Thursday Night Hikes: Irvine/Cherokee Park Hike Architecture Notes, Part 1


Thursday Night Hikes: Irvine/Cherokee Park Hike Architecture Notes, Part 1

Observations on Architectural Styles

Irvine Park to Cherokee Park Hike

Assembled by

Lawrence A. Martin

Webpage Creation: June 14, 2001

General.

The earliest known name for the area where the City of St. Paul is located was "I-Mni-za Ska Dan," or "White Rock." That Dakota name apparently comes from the high limestone bluffs in the area. Nearby Fort Snelling was built during the period 1819-1825 to regulate the fur trade. Initially, nonnative settlement in the area of Minnesota was limited, with that restriction to be enforced by the fort. The American and Columbia fur companies built headquarters nearby the fort and the families of the fur company employees settled at nearby Mendota, Minnesota. Eventually, the fort spawned an inevitable squatters camp in its shadow. Soon, the military officers at the fort and the residents of Mendota became disturbed by the life style of the residents of the squatters camp, most of whom were Swiss, Scotch, and French refugees from the ill-fated Selkirk Colony near Fort Garry in Manitoba, who had first arrived at the fort in 1827.

Two treaties in 1837, one with the Dakota and another with the Ojibway, opened the triangle between the Mississippi River and the St. Croix River to nonnative settlement. Major Lawrence Talliaferro, the Indian Agent at the nearby St. Peter's Indian Agency, issued a proclamation in 1839 banishing the squatters from lands controlled by the Fort and they moved down the river to the northeast, just outside the Fort's jurisdiction, to Fountain Cave. In 1838, a retired illiterate Canadian fur trapper and bootlegger, Pierre "Pig's Eye" Parrant or Parraut, had established his base of operations at Fountain Cave. The nickname "Pig's Eye," apparently related one of Parrant's eyes that had a "piggish expression," had its source in the Fort Snelling suttler, Roswell P. Russell. The Fountain Cave area became known as "Pig's Eye" when mail began to be delivered to Parrant's business. Before he moved on, Parrant owned about 36 blocks of what would become downtown St. Paul. Soon after the Selkirkers set up their new squatter camp, Major Lawrence Taliaferro was successful in extending the jurisdiction of the Fort to include the Fountain Cave site and Major Joseph Plympton, the fort commandant, sent soldiers under the direction of the U. S. Marshal, to burn the new encampment. Responding to complaints from the settlers, the Wisconsin Territorial Legislature objected to the military extending its reserve to the Wisconsin Territory's side of the Mississippi River. The settlers then moved further down the river, settling in what is now part of downtown St. Paul. After being named Grand Marais, or "big swamp", the settlement was renamed Pig's Eye Landing. In 1841, the French priest Rev. Lucien Galtier succeeded in changing its name to Saint Paul, naming it after his new chapel and in honor of his favorite saint. Lawrence Taliaferro (1794-1871,) the son of James Garnett Taliaferro and Wilhelmina Wishart Taliaferro, was born at the Whitehall plantation in King George County, Virginia, enlisted as a volunteer in a Virginia militia company during the War of 1812, served with Josiah Snelling at the battle of Fort Erie in the War of 1812, was promoted a Lieutenant, was appointed by President Monroe in 1819 as permanent Indian Agent at Fort Snelling, served as the Indian agent from 1820 until 1839, was named by Dakota Chief Little Crow "No-Sugar-in-Your-Mouth," was the owner of Harriet Robinson, who married Dred Scott while both were at Fort Snelling, had a daughter born of a part-Indian woman at St. Peter, Minnesota, presided over the drafting of a treaty in 1837, resigned in poor health in 1840, returned to his home in Bedford, Pennsylvania, after resignation, married Elizabeth Dillon, was later appointed a Military Storekeeper, and died at Bedford, Pennsylvania. Mary L. Taliaferro (Mrs. Warren C.) Woodbury ( -1916,) the daughter of Lawrence Taliaferro and Mary/"the Day Sets" or "the Sun Sets" Taliaferro, a daughter of Chief Cloudman of Lake Calhoun, Minnesota, married in 1848, resided at the South St. Paul area prior to 1860, was held captive during the 1862 Dakota uprising, moved to Santee, Nebraska, in 1887 or 1890, and died at Santee, Nebraska. Warren Woodbury (1835-1863,) a member of Company G of the Fifth Minnesota Infantry, died shortly after the Battle of Vicksburg, Mississippi, during the American Civil War. Roswell P. Russell (1820-1896) was born in Richland, Vermont, moved to Michigan in 1836, came to Fort Snelling with Henry M. Rice in 1839, was a suttler's clerk at Fort Snelling, Minnesota, opened the first store in St. Anthony, Minnesota, in 1847, married Marion Patch at St. Anthony Falls, Minnesota, in 1848, was engaged in lumber and flour milling, was a member of the first Ramsey County Board of Commissioners in 1849, was a member of the territorial House of Representatives representing Hennepin County (District 3) in 1853, was a receiver in the U. S. Land Office from 1854 until 1857, was the first chairman of the St. Anthony Falls, Minnesota, town board, resided on Main Street near Manitoba Crossing in Minneapolis in 1860, later resided at 115 Third Avenue Northeast in Minneapolis, was a member of the Minneapolis School Board from 1884 until 1887, and died in Minneapolis. Roswell P. Russell and Marion Patch Russell were the parents of Lucy C. Russell (Mrs. W. C.) Colbrath, Charles M. Russell, Roswell P. Russell, Mary Bell Russell (Mrs. F. M.) Prince, Carrie E. Russell (Mrs. F. L.) Lovejoy, Frank Russell, Fred Russell, George B. Russell ( -1881,) and William Russell, and Edward E. Russell. Lucien Galtier (1811-1866) was born in Ardeches, France, was a student of theology in the seminary in his native diocese under then Bishop Loras, was persuaded along with Joseph Cretin, Augustin Ravoux, and Joseph Pelamourgues to become a missionary in western America, landed in New York in 1838, completed his studies at Emmetsburg College in Maryland, was ordained a Catholic priests in 1840, built the chapel of St. Paul near Dayton's Bluff, continued missionary activities throughout the Iowa, Wisconsin, and Minnesota area, and died at Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin.

St. Paul was incorporated as a town in 1849, having been platted two years before. The City of St. Paul was originally established as the "The Town of St. Paul" by an act of the Legislative Assembly of the Territory of Minnesota in November of 1849. On March 3, 1849, Minnesota was named a territory and Saint Paul was named its capital. The effect of becoming a territory on Saint Paul was immediate and profound. Within three weeks of becoming a territory, the village doubled in size, with seventy new buildings erected, bringing to 142 the number of buildings in the town. The 1851 town census, as reported by W. G. Le Duc, found that Saint Paul had 1294 inhabitants in 257 families with 45 different occupations (five blacksmiths, six butchers, four bar keepers, two bakers, four barbers, three boarding house keepers, one bookkeeper, four brickmakers, 69 carpenters, 25 clerks, five cooks, two cigarmakers, one constable, two draymen, two editors, 77 farmers, ten grocers, six gamblers, four hotelkeepers, two judges, 153 laborers, 17 lawyers, three livery stable keepers, two lumbermen, 21 mechanics, three ministers, 46 merchants, two millwrights, nine printers, ten painters, five plasterers, six physicians, one postmaster, one peddler, five surveyors, three saddlers, one sailor, three school teachers, 13 stone masons, 13 teamsters, six tailors, two tinners, two wheelwrights, one watchmaker, and one wagon maker.) Saint Paul remained a town until 1854, when it became the "City of Saint Paul, Minnesota Territory". In May of 1858, when Minnesota became a state, the city became known as "The City of Saint Paul, State of Minnesota". When "The Town of St. Paul" came into existence in 1849, it occupied approximately 280 acres. The original town site consisted of two subdivisions (plats,) the "Town of Saint Paul" (sometimes refered to as the "Saint Paul Proper") and "Irvine & Rice's addition," officially filed as "Rice and Irvine's addition" to Saint Paul. The original town site boundaries were Elm Street on the west, Smith Avenue and East Seventh Street on the north, Wacouta Street on the east, and the left bank (as one heads upstream) of the Mississippi River on the south. Between the years 1849 and 1887, Saint Paul went through 14 boundary changes: to the west, Summit Avenue in 1871 and Macalester Park during the period 1883-1888; to the southwest, along West Seventh Street during the period 1873-1891; and to the north and to the northwest, Arlington Hills in 1873, Lake Como Villas and Lake Como in 1856 and 1857, and St. Anthony Park in 1885. The current boundaries of St. Paul north of the Mississippi River were set in 1887. The city water department was created in 1881, purchasing the former St. Paul Water Company, which was created in 1869 by Henry Mower Rice, George Otis, William Lee, Nathan Myrick, Robert A. Smith, and C. D. Gilfillan.

Fort Road/West Seventh Street was the connection between Fort Snelling and St. Paul. Irvine Park was platted in 1849, when St. Paul was first platted. Along with Rice Park, Irvine Park is the oldest park in St. Paul. The park was developed in a "city square" style. The park was given to St. Paul. Irvine Park is named for James Irvine, a developer who came to Minnesota in 1843. The area was little more than open space at the edge of a marsh when Irvine donated the land for a park. The site of Irvine Park was part of a 300 acre parcel, which became Rice and Irvine's Addition of the city, that was purchased by James Irvine for $300 in 1843. By 1848, when Henry Rice purchased lots in the Rice and Irvine's Addition, land cost $3 per acre. In 1849, once the Minnesota Territory was created, land in the Rice and Irvine's Addition cost $75-$125 per acre. The area around the park was upper middle class housing. The area was a fashionable place to live during the period 1860-1890. Starting in 1849, many prominent citizens lived on or near Irvine Park, including Alexander Ramsey, Henry Moss, Abram Elfelt, Horace Bigelow, Joseph Forepaugh, William Spencer, Henry Carver, Frederick Driscoll, Harry Horn, and Nathaniel Langford. The park and neighborhood reached their early peak in the 1870's. The park's decline began early in the 20th century. With the development of the railroad below the park and the street car system along West Seventh Street, the area became more commercialized and more working and lower class in character, and Irvine Park became unfashionable.

Irvine Park and Cherokee Park are connected by the "High Bridge." The current High Bridge is the third bridge on this site. The first bridge is reported to have been destroyed by a storm (a tornado or straight line winds) in 1905. The second bridge was razed in 1985 to allow for the construction of a more structurally sound bridge. Photos are available of the second bridge. A photo of the demolition of the second bridge is also available.

The Cherokee Park area was not originally part of St. Paul and initially was sparsely settled. The area began to be developed and to be considered part of St. Paul in the 1860's. In 1874, St. Paul made plans to annex that part of Dakota County lying immediately opposite the city on the west shore of the Mississippi. This territory had been platted as the townsite of West St. Paul in 1856, and the legislature granted it a corporate charter in 1858. The fortunes of West St. Paul were closely tied to the Wabasha (then called Dakota) Street bridge, for its proximity to that structure and downtown St. Paul were its primary attractions. The initial city of West St. Paul, however, did not prove to be as popular as its promoters had hoped and it did not develop a substantial tax base. In 1862, the state legislature revoked West St. Paul's charter. The surrounding township, also named West St. Paul, absorbed the former city's territory. St. Paul's interest in the City of West St. Paul reportedly stemmed from its concern over law enforcement. The area lay outside the jurisdiction of St. Paul police, so that criminals often evaded apprehension simply by crossing the Wabasha Street Bridge. By annexing the land, the city hoped to bring law and order to the wild west side of the Mississippi. St. Paul also had another motive for considering the West St. Paul territory. Industrial sites which were adjacent to downtown and had access to rail and river connections were becoming increasingly scarce on the east side of the Mississippi in the 1870's. The west side river flats, by contrast, were undeveloped and obviously had tremendous industrial potential. By acquiring the west side lands, the City Council hoped to assure St. Paul's future industrial and manufacturing growth. In 1874, voters in both Ramsey and Dakota counties overwhelmingly approved the proposition to transfer Old West St. Paul to Ramsey County. The city began constructing a flood wall along the river front in the 1880's. Industrial growth was further encouraged by the Minnesota & Northwestern RailRoad, which built a bridge over the Mississippi in 1886 to introduce rail service to the area. Upper middle class houses were built on the bluff ridge. More modest "mechanics" homes were located inland. Cherokee Park and Lookout Park were acquired by the city in 1903-1906. [See note on the Minnesota & Northwestern RailRoad.]

The 1857 plan for St. Paul included the two parts of the city, St. Paul Proper and Rice and Irvine's Addition.

Specific Structures. The following presents available information on the housing styles of specific structures located along this portion of the hike:

200 Ann Street: Built in 1936. The structure is a one story, 986 square foot, two bedroom, one bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided house. The 1885 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. William De Groot and Mr. and Mrs. Charles Lockwood all resided on Ann Street near the intersection with West Seventh Street. Charles Lockwood (1842-1935), a resident of Chamberlain, South Dakota, in 1930, was the last survivor (outlasting John Goff, who had died three months earlier) of the "Last Man's Club" of 34 veterans of Company B of the First Minnesota Regiment from the Civil War, which was formed in 1885, and he drank a toast at the Sawyer House/Lowell Inn at Stillwater, Minnesota, where the company had partied in 1861 on the eve of their departure for the war in the East, allegedly from an autographed bottle of wine remaining from the 1885 reunion. The group of veterans included Sam Bloomer (1835-1917) and Adam Marty (1836-1923.) Apparently, the original bottle actually was not used for the toast and still is in the collection of the Washington County Historical Society in Stillwater, Minnesota. Records of the Minnesota Adjutant General and other records indicate that Charles M. Lockwood was a Sergeant in the First Minnesota Regiment, Company B, promoted to that rank after the First Battle of Bull Run, was born in Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin, was mustered into the unit on April 29, 1861, from Washington County, Minnesota, was discharged for promotion in 1862, was commissioned by the Governor of Wisconsin as a Second Lieutenant in Company D of the 31st Wisconsin Infantry, participated in Sherman's "March to the Sea," was promoted to First Lieutenant, was appointed Aide-de-Camp to General Robeson and Provost Marshall, and was mustered out at Madison, Wisconsin in 1865. Lockwood moved to Calmer, Iowa, in 1865, and worked there as a grain dealer, married Helen McKight ( -1926) in 1868 and the couple had four children, continued in the grain business at Chamberlain, South Dakota, and in Pukwana, South Dakota, and until 1895, ran the agency store on the Crow Creek Indian Reservation. Charles M. Lockwood resided at the corner of Page Street and Cherokee Avenue in 1887 and at 365 North Bates Avenue in 1889 and 1891. Charles M. Lockwood ( -1935) died of prostate cancer in Hennepin County at the Minnesota Soldier's Home in Minneapolis. The Sawyer House Hotel established in 1857 and was owned by Henry Sawyer. In 1871, the Sawyer House was purchased by Albert Lowell and Jacob Lowell, was torn down in 1924, and was replaced by the Lowell Inn in 1927. The Lowell Inn was purchased by Arthur Palmer and Nell Palmer in 1930, was operated by the Palmer family until 2001, and is now operated by the St. Croix Boat & Packet Company. The property was last sold in 1995 with a sale price of $56,000. The current owners of record of the property are Gerardo Meza Guttierez and Theresa Ortiz Meza.

204 Ann Street: Built in 1890. The structure is a two story, 2016 square foot, four bedroom, two bathroom, frame house. The structure was built as a duplex and was moved to this address from the site of the current Roy Wilkins Auditorium (former St. Paul Auditorium) in 1903. The 1930 city directory indicates that Ferdinand Putzke and his wife, Emelia Putzke, resided at this address. Ferdinand Putzke, a German-born carpenter, resided at this address during World War II and was investigated by the Federal Bureau of Investigation during the war. In 2003, 2004, and 2005, the building was listed by the City of St. Paul as vacant. Ferdinand Putzke ( -1947) died in Ramsey County. The property was last sold in 2006 with a sale price of $245,000. The previous owner of record of the property was Baker Ford Properties, located at 873 Goodrich Avenue, and the current owners of record of the property are Kaori Kenmotso and Timothy Morgan. The 1930 city directory indicates that Walter Fearing, a clerk employed by the Griggs Cooper & Company, and his wife, Delphine Fearing, resided at the former nearby 204 1/2 Ann Street. [See note on Roy Wilkins for the "Spiral for Justice"/Roy Wilkins Memorial/Civil Rights Monument.] [See the note for the Griggs, Cooper & Company for 901 Euclid Street.]

208 Ann Street: Built in 1870. The structure is a one story, 948 square foot, three bedroom, one bathroom, asbestos-sided house. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Emma Wentink, the widow of Albert G. Wentink, and Mary Wentink, a clerk, both resided at this address. John H. Banks resided at this address in 1980. E. Emma Hanson married Albert G. Wentink in 1885 in Duluth, Minnesota. John Harry Banks (1900-1986) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Banks, and died in Ramsey County. The last sale of this property was in 1994 and the sale price was $34,500. The current owner of record of the property is Barbara A. Bean. The 1920 city directory indicates that Frank L. Allars, a salesman, resided at the former nearby 209 Ann Street. The 1930 city directory indicates that Raymond Field, a driver employed by the Northern States Power Company, and his wife, Mamie Field, resided at the former nearby 209 Ann Street. Raymond Field (1896-1987) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Fetzer, and died in Ramsey County. Mamie Field (1900-1994) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Lexa, and died in Ramsey County. [See note on the Northern States Power Company and Henry M. Byllesby for 21-27 South St. Albans Street.]

212 Ann Street: Built in 1870. The structure is a two story, 1296 square foot, five bedroom, one bathroom, one half-bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided house. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Abbie Wels resided at this address. The current owner of record of the property is Michelle A. O'Brien.

213 Ann Street: William G. Gronewald House; Built in 1901. The structure is a one story, 860 square foot, one bedroom, one bathroom, frame house. The house was built by William G. Gronewald, who then sold it to his daughter, who in turn sold it to Joseph Hofer and Beatrice Hofer, who resided at this address from 1933 to 1980. The 1920 city directory indicates that Henry Dolan, a foreman, resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Frank J. Dowdle, a driver for the Twin City Motor Bus Company, and his wife, Estelle P. Dowdle, resided at this address. William G. Gronewald also built the former house at 209 Ann Street in 1901, which was razed in 1964. The 1880 federal census records indicates that William Gronewald (1853- ) was a laborer who was born in Prussia, had parents who were both born in Prussia, was married, and was the head of a household in St. Paul. The Gronewald household in 1880 included his wife, Susanna Gronewald (1853- ,) who was born in Bavaria, who had parents who were both born in Bavaria, and who was a house keeper, his daughter, Susanna Gronewald (1877- ,) who was born in Minnesota, and his other daughter, Wilhelmina Gronewald (1879- ,) who was born in Minnesota. William J. Gronewald ( -1925) died in Ramsey County. Joseph R. Hofer (1909-1987) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Haider, and died in Ramsey County. The house was on the city vacant house list in 2004, in 2005, and in 2007. The current owner of record of the property is Joel Vig. [See note on the Twin City Motor Bus Company for 1402 Portland Avenue.]

216 Ann Street: Built in 1900 (in 1903 according to Empson); Carl P. Wildung, contractor. The structure is a two story, 2162 square foot, four bedroom, two bathroom, brick house, with a detached one car garage. The 1930 city directory indicates that Edward H. Maute, a cashier employed by Brings & Company, George E. Maute, an operator employed by the St. Paul White Lead & Oil Company, and Grace Maute, a clerk employed by Finch, Van Slyck, & McConville, all resided at this address. Church of the Latter Day Saints genealogical records indicate that Carl Wildung married Henrietta Trapp in 1882 in St. Paul. The St. Paul White Lead & Oil Company was a paint manufacturer. Edward H. Maute ( -1936) died in Ramsey County. George Edward Maute (1899-1977) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of McCarthy, and died in Ramsey County. The property was last sold for $71,900 and that sale occurred in 1995. The current owner of record of the property is Kathleen Donohue, who resides at 983 Eleanor Avenue. The records of the 1919-1920 Minnesota World War I Soldier's Bonus Board (#12101) indicate that George B. Fehland (1892- ,) a 1918 draftee and a Corporal in Company F of the 139th Infantry, who was born in St. Paul, had brown eyes, black hair, and a dark complexion, was 5' 5" tall, was a store clerk at induction, served in the American Expeditionary Force in France, including the Grand Ballon Sector, the Wisserling Sector, St. Mihiel, Argonne, and Verdun, was a clerk employed by Swift & Company after the completion of service, and was unmarried, resided with his sister, Mary Fehland, at the nearby former 216 1/2 Ann Street. The records of the 1919-1920 Minnesota World War I Soldier's Bonus Board (#17725) indicate that Alfred O. Olsen (1890- ,) a 1918 draftee and a Private First Class in Company C of the Third Pioneer Infantry, who was born in St. Paul, had blue eyes, light hair, and a fair complexion, was 5' 10 1/2" tall, was a teamster at induction, served in the American Expeditionary Force in France, including Meuse Argonne, was a driver employed by the Boots Fisheries Company after the completion of service, and was married, resided at the nearby former 217 Ann Street. The 1920 city directory indicates that Elizabeth Fehland, a clerk employed by The Emporium, and Marv C. Fehland, an assistant department manager employed by The Emporium, both boarded at the former nearby 216 1/2 Ann Street. The 1930 city directory indicates that Charles H. Maute, a truckman employed by H & L Company, and his wife, Mae Maute, resided at the former nearby 216 1/2 Ann Street and that John A. Peterson, a clerk employed by the Citizens Alliance Free Employment Bureau, and his wife, Alice Peterson, resided at the former nearby 217 Ann Street. Charles H. Maute (1897-1956) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of McCarthy, and died in Ramsey County. Mae Daisy Maute (1906-2000) was born in South Dakota, had a mother with a maiden name of Hiedly, and died in Ramsey County. The Minneapolis Citizens Alliance was a faux-grassroots organization that was formed in 1903 and that was dedicated to preserving "right-to-work" laws. John W. Schroeder (1889-1955) was the executive director of the Citizens Alliance. The leaders of the organization hired a hitman to dynamite the home of a union leader and were prosecuted by Floyd Bjerstjerne Olson (1891-1936,) a Farmer-Labor Party politician and Hennepin County Attorney, in 1923. The Alliance blacklisted union workers, ran a spy network to ferret out union activity, raised a private army to crush opponents with brute force, and ran a free employment service from 1919 to 1936. The influence of the Citizens Alliance also reached across the State of Minnesota to battle socialists, labor unions, the Nonpartisan League, and the Industrial Workers of the World. The Citizens Alliance was involved in the founding of the William Hood Dunwoody Industrial Institute, opposed the 1917 Minneapolis Streetcar Strike, and collaborated with the Minnesota Commission of Public Safety, the Minneapolis Journal, and the Northwest Bancorporation. The Minneapolis Citizens Alliance fought the Teamster's Union Local 574 in three successive strikes known as the Minneapolis Truckers Strike of 1934. Labor leaders of the 1934 strike included Karl Skoglund, Farrell Dobbs, and Vincent Dunne. Floyd B. Olson went on to become Governor of Minnesota in 1930, was reelected in 1932 and 1934, and died of stomach cancer while running as the Farmer-Labor Party candidate for the U. S. Senate. [See note on the St. Paul White Lead & Oil Company for 859 West Linwood Avenue.] [See note on the Battle of Saint-Mihiel for 614 Portland Avenue.] [See note on Finch, Van Slyck & McConnville for 969 West Osceola Avenue.] [See the note for Swift & Company for 110 Robie Street West.]

