revival in style. The building is a two story, 1128 square foot, six room, two bedroom, one bathroom, frame house. John Skok was a butcher on West Seventh Avenue and was the brother of Frank Skok, who owned the house at 267 Goodhue Street. The Skok family resided here until 1995. The house has been restored. World War I veterans Adolph Skok (1886- ,) a Corporal, and Edward Skok (1894- ,) a Sergeant, both resided at this address in 1919. The 1920 city directory indicates that Adolph Skok, a blacksmith, resided at 253 West Fairfield Avenue, that Emil Skok, a machinist with the Hydraulic Manufacturing Company, resided at this address, and that Edward Skok, a garageman, boarded at this address. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Emil Skok and Frank R. Vanek both resided at this address in 1923. The 1930 city directory indicates that Emil Skok, a blacksmith employed by the St. Paul Hydraulic Hoist Company, and his wife, Anna Skok, resided at this address. John Skok was a grocer and a butcher who came to St. Paul in 1872. John Skok ( -1944) died in Ramsey County. Frank Skok ( -1911) and Frank Skok ( -1922) both died in Ramsey County. Edward J. Skok (1894-1973) died in Ramsey County. Emil J. Skok (1924-1993) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Simdelka, and died in Ramsey County. Emil Skok (1883-1961) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Meskan, and died in Dakota County, Minnesota. The property was last sold in 2003 with a sale price of $167,000. The current owners of record of the property are Ryan M. Kelly and Katherine E. Nelson. [See note on St. Paul Hydraulic Hoist for 773 East Sixth Street.]

284 Goodhue Street: Built in 1900 (1868 according to Empson.) The building is a two story, 2684 square foot, ten room, five bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided house, with a detached garage. The 1916 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. E. G. Henry and their daughter all resided at this address. The house was built by Patrick O'Dea, a stone mason. John Davie was a World War I veteran who resided at this address in 1919. The 1920 city directory indicates that Marie Barsch, the widow of Harold E. Barsch and a waiter at the Golden Rule, boarded at this address and that Marie Bausch, the widow of Harold Bausch and a waiter, resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Louis O. Carlson, a theatrical mechanic, and John C. Silgen, a clerk employed by the Northern Pacific RailRoad, and his wife, Sonora Silgen, all resided at this address. John Davie ( -1934) died in Becker County, Minnesota. John Charles Silgen (1894-1975) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Schmidt, and died in Hennepin County. The last sale of this property was in 1993 and the sale price was $33,855. The previous owners of record of the property were Andrei V. Michelson and Valerius L. Michelson and the current owners of record of the property are Andrei V. Michelson and Nadezhda V. Michelson. [See the note for the Golden Rule Department Store for 657 East Fourth Street.] [See note on the Northern Pacific RailRoad.]

285 Goodhue Street: Built in 1880 (1875 according to Empson.) The building is a two story, 2156 square foot, seven room, four bedroom, one bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided house, with a detached garage. The house was built by John Keogh, who was a railroad engineer. The 1895 city directory indicates that John Keogh, a lamp tender for the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha RailRoad, resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Edward Riley, and his wife, Helen Riley, resided at this address. Donna Marie Gordon, who resides at Apartment #1 at this address, was a party in the 2000 Minnesota Court of Appeals case Stark v. Buhl, relating to the amount of child support payable by a recipient of Supplemental Security Income. John Keogh ( -1919) died in St. Louis County, Minnesota. John T. Keogh ( -1917) died in Crow Wing County, Minnesota. Edward Riley ( -1933) died in Ramsey County. Helen Kiesner Riley (1905-1996) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Coakley, and died in Hennepin County. Helen Rose Riley (1901-1988) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Mooney, and died in Hennepin County. The current owner of record of the property is Rosendo Lucio. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Mary Ann Wright (1833-1911,) the widowed mother of Isabelle Ann Wright, who was born in England to parents also born in England and who died of pneumonia and old age, resided at the nearby former 286 Goodhue Street in 1911. Mary A. Wright ( -1911) died in Ramsey County. Isabelle M. Wright ( -1911) died in Washington County, Minnesota. [See note on the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha RailRoad.]

289 Goodhue Street: Otto Penshorn House; Built in 1880 (1875 according to Empson.) The building is a two story, 1648 square foot, six room, four bedroom, two bathroom, asbestos-sided house. The house was built for Otto Penshorn, an upholsterer. The 1930 city directory indicates that Elgyn D. Baker, a salesman, and Leo Vokaty both resided at this address. Otto E. Penshorn (1879-1961) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Amos, and died in Ramsey County. Elgyn Baker ( -1938) and Leo Vokaty ( -1944) both died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is Deanna Marie Clemons. The 1885 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. William Theobald and Adam Petermann all resided at the former nearby 290 Goodhue Street.

Irvine Park Architectural and House History, Part 2

Irvine Park Architectural and House History Hike Walking Tour Route

Back to the Thursday Night Hikes homepage

Information from the University of Minnesota, Northwest Architectural Archives, was used in this webpage. Information from Donald Empson, Portrait of a Neighborhood, St. Paul, Minnesota, Donald Empson, 1980, also was used in this webpage.

In 1920, the Cosmopolitan State Bank was located at 106 East Fourth Street and its officers were R. N. Katz, president, J. B. Calmenson, vice president, Joseph Bellis, cashier, and L. A. Brandenburg, assistant cashier. The Cosmpolitan Bank was not listed in the 1911, the 1915 or the 1930 city directories.

This webpage was last modified on August 11, 2011.