229 Ann Street: Built in 1890 (in 1914 according to Empson.) The structure is a one story, 1174 square foot, three bedroom, one bathroom, frame house. The house was built on behalf of Fransica Gombold for one of her sons. The 1930 city directory indicates that Frank J. Gombold, a compositor employed by the Daily News Publishing Company, and his wife, Susan Gombold, resided at this address. Frances Gombold ( -1952) died in Ramsey County. Frank J. Gombold (1885-1972) was born in Minnesota and died in Hennepin County. Susan M. Gombold (1892-1969) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Tschida, and died in Ramsey County. The property was last sold in 2004 with a sale price of $148,000. The current owner of record of the property is Aaron J. Courteau. Aaron Courteau is a St. Paul-bred actor in the B-movie "Horror House" that was filmed at the Le Duc Mansion in Hastings, Minnesota.

233 Ann Street: Built in 1890 (in 1910 according to Empson.) The structure is a one story, 1399 square foot, two bedroom, one bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided house, with a detached one car garage. The house was built on behalf of Fransica Gombold for one of her sons. The 1930 city directory indicates that William J. Silk, a foreman employed by Brown & Bigelow, and his wife, Rose Silk, resided at this address. William J. Silk (1896-1971) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Drea, and died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Colleen M. Becker and Rodney J. Becker. [See note on Brown & Bigelow for 757 Linwood Avenue.]

235 Ann Street: Built in 1887 (in 1907 according to Empson.) The structure is a one story, 1641 square foot, four bedroom, one bathroom, frame house. The house was built on behalf of Fransica Gombold for one of her sons. World War I veteran Edward J. Jansen resided at this address in 1919. The 1920 city directory indicates that Edward J. Jansen was a clerk with Swift & Company and resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Frances Gumbold, the widow of Frank Gombold, resided at this address. Frances Gombold ( -1952) died in Ramsey County. Edward J. Jansen (1888-1973) was born outside of Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. The last sale of this property was in 2000 and the sale price was $80,000. The current owners of record of the property are Kibrom W. Haile and Senayit Seyoum Haile, who reside at 2315 Stewart Avenue. [See the note for Swift & Company for 110 Robie Street West.]

237 Ann Street: Built in 1887 (in 1907 according to Empson.) The structure is a one story, 1367 square foot, four bedroom, one bathroom, one half-bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided house, with a detached one car garage. The house was built on behalf of Fransica Gombold for one of her sons. Albert C. Gombold and Rudolph L. Gombold were World War I veterans who both resided at this address in 1919. The 1920 city directory indicates that Alf C. Gombold, a steamfitter, and Rudy L. Gombold, an electrician, both boarded at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Rudolph L. Gombold, an electrician, and his wife, Christine Gombold, resided at this address. Rudolph L. Gombold ( -1946) died in Ramsey County. Alfred Charles Gombold ( -1961) was born in Minnesota and died in Hennepin County. Christine Gumbold resided at this address in 1980 and is the current owner of record of the property. Gombold Electric currently is listed as being located at either this address or at 505 Randolph Avenue and is certified as an Indian-owned business.

238 Ann Street: Built in 1902 (in 1911 according to Empson.) The structure is a one story, 1478 square foot, three bedroom, one bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided house. The house originally faced St. Clair Avenue and was turned to face Ann Street in 1961, when St. Clair Avenue was widened. The current owner of record of the property is Wade M. Walsh.

230 Banfil Street: Built in 1904 (in 1908 according to Empson.) The structure is a two story, 1088 square foot, six room, three bedroom, one bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided house, with a detached one car garage. The house was built by William Haag. The 1930 city directory indicates that Albert Roberts, a cutter employed by the O'Donnell Shoe Company, and his wife, Augusta Roberts, resided at this address. William Haag owned a hardware store at 309 West Seventh Street. Margaret Roberts resided at this address in 1980. William Haag ( -1947) died in Ramsey County. Albert Roberts (1894-1977) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Trovitski, and died in Ramsey County. Augusta Roberts (1894-1978) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Prudenske, and died in Ramsey County. Margaret J. Roberts (1902-1996) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Trovitski, and died in Ramsey County. John Banfil/Banfill (1811-1887) was born in Topsham, Vermont, moved to Dover, New Hampshire, in 1823, and from there to Boston, was a mason, in New Orleans in 1835, fought in the Seminole War in Florida, returned to Albany, New York and, in 1838, married Nancy Foster (1812- ,) of New York City. In 1840, John Banfill and Nancy Banfill moved to Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin, operated the Grant House, then took a contract to build the courthouse in Clayton County, Iowa, returned to Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin, and ran the Prairie House, moved to St. Paul in 1846, and rented the house of Alexander McLeod with the intent of starting a hotel. In 1847, John Banfill made a claim on Rice Creek and kept a tavern there, in Manomin County, Minnesota, and built the Banfill sawmill, was an unsuccessful candidate for county commissioner in 1849, platted Banfill Street in St. Paul in 1851, sold his hotel at Manomin, Minnesota, to Isaac Kimball in 1853, represented the 24th district in the first State legislature in 1857, was the first State Auditor, and moved to Bayfield, Wisconsin, in 1861. Alexander Roderick McLeod (1817-1864,) the son of Alexander Roderick McLeod (1782-1840,) was born in Canada, moved to Minnesota in 1838 or 1839, settled in St. Paul in 1843, was an employee of the American Fur Company, married Nancy Jeffries (1829- ,) built a square log house on land purchased from Benjamin Gervais in which the first territorial legislature met in 1849, operated the Central House, a hotel, enlisted in the Sixth Minnesota Regiment in 1862, and died of disease while in the army at Jefferson Barracks, Missouri. The historic Banfil House is located at 561 West Seventh Street. The property was last sold for $49,900 and that sale occurred in 1992. The current owners of record of the property are Danette G. Matykiewicz and Michael Matykiewicz. Danette Matykiewicz was a member of the Program Committee of the 2003 Conference of the Minnesota Association for the Education of Young Children at the Minneapolis Convention Center. The 1879 city directory indicates that N. P. Lovguin, a carpenter employed by Charles Leonard, boarded at the former nearby 145 Banfill Street, that Findley McCormick, the secretary of the Minnesota State Reform School located at the Ingersoll Block, resided at the former nearby 92 Banfill Street, that Adolphus Moore, a fur buyer with a shop located at 18 Jackson Street, resided at the former nearby 76 Banfill Street, that Isaac D. Morgan, a policeman, resided at the former nearby 97 Banfill Street, that Joseph M. Morgan boards at the former nearby 97 Banfill Street, that Hugh Murnane, a teamster employed by John Martin & Company, and William Murnane, Jr., a laborer, both boarded at the former nearby 141 Banfill Street, that William Murnane, a laborer, resided at the former nearby 141 Banfill Street, that Patrick Murnane, an expressman, boarded at the former nearby 144 Banfill Street, that Annie Nacey was a domestic at the former nearby 76 Banfill Street, that John E. Newell, a policeman, resided at the former nearby 106 Banfill Street, that Henry O'Brien, a clerk employed by Dillon O'Brien, boarded at the former nearby 113 Banfill Street, that John D. O'Brien, a lawyer and a partner with Homer C. Eller in the law firm of O'Brien & Eller, located at the Ingersoll Block, resided at the former nearby 113 Banfill Street, that Mary O'Brien, a teacher at the Jefferson School, boarded at the former nearby 113 Banfill Street, that John O'Donnell, a partner with Henry Warren in O'Donnell & Warren, livery stable and carriage manufacturers and dealers located at 122-124 Exchange Street, resided at the former nearby 44 Banfill Street, and that John O'Donnell, Jr., boarded at the former nearby 44 Banfill Street. In 1854, Findley McCormick was elected St. Paul City Comptoller and in 1860, Findley McCormick was the unsuccessful Republican candidate for St. Paul City Controller. Findley McCormick was involved in real estate and mortgage foreclosure litigation from an 1864 real estate transaction in Israel G. Lash v. Findley McCormick, 17 Minn. 403 (1871.) Adolphus Moore (1822-1897,) the son of James Adolphus Moore (1790-1861) and Jane Austen Moore (1800-1867,) was born either in London, England, or Gloucester Cottage, Parish of Saint Philip & Jacob, Bristol, England, was educated in the common schools of London, learned the fur cutting business in London, emigrated to the United States in 1848, engaged in the fur cutting trade in New York City, married Elisabeth Baldwin ( -1896) in 1850 in New York City, moved to St. Paul in 1856, opened a fur store in the Concert Hall block in 1857, moved to East Third Street between Wabasha Street and Cedar Street, then moved to a store opposite the First National Bank on Third Street, was engaged in the raw fur buying business and the retail fur business until 1864, engaged solely in the raw fur buying business after 1864, was the president of three building associations, and was buried in Oakland Cemetery. Adolphus Moore was married and had a family of two sons, James Adolphus Moore (1856-1916) and Arthur George Moore (1869- ,) and three daughters, Aphra Elizabeth Moore (Mrs. Willis B.) Hawkins (1850-1907,) Anna Maria Moore (Mrs. E. J.) Grumley (1854- ,) and Frances Jane Moore (Mrs. William) Byers (1863-1892.) John D. O'Brien (1851-1913,) the son of Dillon O'Brien, was born in Ireland, came to Minnesota in 1863, moved to St. Paul in 1865, was admitted to the practice of law in 1873, was a partner with Thomas D. O'Brien from 1885 until 1888, was elected a life member of the Minnesota Historical Society in 1903, was a member of the Minnesota Historical Society from 1904 until 1913, and died at Fort Snelling, Minnesota. In 1893, John D. O'Brien represented the St. Paul Daily Globe in litigation with the St. Paul Trust Company as a representative of the estate of the late Norman W. Kittson, and the St. Paul Printing & Publishing Company over control of the newspaper. John D. O'Brien was the president of the St. Paul Moose Lodge #40 from 1909 until 1910. John D. O'Brien was a member, with E. A. Young, Charles W. Ames, R. E. Olds, J. C. Oehler, Rev. Carl Koch, J. Dittenhofer, F. A. Fogg, and F. C. Clemans, of the St. Paul Library Board in 1911. In 1913, John D. O'Brien represented, with Dillon J. O'Brien, the Waldorf Box Company against the Northern Pacific RailRoad in a dispute before the Minnesota RailRoad & Warehouse Commission. Dillon O'Brien (1817-1882) was born in either Tullabeg, County Roscommon, or Kilmore, Ireland, emigrated to the United States between 1856 and 1858, initially was a teacher among Native Americans at La Pointe, Wisconsin, and St. Anthony, Minnesota, settled in St. Paul in 1865, was an author and lecturer, published four novels, The Dalys of Dalystown, published in St. Paul in 1866, and Dead Broke, a Western Tale, published in 1873, Frank Blake, published in 1876, and Widow Melville's Boarding House, published in 1881, was the first editor of the Northwestern Chronicle, a Catholic weekly newspaper, was the secretary of the Catholic Colonization Bureau, and died in St. Paul. Homer C. Eller (1845-1896) was born in Mishawaka, Indiana, was a musician in Company F of the 29th Indiana Regiment during the American Civil War, married Ada Farnam of Indiana, the daughter of Edward Reed Farnam and Harriet Perine Farnam, was an original member of the Acker Post of the Grand Army of the Republic, graduated from the University of Michigan Law School in 1868, moved to St. Paul in 1869, was the author of Digest of Decisions of the Supreme Court of Minnesota: As contained in Volumes 1 to 25 Inclusive of the Minnesota Reports published by West Publishing in 1883, was a partner of Greenleaf Clark and Jared How in the law firm of Clark, Eller & How, from 1885 until 1888, was a partner of Jared How in the law firm of How & Eller in 1896, and died in St. Paul. In 1864 Ireland formed the Minnesota Irish immigration society to promote immigrant aid. In 1864, Rev. John Ireland formed the Minnesota Irish immigration society to promote immigrant aid, but the society was unsuccessful. The Catholic Colonization Bureau was formed by Bishop John Ireland in 1876 to attract Catholics, particularly from Ireland, to Minnesota, where a railroad provided land, and, by 1885, 4,000 German, Irish, and Belgian Catholic families were living in southwestern and west-central Minnesota. Ireland was the sole agent for the St. Paul & Pacific Railroad and held contracts for 369,000 acres in southwestern and mid-central Minnesota, including 75,000 acres in Swift County, Minnesota, from 1876 to 1879. An immigrant family needed a $400 minimum for the first year, eliminating many poor Irish families from the colonization arrangement, but was available for colonists from the Midwest and New England. The colonization scheme settled Irish in promising areas of good farm land within reach of their churches. The land was purchased at a rent. The railroad benefited by the sale of the land and the ensuing railroad fares. The Catholic Colonization Bureau earned the agent's fee of ten percent and had the satisfaction of developing the new territory as Catholic. De Graff, Swift County, Minnesota, Clontarf, Swift County, Minnesota, Adrian, Nobles County, Minnesota, Avoca, Murray County, Minnesota, Iona, Murray County, Minnesota, and Fulda, Murray County, Minnesota, Graceville, Big Stone County, Minnesota, Minneota, Lyon County, Minnesota, and Ghent, Lyon County, Minnesota, became the business centers for the bishop's colonies after 1876. The colonization program ended in 1881. The Graceville, Big Stone County, Minnesota, Connemara colony of 24 destitute Irish Catholic immigrants from County Galway failed in 1880, discrediting the Bureau's efforts in public perception. Southeastern Minnesota became the first major Irish concentration in the state along the Mississippi and Minnesota rivers. The Irish population in southeastern Minnesota peaked in 1870 at over 14,085. Not all immigrants were colonists, but some were railroad workers. In 1880, 870 of railroad officials and employees were Irish constituting six percent of the total Irish labor force and 13.6 percent of the state's railroad employees. Murray County, Minnesota, was a destination because the county was largely depopulated of European settlers by virtue of the Dakota War of 1862 and the Lake Shetek, Minnesota, killings during the war. Dillon O'Brien ( -1880,) the editor of the Northwestern Chronicle, was the secretary of the Catholic Colonization Bureau. The Catholic Colonization Bureau was not the only colonization organization in the state. The Druid Farming and Colonization Company also existed in 1878. John Sweetman, an Irishman, organized the Irish American Colonization Company in Ireland in 1880, following a trip to Minnesota where he purchased tracts of land from the Winona & St. Peter Railroad Company. Irish colonists from the Midwest and New England came from urban backgrounds, were not well prepared for farm life, and eventually migrated back to larger Minnesota cities. Patrick Moore (1830- ) and Norah Moore would be representative of this phenomenon, emigrating in 1850 and 1844 respectively, first resided in Hartford, Connecticut, then initially settled in the St. Croix Valley of Wisconsin in 1855, moved to Stillwater, Minnesota, in 1867, settled on a farm in Kildare, Swift County, Minnesota, in 1876, left Swift County, Minnesota, between 1881 and 1882, and moved to St. Paul, and ran a grocery store and restaurant in St. Paul from 1886 until 1893. [See note on the Northern Pacific RailRoad.] [See note on the Minnesota Railroad & Warehouse Commission for 1321 West Osceola Avenue.] [See note on the the Most Rev. John Ireland for 977 Portland Avenue.] [See note for the St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad.]

232 Banfil Street: Built in 1916 (in 1919 according to Empson.) The structure is a one story, 841 square foot, six room, three bedroom, one bathroom, asbestos-sided house, with a detached garage. The house was built by __?__ Gillen. World War I veteran George E. Ogilvie resided at this address in 1919. The 1920 city directory indicates that George E. Ogilvie, a lawyer, George B. Ogilvie, a clerk, and Marion L. Ogilvie, a copy holder at the Minnesota Typographic Company, all boarded at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that George B. Ogilvie, a chief clerk, and his wife, Kate Ogilvie, resided at this address. In 1907, the Minnesota Typographic Company published A Compendium of Parliamentary Rules by Clarence A. Palmer. Susie Redmon and the Redmon family were residents at this address in 1980. George Burton Ogilvie ( -1943) died in Ramsey County. The property was last sold in 1995 with a sale price of $56,900. The previous owners of record of the property were Darren A. Sjoblom and Deanna M. Sjoblom and the current owner of record of the property is Bruce W. Peterson.

233 Banfil Street: Built in 1909 (in 1908 according to Empson.) The structure is a one story, 1144 square foot, eight room, five bedroom, two bathroom, asbestos-sided house, with a detached garage. The house was built by Henry Teitscheid, who resided at this address until 1968. The 1930 city directory indicates that Henry Teitscheid, a helper employed by the St. Paul Arcade Company, his wife, Sophie Teitscheid, and Dorothy Teitscheid, a cashier employed by Globe Apparel Shop, all resided at this address. Kathy Vadnais and the Vadnais family all resided at this address in 1980. Henry Teitscheid (1878-1972) was born in Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. The last sale of this property was in 2006 and the sale price was $191,000. The previous owner of record of the property was Anne Marie Hagen and the current owners of record of the property are Amy Engebretson and Michele Gillman. Michele Gillman, with a doctorate in music composition from Northwestern University, is a composer and is an Instructor in Musical Theory and Aural Skills at St. Olaf College, Northfield, Minnesota, and a visiting assistant professor of music at Gustavus Adolphus College, St. Peter, Minnesota. Gillman was the executive director and founder of Blue Sky Green Light Studio, a non profit recording studio in Minneapolis which gave young, at-risk youth a chance to experience digital media as a source of creative expression. Michele Gillman was the former choir director of Wicker Park Lutheran Church in Chicago and was a friend, with Aimee Engebretson, of the late Scott Hanselman.

237 Banfil Street: Built in 1921. The structure is a two story, 1308 square foot, six room, three bedroom, one bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. The house was originally located at 302 Arbor Street and was moved to this location in 1965. The current owners of record of the property are Dale A. Sjoblom and Susan A. Sjoblom.

241 Banfil Street: Frederick Scherfenberg House; Built in 1886 (1872 according to Empson;) Mildly Classical Revival in style. The structure is a two (2 1/2 according to the 1982 Ramsey County Historic Sites Survey) story, 1584 square foot, eight room, four bedroom, two bathroom, wood frame aluminum-sided house, with a detached garage. The house features a small half moon in the peak. The 1982 Ramsey County Historic Sites Survey indicates that the house has three bays, a gable roof, one central interior brick chimney, 2/2 rectangular fenestration, semi-circular, small, three panel attic level window, enclosed porch with ornate Victorian brackets and wooden columns, and a segmental arch shaped front door. The house was built by Frederick Scherfenberg, a German-born laborer who lived at this address until the 1890's. The original cost of the house was $2,500. The house was originally numbered 1 Banfil Street and then was numbered 26 Banfil Street. The 1982 Ramsey County Historic Sites Survey indicates that the house is the only house on the block that retains Victorian details. The 1920 city directory indicates that Benjamin F. Dahl, a warehouseman employed by the Washburn Crosby Company, resided at this address and that Emma Erickson boarded at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that William Chariton, a laborer for the St. Paul Department of Public Works, his wife, Anna Chariton, and William Chariton, Jr., a laborer, all resided at this address. Frederick C. Scherfenberg (1839-1907) was born in Germany, emigrated with his family to the United States, settled with his family in St. Cloud, Minnesota, was a store clerk living in St Cloud, Minnesota, in 1861, was mustered into Company D of the First Minnesota Regiment, developed a hernia, was discharged in 1862, married Louisa Amelia Metzger (1846-1928,) the daughter of Frederick Metzger and Rosina Margeretha Zessler Metzger, resided at 26 Banfill Street in 1879, joined the William Acker Grand Army of the Republic Post #21 in 1885, died in St. Paul, and was buried in the Elmhurst Cemetery. Louisa Amelia Metzger Scherfenberg subsequently married Xavier Mannhart in 1862. F. Scherfenberg (1839-1907) was born in Germany and died in Ramsey County. Frederick Scherfenberg was a German-born laborer. William Chariton ( -1944) died in Ramsey County. The property was last sold for $35,440 and that sale occurred in 1995. The current owner of record of the property is Vadim Nmn Tokman, who resides in Eagan, Minnesota. [See note for Cadwallader Colden Washburn, the Washburn Crosby Company, and General Mills for 2201 First Avenue South.]

244 Banfil Street: Built in 1908 (in 1909 according to Empson.) The structure is a two story, 1612 square foot, seven room, three bedroom, two bathroom, asbestos-sided house, with a detached one car garage. The house was built by __?__ Gillen. The 1930 city directory indicates that Edwin W. Brown, an electrician employed by the St. Paul Department of Parks, and his wife, Martha Brown, resided at this address. The Bird family resided at this address from the 1940's until the 1980's. Bruce W. Peterson resided at this address before 2000. Edwin W. Brown (1896-1959) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Dvorak, and died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is Amelia K. Lindgren.

245 Banfil Street: Built in 1921. The structure is a one story, 941 square foot, five room, two bedroom, one bathroom, frame house, with a detached one car garage. The house was built from the parts of the houses that earlier were located on the property. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Matilda Picha (1870-1897,) of Bohemian extraction who died of consumption, and James Picha, husband and wife, resided at this address in 1897. The 1930 city directory indicates that Frank J. Markie, a driver employed by Citizens Ice & Fuel Company, and his wife, Florence Markie, resided at this address. Frank J. Markie (1896-1973) was born in Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. The Oakland Cemetery has significance as a local example of the "rural" cemetery style that swept the nation in the 1800's, where the cemetery is park-like and is planted with many trees. The pre-1852 cemetery, Jason's Woods, was incorporated into a new larger plan that was laid out by William M. R. French and Horace W. S. Cleveland, where they took the rectangular tract of rolling oak savannah and designed an open curvilinear plan that did not change the nature of the topography, but enhance it and maximize its beauty. In 1904, Oakwood Cemetery had 140 varieties of plants within it and, beginning in 1924, the Oakland Cemetery Association planted 1,700 trees, including some elms. By 1938, there were 30,000 trees in the Oakland Cemetery, with over 1,000 of these elm trees that largely succumbed to Dutch Elm disease in the early 1970's. The trees and ornamental plantings and open areas made it an early public "garden." There are 46,700 graves located on its 100 acres of rolling hills. William Marchant Richardson French (1843-1914) was born in Exeter, New Hampshire, came to Chicago to pursue a career in engineering and landscape gardening, worked with Horace W. S. Cleveland, wrote numerous articles and delivered lectures before professional societies, became the Secretary of the Chicago Academy of Design in 1878, became the Secretary of the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts (reorganized as The Art Institute of Chicago in 1882) in 1879, and was a founder, a charter member, and eventually the president of the American Association of Museums. Daniel Chester French, the sculptor of the Quadriga/"Progress of the State" Statue atop the Minnesota State Capitol, was the brother of William M. R. French. The previous owners of record of the property were Aaron Leventhal and Elise B. Leventhal and the current owner of record of the property is Aaron Leventhal. Aaron Leventhal, a 15 year professional soccer player formerly with the Minnesota Thunder, and Fit Training were named in 2007 as the strength and conditioning coaches of the Minnesota Thunder Soccer team.

246 Banfil Street: Built in 1905 (in 1907 according to Empson.) The structure is a two story, 1624 square foot, eight room, three bedroom, two bathroom, asbestos-sided house, with a detached one car garage. The house was built by Edward Peters and was purchased by Patrick J. Lawless, a railroad cashier. The records of the 1919-1920 Minnesota World War I Soldier's Bonus Board (#20452) indicate that John J. Kelly (1889- ,) a 1917 draftee and a Corporal in Company C of the 312th Field Signal Battalion, who was born in St. Paul, had blue eyes, black hair, and a fair complexion, was 5' 9" tall, was a lineman at induction, served in the American Expeditionary Force in France, was a lineman employed by the Tri-State Telephone & Telegraph Company after the completion of service, and was unmarried, resided with his sister, Kathine Taylor, at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Patrick J. Lawless, a clerk employed by the Northern Pacific RailRoad, his wife, Christine M. Lawless, Joseph J. Lawless, a manager employed by the Northern Pacific RailRoad, and Marion Lawless, a student, all resided at this address. Susanne Langworthy resided at this address before 2005. The Minnesota sur Seine jazz festival office was located at this address in 2005. Edward Peters ( -1933) died in Ramsey County. Patrick Lawless (1877-1957) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Golden, and died in Ramsey County. Christina Marie Lawless (1882-1969) was born outside of Minnesota and died in Wadena County, Minnesota. Joseph Lawless ( -1953) died in Ramsey County. Joseph Lawless (1907-1960) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Rose, and died in Ramsey County. The property was last sold in 1997 with a sale price of $53,000. The current owner of record of the property is Sara A. Remke. Sara Remke is associated with Minnesota surSeine music festival, is a co-owner of the Black Dog Coffee & Wine Bar, and was a member of the 2007 Cultural STAR Board of the City of St. Paul, a program to promote economic growth in Saint Paul by strengthening the arts and cultural sector and by supporting Downtown as a vital cultural center. [See note for Tri-State Telegraph & Telephone Company for 596 Portland Avenue.] [See note on the Northern Pacific RailRoad.]

248 Banfil Street: Built in 1904 (in 1905 according to Empson.) The structure is a 1 3/4 story, 1575 square foot, seven room, three bedroom, one bathroom, one half-bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage. The house was built by Patrick J. Lawless, a railroad cashier. The 1920 city directory indicates that Edward F. Brown, a clerk employed by the Capitol City Lumber Company, boarded at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Alfred W. Bartlett, a houseman employed by the Railway Express Agency, his wife, Evelyn Bartlett, Mrs. Elsa Wasley, a widow of William Wasley and a cook employed at 106 East Fifth Street, and Albert W. Wasley, a clerk employed by G. Sommers & Company, all resided at this address. The Railway Express Agency was started in 1839 by William Harriden, was the initial express agency in the country as the American Express Company, and was owned by the private passenger railroads as an umbrella firm to ship packages and other items on passenger trains. By 1900, there were four principal railway express companies, the Adams Express Company, the Southern Express Company, the American Express Company, and Wells Fargo. During World War I, the United States Railway Administration took over the nation's railroads and the four major and three minor express companies, other than a portion of the Southern Express that operated over the Southern Railway and the Mobile & Ohio RailRoad, were consolidated as American Railway Express, Inc. In 1929, the assets and operations of American Railway Express Inc. were transferred to the Railway Express Agency under the ownership of 86 railroads in proportion to the express traffic on their lines. In 1938, the remainder of Southern Express also joined the consolidated Railway Express Agency. The Railway Express Agency concentrated on express refrigerator service from 1940 on, and continued to expand its fleet of express reefers until the mid-1950's and late-1950's, when business declined dramatically due to the increase in refrigerated motor truck shipments. The enterprise withered away as the passenger trains did and as truck and then air shipping companies grew. The official name became "REA Express" in 1969. In 1975, REA Express terminated operations and filed for bankruptcy. Patrick Lawless (1877-1957) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Golden, and died in Ramsey County. Alfred W. Bartlett (1898-1968) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Wigley, and died in Ramsey County. Evelyn Marion Bartlett (1900-1965) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Peterson, and died in Ramsey County. Elsa T. Wasley (1889-1974) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Krueger, and died in Washington County, Minnesota. Gerald Plante resided at this address at some time before 2005. The last sale of this property was in 1995 and the sale price was $71,500. The current owner of record of the property is Margarita Scott.

251 Banfil Street: Built in 1910 (in 1909 according to Empson.) The structure is a two story, 1288 square foot, seven room, four bedroom, one bathroom, one half-bathroom, frame house. The house was built by Samuel Connelly, a collector for the St. Paul City Water Department, in 1930. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Mary Hallauf and James F. Hammer, a baker employed by John Sevcik, and his wife, Bertha Hammer, all resided at this address. John Sevcik ( -1930) and Samuel Connelly ( -1951) both died in Ramsey County. James Frank Hammer (1905-1993) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Heroff, and died in Ramsey County. Bertha T. Hammer (1907-1985) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Stochbauer, and died in Ramsey County. John Sevcik (1889-1957) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Relych, and died in Ramsey County. John Sevcik (1896-1956) was born in Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. The property was last sold for $87,900 and that sale occurred in 1999. The current owner of record of the property is Gloria Noel.

253 Banfil Street: Built in 1889 (in 1882 according to Empson and according to the 1981 Ramsey County Historic Sites Survey;) Mildly Greek Revival/Greek Revival Cottage in style. The structure is a 848 square foot, five room, two bedroom, one bathroom, frame rambler, with a detached garage. The 1981 Ramsey County Historic Sites Survey indicates that the house has a gabled roof, one central brick chimney, 2/2 segmental arch and 1/1 rectangular fenestration, a limestone foundation, a recently added enclosed porch, a main facade with two windows with dog-eared frames and with plain architraves, a main entrance with a segmental arched transom, and a plain freize and cornerboards. The house was built by Charles Haas and originally cost $2,000. The 1895 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Regan resided at this address. In 1900, Mathias Ross, a flour company agent, resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Frank A. Fedkenheyer, a pipeman employed by the St. Paul Fire Department and assigned to Fire Engine Company No. 3, and his wife, Catherine Fedkenheyer, resided at this address. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that the Duffy family resided at this address in 1937. Mathias Ross married Margaret Meyer (1869-1939,) the daughter of Nicholas Meyer and Julia Klinkhammer Meyer, in 1890. Mathias Ross and Margaret Meyer Ross had seven children, Nicholas Ross, Mathias Ross, Jr., Andrew Ross, William Ross, __?__ Ross (spouse Albert Danisch,) Susan C. Ross (spouse Charles Jodel,) and Margaret C. Ross. Charles Haas ( -1920,) Paulina Danisch ( -1943,) William J. Regan ( -1950,) and Mathias Ross ( -1953) all died in Ramsey County. Mathias P. Ross (1892-1978) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Meyer, and died in Ramsey County. Andrew John Ross (1896-1976) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Meyer, and died in Ramsey County. Nicholas A. Ross (1891-1969) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Meyer, and died in Ramsey County. William F. Ross (1901-1985) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Meyer, and died in Ramsey County. Susan C. Jodel (1900-1988) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Meyer, and died in Ramsey County. Catherine M. Fedkenheyer (1883-1955) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of McGuire, and died in Ramsey County. The property was last sold in 2006 with a sale price of $174,900. The previous owner of record of the property was John Anthony Duscha and the current owner of record of the property is Debra I. Fisher. Tony Duscha, equipment coordinator for the Blackhawks of St. Paul Youth Soccer Club, resided at this address in 2004. The Blackhawks Club is the oldest soccer club in Minnesota, founded in 1952, and offers soccer programs at the youth, junior's, men's, women's and senior's levels.

254 Banfil Street: Built in 1912. The structure is a 1 3/4 story, 945 square foot, six room, three bedroom, one bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. The property was a vacant lot until 1960, when a house from the lower levee area was moved to this site. In 1999, Jillayn Lindahl initially appealed, then withdrew the appeal, of a summary abatement order from the City of St. Paul related to this property. The last sale of this property was in 1998 and the sale price was $77,500. The current owner of record of the property is Jillayn M. Lindahl. Jillayn Lindahl is a healthy families public health nurse employed by the St. Paul-Ramsey County Public Health Department.

258 Banfil Street: Built in 1900. The structure is a 768 square foot, four room, one bedroom, one bathroom, frame rambler, with a detached garage. The house was moved to this address in 1960. The last sale of this property was in 2006 and the sale price was $150,380. The previous owners of record of the property were Rosemary I. Merkley and Pamela L. Scheler and the current owners of record of the property are Michael A. Conrad and Laura A. Mathees.

261 Banfil Street: Built in 1910 (built before 1885 according to Empson.) The structure is a 1 3/4 story, 1252 square foot, five room, two bedroom, one bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided house, with a detached garage. The 1930 city directory indicates that Philip Parizino, a laborer, his wife, Mary Parizino, Dominic Parizino, a trimmer employed by the Ford Motor Car Company, and Patrick Parizino, a trimmer employed by the Ford Motor Car Company, all resided at this address. Philip Parizino ( -1946) died in Ramsey County. The property was last sold in 2001 with a sale price of $140,000. The current owner of record of the property is Julia E. Reimer and the current owners of record of the property are Phillip B. Lund and Julia E. Reimer. [See note on the Ford Motor Company for 334 St. Clair Avenue.]

262 Banfil Street: Von Minden House; Built in 1850 (in 1870 according to Empson.) The structure is a one story, 937 square foot, six room, two bedroom, one bathroom, asbestos-sided house, with a detached garage. The house was built for Henning Van Minden, a surveyor. In 1862, John Kearney (1796-1863) and Rose Anne Kearney (1811-1860) owned and resided at this address. C. F. Tolberg, an assistant Minnesota Secretary of State, resided at this address in 1873. Christine Rockstrum resided at this address in 1880. The 1889 city directory indicates that Klaus A. Rockstrom, a foreman employed by Jefferson & Kasson, John O. Rockstrom, a blacksmith, and Oscar Rockstrom all resided at this address and that Christina Rockstrom was a boarder at 858 Armstrong Avenue. Louis G. Winter, who manufactured cigars in the barn at the rear of the property, resided at this address in 1900. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Mrs. Sophia L. Winter resided at this address in 1914. The 1930 city directory indicates that Peter O. Peterson, a teamster employed by Holm & Olson, Inc., and his wife, Mary Peterson, resided at this address. Henning Von Minden (1826-1872) was born in Schleswig-Holstein, was educated as a civil engineer, served as a volunteer in the Schleswig-Holstein war in 1853 and 1854, came to the United States in 1855, was elected St. Paul city surveyor in 1858, took an active part in organizing the First Minnesota Cavalry Company, the German Cavalry, of which he was elected captain, which was mustered in in 1861, was subsequently assigned to the Curtis Horse Regiment, and became part of the Fifth Iowa. Von Minden was captured by Confederate forces twice, first being wounded and captured by Colonel Thomas Claiborne's forces at Lockridge's Mill, Tennessee, in 1862, was paroled, and then surrendering to Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest, in 1863, at the Cumberland Iron Works/Fort Donelson, Tennessee, was exchanged three months later, then served on the staff of General Crook as topographical engineer, then served on the staff of General Sully, was appointed major of the Independent Battalion Minnesota Cavalry (also known as Hatch's Battalion) in 1864, was mustered out of the military in 1866, returned to civilian life as the chief book keeper in the Dawson & Co. bank, and then was appointed the chief draughtsman in the Surveyor General's office. Von Minden & Wippermann, architects & civil engineers, in St. Paul, Minnesota Territory, in 1857, published a map of St. Paul, West St. Paul and Brooklyn. Henning Von Minden was the draftsman of a map of Woodland Park in St. Paul (the area bounded by Marshall Avenue and Summit Avenue, Dale Avenue and Nina Street) in 1870. Von Minden was married and he and his wife had three children. Brigitte Steinmann-Riddle is a great-great-granddaughter of Henning von Minden. Michigan Street, formerly Von Minden street, presumably was named initially for Henning Von Minden. The Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) post in Jordan, Minnesota, was named for von Minden. John Kearney was born in Ireland, emigrated to Canada, moved to Minnesota before 1857, initially resided in Hamilton/Savage, Minnesota, and married Rose Anne McKeown. John Kearney and his first wife had four children, Edward Kearney (183?- ,) Rose Anne Kearney (Mrs. Patrick) Boylan (183?- ,) James Kearney (183?- ,) and John Kearney (183?- .) John Kearney and Rose Anne Kearney had five children, Peter Kearney, Sarah Kearney (Mrs. Thomas) Byrne, George Kearney, Mary Kearney (Mrs. Andrew Welch,) Andrew Kearney, and Thomas Kearney (1851- .) Rose Ann McKeown (Mrs. John) Kearney died of a gunshot wound. Claes/Klaus A. Rockstrom (1856- ,) the son of Anders August Rockstrom (1826-1869,) and Stina Greta Mansdotter Rockstrom (1825- ,) was born in Landeryd, Ostergotland, Sweden, married Anna Benson (1862-1946,) and immigrated in 1880. Johan Oscar Rockstrom/Roxstrom, a blacksmith's apprentice, emigrated from Sturefors, Vist parish, Sweden in 1879. Klaus A. Rockstrom moved to Spokane, Washington in 1905 and was General Superintendant of the McGoldrick Lumber Company. Sophia L. Winter ( -1929) and Louis Winter ( -1932) died in Ramsey County. Hatch's Battalion, Minnesota Volunteer Cavalry, was mustered in at Fort Snelling and St. Paul, Minnesota, in 1863, with an additional two companies raised in 1864, was originally assigned to Pembina, Dakota Territory, until 1864, when it was moved to Fort Abercrombie and other small posts, and was mustered out in 1866. Major Edwin A. C. Hatch was the unit's initial commander. The battalion lost 21 members during service from disease. Edwin A. C. Hatch (1825-1882) was born in New York, engaged in trade with the Dakota in 1840, moved to Minnesota in 1843, settled in St. Paul in 1848, married Lotta Pierson, was the federal agent to the Blackfeet Indians in 1856, organized an independent cavalry unit in 1863, engaged in the railroad business after the American Civil War, was the right of way agent for the St. Paul & Manitoba RailRoad in 1882, and died in St. Paul. The last sale of this property was in 2004 and the sale price was $130,000. The current owners of record of the property are Leon Andre Rodrigues and Sophie Rodrigues.

265 Banfil Street: John O'Donnell House; Built before 1861; Victorian in style. The structure is a two story wood frame and asbestos-sided house. The 1981 Ramsey County Historic Sites Survey indicates that the slightly altered house has two bays, an intersecting gable roof, one rear brick chimney, 2/2 rectangular fenestration, a limestone foundation, windows with simple architrave molding, and a front gable end with narrow paired 2/2 windows. The 1981 Ramsey County Historic Sites Survey indicates that the structure was built with economy and exhibits pieced construction. The house was originally numbered as 8 Banfil Street and was subsequently numbered as 44 Banfill Street. John O'Donnell moved to St. Paul in 1856, was a carriage manufacturer, operated a livery, sale, and boarding stable, and resided at this address until the 1890's. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Katherine Tomlinson resided at this address. In 1996, the St. Paul City Council approved the sale of this parcel.

266 Banfil Street: Cominsky House; Built in 1884 (approximately 1871 according to the 1981 Ramsey County Historic Sites Survey and Empson;) Italianate in style. The structure is a two (2 1/2 according to the 1981 Ramsey County Historic Sites Survey) story, 1824 square foot, eight room, four bedroom, two bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided duplex, with a detached garage. The 1981 Ramsey County Historic Sites Survey indicates that the slightly altered house has three bays, a truncated hip roof, one pedimented gable dormer, one interior endwall brick chimney, 2/2 rectangular fenestration, concrete over stone foundation, wood frame asbestos-sided structure, with the central pediment topped by a finial at the roofline of the main facade, a polygonal window within the pediment, ornate brackets and sunrise motif relief panel beneath the eaves, tall and narrow windows with incised carved frames, and with a porch. The house was previously numbered 9 Banfil Street and 43 Banfil Street before being renumbered. The house was constructed by Christopher Cominsky, a cooper. Subsequently, Ernest Schroeer, a U. S. Post Office letter carrier, resided at this address and the Schoeer family continued to reside at this address past 1900. The 1930 city directory indicates that John Johnson, his wife, Fina Johnson, Oscar W. Johnson, a cashier employed by the Twin City Motor Bus Company, and his wife, Alma Johnson, all resided at this address. Ernest Henry Schroeer (1895-1989) was born outside of Minnesota and died in St. Louis County, Minnesota. The property was last sold for $91,600 and that sale occurred in 1998. The current owners of record of the property are Karma Tsomo Namgyal and Kunga Namgyal.

267 Banfil Street: Wolfgruber House; Built in 1907 according to Empson; Victorian in style. The original house on the property was built by Peter Wolfgruber, a stonemason, who lived at 283 Banfil Street. The 1981 Ramsey County Historic Sites Survey indicates that the two story, woodframe, clapboard unornamented simple worker's cottage has three bays, a gable roof, one interior central brick chimney, rectangular 2/2 and 4/4 fenestration, a cement covered limestone foundation, with the original transom for the mainentrance, and with paired rectangular windows at the gable end. The house is situated decidedly towards the 265 Banfil Street side of the lot. The 1981 Ramsey County Historic Sites Survey indicates that the proportions and scale of the house suggests a construction date between 1880 and 1890. The 1930 city directory indicates that Frederick C. Richter, a plumber employed by Reuben L. Anderson, Inc., and his wife, Clara Richter, resided at this address. Peter Wolfgruber ( -1918) and Clara A. Richter ( -1945) both died in Ramsey County. Clara Richter (1893-1978) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Florgerzi, and died in Ramsey County. In 1996, the St. Paul City Council approved the sale of the east half of this parcel. The Reuben L. Anderson plumbing and heating company started around 1924 and did business as Reuben L. Anderson-Cherne Plumbing. By the late 1920's, the company also had branched out into asbestos and pipe insulation and the distribution of insulation materials. In 1948, the insulation-related activities were spun off into a separate firm known as Asbestos Products, which eventually became APi Distribution, a wholesaler of insulation products for industry, and APi Construction Company, an insulation contractor for the utility, energy generation, petroleum, and paper industries. Anderson operated Asbestos Products as an independent sister company to his plumbing firm for about three decades. Asbestos Products changed its name to APi Inc. in the 1970's. Anderson eventually sold his interest in the plumbing firm in 1979. In 1860, John Kearney and Rose Ann Kearney owned the former nearby 238 Banfil Street. The 1920 city directory indicates that Patrick H. Doyle, a bricklayer, resided at the former nearby 268 Banfil Street.

269 Banfil Street: Built in 1884 (in 1869 according to Empson.) The structure is a one story, 1181 square foot, six room, three bedroom, one bathroom, stucco house, with a detached one car garage. The house was built for Roger Haley and initially cost $275. The 1885 city directory indicates that H. C. Sohns resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Herman J. Dunker, a conductor, resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Lawrence E. Bleise, an interior and exterior painting and decorating contractor, and his wife, Anna M. Bleise, and John E. Becker, a laborer, all resided at this address. Lawrence Edward Bleise (1900-1960) was born outside of Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. Anna M. Bleise (1899-1975) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Figlmiller, and died in Rice County, Minnesota. John E. Becker ( -1945) died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Deborah Ann Seiberlich and Michael J. Seiberlich. Debbie Seiberlich is the registration coordinator for the West End Youth Hockey Club.

274 Banfil Street: Henry Mandehr House; Built in 1881 (in 1884 according to Empson, Rear addition in 1897;) Victorian in style. The structure is a one story, 1337 square foot, six room, two bedroom, one bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage. The 1981 Ramsey County Historic Sites Survey indicates that the 1 1/2 story, wood frame, asbestos-sided, slightly altered house has three bays, an intersecting gable roof, one central brick chimney, 1/1 and 2/2 rectangular fenestration, a limestone foundation, and an open front porch with a hipped roof supported by rounded columns with spindled balustrade. The house was built for Henry Mandehr, a cigarmaker, and initially cost $1,200. The 1893 and 1895 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. Henry Mandehr resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Frank Bladeg, a helper employed by the J. T. McMillan Company, boarded at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Arthur J. Mandehr, an engineer, his wife, Myrtle Mandehr, and Rose Mandehr, the widow of Henry Mandehr, resided at this address. The 1981 owner of the house was Herman Meyer. Henry L. Mandehr ( -1916) and Rose Mandehr ( -1931) both died in Ramsey County. Arthur J. Mandehr (1895-1970) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Amos, and died in Ramsey County. Myrtle E. Mandehr (1902-1990) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Leach, and died in Washington County, Minnesota. The property was last sold in 2003 with a sale price of $167,500. The current owner of record of the property is Michael A. Walter.

275 Banfil Street: Built in 1884 (built before 1880 according to Empson.) The structure is a two story, 1856 square foot, seven room, three bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage. The 1887 and 1889 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. Mathew Cech resided at this address. The 1891 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Herman Schlichting resided at this address. The 1893 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Herman Schlichting and Mr. and Mrs. C. Mims and their daughter resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Frederick W. Nelson, a glass worker employed by the Ford Motor Company, his wife, Frances Nelson, Jacob K. Fisher, a laborer employed by the Seeger Refrigerator Company, and his wife, Anna Fisher, all resided at this address. Charles Mims ( -1922) died in Hennepin County. Frederick W. Nelson ( -1945) died in Dakota County, Minnesota. Jacob K. Fisher (1894-1975) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Fogenbibia, and died in Stearns County, Minnesota. The property was last sold for $132,000 and that sale occurred in 1999. The current owners of record of the property are Timothy P. O'Brien and Lisa M. Weicht. [See note on the Ford Motor Company for 334 St. Clair Avenue.] [See note on John A. Seeger, the Seeger-Gallarch Refrigerator Company, and the Whirpool Corporation for 655-657 East Fifth Street.]

276 Banfil Street: Amos/Ames House; Built in 1889 (approximately 1860 according to Empson;) originally Greek Revival in style; subsequently totally altered. The structure is a one story, 974 square foot, six room, two bedroom, one bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. The 1981 Ramsey County Historic Sites Survey indicates that the 1 1/2 story, stucco, considerably altered house has three bays, a gabled roof with one gabled dormer, 1/1 fenestration, and a half length enclosed porch. The house was initially numbered 13 Banfil Street, then 51 Banfil Street, before its current numbering. The house was built by Jacob Ames (1835-1889,) a German-born stonemason, and by Elizabeth Ames. The 1930 city directory indicates that John F. Simonson resided at this address. The sons of Jacob Ames and Elizabeth Ames, Jacob H. Ames and Frank Ames, were cigarmakers, and the family sold the house prior to 1900. The 1981 Ramsey County Historic Sites Survey indicates that the house is the oldest house on Banfil Street, although its age is masked by its subsequent total alteration. Frank Ames ( -1944) died in Ramsey County. The last sale of this property was in 2003 and the sale price was $144,000. The current owner of record of the property is Alan R. Cashin.

279-281 Banfil Street: Built in 1904 (in 1903 according to Empson.) The structure is a two story asbestos-sided house. The structure is a two story, 2240 square foot, ten room, four bedroom, two bathroom, asbestos-sided house. The house was built as a double house by Peter Wolfgruber, a stonemason, and the house replaced an earlier one story frame house. The 1920 city directory indicates that James Cecka resided at 279 Banfil Street and that Rose Cecka, a seamstress, boarded at 279 Banfil Street. The 1930 city directory indicates that Frank W. Nelson, a painter employed by Axel A. Johnson, and his wife, Ethel K. Nelson, resided at this address. Reasonable Recovery Solutions Company LLC also is located at this address. Peter Wolfgruber ( -1918) died in Ramsey County. The property was last sold for $31,500 and that sale occurred in 1992. The current owner of record of the property are Darla R. E. Williams and Roland L. Williams.

280 Banfil Street: Vander Heyden House; Built in 1884 (approximately 1870 according to the 1981 Ramsey County Historic Sites Survey and the 1860's according to Empson;) Greek Revival in style. The structure is a one (1 1/2 according to the 1981 Ramsey County Historic Sites Survey) story, 954 square foot, five room, two bedroom, one bathroom, asbestos-sided house, with a detached garage. The 1981 Ramsey County Historic Sites Survey indicates that the wood frame, aluminum-sided, considerably altered house has a gable roof, one central brick chimney, 1/1 and 3/1 rectangular fenestration, and an enclosed porch with a fake gable design over the main door. The Patrick Doyle family resided at this address for 42 years, from 1858 to 1908. Thomas Doyle resided at this address in 1869. Julia Doyle married into the Cunningham family and resided at 334 Goodhue Avenue. In 1894, Mary Jane McQuillan (1852-1914) and Andrew O'Grady (1859-1916) married and moved to this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Christine Johnson, the widow of William Johnson, resided at this address. Fred Plante and Lucy Plante resided at this address before 1935 and were Delma Vander Heyden's grand parents. The Vander Heyden family resided at this address for at least 45 years, from 1935 to 1980. In 1980, William Vander Heyden and Delma Vander Heyden resided at this address. Andrew O'Grady and Mary Jane McQuillan O'Grady subsequently resided at 424 Charles Street, then at 435 Banfil Street, and then at 283 Farrington Avenue in 1907. Mary Jane McQuillan was the granddaughter of Mary McQuillan and was the daughter of John McQuillan and Margaret McAloon McQuillan, was born in Vinegar Hills Township, Jo Daviess County, Illinois, moved to Minnesota in 1864, and moved to St. Paul in 1884. Andrew O'Grady was born in Rosemount, Minnesota. Mary Neason McQuillan (1790-1876) was born in County Fermanagh, Northern Ireland, married James McQuillan in Ireland, and the couple had six children, all born in Ireland, James McQuillan (1818-1863,) John McQuillan (1821-1889,) Patrick Edward McQuillan (1824-1897,) Jane McQuillan (1829-1874,) Bernard McQuillan (1829-1859,) and Philip Francis McQuillan, Sr. (1834-1877.) Philip Francis McQuillan, Sr., married Louisa E. Allen (1841-1913,) of Galena, Illinois, the daughter of Joseph Allen and Catherine Mahoney Allen, and the couple had eight children, Mary "Mollie" McQuillan (1860-1936,) Allen McQuillan (1863-1940,) Agnes Frances McQuillan (1865-1866,) Annabell McQuillan (1866-1963,) Clara McQuillan (1868-1911,) Josephine McQuillan (1871-1872,) John F. McQuillan (1872-1874,) and Philip Francis McQuillan, Jr. (1877-1938.) P. F. McQuillan, Sr., opened up his own wholesale firm and his business grew to be the largest grocery business in St. Paul after the Civil War. P. F. McQuillan, Sr., was the grandfather of F. Scott Fitzgerald. In 1879, Thomas Doyle, a porter with Beaupre, Allen & Keogh, resided at 116 Goodhue Street and Thomas Doyle, Jr., a bricklayer, boarded at 116 Goodhue Street. Mary O'Grady ( -1914) died in Ramsey County. Julia Cunningham (1863-1907) was born in the United States and died in Ramsey County. Delma L. Vander Heyden (1912-1990) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Bernard, and died in Ramsey County. William F. Vander Heyden (1910-1993) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Grimm, and died in Washington County, Minnesota. The property was last sold in 2003 with a sale price of $153,000. The previous owners of record of the property were Maria Pacheco and Reyes J. Villeda Pacheco and the current owner of record of the property is Maria Pacheco. The 1930 city directory indicates that John McMonigal, a shipping clerk, and his wife, Margaret McMonigal, resided at the former nearby 281 Banfil Street. John McMonigal (1893-1974) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of McMonagle, and died in Ramsey County. Margaret C. McMonigal (1898-1969) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Kelly, and died in Ramsey County.

283 Banfil Street: Built in 1885 (in 1903 according to Empson.) The structure is a two story, 2100 square foot, ten room, four bedroom, one bathroom, one half-bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided house, with a detached garage. Peter Wolfgruber, a stonemason, resided at this address at the turn of the 20th Century. John "Jack" Clarkin (1872-1922) reportedly resided at this address in 1915. The records of the 1919-1920 Minnesota World War I Soldier’s Bonus Board (#17349) indicate that Peter Koch (1892- ,) a 1918 draftee and a Private in Company M of the 54th Pioneer Infantry, who was born in Wabash, Wisconsin, moved to Minnesota in 1892, had blue eyes, black hair, and a dark complexion, was 5' 11 1/2" tall, was a farmer at induction, served in the American Expeditionary Force in France, including the Argonne and the Meuse, was a railroad and rail roundhouse fireman employed by the Northern Pacific RailRoad after the completion of service, and was unmarried, resided with his father, John Koch, at this address. The records of the 1919-1920 Minnesota World War I Soldier’s Bonus Board (#19644) indicate that Paul P. Koch (1885- ,) a 1918 draftee and a Private First Class in Company B, First Battalion, Edgewood Arsenal, who was born in Caledonia, Minnesota, had brown eyes, dark brown hair, and a ruddy complexion, was 5' 11" tall, was a farmer at induction, was a fireman employed by the Pennsylvania RailRoad tower house after the completion of service, and was unmarried, resided with his father, John Koch, at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Eugene Bebo, a driver employed by O'Donnell Shoe Company, and Peter Cook, a laborer employed at the Northern Pacific RailRoad Shops, both boarded at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Norman H. Kennedy, a service manager employed by the Northern Motor Company, and his wife, Rose Kennedy, resided at this address. Peter Wolfgruber ( -1918) died in Ramsey County. Norman H. Kennedy (1900-1975) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Muckle, and died in Chisago County, Minnesota. The last sale of this property was in 2000 and the sale price was $83,500. The current owner of record of the property is Dirk A. Stuurop, who resided in Greenwich, Connecticut, in 2004. [See note on the Northern Pacific RailRoad.] [See note on the Pennsylvania RailRoad for 1297 St. Clair Avenue.]

286 Banfil Street: Horn/Levy House; Built in 1884 (1860's according to the 1981 Ramsey County Historic Sites Survey;) originally Greek Revival in style, but subsequently altered significantly. The structure is a one story, 864 square foot, four room, two bedroom, one bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided house, with a detached garage. The 1981 Ramsey County Historic Sites Survey indicates that the 1 1/2 story, wood frame, aluminum-sided, considerably altered house has two bays, a gabled roof, one central brick chimney, 3/1 rectangular fenestration, with an added gable roofed front porch and a rear addition. The Horn family resided at this address in 1865. Edward Levy, an expressman, resided at this address in 1883. The 1930 city directory indicates that Frank W. La Terre, a painter, and his wife, Ovida La Terre, resided at this address. Frank W. La Terre (1878-1956) was born in Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. Susie Jannetto resided at this address before 2005. The property was last sold for $112,000 and that sale occurred in 2004. Michael Johnson is the current owner of record of the property.

287 Banfil Street: Built in 1870 (in 1885 according to the 1981 Ramsey County Historic Sites Survey and in 1872 according to Empson;) Victorian in style. The structure is a two story, 1398 square foot, eight room, two bedroom, one bathroom, two half-bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage. The 1981 Ramsey County Historic Sites Survey indicates that the wood frame, clapboard-sided, slightly altered house has two bays, a gable roof, a single central brick chimney, 1/1 and 2/2 rectangular fenestration, a cement over stone foundation, an enclosed porch, cornerboards, and plain fascia boards. The house also has several additions to the rear of the structure. The house is situated several feet above the present street level. The 1981 Ramsey County Historic Sites Survey indicates that the house stylistically appears to have been constructed during the mid-1880's. The original owner of the property, in 1851, was James Winslow, who platted the area. Winslow sold the empty lot to Patrick Cunningham in 1851. The house was built by Simon Riesgraf, a German-born carpenter. Nicholas Wallerich, a weaver, resided at this address in 1873. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that F. Marshall resided at this address in 1891. The 1930 city directory indicates that Patrick Donohue and his wife, Annie Donohue, resided at this address. Marnold Skara resided at this address in 1980. James M. Winslow (1825-1885) was born in Vermont, settled in Minnesota in 1852, built a mill, erected hotels in St. Anthony, Minnesota, St. Paul, and St. Peter, Minnesota, introduced the telegraph into St. Paul, moved to California, and died in San Francisco, California. Patrick James Donohue ( -1934,) Patrick Donohue ( -1943,) and Anne Marie Donohue ( -1946) all died in Ramsey County. Marnold E. Skara (1928-1985) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Bates, and died in Ramsey County. The property was last sold in 1998 with a sale price of $37,000. The current owner of record of the property is James T. Powell, Jr. Occasional Art, an art gallery directed by Aaron VanDyke, is listed as being located at this address in 2009.

290 Banfil Street: Built in 1900 (in 1898 according to Empson.) The structure is a two story, 2844 square foot, nine room, three bedroom, two bathroom, asbestos-sided house, with a detached garage. The house was built by Theresa Bear. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Theresa F. Baer resided at this address in 1910. The 1920 city directory indicates that J. Leo Doody, a plumber employed by M. J. O'Neil, resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Frederick E. Locke, a body builder employed by the Ford Motor Car Company, his wife, Augusta Locke, and William G. Napier resided at this address. The Baer burial plot at Oakland Cemetery includes the graves of Theresa F. Baer (1844-1926,) William Baer (1839-1898,) August Baer (1878-1894,) Minnie Conrad (1874-1938,) George F. Baer (1870-1925,) and Charles W. Baer (1866-1910.) Theresa Fredericka Baer ( -1926) died in Ramsey County. William Gladstone Napier (1889-1959) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Green, and died in Ramsey County. The property was last sold in 1998 with a sale price of $65,000. The previous owner of record of the property was Adeyinka S. Fashakin and the current owner of record of the property is Adeyinka Sunday Adesida, who resides in Minnetonka, Minnesota. Adeyinka S. Adesida and Elizabeth A. Adesida were subject to a foreclosure in 2008. [See note on the Ford Motor Company for 334 St. Clair Avenue.]

293 Banfil Street: Built in 1870 (in 1890 according to Empson.) The structure is a two story, 1436 square foot, ten room, four bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided house, with a detached one car garage. Clara Wallerich, the daughter of Nicholas Wallerich, a weaver and the resident at 287 Banfil Street in 1873, was the initial resident at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that John H. Fisher, Sr., a teamster, resided at this address and that Robert Durvall, a telephone operator employed by the St. Paul Hotel, Anthony J. Fisher, a baker employed by the Andrew Schoch Grocery Company, Catherine Fisher, a machine operator employed by the North West Paper Goods Company, and John H. Fisher, Jr., a baker employed by E. H. Braunig & Sons, all boarded at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Clara Wallerick resided at this address. Most of the Wallerich family resided in Wabasha County, Minnesota, but Michael A. Wallerich (1895-1963) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Schmit, and died in Ramsey County. The property was last sold in 1995 with a sale price of $15,435. The current owner of record of the property is Rosebear, Inc.

294 Banfil Street: Built in 1874 (approximately 1870 according to the 1981 Ramsey County Historic Sites Survey;) Worker's Cottage in style. The structure is a one story, 1125 square foot, seven room, three bedroom, one bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided house. The 1981 Ramsey County Historic Sites Survey indicates that the 1 1/2 story, wood frame, aluminum-sided totally altered house has three bays, gabled roof, single interior brick chimney, 6/1 and 1/1 rectangular fenestration, stone foundation, and an enclosed entrance porch. The house was vacant in 1903. John "Jack" Clarkin reportedly resided at this address in 1920. The 1930 city directory indicates that Edward Dolzer, a stockman for Fairbanks Morse & Company, and his wife, Evelyn Dolzer, resided at this address. Edward Dolzer (1885-1959) was born outside of Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. Evelyn N. Dolzer ( -1967) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Jacobs, and died in Ramsey County. The predecessor to Fairbanks, Morse & Company was established in 1823 by inventor Thaddeus Fairbanks (1796–1886,) who leased the iron works of his cousin, Huxham Paddock, at St. Johnsbury, Vermont, in order to manufacture cast iron plows and heating stoves. In 1829, brothers Thaddeus Fairbanks and Vermont Governor Erastus Fairbanks (1792-1864,) who did business as E. & T. Fairbanks, became involved in a hemp dressing business for which they built the machinery, including the platform scale. Once brother Joseph Fairbanks joined the business, the firm began to successfully market the platform scale. At the end of the Civil War, the production of scales was 4,000 per month and by 1868, Fairbanks had about 300 mechanics building scales. Charles Hosmer Morse, a former Fairbanks employee, created Fairbanks, Morse & Company at Cincinnati, Ohio, and later in Chicago, to market Fairbanks scales as well as Eclipse windmills, Eclipse friction clutches, and Williams steam engines. In 1879, Colonel Franklin Fairbanks (1828-1895,) Vermont Governor Horace Fairbanks (1820-1888,) and Thaddeus Fairbanks resided in St. Johnsbury, Vermont, and the St. Paul Fairbanks, Morse & Company was located at 46 East Third Street. Ultimately, Fairbanks, Morse & Company had a 700 page hardbound catalog of products it sold and also began building gasoline powered railcars, railroad handcars, diesel locomotives, and gasoline cars. In 1964, Fairbanks became a wholly-owned subsidiary of Colt Industries, Inc. The company eventually was restructured and in 1988, F. Norden, a majority shareholder in the U. S. scale franchise, bought back the Fairbanks Scale business and its assets in Vermont, Missouri and Mississippi. Fairbanks Morse engines continue in the form of EnPro Industries, Inc. The property was last sold in 2005 with a sale price of $169,000. The previous owner of record of the property was Frank A. Krejce and the current owners of record of the property are Mario Espinoza and Olga Splichalova.

296 Banfil Street: Theodore Rohland/Theodore Bohland House; Built approximately in 1870. The 1981 Ramsey County Historic Sites Survey indicates that the one story, wood frame, asbestos-sided, considerably altered house has three bays, a gable roof, a single interior brick chimney, 2/2 rectangular fenestration, a stone foundation, an enclosed porch, and a semicircular attic level window that is the only remaining original window. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Wilhelmina Rohland and Henry Heinsch resided at this address in 1916. John "Jack" Clarkin reportedly resided at this address in 1922. The 1920 city directory indicates that Frank Antio, a janitor employed by the Endicott Building, boarded at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Walter E. La Favor, a wheatman employed by the Capital Flour Mills, and his wife, Audrey La Favor, resided at this address. Capital Flour Mills, Inc., eventually became a division of the International Milling Company. Capital Flour Mills had an elevator in the North End, at the corner of Rice Street and Sycamore Street. The house was previously numbered as 67 Banfil Street. Thomas Bohland was a carpenter. Thedore Rohland ( -1916,) Henry Heinsch ( -1917,) and Walter La Favor ( -1954) all died in Ramsey County.

298 Banfil Street: Andrew Schultz House; Built in 1884 (in 1871 according to Empson;) Italianate in style. The structure is a two story, 2020 square foot, eight room, two bedroom, one bathroom, one half-bathroom, asbestos-sided house. The 1981 Ramsey County Historic Sites Survey indicates that the 2 1/2 story, wood frame, slightly altered house has three bays, a truncated hip and rear gable roof, a pair of interior endwall brick chimneys, 2/2 rectangular fenestration, cement block and limestone foundation, a central broken pediment at the roofline surrounding a bullseye window, wide eaves with supporting brackets featuring cut out detailing, fascia boards with circular incised carving beneath the eaves, window frames with plain architraves and incised carving, and an intact porch with square columns and simple capitals, fretwork with a cut out trefoil motif, and carved balusters. The house was built by Andrew Schultz, a house painter, and the house cost $2,500 to build. The 1887 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. A. Wolff resided at this address. The 1906 Jubilee Manual of the House of Hope Presbyterian Church indicates that Henry W. Goetzinger and Grace (Mrs. H. W.) Goetzinger, members of the church since 1894 and 1895, respectively, resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Thomas Roessier and his wife, Elizabeth Roessier, resided at this address. Josephine Lendway resided at this address before 2005. Andrew Schultz ( -1924) died in Ramsey County. William J. Gronewald ( -1925) died in Ramsey County. Patrick Henry Collins (1881-1970) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Tigue, and died in Hennepin County. Henry E. Dahlmeir (1878-1969) was born in Minnesota and died in Hennepin County. Florence Huntress (1897-1897) was the daughter of F. H. Huntress. Frank Hyatt Huntress ( -1947) died in Ramsey County. The last sale of this property was in 2000 and the sale price was $142,900. The current owners of record of the property are Mary M. Brown and Aaron C. Van Dyke. Aaron Van Dyke, M.A. in Art History, University of Wisconsin, and M.F.A. in Studio Arts, University of British Columbia, is an instructor at the College of Visual Arts. The gallery "Occasional Art" is also currently located in the foyer and front hallway of this residence. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that William J. Gronewald resided at the nearby former 323 Banfil Street from 1874 to 1924, that Wilbert O. Morehead resided at the nearby former 325 Banfil Street from 1892 to 1893, that Owen Williams resided at the nearby former 327 Banfil Street from 1892 to 1893, and that the 325-327 Banfil Street duplex was moved to 555 West Seventh Street in 1977. The 1885 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. A. Moore and their daughter resided at the former nearby 315 Banfil Street, that Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Johnson resided at the former nearby 333 Banfil Street, that Mr. and Mrs. M. C. Harrison resided at the former nearby 336 Banfil Street, that Mr. and Mrs. Isaac D. Morgan, Mrs. M. A. Vanderwarker, J. A. McMurphy, and J. M. Morgan all resided at the former nearby 340 Banfil Street, and that Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Butterfield resided at the former nearby 358 Banfil Street. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Wilhelm J. Gronewald resided at the nearby former 323 Banfil Avenue in 1883. The 1887 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Gronewold resided at the former nearby 323 Banfil Street, that Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Johnson resided at the former nearby 333 Banfil Street, that Mr. and Mrs. M. C. Harrison resided at the former nearby 336 Banfil Street, and that Mr. and Mrs. Robert Schnell resided at the corner of Banfil Street and Western Avenue. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that William J. Gronewald and Therese Gronewald (1843-1899,) of German extraction who died of tuberculosus, husband and wife, resided at the former nearby 325 Banfil Street in 1899. The 1903 city directory indicates that Patrick H. Collins, a laborer, and Henry E. Dahlmier, a laborer, both boared at the nearby former 315 Banfil Street. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that F. H. Huntress resided at the former nearby 336 Banfil Street in 1897. In 1918, Robert A. Murname, a World War I veteran, and his wife, Agnes E. Murname, resided at the former nearby 353 1/2 Banfil Street. Nicholas Hosch and Valentine Hosch were World War I veterans who resided at the nearby former 315 Banfil in 1919. The records of the 1919-1920 Minnesota World War I Soldier's Bonus Board (#12409/33196) indicate that Valentin Hosch (1888- ,) a 1918 draftee and a Cook in the 48th Company of the 20th Engineers, who was born in St. Paul, was a steam fitter helper employed by Armour & Company with after the completion of service, and was unmarried, resided with his mother, Mary Hosch, at the nearby former 315 Banfil Street. The 1920 city directory indicates that Angeoletto Erminolo, proprietor of the Twin City Statuary Company, resided at the former nearby 333 Banfil Street, that Myron Erminolo, a clerk employed by the Northern Pacific RailRoad, boarded at the former nearby 333 Banfil Street, that Terrence Dolan boarded at the nearby former 343 Banfil Street, that John C. Doth, a clerk employed by the Hackett Gates Hurty Company, resided at the former nearby 348 Banfil Street, that Helen C. Doyle, a clerk employed by the Northern Pacific RailRoad, Margaret G. Doyle, a clerk employed by the Northern Pacific RailRoad, and Mary E. Doyle, a bookkeeper employed by Bucka Brothers, all boarded at the former nearby 368 Banfil Street, that Josephine Edwards, a clerk employed by the St. Paul Drug Company, boarded at 358 Banfil Street, that Samuel S. Edwards, a checker, resided at 358 Banfil Street, that Aug H. Eineke, a carpenter, resided at the former nearby 340 Banfil Street, and that Theresa Erlandson, the widow of Frank Erlandson, resided at the former nearby 369 Banfil Street. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that William J. Gronewald (1850-1925,) the widower father of Mrs. John E. Thomas, who was born in Germany to parents born in Germany and who died of a carcinoma of the liver, resided at the nearby former 323 Banfil Avenue in 1925. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Anna T. Nelson (1849-1925,) the widowed mother of John C. Thomas, who was born in Sweden to parents born in Sweden and who died of apoplexy and arteriosclerosis, resided at the nearby former 323 Banfil Street in 1925. The 1930 city directory indicates that William E. Carr, a janitor at the Chamber of Commerce Building, and his wife, Lillian Carr, resided at the former nearby 315 Banfill Street, that John C. Thomas resided at the former nearby 323 Banfill Street, that Frederick P. Keintz, a checker, and his wife, Helen Keintz, resided at the former nearby 325 Banfill Street, that Mrs. Theresa Metlinger, the widow of John Metlinger, Emil Palmer, a weaver, and his wife, Ruth Palmer, resided at the former nearby 327 Banfill Street, that William Best, an estimator, and his wife, Laura Best, and Walter H. Ingleston, a laborer employed by the Seeger Refrigerator Company, and his wife, Dorothy Ingleston, resided at the former nearby 333 Banfill Street, that Carl P. Barsokine, a caller for the Soo Line RailRoad, his wife, Margaret Barsokine, and Margie Barsokine, an operator employed by Simon & Mogliner, resided at the former nearby 336 Banfill Street, that Charles Johnson, his wife, Minnie Johnson, Walter Gajewski, a comber employed by the Maendler Brush Manufacturing Company, and his wife, Evelyn Gajewski, resided at the former nearby 340 Banfill Street, that David Kay, a coal merchant located at 542 West Seventh Street, and his wife, Anna Kay, resided at the former nearby 343 Banfill Street, that Walter W. Shelley resided at the former nearby 344 Banfill Street, that Benjamin F. Warner and Theo H. Woshling resided at the former nearby 348 Banfill Street, that Arland Boyce resided at the former nearby 353 Banfill Street, that Irvin Moss, a helper, and his wife, Signe Moss, resided at the former nearby 353 1/2 Banfill Street, that the former nearby 355 Banfill Street was vacant, that Frederick W. Grapp, a sausagemaker employed by Swift & Company, and his wife, Caroline Grapp, resided at the former nearby 357 Banfill Street, that William D. Urguard resided at the former nearby 358 Banfill Street, that Patrick H. Doyle, a guard at the First National Bank, and his wife, Mary Doyle, resided at the former nearby 368 Banfill Street, that Joseph Groppoli, a laborer employed by the St. Paul City Water Department, and his wife, Bessie Groppoli, resided at the former nearby 369 Banfill Street, and that John Ruprecht, his wife, Maria Ruprecht, Helen Ruprecht, a clerk, Herbert Ruprecht, a laborer, and John Ruprecht, Jr., a driver, all resided at the former nearby 371 Banfill Street. John G. Wisema resided at the former nearby 366 Banfil Street before 2005. Between 1865 and 1920, the Maendler Brush Manufacturing Company operated as the Maendler Brothers or Maendler Brothers Brushes. In 1952, A. Lee Runyon was an officer of Maendler Brush Manufacturing Company and was Boreas Rex XVI for the 1952 St. Paul Winter Carnival. Owen Williams ( -1921) died in Hennepin County. William Emery Carr (1883-1956) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Hauk, and died in Ramsey County. Lillian E. Carr (1891-1958) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Schleick, and died in Ramsey County. John Ruprecht ( -1932,) Fred Grapp ( -1938,) John Ruprecht ( -1944,) Joseph Groppoli ( -1947,) Benjamin F. Warner ( -1947,) Frederick P. Keintz ( -1950,) Laura Best ( -1952) all died in Ramsey County. Helen M. Keintz (1889-1976) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Conroy, and died in Ramsey County. Emil Palmer (1894-1969) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Berg, and died in Ramsey County. Dorothy Priebe Ingleston (1908-1996) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Krenz, and died in Hennepin County. Carl P. Barsokine (1895-1969) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Fortuna, and died in Ramsey County. Irvin W. Moss (1904-1963) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Marquette, and died in Crow Wing County, Minnesota. Signe Sophie Moss (1904-1999) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Johnson, and died in Anoka County, Minnesota. Bessie "Bernedetta" Groppoli (1881-1976) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Iosue, and died in Ramsey County. Helen Othelia Ruprecht (1904-1986) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Loesch, and died in Stearns County, Minnesota. Herbert J. Ruprecht (1905-1978) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Zillich, and died in Ramsey County. [See note on Philip Danforth Armour and Armour & Company for 3 Alice Court.] [See note on the Northern Pacific RailRoad.] [See note on John A. Seeger, the Seeger-Gallarch Refrigerator Company, and the Whirpool Corporation for 655-657 East Fifth Street.] [See note on the Soo Line RailRoad.] [See the note for Swift & Company for 110 Robie Street West.] [See note on the First National Bank of St. Paul for 331 Maple Street.]

382 Banfil Street: Built in 1870. The structure is a two story, 1240 square foot, five room, two bedroom, one bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. The 1887 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Robert Schnell resided at the corner of Banfil Street and Western Avenue. Robert Schnell ( -1919) died in Ramsey County. The property was last sold for $115,000 and that sale occurred in 2001. The current owner of record of the property is Leif J. Erickson. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Isaac D. Morgan resided at the former nearby 340 Banfil Street in 1894. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Isaac D. Morgan (1827-1897,) who died of heart failure, and Julia Morgan, husband and wife, resided at the former nearby 340 Banfil Street in 1897. The 1906 Jubilee Manual of the House of Hope Presbyterian Church indicates that Edith (Mrs. F. W.) Pelton, a member of the church since 1901, and Stella Schnell, a member of the church since 1901, both resided at the nearby former 386 Banfil Street. The 1930 city directory indicates that Lorenz/Lorenzo Bongiovanni, a weaver employed by the North Western Rug Manufacturing Company, and his wife, Antoinette Bongiovanni, and David Unuk all resided at the former nearby 386 Banfil Street.

388 Banfil Street: Built in 1976. The structure is a 1092 square foot, six room, three bedroom, two bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided rambler, with a detached garage. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Nicholas Meyer and Ella A. Meyer, husband and wife, resided at this address in 1909. The 1930 city directory indicates that William C. Levine, a teamster, and his wife, Mary Levine, resided at this address. The current owners of record of the property are Paul Polta and Peggy Sue Heroff. The 1930 city directory indicates that William J. Cashill resided at the former nearby 390 Banfil Street. William J. Cashill (1876-1960) had a mother with a maiden name of Rooney and died in Ramsey County. Jos. McCue was a World War I veteran who resided at the former nearby 390 Banfil Street in 1919. Florence Pein resided at the former nearby 390 Banfil Street before 2005. Ella Meyer ( -1915) died in Ramsey County.

391 Banfil Street: Built in 1900. The structure is a two story, 2192 square foot, ten room, five bedroom, two bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that George A. Weston resided at the former nearby 392 Banfil Street in 1892. The 1920 city directory indicates that Hulda Eyinck resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Emma M. Wedell and Jerry J. Trinka resided at this address. George Albert Weston ( -1921) died in Rice County, Minnesota. Emma M. Wedell (1866-1958) was born outside of Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. The last sale of this property was in 1993 and the sale price was $5,000. The current owners of record of the property are Matthew H. Brown and Carlisa Rivamonte. The 1930 city directory indicates that Charles Passavant, Frank Passavant, a sub foreman employed by the St. Paul Department of Public Works, and Gust Passavant, a laborer, all resided at the former nearby 392 Banfil Street. Charles Passavant (1832-1908) was born at Frankfort-on-the-Main, Germany, was employed on a farm, attended an agricultural college for two terms, emigrated to the United States in 1854, initially settled in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, moved to St. Paul in 1855, married __?__ Schlief in 1856, was the acting editor of the Deutsche Zeitung in 1858, was deputy register of deeds from 1858 until 1860, read the law with C. D. Gilfillan from 1858 until 1860, was secretary of the St. Paul Lower Town Home Guards in 1862, was a Republican, was the Ramsey County Register of Deeds from 1862 until 1866, was the partner of __?__ Geis in the Northwestern Steam Bakery in 1867, was the St. Paul City Assessor from 1870 until 1874, was the agent for the Detroit Fire and Marine Insurance Company of Detroit, Michigan, of the German Insurance Company of Illinois, of the Milwaukee and Mechanics Insurance Company, and of the Rochester German Insurance Company of New York in 1879, engaged in the real estate and insurance businesses after 1880, owned an interest in the St. Paul flour mills after 1880 and operated them until 1883, was appointed St. Paul Abstract Clerk, was appointed the second administrator of the estate of Horatio N. Thompson in 1889, was the German consul at St. Paul in 1896, when he resided at 349 Wabasha Street, and died in St. Paul. Anna E. Meili was a daughter of Charles Passavant. August Charles Passavant ( -1931,) Charles Passavant ( -1940,) and Frank Passavant ( -1940) all died in Ramsey County.

394 Banfil Street: Built in 1976. The structure is a 1092 square foot, six room, three bedroom, one bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided rambler, with a detached garage. The 1930 city directory indicates that Aug Kammueller, a butcher employed by J. T. McMillan Company, his wife, Caroline Kammueller, Aug J. Kammueller, a carpenter, and William J. Kammueller, a bookkeeper employed by American Motor Sales & Service, resided at this address. J. T. McMillan was a pork packing house from at least 1887. The J. T. McMillan Meat Packing Company was bought out by Wilson & Co. in 1937. August F. Kammueller ( -1936) died in Ramsey County. Caroline Kammueller (1880-1957) was born in Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is Kathleen Marie Averill. [See note on James T. McMillan for 900 Lincoln Avenue.]

398 Banfil Street: Built in 1875. The structure is a one story, 837 square foot, five room, two bedroom, one bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided house. The 1930 city directory indicates that William L. Bastyr, a machine operator at the American Can Company, and his wife, Rose Bastyr, resided at this address. William L. Bastyr (1906-1975) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Maruska, and died in Hennepin County. Rose Francis Bastyr (1907-1997) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Topinka, and died in Hennepin County. The property was on the vacant house list in 2007. The property was last sold in 2005 with a sale price of $175,000. The previous owner of record of the property was Quality Residences LLC, located in Hopkins, Minnesota, and the current owner of record of the property is WM Specialty Mortgage LLC of Orange, California.

403 Banfil Street: Built in 1900. The structure is a two story, 1512 square foot, seven room, three bedroom, one bathroom, one half-bathroom, asbestos-sided house, with a detached one car garage. The 1930 city directory indicates that William P. Byrne, an accountant with Swift & Company, and his wife, Mary Byrne, resided at this address. William Patrick Byrne, Sr. (1884-1958,) was born in Kilkenny, Le Sueur County, Minnesota, died in St. Paul, and is buried at Calvary Cemetery in St. Paul in the Murnane family plot. Mary C. "Mayme" Murnane Byrne (1885-1950,) was born in Saint Paul, died in Saint Paul, and is buried in Calvary Cemetery in Saint Paul in the Murnane family plot. William P. Byrne (1884-1958) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of O'Leary, and died in Ramsey County. The last sale of this property was in 1995 and the sale price was $24,700. The current owner of record of the property is Angie M. Vogeli. [See the note for Swift & Company for 110 Robie Street West.]

404 Banfil Street: Built in 1882. The structure is a two story, 2684 square foot, 16 room, five bedroom, three bathroom, asbestos-sided house, with a detached one car garage. The 1887 and 1889 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Wegman resided at this address. The 1891 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Wegman resided at this address. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Nels Peter Lofgren and Christina Lofgren, husband and wife, resided at this address in 1899. Frank S. Bradac, John Bradac, and John J. Casby were World War I veterans who resided at this address in 1919. The 1920 city directory indicates that Julius Biershenk/Bierschenk was a painter who resided at this address and that Anna M. Bradac, a clerk employed by the Tri-State Telephone & Telegraph Company, Frank S. Bradac, a compositor employed by the Webb Publishing Company, and Mae Bradac, a finisher employed by Brown & Bigelow, Inc., all boarded at this address. Julius Biershenk/Bierschenk resided at 657 Palace in 1930. The 1930 city directory indicates that William H. Fredette, a barber located in the basement of the Pioneer Building, and his wife, Winifred Fredette, resided at this address. In 1879, Nels P. Lofgren, a carpenter, resided at 145 Banfill Street. William J. Wegman (1890-1979) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Lehnertz, and died in Winona County, Minnesota. Frank S. Bradac (1895-1985) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Lipold, and died in Ramsey County. William H. Fredette (1878-1956) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of McNamara, and died in Ramsey County. The property was last sold for $51,500 and that sale occurred in 1991. The previous owners of record of the property were Neil A. Lundholm and Rhetta M. Lundholm and the current owner of record of the property is Uliano Properties Inc., located at 986 North Dale Street. The 1887 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Wegman resided at the former nearby 406 Banfil Street. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Hattie W. Wegman (1878-1892,) of German heritage who died of tuberculosis, resided at the former nearby 406 Banfil Street in 1892. Julius Biershenk (1896- ,) a Private, was a World War I veteran who resided at the former nearby 406 Banfil in 1919. The records of the 1919-1920 Minnesota World War I Soldier's Bonus Board (#20608) indicate that Julius Bierschenk (1895- ,) a 1918 draftee and a Private in Company H of the 57th Pioneer Infantry, who was born in St. Paul, had hazel eyes, brown hair, and a ruddy complexion, was 5' 10" tall, was a painter at induction, served in the American Expeditionary Force in France, was issued one bronze Victory button, was a painter employed by Margens & Son after the completion of service, and was married, resided with his wife at the nearby former 406 Banfil Street. The 1920 city directory indicates that Julius Bierschenk, a painter, and Frank J. Cerkvantz, a tailor, both resided at the former nearby 406 Banfil Street. The 1930 city directory indicates that William L. Fredette, a clerk employed by the Tri-State Telephone & Telegraph Company, his wife, Evelyn Fredette, and Charles A. Lamont resided at the nearby former 406 Banfil Street. Hattie W. Wegman was the daughter of James W. Wegman. William L. Fredette (1907-1962) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Loftgren, and died in Ramsey County. Evelyn Florence Fredette (-) was born in North Dakota, had a mother with a maiden name of Stephens, and died in Ramsey County. Charles A. Lamont ( -1939) died in Hennepin County. [See note for Tri-State Telegraph & Telephone Company for 596 Portland Avenue.]

408 Banfil Street: Built in 1870. The structure is a one story, 1008 square foot, six room, three bedroom, one bathroom, asbestos-sided house, with a detached one car garage. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Mrs. Emma M. Peterson resided at this address in 1917. The 1930 city directory indicates that Elmer G. Otte, a driver employed by the American Linen Supply Company, his wife, Grace Otte, Walter R. Genereaux, who operated a garage located at 138 South Robert Street, and his wife, Nellie Genereaux, resided at this address. In 2003, this property was the subject of a City of St. Paul code enforcement action assessment for towing abandoned automobiles from the location. George A. Steiner ( -1946) founded the American Linen Supply Company in 1889 in Lincoln, Nebraska. In 1891, Steiner's younger brother, Frank M. Steiner, entered the business as a partner of the "Lincoln Towel and Apron Supply." The local economy of Lincoln, Nebraska, was particularly affected by the economic depression of the 1890's. In 1895, George Steiner moved his operations to Salt Lake City, Utah. The company was incorporated in 1912 under the original name "American Linen." Following World War I, George Steiner's son, Frank Steiner, grew the business with the invention of the continuous towel cabinet. American Linen was a pioneer in the commercial and industrial laundry businesses, or textile services. In 1958, Richard R. Steiner took over the helm from his father and continued to extend the markets in the United States and other countries for another 46 years. When the Alsco board became irreparably factionalized, the decision was made in 1959 to split the business into two companies, with George R. Steiner and Lawrence McIvor Steiner, the sons of Frank M. Steiner, assuming control of 22 plants in the Midwest and Canada, with headquarters in Minneapolis, and with F. G. Steiner and his son Richard Steiner staying in Salt Lake City, retaining control of 19 western plants, those in Milwaukee and Chicago, plus the operation in Brazil and another international effort in Cologne, Germany. The Minneapolis faction continued to operate under the name American Linen Supply Company, while the Salt Lake group changed their name, effective January 1, 1960, to Steiner American Corporation. The American Linen Supply Company of Minneapolis is privately held, has 5500 employees, and reported sales of $290 million in 1998. Elmer George Otte (1903-1966) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Spoerner, and died in Ramsey County. Walter R. Genereaux (1897-1971) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Chapin, and died in Ramsey County. Nellie C. Genereaux (1887-1983) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Berglund, and died in Dakota County, Minnesota. The current owner of record of the property is Kimie Terese Clinton Kearney.

411 Banfil Street: Built in 1885. The structure is a one story, 893 square foot, five room, two bedroom, one bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage. World War I veteran Michael F. Dahill resided at this address in 1919. The 1920 city directory indicates that Catherine C. Dahill, a bookkeeper for the P. N. Peterson Granite Company, boarded at this address and that James Dahill, a laborer, resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Marion A. Colvin, a foreman at the Union Depot, and his wife, Elizabeth Colvin, resided at this address. Catherine C. Dahill (1896-1974) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Goss, and died in Ramsey County. James Dahill ( -1924) and James Joseph Dahill ( -1932) both died in Ramsey County. James John Dahill (1908-1975) was born in Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. Marion Colvin (1884-1963) was born outside of Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. Elizabeth J. Colvin (1886-1962) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Makella, and died in Ramsey County. The P. N. Peterson Granite Company constructed the Okoboji and Spirit Lake Monument in Dickinson County, Iowa, a 65 foot high shaft of alternate blocks of rough and polished Minnesota granite, that commemorated the 1857 massacre of settlers by Chief Inkpadutah's band of Wapekutah. The P. N. Peterson Granite Company also contracted to produce monuments related to the 1862 Dakota Uprising in Minnesota. The Peterson Granite Company factored into an interesting segmant of Minnesota history, employing Cole Younger to make tombstones in Stillwater, Minnesota, after Younger was paroled from the state prison and received a pardon in 1903. Thomas Coleman "Cole" Younger (1844-1916) was a member of William Clarke Quantrill's Confederate raiders during the Civil War, participated in the infamous Lawrence, Kansas, massacre, was a member of the Jesse James gang, and was severely wounded, captured, tried and sentenced to 25 years for the 1876 Northfield, Minnesota, bank raid. In prison, Cole Younger became a hero helping to protect women convicts during a disastrous fire, founded the "Prison Mirror" newspaper, and was converted to a lawful life by Bernard Casey, a Stillwater, Minnesota, prison guard who later became a Capuchin priest and was beatified in 1995. Jim Younger (1848-1902,) also wounded during the Northfield, Minnesota, bank raid, also worked for the P. N. Peterson Granite Company, selling tombstones, but was despondent over being forbidden to marry newspaper writer Alice J. Miller and eventually committed suicide in St. Paul. The property was last sold in 2003 with a sale price of $138,700. The current owner of record of the property is Joshua T. Berntsen. The 1920 city directory indicates that Marion A. Colvin, a foreman employed by the Union Depot Company, resided at the former nearby 411 1/2 Banfil Street. The 1930 city directory indicates that the former nearby 411 1/2 Banfil Street was vacant.

412 Banfil Street: Built in 1875. The structure is a 644 square foot, five room, two bedroom, one bathroom, asbestos-sided rambler, with a detached one car garage. The 1930 city directory indicates that Charles A. Raeubig, a houseman employed by the Railway Express Agency, and his wife, Elizabeth Raeubig, resided at this address. Miguel J. Clinton resided at this address at some time before 2000. Charles A. Raeubig (1883-1956) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Liebch, and died in Ramsey County. Elizabeth Raeubig (1882-1958) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Sontag, and died in Ramsey County. The property was last sold in 2005 with a sale price of $123,000. The previous owner of record of the property was Neil Steven Raymond and the current owner of record of the property is Joel J. Cina. [See note for the Railway Express Agency for 248 Banfil Street.]

413 Banfil Street: Built in 1880. The structure is a two story, 1372 square foot, six room, two bedroom, one bathroom, one half-bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided house, with a detached garage. The 1930 city directory indicates that Hugh Murname and his wife, Catherine Murname, resided at this address. Hugh Murname (1855-1933) and Catherine Murname (1862-1936) are buried in Calvary Cemetery in Saint Paul. The last sale of this property was in 1992 and the sale price was $46,100. The current owners of record of the property are Anita C. Olson and David W. Olson.

414 Banfil Street: Built in 1890. The structure is a one story, 991 square foot, five room, two bedroom, one bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided house. The 1930 city directory indicates that Thomas F. Medella, a barber with a shop at 265 West Seventh Street, and his wife, Ruth E. Medella, resided at this address. Thomas Medella (1885-1958) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Furlito, and died in Ramsey County. Ruth E. Medella (1888-1977) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Poston, and died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is Rachel C. Robinson.

415 Banfil Street: Built in 1885. The structure is a two story, 1336 square foot, six room, three bedroom, one bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided house, with a detached garage. The 1908 city directory indicates that Patrick F. Murphy, a packer employed by G. Sommers & Co. resided at this address. Patrick Murphy (1878-1916) was listed in the 1910 federal census as residing at this address with his wife and his two sons, was employed as a packer at G. Sommers & Company and a foreman for wholesale dry goods, was born in Ireland as were his parents, immigrated in 1895 and married about 1902. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Phoebe Frid (1893-1922,) the wife of Thomas F. Frid, who was born in Wisconsin to parents born in the United States and who died of septicema, resided at this address in 1922. The 1930 city directory indicates that Thomas F. Frid, a foreman employed by the Mullery Paper Box Company, and his wife, Jennie Frid, resided at this address. Rose E. Truhler resided at this property before 2003. Phoebe (Mrs. Thomas) Frid ( -1922) died in Ramsey County. Thomas Frank Frid (1892-1958) was born in Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. Thomas F. Frid (1935-1985) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Dubsky, and died in Ramsey County. Jennie Anna Frid (1901-1990) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Zayechak, and died in Ramsey County. The property was last sold for $178,500 and that sale occurred in 2005. The previous owners of record of the property were Elias Salvador and Flora Salvador and the current owners of record of the property are Shawn P. N. Calkins and Teresa A. Vazquez. [See note on the G. Sommers & Company for 9 South St. Albans Street]

418 Banfil Street: Built in 1977. The structure is a 1092 square foot, five room, three bedroom, one bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided rambler, with a detached garage. The 1920 city directory indicates that Minnie A. Culhane, a packer employed by the Twin City Wholesale Grocery Company, and William J. Culnane, a machinist employed by the Minnesota Transfer RailRoad, both resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that William J. Culnane, a machinist employed by the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad, resided at this address. William J. Culnane ( -1950) died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is St. Paul Public Housing Agency. [See the note for the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad.] [See the note for the Minnesota Transfer RailRoad.]

421 Banfil Street: Built in 1886. The structure is a 974 square foot, four room, one bedroom, one bathroom, asbestos-sided rambler, with a detached one car garage. The 1930 city directory indicates that Viola H. Grunewald, a saleswoman employed by Schunemans & Mannheimers department store, resided at this address. Viola H. Grunewald (1910-2000) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Grunewald, and died in Ramsey County. The property was last sold in 2001 with a sale price of $105,000. The current owner of record of the property is Miriam B. Gerberg. [See note on the Schuneman & Evans Department Store for 275 Summit Avenue.] [See note for the Mannheimer Brothers for 270 West Seventh Street.]

424 Banfil Street: Built in 1906 (approximately 1905 according to the 1981 Ramsey County Historic Sites Survey;) Mildly Colonial Revival in style. The structure is a one (1 1/2 according to the 1981 Ramsey County Historic Sites Survey) story, 1446 square foot, seven room, two bedroom, two bathroom, frame house. The 1981 Ramsey County Historic Sites Survey indicates that the unaltered house has a gable roof with one pedimented gabled dormer, one central red brick chimney, 1/1 double hung sash rectangular fenestration, a rockfaced concrete block foundation, an open porch with Tuscan columns and turned balusters extending across part of the front facade, a projecting bay window on the left side of the facade within the porch, and window frames with simple architrave. The 1981 Ramsey County Historic Sites Survey indicates that the house is one of the best preserved houses in the area. The 1930 city directory indicates that Charles W. Picha, a janitor employed by the Guardian Building, and his wife, Rose Picha, and Ralph J. Walsh resided at this address. Charles Picha ( -1945) died in Ramsey County. Rose J. Picha (1888-1970) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Kohout, and died in Ramsey County. Rose Picha (1883-1971) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Meskan, and died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is Robert Louis Menier, who resides at 998 Armstrong Avenue.

427 Banfil Street: Built in 1880. The structure is a two story, 1208 square foot, six room, three bedroom, one bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. The 1920 city directory indicates that Mary C. Churchill, a clerk employed by the Golden Rule, and Nora B. Churchill, a supervisor employed by the Tri-State Telephone & Telegraph Company, both boarded at this address and that Nora V. Churchill, the widow of Martin Churchill, resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Nora Churchill, the widow of Martin Churchill, Nora V. Churchill, a clerk for the Tri-State Telephone & Telegraph Company, Anton H. Haus, a glass worker employed by the Ford Motor Car Company, and his wife, Mary C. Haus, all resided at this address. Martin Churchill ( -1906) was born in Ireland and died in Ramsey County. Nora V. Churchill ( -1951) died in Ramsey County. Anton Haus (1894-1958) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Radschelter, and died in Ramsey County. Mary Haus (1887-1965) was born in Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is Muriel M. Peterson. [See note for Tri-State Telegraph & Telephone Company for 596 Portland Avenue.] [See note on the Ford Motor Company for 334 St. Clair Avenue.]

428 Banfil Street: Built in 1875. The structure is a two story, 1032 square foot, five room, two bedroom, one bathroom, frame house, with a detached one car garage. The 1920 city directory indicates that Eve Diehl, a sorter, boarded at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Julius Gunderson, a tailor employed by Samuel Laff, and his wife, Elvina Gunderson, resided at this address. Julius Gunderson ( -1948) died in Ramsey County. Elvina Gunderson ( -1931) died in Ramsey County. Elvina Gunderson (1882-1970) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Arveson, and died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is John R. Skarda, who resides at 647 Victoria Street South.

429 Banfil Street: Built in 1885. The structure is a 733 square foot, four room, one bedroom, one bathroom, stucco rambler. The 1920 city directory indicates that Florence F. Eha and Gertrude H. Eha, a clerk employed by the Golden Rule, both boarded at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Gertrude Eha, a clerk for the North West Trust Company, resided at this address. Hoo Ahhs LLC, a sporting goods wholesale manufacturer, is listed as being located at this address in 2009. Gertrude H. Eha (1894-1973) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Fehland, and died in Ramsey County. The last sale of this property was in 2005 and the sale price was $115,300. The previous owner of record of the property was John F. Coonan and the current owner of record of the property is Andrea Crawford.

430 Banfil Street: Built in 1870. The structure is a one story, 749 square foot, four room, two bedroom, one bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided house. The 1920 city directory indicates that Oscar Carlson, a compiler, boarded at this address and that John E. Clonkey, a carpenter, resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that John G. Figura, a machinist, and his wife, Anna Figura, resided at this address. John G. Figura (1902-1989) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Visnovec, and died in Washington County, Minnesota. The property was on the vacant house list in 2007 and was considered by the St. Paul City Council for designation as a nuisance property. The property was last sold for $210,000 and that sale occurred in 2005. The previous owners of record of the property were Bee Vue and Lamena Vue and the current owners of record of the property are Joy Nazario and Michael Nazario, who reside in Minneapolis. The 1930 city directory indicates that Lamuel Holborn resided at the former nearby 431 Banfil Street. Lemuel James Holborn (1902-1993) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Jones, and died in Hennepin County.

432 Banfil Street: The property was on the vacant house list in 2007 and was considered by the St. Paul City Council for designation as a nuisance property.

435 Banfil Street: Built in 1885. The structure is a 906 square foot, five room, two bedroom, one bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided rambler. The 1895 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. H. J. Gonden resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Frank J. Zachokke resided at this address. Mary Jane McQuillan (1852-1914), a relative of F. Scott Fitzgerald, and Andrew O'Grady (1859-1916) resided at this address before 1907. Harvey J. Gonden ( -1939) died in Ramsey County. The property was last sold in 2003 with a sale price of $114,900. The current owner of record of the property is Lindsey Alexander. [See the note for Mary Jane McQuillan O'Grady and Andrew O'Grady at 280 Banfil Street.]

436 Banfil Street: Built in 1978. The structure is a 2030 square foot, eight room, four bedroom, two bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided split-level house, with a detached garage. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Josiah C. Gregg, Charles A. Sachse ( -1896,) and his wife, Caroline Sachse, resided at this address in 1894. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that William Schmidt resided at this address in 1899. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Julia Horak, the widow of Thomas Horak, resided at this address. Caroline W. Sachse ( -1916) died in Ramsey County. Julia Horak (1886-1956) was born in Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Abednego J. Ingram and Hattie R. Ingram. Abednego Ingram served during the Korean Conflict from June 1, 1950 to June 1, 1951, assigned to "L" Company, 21st Infantry, 24th Infantry Division.

437 Banfil Street: Built in 1875. The structure is a two story, 4287 square foot, five bedroom, two bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided house, with a detached one car garage. The 1920 city directory indicates that Elmer Ensign, a laborer, boarded at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Alma Houchin, the widow of William Houchin, Frederick L. Franz, a road contractor, and his wife, Anna Franz, resided at this address. William Minford Houchin ( 1928- ) and Anna L. Franz ( -1954) both died in Ramsey County. Anna Alvina Franz (1891-1967) had a mother with a maiden name of Doepel and died in Ramsey County. The last sale of this property was in 2000 and the sale price was $112,650. The previous owner of record of the property was Kern Lawn Service, which was located 186 Montrose Place, and the current owner of record of the property is James Alick.

440 Banfil Street: Built in 1978. The structure is a 1092 square foot, six room, three bedroom, one bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided rambler. The current owner of record of the property is Ronald G. Amey.

441 Banfil Street: Built in 1875. The structure is a 1 3/4 story, 1225 square foot, seven room, three bedroom, two bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided house. The 1920 city directory indicates that Gust W. Carlson, a plasterer, resided at this address and that Oscar Erickson, a laborer employed by the Consolidated Printing Ink Company, boarded at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that this address was vacant. The property was on the vacant house list in 2007. The previous owner of record of the property was Diane M. Carrico and the current owner of record of the property is the Red Branch Financial Corporation, located in Arden Hills, Minnesota. The 1930 city directory indicates that the Robert P. Gruber grocery was located at the former nearby 442 Banfil Street. Robert P. Gruber (1889-1965) had a mother with a maiden name of Fitzgerald and died in Ramsey County. Robert Patrick Gruber (1915-1967) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Green, and died in Ramsey County.

443 Banfil Street: Built in 1880. The structure is a 1 3/4 story, 1520 square foot, two bedroom, two bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage. The previous owner of record of the property was Carolyn L. Acevedo and the current owners of record of the property are Margaret D. Mork Ludgate and Robert Ludgate.

444 Banfil Street: Built in 1924. The structure is a two story, 1472 square foot, six room, three bedroom, one bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. The 1930 city directory indicates that Robert P. Gruber, a grocer, and his wife, Myrtle Gruber, resided at this address. Robert P. Gruber (1889-1965) had a mother with a maiden name of Fitzgerald and died in Ramsey County. Robert Patrick Gruber (1915-1967) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Green, and died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are James M. Sutton and Wendy S. Sutton. Edward Svec and Lester H. Verhaaf were World War I veterans who resided at the former nearby 445 Banfil Street in 1919. The 1930 city directory indicates that Charles Svec resided at the former nearby 445 Banfil Street. Edward Svec (1887-1952) is buried at Fort Snelling National Cemetery. Edward Svec ( -1952) died in Nicollet County, Minnesota. Edward W. Svec (1888-1959) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Kuba, and died in Ramsey County. Charles Svec (1886-1966) was born in Minnesota and died in Ramsey County.

447 Banfil Street: Built in 1978. The structure is a 1895 square foot, ten room, four bedroom, two bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided split-level house, with a detached garage. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Frank Broz resided at this address from 1900 to 1934. The 1920 city directory indicates that Anna C. Broz, a stenographer employed by the West Publishing Company, boarded at this address and that Frank Broz, a mason, resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Anna Broz, the widow of Frank Broz, Mrs. Veronica Gohde, the widow of William Gohde, Daniel W. Gohde, a driver employed by the Superior Packaging Company, Dorothy J. Gohde, an operator employed by the Tri-State Telephone & Telegraph Company, and William Gohde, a driver, all resided at this address. The property was declared a nuisance property in 1998 by the St. Paul City Council, which ordered the structure to be repaired or demolished. Frank J. Broz ( -1924) and William Gohde ( -1927) died in Ramsey County. Frank J. Broz ( -1929) and Anna Broz ( -1931) both died in Hennepin County. Veronica Gohde (1866-1957) was born outside of Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is Sass Inc., located in Lake Elmo, Minnesota. [See note on the West Publishing Company for 415 Summit Avenue.] [See note for Tri-State Telegraph & Telephone Company for 596 Portland Avenue.]

449 Banfil Street: Built in 1925. The structure is a 1 3/4 story, 1394 square foot, six room, three bedroom, one bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. The 1920 city directory indicates that Glen L. Glancey, a steamfitter employed at the Great Northern shops, and Adolph Koci, a helper employed by the Capitol City Baking Company, both resided at this address. The 1920 federal census indicates that Albert Koci (1853- ,) a laborer employed by a bakery and the head of household, who was born in Moravia to parents who were born in Moravia, who emigrated to the United States in 1893, and who was naturalized in 1899, his wife, Mary Koci (1854- ,) who was born in Bohemia to parents who were born in Bohemia, who emigrated to the United States in 1893, and who was naturalized in 1899, and that Glen L. Glancy (1886- ,) a steamfitter and the head of household, who was born in Illinois to a father who was born in Ohio and a mother who was born in Iowa, his wife, Marie Glancy (1887- ,) who was born in Austria to a father who was born in Moravia and a mother who was born in Bohemia, who emigrated to the United States in 1893, and who was naturalized in 1899, and his son, Gordon Glancy (1911- ,) who was born in Minnesota, all resided at the former nearby 450 Banfil Street. The 1930 city directory indicates that Herman J. Gaul, a machinist employed by the Eastern Machine Works, and his wife, Anna Gaul, resided at this address. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Glen L. Glancy resided at this address in 1930. The property was declared a nuisance property in 1998 by the St. Paul City Council, which ordered the structure repaired or demolished and which again considered demolition of the structure in 2000. Herman J. Gaul (1889-1960) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Schaefer, and died in Ramsey County. Anna Gaul ( -1952) died in Ramsey County. Glen L. Glancy (1884-1968) was born outside of Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. The previous owner of record of the property was Sass Inc., located in Lake Elmo, Minnesota, and the current owner of record of the property is James E. Sass, who resides in Grant, Minnesota. The 1930 city directory indicates that Glenn L. Glancy, a laborer employed by the St. Paul City Water Department, his wife, Marie Glancy, and Adolph J. Koci all resided at the former nearby 450 Banfil Street. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Adolph Koci resided at the nearby former 450 Banfil Street in 1921. Gordon C. Glancy listed this address as his residence before 2005. Glen L. Glancy (1884-1968) was born outside of Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. Mary Glancy (1886-1955) was born in Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. Adolph Koci ( -1931) died in Ramsey County.

454 Banfil Street: Built in 1976. The structure is a 1092 square foot, six room, four bedroom, two bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided rambler, with a detached garage. The 1920 city directory indicates that Hannah B. Lannon resided at this address and that Helen M. Lannon, an operator employed by the Tri State Telephone & Telegraph Company, Margaret M. Lannon, a clerk employed by the Northern Pacific RailRoad, and Patrick J. Lannon, a clerk employed by the Northern Pacific RailRoad, all boarded at this address. The 1920 federal census indicates that Hannah Lannon (1872- ,) the head of household, who was born in Minnesota to parents who were born in Ireland, her daughter, Helen Lannon (1901- ,) a telephone operator who was employed by a telephone company and who was born in Minnesota to a father who was born in Virginia and a mother who was born in Minnesota, her daughter, Marguerite Lannon (1902- ,) a claim clerk who was employed by a railroad and who was born in Minnesota to a father who was born in Virginia and a mother who was born in Minnesota, and her son, Patrick Lannon (1906- ,) who was born in Minnesota to a father who was born in Virginia and a mother who was born in Minnesota, all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Hannah/Hanna Lannon, the widow of Patrick J. Lannon, Marguerite M. Lannon, a stenographer employed by the Northern Pacific RailRoad, and Patrick J. Lannon, a police officer assigned to Police Station No. 1, all resided at this address. Patrick Lannon ( -1908) and Hannah B. Lannon ( -1946) died in Ramsey County. Patrick J. Lannon (1882-1968) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Egan, and died in Big Stone County, Minnesota. The current owners of record of the property are Daniel G. Stoltz and Katrina R. Stoltz. Mary Katrina Stoltz, a student at Bemidji State University, also resides at this address. [See note on the Northern Pacific RailRoad.] [See note for Tri-State Telegraph & Telephone Company for 596 Portland Avenue.]

455 Banfil Street: Built in 1900 (approximately 1890 according to the 1981 Ramsey County Historic Sites Survey;) Victorian in style. The structure is a two (2 1/2 according to the 1981 Ramsey County Historic Sites Survey) story, 2345 square foot, nine room, four bedroom, three bathroom, frame house. The 1981 Ramsey County Historic Sites Survey indicates that the wood frame, asbestos-sided, significantly altered house has three bays, multiple hip with intersecting gable roof, one jerkinhead dormer, 1/1 and 2/2 rectangular fenestration, a complex roof line, simple architraves, and a leaded glass transom window within the porch. The 1981 Ramsey County Historic Sites Survey also indicates that the house has been altered almost beyond redemption. Jacob Sokolik (1898- ,) a Seaman, was a World War I veteran who resided at this address in 1919. The 1930 city directory indicates that Anton Becker, an engineer, his wife, Gertrude Becker, Mrs. Anna Musil, the widow of Frank Musil, Ann Musil, an icer employed by Paramount Pies Inc., Frank Musil, a foreman employed by the Purity Baking Company, James Musil, a baker employed by Anderson & Company, and Joseph Musil, a mixer employed by the Purity Baking Company, all resided at this address. William "Bill" Wimer and Alice Godfrey Wimer lived at this address, downstairs, originally when Bill Wimer was working on his thesis and working for the St. Paul Council of Churches. This was a house that Otis Hickman Godfrey owned. Robert "Bob" Burnes and Marilyn Godfrey were married in l946 and then resided at this address. Bill Wimer and Alice Wimer moved to Massachusetts in 1946 and Otis "Otie" Hickman Godfrey, Jr., his wife, Jean Keys Godfrey, and their children moved to this address after Otis Godfrey, Jr., graduated from Yale University. A friend of Otie Godfrey's, Bill Moffett, also moved to this address. When the Burnes family moved to California, Allan Godfrey and Marge Godfrey moved to this address while Allen Godfrey finished his studies at Macalester College. After all the children had grown up, Otis Hickman Godfrey, Sr., rented the apartments and when the tenants could not pay, reportedly he let them stay on anyway. Otis Hickman Godfrey, the son of Percy Downing Godfrey (1871- ) and Minnie Rebecca Lawton Godfrey (1872- ,) was born in St. Paul, graduated from Phillips Exeter Academy, Exeter, New Hampshire, in 1942. In 1949, Otis Hickman Godfrey, Jr., moved to 772 W. Fairmount Avenue. In 1923,Otis Hickman Godfrey, Sr.(1893-1985,) his wife, Alice Flinn Godfrey (1895-1976,) and their children, Alice Godfrey, Otis Hickman Godfrey, Jr., and Marilyn Godfrey, lived at 1764 Princeton Avenue. Otis Hickman Godfrey, Sr., the son of Percy Downing Godfrey (1871-1919) and Minnie Rebecca Lawton Godfrey (1872-1944,) was born in St. Paul. Percy Downing Godfrey (1871-1919,) the son of Jacob Talent Godfrey (1841-1928) and Annette "Nettie" Harriet Downing Godfrey, was born in Hampton, Rockingham County, New Hampshire, was educated in the public schools of Hampton, New Hampshire, attended the Hampton, New Hampshire, high school, graduated in 1887 from the Hampton Academy, moved to St. Paul in 1887, entered the law office of Otis & Otis as a clerk and student in 1887, read the law under Judge A. C. Hickman, graduated from the University of Minnesota Law School in 1892, married Minnie Rebecca Lawton, the daughter of Jonathan Lawton and Elizabeth Anthony Brayton Lawton (1830- ,) in St. Paul in 1892, was a Republican, was the secretary of the Ramsey County Republican Convention in 1892/1896, was admitted to the practice of law in Minnesota in 1892/1896, was a lawyer, was the secretary of the Fourth Congressional District Republican Convention in 1896, was the partner of Arthur G. Otis in the law firm of Otis & Godfrey, then was the senior member of the law firm of Godfrey & Molander, then practiced law as a sole practitioner, was a member of the law firm of Godfrey, Newman & Mattimore in 1916, was a member of the St. Paul Board of Park Commissioners, was a commissioner of the United States Court of Claims at St. Paul, was a member of the St. Paul Bar Association, was a member of the Minnesota State Bar Association, was a member of the Congregational church, was a Knight Templar, was a Scottish Rite Mason, was a member of the Mystic Shrine, was a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, was a member of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, was a member of the Modern Woodmen of America, was a member of the Royal Arcanum, was a member of the Knights of Pythias, was a member of the St. Paul Commercial Club, engaged in the hobbies of yachting, billiards, and baseball, officed at the New York Life Building in 1907, officed at the Commerce Building in 1916, resided at 133 E. Congress Street in 1907, resided at 1089 Lincoln Avenue in 1916, and was buried in Acacia Park Cemetery, Mendota Heights, Minnesota. Percy Downing Godfrey and Minnie Rebecca Lawton Godfrey had two children, Otis Hickman Godfrey (1893- ) and Percy Downing Godfrey, Jr. (1899- .) Minnie Rebecca Lawton Godfrey also married Augustus C. Knight (1873-1942,) who was deaf and met Minnie Godfrey in Baltimore, Maryland, while both were taking lip reading classes there. Percy Downing Godfrey, Jr., was an assistant in Physical Education & Athletics at the University of Minnesota in 1926 and 1927. In 1934, the Godfrey family moved to 1730 Portland Avenue, with the addition to the family, Allan Godfrey, who was born in 1934. In December, 1949, Otis Hickman Godfrey, Jr., moved to 772 West Fairmount Avenue. In 1976, Otis Hickman Godfrey and Alice Godfrey lived at 515 South Lexington Street. In 1985, Otis Hickman Godfrey lived at 512 Humboldt Avenue, St. Paul. Alice J. Flinn Godfrey was the daughter of St. Alban (eventually changed to Allen) Leon Flinn (1864-1954) and Alice Julia Hammond Flinn (1868-1956) and graduated from Macalester College. A. L. Flinn originally was employed as a clerk in a Winnipeg railroad yard, then moved to Iowa while employed by the Chicago Great Western RailRoad as a clerk to a divisional superintendent, then next worked for a Seattle steamship company, then came to St. Paul to work in the rate department for the Chicago Great Western RailRoad, and then worked for 34 years (1902-1936) for the Minnesota Railroad & Warehouse Commission. Otis Hickman Godfrey, Jr., was a graduate of Phillips Exeter Academy, Exeter, New Hampshire, class of 1942. Augustus C. Knight wrote the operetta Pepita, which had its copyright renewed by Otis H. Godfrey. Otis Hickman Godfrey, Jr., was a cantankerous Ramsey County judge who inspired many courthouse stories. Otis H. Godfrey, Jr., was on the board of the St. Paul Jaycees in 1959. Former Ramsey County District Judge Otis Godfrey retired from the bench in 1991. Otis Godfrey resided at 772 Fairmount Avenue and was the president of the Keller Men's Club in 1998. Otis Godfrey was a member and was the Past (1976) Grand Master of Ancient Landmark No. 5, Grand Lodge A.F. & A.M. of Minnesota. The Minnesota Railroad & Warehouse Commission was established by the Minnesota Legislature in 1895, the successor to the position of RailRoad Commissioner that was established in 1871, and was an early and important state regulatory body. In Smyth v. Ames 169 U.S. 466 (1898,) the U.S. Supreme Court upheld the power of the state to regulate railroad rates. The Minnesota Railroad & Warehouse Commission was reconfigured and renamed the Minnesota Public Utilities Commission in 1975, retaining its former authority over telecommunications, transportation and warehouse facilities and gaining new powers to regulate electric and gas utilities. Jacob Sokolik (1898- ,) a Seaman, and Lester H. Verhaaf were World War I veterans who resided at this address in 1919. The 1920 city directory indicates that Jacob Sokolick was a helper at the Omaha Shops and boarded at 1451 Charles Avenue. The Purity Baking Company was the baker of Taystee Bread in Minnesota, later became the American Baking Company, and now is the Metz Baking Company. In 1889, Percy Downing Godfrey resided at 348 Winifred Street East. Jacob Sokolik (1899-1963) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Powers, and died in Ramsey County. Frank Musil ( -1927) and Allan L. Flinn ( -1954) died in Ramsey County. Alice J. Flinn (1868-1956) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Briggs, and died in Ramsey County. Anton Becker ( -1931) and Anton Becker (1885-1956) both died in Hennepin County. Gertrude Becker (1888-1963) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Hiersekom, and died in Ramsey County. Gertrude M. Becker (1889-) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Faricy, and died in Ramsey County. Anna S. Musil (1871-1961) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Babicha, and died in Ramsey County. Frank Rudolph Musil (1903-1987) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Kubec, and died in Ramsey County. James C. Musil (1901-1974) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Jubac, and died in Ramsey County. Joseph W. Musil (1906-1994) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Kubec, and died in Ramsey County. Otis H. Godfrey (1893-1985) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Lawton, and died in Ramsey County. Alice J. Godfrey (1895-1976) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Hammond, and died in Ramsey County. The last sale of this property was in 2004 and the sale price was $287,550. The previous owner of record of the property was Marie Arver, who resided at 459 Banfil Street, and the current owner of record of the property is JT Horizon LLC, located in Eagan, Minnesota. [See note on Knights of Pythias for 2225 East Lake of the Isles Parkway.] [See note on the Chicago & Great Western Railway.] [See note on the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks for 334 Cherokee Avenue.] [See note for the fifth entry after the entry for 1605 Summit Avenue for information on Macalester College.] [See note on the St. Paul Commercial Club for 505 Summit Avenue.]

459 Banfil Street: Built in 1900. The structure is a two story, 1512 square foot, seven room, two bedroom, two bathroom, asbestos-sided house. The 1930 city directory indicates that William C. Pesek, a plumber employed by Beier Brothers, and his wife, Mary Pesek, resided at this address. William C. Pesek ( -1949) died in Ramsey County. Mary A. Pesek (1902-1997) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Kovarik, and died in Ramsey County. Mary Ann Pesek (1889-1965) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Hammer, and died in Ramsey County. The property was last sold for $121,540 and that sale occurred in 2002. The previous owner of record of the property was Marie Arver and the current owner of record of the property is JT Horizon LLC, located in Eagan, Minnesota.

460 Banfil Street: Built in 1922. The structure is a one story, 1203 square foot, six room, three bedroom, one bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. The 1930 city directory indicates that Ulrich J. Winkler resided at this address. The property was last sold in 2002 with a sale price of $175,500. The current owners of record of the property are Brandi P. Lawler Hegel and Grady B. Hegel. The 1930 city directory indicates that Steven J. Fuchs resided at the former nearby 461 Banfil Street.

463 Banfil Street: Built in 1875. The structure is a one story, 787 square foot, five room, two bedroom, one bathroom, asbestos-sided house, with a detached garage. The last sale of this property was in 1993 and the sale price was $15,000. The current owners of record of the property are Jodi L. Brezniak and Scott D. Brezniak, who reside in Woodbury, Minnesota. Scott D. Brezniak also owns 469 Banfil Street.

466 Banfil Street: Built in 1976. The structure is a 1144 square foot, five room, three bedroom, one bathroom, frame rambler, with a detached garage. World War I veteran Edward J. Shimon resided at this address in 1919. The 1920 city directory indicates that Edward Shimon, a plumber, Emily M. Shimon, a stenographer, and Mary A. Shimon, an embroiderer on Selby Avenue, boarded at this address and Frank J. Shimon, a plumber with M. J. O'Neil, resided at this address. The 1920 federal census indicates that Frank Shimon, Sr. (1868- ,) a plumber employed by a plumbing house and the head of household, who was born in Illinois to parents who were born in Bohemia, his wife, Anna Shimon (1868- ,) who was born in Minnesota to parents who were born in Bohemia, his son, Edward Shimon (1892- ,) a self-employed plumbing contractor who was born in Minnesota, his daughter, Mary Shimon (1898- ,) a milliner employed by a millinery shop who was born in Minnesota, and his daughter, Emily Shimon (1902- ,) a milliner employed by a millinery shop who was born in Minnesota, all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Frank J. Shimon and Joseph B. Gerlach, a teller employed by the State Savings Bank, and his wife, Emily Gerlach, all resided at this address. Edward J. Shimon (1892-1965) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Pavlack, and died in Ramsey County. Frank J. Shimon (1889-1966) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Pavlik, and died in Ramsey County. Joseph B. Gerlach (1898-1972) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Ganzer, and died in Ramsey County. Emily Gerlach (1901-1968) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Pavlicek, and died in Washington County, Minnesota. Shimon Plumbing & Water Care is currently located in Woodbury, Minnesota. The property was last sold for $182,000 and that sale occurred in 2002. The current owners of record of the property are Victor Artola and Maria De Jesus Romero, who reside in Woodbury, Minnesota. The 1930 city directory indicates that Edward H. O'Brien, a stockman employed by American Hoist & Derrick Company, and his wife, Edna O'Brien, resided at the former nearby 468 Banfil Street. Edward Harry O'Brien (1894-1956) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Kroeger, and died in Ramsey County. [See note on State Savings Bank for 703 Lincoln Avenue.] [See note for the American Hoist & Derrick Company for 2010 Summit Avenue.]

469 Banfil Street: Built in 1904. The structure is a one story, 1399 square foot, eight room, two bedroom, two bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage. The 1930 city directory indicates that William M. Benzik, a helper at the Bohn Refrigerator Company, his wife, Emma Benzik, and Albert T. Moudry, a bookkeeper employed by John Sevcik, and his wife, Lillian Moudry, all resided at this address. Albert T. Moudry (1891-1979) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Trnka, and died in Ramsey County. Lillian Cecilia Moudry (1895-1990) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Sticka, and died in Ramsey County. John Sevcik ( -1930) died in Ramsey County. John Sevcik (1889-1957) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Relych, and died in Ramsey County. John Sevcik (1896-1956) was born in Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. John Sevcik (1869-1930) was born in Dobrny, Bohemia, Czechoslovakia, married Anna __?__ about 1887 in St. Paul, died in St. Paul, and was buried in Calvary Cemetery. Anna __?__ Sevcik (1869-1946) was born in Dobrny, Bohemia, Czechoslovakia, died in St. Paul, and was buried in Calvary Cemetery. John Sevcik and Anna Sevcik had five children, Anna Sevcik (1887-1956,) Theresa Sevcik (1889-1976,) Mary Sevcik (1891- ,) John Raymond Sevcik (1896-1956,) and Frank Sevcik (1898-1934.) John Raymond Sevcik was buried in Resurrection Cemetery, Dakota County, Minnesota, married Vivian St. Germain before 1920 in St. Paul, and the couple had one child, Virginia Gladys Sevcik (1918-1994.) John Raymond Sevcik also was married to Margaret Fern Snyder(1900-1980.) Margaret Fern Snyder also was married to Donald Alexander (1901-1984.) The previous owner of record of the property was Jean T. Gerlach and the current owner of record of the property is Scott D. Brezniak, who resides in Woodbury, Minnesota. Scott Brezniak is a member of the Building Maintenance Volunteer Committee for Preserve North Single Family in Woodbury, Minnesota.

472 Banfil Street: Built in 1976. The structure is a 1092 square foot, five room, three bedroom, one bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided rambler. The 1920 city directory indicates that Frank C. Cigler, a clerk employed by the Univrsity Club and Thomas V. Cigler, a bookkeeper, both boarded at this address and Thomas C. Cigler, a shoe store proprietor, resided at this address. The 1920 federal census indicates that Matthew Smith (1889- ,) a painter employed by a railroad and the head of household, who was born in Minnesota to parents who were born in Denmark, his wife, Amelia Smith (1892- ,) who was born in Minnesota to parents who were born in Sweden, and his sister-in-law, Agnes Martinson (1897- ,) a saleslady employed by a confectionery who was born in Minnesota to parents who were born in Sweden, and that Thomas Cigler (1871- ,) a self-employed shoe repairer and the head of household, who was born in Bohemia to parents who were born in Bohemia, who emigrated to the United States in 1871, and who was naturalized in 1885, his wife, Mary Cigler (1875- ,) who was born in United States to parents who were born in the United States, his son, Thomas Cigler (1900- ,) a bookkeeper who was employed by a railroad and who was born in Minnesota, his son Frank Cigler (1902- ,) who was born in Minnesota, his daughter, Rose Cigler (1905- ,) a who was born in Minnesota, and his cousin, Frank Mracek (1880- ,) a plumber who was employed by a plumbing house and who was born in Minnesota to parents who were born in Bohemia, all resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Thomas C. Cigler, a shoe rebuilder, his wife, Mary B. Cigler, Frank C. Cigler, a plumber, his wife, Eleanor Cigler, Thomas V. Cigler, a salesman for the Pittsburgh Coal Company, his wife, Celina A. Cigler, and Gilbert M. Hoare resided at this address. Thomas Cigler ( -1935) died in Ramsey County. Mary Barbara Cigler (1874-1961) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Mishek, and died in Crow Wing County, Minnesota. Thomas V. Cigler ( -1940) died in Wabasha County, Minnesota. Frank C. Cigler (1901-1973) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Picha, and died in Crow Wing County, Minnesota. Eleanor Cigler (1905-1974) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Wessner, and died in Crow Wing County, Minnesota. David R. Priebe (1980- ,) Vocals/Bass and Songwriter/co-writer for the Indie rock band "Maudlin," and Priscilla K. Priebe (1982- ,) Rhythm Guitarist/Vocals and songwriter/co-writer for the band "Maudlin," currently reside at this address. Frontmen David Priebe and Priscilla Priebe have been playing together for more than seven years, first while based out of Winona, Minnesota, in the late 1990's and currently out of the Twin Cities. The band's sound comes from a juxtaposition of influences, including the Pixies, Leonard Cohen, J. Mascis, Pedro the Lion, and Johnny Cash, focusing lyrically on morality and human behaviour. The band plays locally in the Twin Cities and surrounding areas, in clubs, bars, colleges, and youth events. The current owners of record of the property are Lynn M. Emerton and Bruce A. Fredericksen. Bruce Fredericksen has 23 years of experience as a producer and director to post-production as a part owner of Broad Daylight, a St. Paul company involved in creating, compositing, manipulating and editing moving images for a variety of video, film, CD-ROM and DVD applications.

473 Banfil Street: Built in 1880. The structure is a 1 3/4 story, 1470 square foot, eight room, two bedroom, two bathroom, asbestos-sided house, with a detached garage. James B. Pesek and William C. Pesek were World War I veterans who resided at this address in 1919. The records of the 1919-1920 Minnesota World War I Soldier's Bonus Board (#11534) indicate that James Bart Pesek (1896- ,) a 1918 draftee and a Seaman Second Class in the U. S. Navy, who was born in St. Paul, was a machinist employed by the Twin City Lines after the completion of service, and was unmarried, resided with his father, James Pesek, at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that James M. Pesek, a mechanic employed by Farwell, Ozmun, Kirk & Company, his wife, Marie Pesek, Joseph L. Langevin, a carpenter employed by the Great Northern RailRoad, and his wife, Helen Langevin, all resided at this address. William C. Pesek ( -1949) died in Ramsey County. James B. Pesek (1896-1977) was born in Minnesota and died in Stearns County, Minnesota. Marie Pesek (1875-1963) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Shonka, and died in Hennepin County. Helen Langevin (1881-1958) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Bibeau, and died in Ramsey County. Deborah Svoboda resided at this address before 2002. The property was last sold in 2004 with a sale price of $168,500. The current owners of record of the property are Mary M. Kosel and Stephen A. Kosel, who reside in Woodbury, Minnesota. [See note on Farwell, Ozmun, Kirk & Company for 406 Maple Street.] [See note on the Great Northern RailRoad.] [See note on the Twin City Rapid Transit Company.] [See note on Farwell, Ozmun, Kirk & Company for 406 Maple Street.]

475 Banfil Street: Built in 1875. The structure is a 1 3/4 story, 1236 square foot, six room, three bedroom, one bathroom, one half-bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage. The 1930 city directory indicates that James J. Malecha, a mechanic employed by Farwell, Ozmun, Kirk & Company, his wife, Antoinette Malecha, and Rose M. Malecha, the widow of John Malecha, all resided at this address. Mrs. Rosalia Malecha ( -1933) and James J. Malecha ( -1946) both died in Ramsey County. Antoinette Malecha (1884-1969) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Dejcmar, and died in Ramsey County. The previous owner of record of the property was Homes Real Estate Investments, located at 806 Holly Avenue, and the current owners of record of the property are Mark K. Hulsey and Nancy L. Hulsey. [See note on Farwell, Ozmun, Kirk & Company for 406 Maple Street.]

476 Banfil Street: Built in 1894. The structure is a 1 3/4 story, 1449 square foot, six room, three bedroom, one bathroom, brick house, with a detached garage. The current owners of record of the property are Esparanza Zamora and Ramon Zamora.

477 Banfil Street: Built in 1870. The structure is a one story, 932 square foot, five room, two bedroom, one bathroom, one half-bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided house, with a detached one car garage. The 1930 city directory indicates that Earl C. Broneak, a folder for the Webb Publishing Company, and his wife, Cecelia Broneak, resided at this address. Earl C. Broneak (1899-1975) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Larkin, and died in Ramsey County. Cecelia A. Broneak (1901-1986) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Shimon, and died in Ramsey County. The property was last sold for $139,000 and that sale occurred in 2003. The current owner of record of the property is Alexandra C. Horochowski. Alexa Horochowski (1965- ) was born in Columbia, Missouri, was raised in Comodoro Rivadavia, Argentina, received bachelor degrees in journalism and in art, English and creative writing from the University of Missouri, Columbia, in 1988, received a M.F.A. in photography from the University of Michigan in 1996, is a sculptor and a painter, had solo exhibitions in Minneapolis in 2002 and in Buenos Aires, Argentina, and in Chicago in 2003, was a Bush Artist Fellow in 2004, is an assistant professor of Art at St. Cloud State University, in St. Cloud, Minnesota, and exhibited new paintings at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts in 2006 as part of the Minnesota Artists Exhibition Program. [See the note for Webb Publishing for 58 Prospect Boulevard.]

480 Banfil Street: Built in 1976. The structure is a 1092 square foot, five room, three bedroom, one bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided rambler. The current owner of record of the property is Thomas J. Neumann. The 1930 city directory indicates that Louis H. Franz, his wife, Theresa Franz, Raymond M. McMahon, a station agent employed by the Phillips Petroleum Company, and his wife, Mary J. McMahon, all resided at the former nearby 482 Banfil Street. Louis Herman Franz ( -1941) died in Ramsey County. Theresa Franz (1899-1985) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Roche, and died in Koochiching County, Minnesota. Raymond M. McMahon (1893-1972) was born outside of Minnesota and died in Hennepin County. In 1905, Frank Phillips and his brother, L. E. Phillips, hit their first successful oil well at Bartlesville, Oklahoma, in the middle of Indian Territory, the first of 81 wells in a row without a single dry hole, and the Phillips Petroleum Company was established in 1917 with the opening of its first gas liquids plant. In 1923, Phillips Petroleum Company won its first patent on process for recovering natural gasoline from natural gas and, in 1927, began marketing gasoline through first of more than 10,000 service stations. In 1929, the Phillips Petroleum Company was the first to develop and market propane for home heating and cooking, produced and sold the first gasoline that was designed to match seasonal conditions in 1930, built the first long-distance multi-product pipeline in 1931, and developed and introduced the first all-season motor oil in 1954. In 2000, a joint venture transaction combined Phillips Petroleum Company and Chevron Corporation's chemicals and plastics operations, creating as a new company the Chevron Phillips Chemical Company, and, in 2001, acquired Tosco Corporation, one of the largest refiners and marketers in the United States.

484 Banfil Street: Built in 1976. The structure is a 1092 square foot, five room, three bedroom, one bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided rambler, with a detached garage. In 1977, Louis Nutzman (1905-1977) resided at this address. The current owners of record of the property are Delores M. Still and Leroy A. Still.

485 Banfil Street: Built in 1890. The structure is a 708 square foot, four room, one bedroom, one bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided rambler. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Katherine Stage resided at this address. Katherine C. Stage (1891-1971) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Bank, and died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is Carolyn D. Sparks. The 1920 city directory indicates that Michael J. Dircks, a tiler, resided at the former nearby 486 Banfil Street. The 1930 city directory indicates that Leonard J. Rock and Joseph Novak resided at the former nearby 486 Banfil Avenue. Joseph Novak ( -1945) and Leonard J. Rock ( -1951) both died in Ramsey County.

487 Banfil Street: Built in 1875. The structure is a 1 3/4 story, 980 square foot, five room, two bedroom, one bathroom, asbestos-sided house, with a detached garage. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Josephine Stary (1841-1906,) the widowed step-mother of Mrs. Lincoln Good, who was born in Austria to parents born in Bohemia and who died of a carcinoma of the pelvis, resided at this address in 1906. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Marie Prokop, the widow of Joseph Prokop, resided at this address. Lincoln Good (1872-1907) was born in Bohemia and died in Ramsey County. Lincoln Good ( -1918) died in Ramsey County. Marie Jeanette Prokop (1903-1958) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Henessy, and died in Wright County, Minnesota. The current owners of record of the property are Jacqueline Koehnen and Richard P. Koehnen. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Anna Morschauser, the widow of John Morschauser, resided at the former nearby 490 Banfil Street. Maria Anna Morschauser ( -1934) died in Ramsey County.

491 Banfil Street: Built in 1980. The structure is a 816 square foot, four room, two bedroom, one bathroom, frame rambler. The current owners of record of the property are Mary W. Reinhardt and Nathan C. Reinhardt.

494 Banfil Street: Built in 1890. The structure is a 792 square foot, five room, two bedroom, one bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided rambler, with a detached garage. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Philip Scheider resided at the former nearby 496 Banfil Street in 1889. The 1920 city directory indicates that Andr G. Boratko, a barber employed by Joseph Mlinar, resided at this address and that George Boratko, a laborer, boarded at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Andrew G. Boratko, a barber located at 661 University Avenue, and his wife, Mary Boratko, and Emma M. Boratko, a clerk employed by Glemaker & Company, resided at this address. Andrew G. Boratko (1887-1962) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Gallo, and died in Ramsey County. Mary Y. Boratko (1886-1956) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Pasternak, and died in Ramsey County. The previous owner of record of the property was Anita Jane and the current owners of record of the property are Anita J. Davis and Leonardo Davis. William P. Richardson was a World War I veteran who resided at the former nearby 496 Banfil Street in 1919. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Nettie Koci, the widow of Stanley Koci, Evelyn F. Koci, a stenographer employed by Glemaker & Company, and Stanley Koci, a helper, resided at the former nearby 495 Banfil Street, that Peter Olson, a trackman employed by the Twin City Rapid Transit Company, and his wife, Bettie Olson, resided at the former nearby 496 Banfil Street, and that Alex A. Newman, a brewer, and his wife, Catherine Newman, resided at the former nearby 498 Banfil Street. Robert C. Steele resided at the former nearby 498 Banfil Street before 2005. William P. Richardson (1890-1977) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Riley, and died in Ramsey County. Stanley J. Koci ( -1919) died in Ramsey County. Antoinette Koci (1875-1960) was born in Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. Catherine A. Newman (1890-1962) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Schneider, and died in Ramsey County. [See note on the Twin City Rapid Transit Company for 165 Western Avenue North.]

235 Chestnut Street/223-229 Eagle Parkway: The property is a vacant tax exempt lot. The 1920 city directory indicates that Robert De Marre, a clerk, boarded at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that John Horwath and Roy Murphy resided at this address. With the relocation of the Armstrong House to this lot, it was redesignated as 223-229 Eagle Parkway. The 1879 city directory indicates that William Lynch, a brakeman employed by the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad, boarded on the West side of Chestnut Street near Franklin Street, that John McCarthy boarded at the former nearby 118 Chestnut Street, that Henry Miller, an African-American cook employed by the International Hotel, boarded at the former nearby 127 Chestnut Street, that Minnie Miller was a domestic at the former nearby 83 Chestnut Street, that Minnie Moser was a domestic at the former nearby 32 Chestnut Street, that Mrs. A. B. Moss, proprietor of a grocery located at 164 West Third Street, resided at the former nearby 79 Chestnut Street, that Albert P. Moss, an employee of A. B. Moss, and Samuel Moss, an employee of A. B. Moss, both boarded at the former nearby 79 Chestnut Street, that Franklin Mowder, a fireman, resided at the former nearby 33 Chestnut Street, that Hugh Mularkey, a laborer, and Hugh Mularkey, Jr., a laborer, both boarded at the former nearby 114 Chestnut Street, and that Martin Mylon, a teamster, resided at the former nearby 118 Chestnut Street. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Minnie Crawford Jackson (1877-1908,) the wife of Louis Jackson, who was born in the United States to Afro-American parents and who died of pulmonary tuberculosis, resided at the former nearby 222 Chestnut Street in 1908. The 1920 city directory indicates that Leonard O. Andrews, a pipe cutter employed by the American Hoist & Derrick Company, boarded at the former nearby 234 Chestnut Street, that James Benevenia, a machine operator, boarded at the nearby former 251 Chestnut Street, that Alphonse Barbato, a partner with Louis Rogers in the soft drink dealer Barbato & Rogers, resided at the nearby former 251 Chestnut Street, that Joseph Barbato, a mechanic employed by Joy Brothers Motor Car Company, boarded at the nearby former 251 Chestnut Street, that Felix Chavione, a helper, roomed at the nearby former 257 Chestnut Street, that Anna E. Conter, a partner with Margaret B. Conter and Emma A. Conter in the Shakopee Cement Lime Manufacturing Company, a wholesale and retail building material, cement, and plaster dealer located at the nearby former 220 Chestnut Street, boarded at the nearby former 220 Chestnut Street, that Margaret B. Conter, a partner with Anna E. Conter and Emma A. Conter in the Shakopee Cement Lime Manufacturing Company, resided at the nearby former 220 Chestnut Street, that Joseph De Marre, a laborer, resided at the former nearby 223 Chestnut Street, and that Edward Dufresne, a cook employed at 24 West Ninth Street, resided at the former nearby 250 Chestnut Street. The 1930 city directory also indicates that Andrew J. Mandel, who operated a restaurant located at 224 West Seventh Street, and his wife, Mary Mandel, resided at the former nearby 225 Chestnut Street, that John Maurus was a blacksmith with a shop located at the former nearby 227 Chestnut Street, that Frank O. Zebe resided at the former nearby 225 Chestnut Street, that Frank F. Mandel, a carpenter, and his wife, Anna Mandel, resided at the former nearby 225 Chestnut Street, that the former nearby 249 Chestnut Street was vacant, that Alphonse Barbato, a laborer for J. T. McMillan Company, his wife, Pauline Barbato, Anthony J. Barbato, a laborer for J. T. McMillan Company, his wife, Josephine Barbato, George Barbato, a helper, Henry Barbato, a packer for J. T. McMillan Company, Madeline Barbato, a clerk, Charles Mombrae, a janitor, and his wife, Selma Mombrae, all resided at the former nearby 251 Chestnut Street, that Mrs. Hester Williams resided at the former nearby 257 Chestnut Street, that John Tinsley resided at the former nearby 259 Chestnut Street, that Dominick Palumbo, a confectioner, and his wife, Carmen Palumbo, resided at the former nearby 261 Chestnut Street, that the Dominick Palumbo contracting service was located at the former nearby 263 Chestnut Street, and that the National Checking Company was located at the former nearby 271 Chestnut Street. Minnie Crawford Jackson ( -1908,) Louis Jackson ( -1930,) Louis Jackson ( -1934,) Andrew J. Mandel ( -1935,) Dominic Palumbo ( -1940,) Louis E. Jackson ( -1942,) and Alphonse Barbato ( -1947) all died in Ramsey County. Anna M. Mandel (1892-1960) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Stepbauer, and died in Ramsey County. Anthony Barbato (1904-1978) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Monaco, and died in Ramsey County. Josephine M. Barbato (1908-1986) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Abaese, and died in Ramsey County. George Joseph Barbato (1910-1999) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Monocco, and died in Ramsey County. Henry Barbato (1906-1978) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Monico, and died in Ramsey County. Selma Mombrae (1900-1968) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Freistad, and died in Ramsey County. Dominic J. Palumbo (1907-1988) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Palumbo, and died in Ramsey County. John William Maurus (1883-1964) was born in Minnesota and died in Hennepin County. Pauline Barbato (1885-1980) was born outside of Minnesota and died in Dakota County, Minnesota. [See note for the Armstrong Quinlan House for 223-229 Eagle Parkway.]

Former 272 Chestnut Street: Charles Emmert House; Built in 1904. The house was built for $3,000. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Mathilde C. Emmert resided at this address. Charles Emmert (1857-1919) was engaged in the legal and real estate professions and spoke nine languages. Charles Emmert (1857-1919) was the son of Frederick Emmert and Anna Bleissang Emmert. The 1880 federal census records indicates that F. E. Emmert (1832- ,) a brewer who was born in Germany, had parents who were both born in Germany, and was a head of household in St. Paul. The Emmert household in 1880 included his wife, A. Emmert (1842- ,) who was born in Pennsylvania, who had parents who were both born in Germany, and who was a house keeper, his son, Charles Emmert (1858- ,) who was born in Minnesota, who was unmarried, and who was a book keeper, his daughter, Emma Emmert (1861- ,) who was born in Minnesota and who was unmarried, his son, William Emmert (1866- ,) who was born in Minnesota and who was unmarried, his son, Fred Emmert (1872- ,) who was born in Minnesota and who was a student, his father-in-law, Christian Schilling (1806- ,) who was born in Germany, who had a father who was born in Germany and a mother who was born in Pennsylvania, who was a widower, and who was a retired stove dealer, and Hannah Lindert (1862- ,) who was born in Minnesota, who had parents who were both born in Germany, who was unmarried, and who was a domestic servant. The 1920 city directory indicates that George Beisang and Winnie Branch, a cook, both boarded at this address. Frederick Emmert (1831-1889,) born in Germany, emigrated to the United States in 1849, resided in Columbus, Ohio, in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in Chicago, in St. Louis, in Omaha, Nebraska, and in Council Bluffs, Iowa, working as a cooper, butcher, and lumber dealer, was a short, fiery, red-haired, bearded man who had made most of his money in the hotel and saloon businesses, arrived in St. Paul in 1854 and became involved in the hotel and salon businesses, owning at various times the St. Paul House, the Emmert House, the Oak Hall Saloon, and Emmert's Saloon. In 1866, Frederick Emmert purchased the City Brewery from William Funk and turned it into the second largest brewery in St. Paul. In 1879, the City Brewery was located at 168 Exchange Street South and Frederick Emmert, a resident of 13 Forbes Street, was its proprietor. Frederick Emmert was a member of the Republican Party and was a close friend of Governor Alexander Ramsey. Fred Emmert, William Emmert, and Charles Emmert, sons of Frederick Emmert and all educated and experienced brewerymen, succeeded their father in owning the brewery, renamed in 1890 as the F. Emmert Brewing Company. In 1879, Charles Emmert was a bookkeeper employed by Frederick Emmert and boarded at 13 Forbes Street and Frederick Emmert, the proprietor of the City Brewery, resided at 13 Forbes Street. Charles Emmert also owned a saloon located at 301 Eagle/192 South Washington which was sometimes referred to as the "Bucket of Blood" because of its many bar-room brawls. The brewery was sold to the Theo Hamm Brewing Company in 1901 and its buildings became storage facilities. Blessius Bleissang, the brewmaster at the F. Emmert Brewing Company, was the brother of Anna Bleissang Emmert, was a native of Alsace-Lorraine, and resided at 734-736 Stewart Avenue. In 1998, the City of St. Paul allocated funds for the demolition/site clearance of the structure at this address. Charles W. Emmert ( -1919) and Matilda Emmert ( -1931) died in Ramsey County. Fred Emmert ( -1949) died in Hennepin County. William Carter Emmert (1885-1969) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Bogart, and died in Winona County, Minnesota. The most recent owner of the house was Violet Dire, who was Charles Emmert's daughter. The 1930 city directory indicates that John Mazzone, a musician, his wife, Caroline Mazzone, Elizabeth Mazzone, a clerk, and Lucille Mazzone, a marker employed by the Co-operative Laundry Company, all resided at the former nearby 276 Chestnut Street. John Mazzone ( -1940) died in Ramsey County. Caroline Mazzone (1862-1960) was born outside of Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. Elizabeth Mazzone (1895-1977) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Cotzzi, and died in Ramsey County.

279 Chestnut Street: Built in 1880. The structure is a one story, 900 square foot, four room, two bedroom, one bathroom, one half-bathroom, brick rowhouse. The property was last sold for $195,700 and that sale occurred in 2003. The current owner of record of the property is Alissa Mae Brant, who resides in Hinckley, Minnesota. The 1920 city directory indicates that Homer E. Brinker, a waiter employed by the Northern Pacific RailRoad, boarded at the former nearby 296 Chestnut Street, that Charles A. Chickett, a partner with Michael E. Chickett in Chickett Brothers, a grocery located at 123 West Seventh Street, and Michael Chickett, a laborer, both boarded at the former nearby 294 Chestnut Street, that Joseph Chickett resided at the former nearby 294 Chestnut Street, and that Pasco Farnasco resided at the nearby former 292 Chestnut Street. The 1930 city directory indicates that Antonio Palumbo, a laborer employed by the St. Paul City Department of Public Works, and his wife, Flemie Palumbo, resided at the former nearby 290 Chestnut Street, that Mrs. Rose Turitto and Mrs. Lucinda Lowery resided at the former nearby 294 Chestnut Street, that Anthony L. Rancone, a tailor with a shop located at 214 West Fourth Street, and his wife, Carmelia Rancone, resided at the former nearby 295 Chestnut Street, that Robert Allen, a laborer, his wife, Gertrude Allen, and William H. Fuller, a cement worker, all resided at the former nearby 296 Chestnut Street, and that Camillo Frederick, a grocer located at 241 West Seventh Street, and his wife, Josephine Frederick, resided at the former nearby 297 Chestnut Street. Antonio Palumbo ( -1947) died in Itasca County, Minnesota. Florence "Flemie" Palumbo (1880-1958) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Colabrese, and died in Ramsey County. Mrs. Rose Turitto ( -1933) died in Ramsey County. Anthony "Tony" L. Rancone (1901-1973) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Pompei, and died in Ramsey County. Carmella B. Rancone (1899-1976) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Cinderella, and died in Ramsey County. Camillo Frederick (1888-1970) was born outside of Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. Josephine Frederick (1894-1977) was born in Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. [See note on the Northern Pacific RailRoad.]

300 Chestnut Street: Built in 1945. The structure is a one story, 11550 square foot commercial warehouse building. In 1879, Patrick Hayes, a laborer, resided on the East side of Chestnut Street between Fort Road and Exchange Street. The current owner of record of the property is Robert L. Walsh, who is located at 216 West Seventh Street. The 1885 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. A. P. Moss resided at the former nearby 317 Chestnut Street. The 1916 University of Minnesota Alumni Directory indicates that Albert J. Deslauriers was located at the former nearby 311 Chestnut Street and that Oscar A. Olstad, a 1911 graduate of the University of Minnesota and a mechanical engineer, resided at the former nearby 311 Chestnut Street. The 1920 city directory indicates that Aug Barbado, a laborer employed by the Wells Brothers Construction Company, roomed at the former nearby 319 1/2 Chestnut Street, that Domnick Chierello, a plasterer employed by G. A. Menz & Son, resided at the former nearby 319 1/2 Chestnut Street, and that the Deslauriers Metal Products Company, Alb J. Deslauries, manager, was located at the former nearby 311 Chestnut Street. The 1930 city directory indicates that the former nearby 301 Chestnut Street was vacant, that the Superior Metal Products Company was located at the former nearby 311 Chestnut Street, that Guy Williams and Mrs. Emma Brooks, a charwoman, both resided at the former nearby 319 Chestnut Street, and that John T. Williams resided at the former nearby 319 1/2 Chestnut Street. Emma Martha Brooks (1887-1978) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Ziech, and died in Ramsey County.

321 Chestnut Street: The property is a commercial vacant lot. The 1930 city directory indicates that Frank Dicaslo resided at this address. The property is owned by Joseph A. Costa and Lorraine M. Costa, who reside in Stillwater, Minnesota. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that William K. Drew resided at the former nearby 319 Chestnut Street in 1904. Fred Drew was the nephew of William K. Drew. The 1920 city directory indicates that David Bukofsky, a carpenter, resided at the former nearby 321 1/2 Chestnut Street. The 1930 city directory indicates that Paul Cheigo resided at the former nearby 321 1/2 Chestnut Street.

323 Chestnut Street: Built in 1884. The structure is a two story, 1648 square foot, ten room, four bedroom, two bathroom, frame house. The 1920 city directory indicates that Santi Campion, a grocer with a store located at 226 West Seventh Street, resided at this address and that Grace Champion, a machine operator employed by the West Publishing Company, boarded at the nearby former 323 Chestnut Street. The 1930 city directory indicates that Frank Ruffo resided at this address. Frank Ruffo ( -1935) died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Rosalie J. Wescott and Wallace G. Wescott, who are located at 226 West Seventh Street. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Ellen A. Strong (1842-1912,) the widowed mother of William A. Hall, who was born in Michigan to parents born in the United States and who died of valvular insufficiency, resided at the nearby former 348 Chestnut Street in 1912. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Mrs. Harriet McKenzie resided at the former nearby 347 Chestnut Street in 1919. The records of the 1919-1920 Minnesota World War I Soldier's Bonus Board (#1966) indicate that Edward Gamble (1876- ,) a 1918 enlistee and a Horse Shoer at Veteran's Hospital #74, who was born in Prince Edward Island, Canada, moved to Minnesota in 1889, had blue eyes, grey hair, and a fair complexion, was 5' 8" tall, was a horse shoer at enrollment, served in the American Expeditionary Force in France, was a night watchman employed by Bannons Department Store after the completion of service, and was married, resided at the nearby 347 Chestnut Street. The records of the 1919-1920 Minnesota World War I Soldier’s Bonus Board (#17996) indicate that Charles W. Caron (1887- ,) a 1918 draftee and a Private in the 342nd Infantry, who was born in Bemidji, Minnesota, had gray eyes, dark brown hair, and a medium complexion, was 5' 7" tall, was a factory worker at induction, was a meat packing plant worker in the sausage department employed by Swift & Company after the completion of service, and was married, resided with his wife at the nearby former 347 Chestnut Street. The 1920 city directory indicates that William Anderson, a clerk, roomed at the former nearby 352 Chestnut Street, that Mrs. Louise Bergstrom resided at 348 1/2 Chestnut Street, that Isaiah Betz, a laborer, resided at the nearby former 350 Chestnut Street, that Theo Betz, a painter employed by F. A. Marko, boarded at the nearby former 350 Chestnut Street, that Leo H. Bryck, a gasmaker employed by the Northwestern Blau Gas Company, located at Hampden Street at Charles Street, resided at the former nearby 350 Chestnut Street, that Michael Cann, a buttermaker employed by R. E. Cobb Company, resided at the former nearby 345 Chestnut Street, that William Carson, a meat cutter, roomed at the former nearby 348 Chestnut Street, that Amos M. Conn, a buttermaker, and Mrs. Anna Conn, a clerk employed by the Golden Rule, resided at the nearby former 347 Chestnut Street, that Mrs. Henrietta L. Coons, a clerk employed by Emman Papas, boarded at the former nearby 345 Chestnut Street, that Paul W. Coons, a machinist employed by the St. Paul Twine Mills, resided at the former nearby 347 Chestnut Street, that Mrs. Florence Cunningham, a clerk, resided at 347 Chestnut Street, that Gerald C. Cunningham, a clerk empolied by Lindeke, Warner & Sons, boarded at the nearby former 349 Chestnut Street, and that Letitia T. Cunningham, a clerk employed by the Tri-State Telephone & Telegraph Company, boarded at the former nearby 347 Chestnut Street. The 1924 city directory indicates that John McDevitt resided at the former nearby 347 Chestnut Street. The 1930 city directory indicates that the former nearby 323 1/2 Chestnut Street was vacant, that Richard C. Christofferson, a helper at Superior Metal Products Company, and his wife, Mary Christofferson, resided at the former nearby 340 Chestnut Street, that Charles E. O'Neil resided at the former nearby 342 Chestnut Street, that the Rosen Apartments were located at the former nearby 345 Chestnut Street, the Chestnut Place, with Andreas Geschwill, a janitor employed by the Rosen Apartments, and his wife, Lena Geschwill, at an unnumbered apartment, Mrs. Amelia Winters at Apartment #1, Mrs. Ida A. Van Vorohis at Apartment #2, Walter W. Peck at Apartment #3, John McDevitt at Apartment #4, Joseph Hosch at Apartment #5, and Jay L. Bowdish, a driver, and his wife, Violet Bowdish, at Apartment #6, that George Bedford, a fireman at the St. Paul Hotel, and his wife, Abbie Bedford, resided at the former nearby 348 Chestnut Street, that Mrs. Emily S. Hill, a charwoman, resided at the former nearby 348 1/2 Chestnut Street, that William Dailey, a laborer, his wife, Pearl Dailey, James A. Nicholson, a laborer employed by Northern States Power Company, his wife, Hannah Nicholson, William Mulholland, a plastertender, and his wife, Sadie Mulholland, resided at the former nearby 350 Chestnut Street, that the former nearby 350 1/2 Chestnut Street was vacant, and that Mrs. LuLu J. Ingram, the widow of George W. Ingram, James B. Johnson, a painter, decorator, and paperhanger, and his wife, Julia Johnson, resided at the former nearby 352 Chestnut Street. In 1998, Christina M. Turngren received a patent for a type of sterile adhesive bandage and resided at the former 339 Chestnut Street. Ellen A. Strong ( -1912,) John Bowdish ( -1931,) Lina Geschwill ( -1936,) Andrew Geschwill ( -1937,) John McDevitt ( -1939,) John McDevitt ( -1940,) Harriet A. McKenzie ( -1943,) George Bedford ( -1950) died in Ramsey County. Richard Paul Christofferson (1893-1960) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Clausen, and died in Ramsey County. Mary L. Christofferson (1893-1983) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Kleinfeldt, and died in Ramsey County. Charles E. O'Neil (1884-1971) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of McDonald, and died in Hennepin County. Amelia Winters (1883-1962) was born in Minnesota and died in Wright County, Minnesota. Walter W. Peck (1889-1970) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Johnson, and died in Ramsey County. Joseph C. Hosch (1900-1966) was born in Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. George W. Ingram ( -1929) and Abie Bedford ( -1944) both died in Nicollet County, Minnesota. Emily S. Hill (1875-1955) was born outside of Minnesota and died in Washington County, Minnesota. Pearl Dailey ( -1956) was born outside of Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. James A. Nicholson (1906-1967) was born outside of Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. Hannah N. Nicholson (1906-1982) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Johnson, and died in Ramsey County. William M. Mulholland (1920-1980) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Van Buskirk, and died in Hennepin County. LuLu Ingram (1876-1956) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Robinson, and died in Dakota County, Minnesota. [See note for the Northwestern Blau Gas Company for 1994 Summit Avenue] [See the note for the Golden Rule Department Store for 657 East Fourth Street.] [See the note for Swift & Company for 110 Robie Street West.] [See note for Tri-State Telegraph & Telephone Company for 596 Portland Avenue.] [See note on the Northern States Power Company and Henry M. Byllesby for 21-27 South St. Albans Street.]

354 Chestnut Street: Chestnut Arms Apartments/Former Benida Apartments; Built in 1959. The property contains two identical structures, each two story and 12906 square foot structures. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that the Benida Apartments were located at this address from 1961 to 1980 and that the Chestnut Arms Apartments were located at this address from 1981. The current owner of record of the property is Chestnut Arms Partnership, located at 321 University Avenue SE, Minneapolis. The 1920 city directory indicates that Frank Ciollova, a clerk, and Santo Collova, a laborer, both roomed at the former nearby 379 Chestnut Street. The 1930 city directory indicates that Joseph Meyer, a driver employed by the American Dye Works, and his wife, Mamie Meyer, resided at the former nearby 379 Chestnut Street. Mamie Amelia Meyer (1887-1974) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Meyer, and died in Mower County, Minnesota.

380 Chestnut Street: Built in 1969. The structure is a two story, 18200 square foot, commercial warehouse. The previous owners of record of the property were John E. Blomquist, Jr., and Richard K. Blomquist, located at 360 Robert Street, and the current owner of record of the property is Allina Health System of Minneapolis. The 1920 city directory indicates that Erick C. Carlson, a painter employed by Rosness & Seme, roomed at the former nearby 381 Chestnut Street. The 1930 city directory indicates that Peter Wolf resided at the former nearby 381 Chestnut Street. Peter Wolf ( -1939) died in Ramsey County.

393 Chestnut Street: Built in 1964. The structure is a two story, 24780 square foot, nursing home. Catherine Raub resided at this address in 2004. The previous owner of record of the property was Hoikka House Inc., located at Ellsworth, Wisconsin, and the current owner of record of the property is Allina Health System of Minneapolis. The records of the 1919-1920 Minnesota World War I Soldier's Bonus Board (#22584) indicate that Holman E. Brinker (1890- ,) a 1918 draftee and a Musician First Class in the Headquarters Company of the 809th Pioneer Infantry, who was born in Paris, Illinois, moved to Minnesota in 1905, had brown eyes, black hair, and a colored complexion, was 5' 5" tall, was a musician at induction, served in the American Expeditionary Force in France, was issued one bronze victory button, was a waiter employed by the Northern Pacific RailRoad after the completion of service, and was married, resided with his wife, Lena Brinker, at the nearby former 396 Chestnut Street.

227 Cliff Street: The property is owned by Xcel Energy Company.

229 Cliff Street: Built in 1886 (in 1900 according to Empson;) Simple frame house in style. The structure is a 1 3/4 story, 1344 square foot, four bedroom, one bathroom, one half-bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided house. The house was built for Emerson W. Peet & Sons, a mortgage investment company. The 1930 city directory indicates that William B. Oliphant, an engineer employed at Hendricks School, and his wife, Hannah Oliphant, resided at this address. Church of the Latter Day Saints genealogical records indicate that Emerson William Peet (1834/1836-1902) was born in Euclid, Cuyahoga, Ohio, and was the son of Reverend Stephen Peet and Martha Sherman Dennison Peet. Emerson W. Peet attended Beloit College, Wisconsin, where his father was one of the founders, graduated from Amherst College in 1856, was a teacher in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and Oshkosh, Wisconsin, moved to Texas and engaged in land surveying in 1860, was engaged in the life insurance business after 1864, settled in St. Paul in 1885, was manager for the Mutual Life Insurance Company, had other extensive business interests and investments, became a member of the Minnesota Historical Society in 1898, and died in St. Paul. Emerson Peet (1836-1902) died in St. Paul. William B. Oliphant ( -1940) died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Helen L. Thilmany and Robert J. Thilmany. Robert Thilmany was a member of the Class of 1966 of Cotter High School in Winona, Minnesota. [See notes for Emerson William Peet for 271 Summit Avenue.]

231 Cliff Street: Built in 1886 (in 1900 according to Empson.) The structure is a 1 3/4 story, 1176 square foot, two bedroom, two bathroom, asbestos-sided house. The house was built for Emerson W. Peet & Sons, a mortgage investment company. The 1930 city directory indicates that Samuel McMahon and his wife, Mabel McMahon, resided at this address. Samuel McMahon (1896-1976) was born in Minnesota and died in Rice County, Minnesota. Mabel A. McMahon (1869-1962) was born outside of Minnesota and died in Todd County, Minnesota. The current owner of record of the property is David Heroff. [See notes for Emerson William Peet for 271 Summit Avenue.]

245 Cliff Street: Built in 1900 (in 1905 according to Empson.) The structure is a one story, 1294 square foot, three bedroom, two bathroom, aluminum/vinyl-sided house. The house was built for Mrs. Hawlett. The 1920 city directory indicates that Mollie Bowen, the widow of George Bowen, resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Henry H. Rover, a foreman employed by Iverson Decorating Company, and his wife, Hazel Rover, resided at this address. World War I veteran Elwerd Gabrio (1893- ), a Sergeant, resided at this address in 1919. Irene Rover resided at this address in 1980. The Rover family resided at this address from 1930 to 1980. Henry H. "Harry" Rover ( -1972) was born outside of Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. Hazel L. Rover (1892-1959) was born in Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. Edward C. Gabrio ( -1947) died in Hennepin County. The previous owner of record of the property was Irene R. Rover and the current owner of record of the property is Sandor Gallo.

263 Cliff Street: Built in 1888 (in 1902 according to Empson.) The structure is a two story, 1384 square foot, three bedroom, one bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage. The house was built as investment property. The 1930 city directory indicates that Frank E. Watzl resided at this address. Frank E. Watzl ( -1954) died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is Jeffrey M. Hall, who resides in White Bear Lake, Minnesota.

267 Cliff Street: Built in 1894 (in 1902 according to Empson.) The structure is a two story, 1288 square foot, three bedroom, one bathroom, stucco house, with a detached one car garage. The house was built for Anna Poppler. The 1920 city directory indicates that William Beaudette, a switchman, resided at this address and that Alb W. Bartlett, a helper employed by American Railway Express, and Corinne F. Bartlett, a clerk employed by the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha RailRoad, both boarded at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that William C. Baudette/Beaudette, a machinist employed by the National Battery Company, William Beaudette, a switchman employed by the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad, and his wife, Mary Beaudette, resided at this address. Annie Koehner Poppler ( -1920) died in Carver County, Minnesota. William C. Beaudette (1904-1981) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Wigley, and died in Ramsey County. The property was last sold in 1995 with a sale price of $39,900. The previous owners of record of the property were Jason M. Johnston and Jodi L. Johnston and the current owners of record of the property are Jeanne Kedrowski and Richard Kedrowski, who reside in Stillwater, Minnesota. Richard Kedrowski is the principal of Kedrowski Investments LLP in Stillwater, Minnesota. [See note for the National Battery Company, its successor, the Gould National Battery Company, and its owner, Lytton Shields, for 1873 Summit Avenue.] [See the note for the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad.] [See note for the American Railway Express Company for 47 Douglas Street.]

275 Cliff Street: Built in 1900 (in 1870 according to Empson.) The structure is a two story, 2128 square foot, four bedroom, one bathroom, stucco house. The house was set at an angle to the street, which was the fashion of the era in which it was built. The house was built for Frank J. Poppler ( -1901.) The 1920 city directory indicates that Charles E. Carlson, an ironworker, resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Gustav V. Nast, a paperhanger employed by Bachke & Tein, his wife, Clara Nast, and Mrs. Mary Zwirn all resided at this address. Clare A. Nast (1897-1965) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Schwenke, and died in Ramsey County. Mary Zwirn (1869-1958) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Becker, and died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is Mario Meza.

277 Cliff Street: Built in 1900. The structure is a 1210 square foot, three bedroom, one bathroom, asbestos-sided rambler. The house was built for Frank J. Poppler and Anna Poppler. It originally was the site of a barrel making shop. The 1930 city directory indicates that Cornelius Osborne, a helper employed by Standard Brands Inc., his wife, Grace Osborne, Elmer L. Beaudoin, a laborer with Swift & Company, and his wife, Mary Beaudoin, all resided at this address. Lawrence Palmen resided at this address in 1980. In 1873, Frank Poppler was a cooper who established a shop in St. Paul. Frank Poppler was a German stonemason who donated the land at 650 Palace for the St. Francis de Sales Church in 1883-1884. Grace Eugenia Osborne (1876-1978) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Grant, and died in Hennepin County. Frank J. Poppler ( -1947) died in Dakota County. Elmer L. "Frenchy" Beaudoin (1904-1975) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of St. Peter, and died in Ramsey County. Mary J. D. Beaudoin (1905-1980) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Lavery, and died in Ramsey County. Laurence Joseph Palmen (1913-1990) was born in Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. The previous owner of record of the property was Lori A. Palmen and the current owners of record of the property are Lee Cooper and Lori A. Cooper. The 1920 city directory indicates that Rudolph Bonine, a grinder employed by the Irvin & Beard Company, boarded at the former nearby 283 Cliff Street. The 1930 city directory indicates that Leo J. Wilson resided at the former nearby 283 Cliff Street. Leo Wilson (1900-1973) was born outside of Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. [See the note for Swift & Company for 110 Robie Street West.]

285 Cliff Street: Cliff View Condominiums; Built in 1926; Renovated in 2001. The structure is a stucco, multi-unit condominium building, with a detached garage. Unit #1 is a 810 square foot, five room, one bathroom, condominium unit, which was last sold in 2003 for $134,900 and which is currently owned by Maggie M. Miller. Unit #2 is a 657 square foot, four room, one bathroom, condominium unit, which was last sold in 2004 for $120,000 and which is currently owned by Tait Anders Danielson Castillo. Unit #3 is a 930 square foot, five room, one bathroom, condominium unit, with a detached one car garage, which was last sold in 2004 for $174,735 and which is currently owned by Shawn P. Boyd. Unit #4 is a 930 square foot, five room, one bathroom, condominium unit, with a detached garage, which was last sold in 2002 for $165,000 and which is currently owned by Cynthia J. Mueller. Unit #5 is a 926 square foot, five room, two bathroom, condominium unit, with a detached one car garage, which was last sold in 2002 for $165,000 and which is currently owned by Barbara E. Weinrich. Unit #6 is a 926 square foot, five room, two bathroom, condominium unit, which was last sold in 2002 for $155,000 and which is currently owned by Michael P. Schmitt. The St. Paul City Council designated November 22, 2006 as "Tait Anders Danielson Castillo Day" in the City of St. Paul in recognition of his dedication and work in the community. Tait Danielson Castillo is the executive director of the Hawthorne Area Community Council in Minneapolis, was the former Lead Organizer with the District 7 Planning Council of Saint Paul, and has been a volunteer for the Center for Victims of Torture and for the Science Museum. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Nettie L. Thomas (1863-1911,) the wife of Charles Thomas, who was born in Illinois to parents born in Scotland and who died of abdominal dropsy, resided at the nearby former 287 Cliff Street in 1911. The 1920 city directory indicates that Aug Bonnen, a carpenter, resided at the former nearby 287 Cliff Street, that Florence I. Cavanaugh, a messenger employed by the West Publishing Company, and Helen J. Cavanaugh, a clerk employed by Fairbanks Morse & Company, both boarded at 289 Cliff Street, that John Cavanaugh, a packer employed by Finch, Van Slyke & McConnville, resided at the nearby former 289 Cliff Street, that Sigfrid Conrad, a tuner, boarded at the nearby former 291 Cliff Street, and that Joseph Crenshaw, an engineer employed by the St. Paul Gas Light Company, resided at the nearby former 293 Cliff Street. The 1930 city directory indicates that Roy P. St. Lawrence resided at the former nearby 287 Cliff Street and that the former nearby 289 Cliff Street, the former nearby 291 Cliff Street, and the former nearby 293 Cliff Street were vacant. Nettie L. Thomas ( -1911) died in Ramsey County. [See note for the Fairbanks, Morse & Company for 294 Banfil Street.] [See note on the West Publishing Company for 415 Summit Avenue.] [See note on the St. Paul Gas Light Company for 761 West Linwood Avenue.] [See note on Finch, Van Slyck & McConnville for 969 West Osceola Avenue.]

Irvine Park Architectural and House History, Part 2

Irvine Park Architectural and House History Hike Walking Tour Route

Back to the Thursday Night Hikes homepage

Information from the University of Minnesota, Northwest Architectural Archives, was used in this webpage. Information from Donald Empson, Portrait of a Neighborhood, St. Paul, Minnesota, Donald Empson, 1980, also was used in this webpage.

In 1920, the Cosmopolitan State Bank was located at 106 East Fourth Street and its officers were R. N. Katz, president, J. B. Calmenson, vice president, Joseph Bellis, cashier, and L. A. Brandenburg, assistant cashier. The Cosmpolitan Bank was not listed in the 1911, the 1915 or the 1930 city directories.

This webpage was last modified on July 15, 2011.