Thursday Night Hikes: Washburn-Fair Oaks Hike Architecture Notes


Observations on Architectural Styles and House Histories

Washburn-Fair Oaks Hike

Assembled by

Lawrence A. Martin

St. Paul, Minnesota

Webpage Creation: November 20, 2001

General. The Washburn-Fair Oaks "Mansion" District is located in Minneapolis, just south of downtown. Fair Oaks became a fashionable neighborhood for several generations of Minneapolitans because it was convenient to downtown while it was separated by elevation of land from the working class sections of the city. The neighborhood's grandest mansions were built by the first generation of Minneapolis business leaders from the 1850's to the 1880's. Unfortunately, only one of the houses from this era remains. Today, the district consists of the early 20th century homes of the second generation elite, which are clustered around the Minneapolis Institute of Arts, Fair Oaks Park, and the First Christian Church. These structures were built on the sites of the earlier mansions. Most of the houses are now used for commercial and institutional purposes. The architecture of the neighborhood showcases the work of some of Minneapolis' most prominent architects, including William Channing Whitney, Hewitt & Brown, and Ernest Kennedy. A wide range of period revival styles were popular during this period, and most of them are represented in the district. The district was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1977.

Specific Structures. The following presents available information on the housing styles of specific structures located along this portion of the hike:

2400 Third Avenue South: Minneapolis Institute of Arts; Built between 1911 and 1914; originally Neoclassic/Beaux Arts in style, with addition Contemporary in style; McKim, Mead & White, original museum architect, Hewitt & Brown, art school architect, and Kenzo Tange, in association with Parker, Klein Associates, addition architects. The museum is a monument designed by the American masters of the Beaux Arts style. The 1885 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. E. H. Moulton, Dr. and Mrs. H. H. Kimball, Clinton Morrison, and Hon. and Mrs. D. Morrison all resided at this address. The museum was built as gallery space for the Minneapolis Society of Fine Arts, replacing a small gallery in the original Minneapolis Public Library at 10th and Hennepin. The Minneapolis Institute of Arts was established in 1883. The mansion owners in Fair Oaks were major benefactors of the Institute. The Morrison family donated the site of its mansion, "Villa Rosa," for the new museum and the core of the original collection came from the private collections of the neighbors. Eder H. Moulton (1844-1927,) the son of R. G. Moulton and Cornelia Moulton, was born in New York City, New York, was educated in private schools and at Oxford University in England, married Harriet E. Skyles in 1874, was first engaged as a cashier in banks in London, England, and Frankfort, Germany, returned to New York and was connected with the banking house of Henry Clews & Company until 1874, removed to Minneapolis and organized the Farmers & Mechanics Savings Bank, was the treasurer of the Farmers & Mechanics Savings Bank from 1874 until 1906, served as the treasurer of the City of Minneapolis from 1883 until 1890, was a telephone official, was the president of the Twin City Telephone Company from its organization in 1901 until it was succeeded by the Tri-State Telephone & Telegraph Company, was a Minneapolis Park Board commissioner from 1901 until 1907, was the vice president of the the Farmers & Mechanics Savings Bank after 1906, was the president of the Tri-State Telephone & Telegraph Company, was an incorporator of the Minnesota Homeopathic Medical College in Minneapolis, was a member of the Minneapolis Club, was a member of the Minikahda Club, was a member of the Minneapolis Commercial Club, and officed at the Tri-State Telephone & Telegraph Building in 1907. Eder H. Moulton and Harriet E. Skyles Moulton were the parents of Eder H. Moulton, Jr., and Kate Moulton. Dorilus Morrison (1814/1816-1897/1898), the son of Samuel Morrison, a wheelwright, and Betsey Benjamin Morrison, was born in Livermore, Oxford County, Maine, was a lumberman, was in the mercantile and lumbering business in Bangor, Maine, in 1842, came to Minnesota in 1854 or 1855, spent one year in Stillwater, Minnesota, invested in a large tract of pine lands on the Rum River, was a St. Anthony lumber mill operator and business leader, engaged in the manufacture of lumber, was prominent in the development of the water power of the falls of St. Anthony, was prominent in connection with the Northern Pacific RailRoad, was also a large stockholder in the Minneapolis Harvester Works, was a Republican, served in the Minnesota State Senate representing Hennepin County (District 5) from 1864 to 1865, was the first mayor of Minneapolis (1867-1868 and 1869-1870), served on the Minneapolis Board of Education, was a Minneapolis Park Board commissioner, was the president of the Northwestern National Bank, built the first house in the Fair Oaks neighborhood in 1858, nine years before the area was incorporated into the city, died in Minneapolis, and is buried in Lakewood Cemetery (Section 2.) Morrison was a principal incorporator and the treasurer of the Minneapolis Mill Company, which was incorporated in 1856 and eventually owned all the water power upon the west side of the Mississippi River, several saw mills and flour mills, a large elevator, and the North Star woolen mill. Morrison was involved with the Minneapolis Harvester Works in the 1860's, with the Upper Mississippi Navigation Company and with the Consolidated Elevator Company in Duluth. Morrison also was a director of the Northern Pacific RailRoad before its reorganization after the default of Jay Cooke and he built a 240 mile section of the rail line from the St. Louis River to the Red River. Dorilus Morrison was married at Livermore, Maine, to his first wife, Harriet K. Whitmore/Whittemore Morrison ( -1881), and the couple had three children, George H. Morrison, Clinton Morrison (1842-1913,) and Grace Morrison (Mrs. H. H.) Kimball and his second wife, Abby C. Clagstone Morrison, was the former Mrs. A. G. Clagstone. Morrison called his residence "Villa Rosa." It was reached from the city by following a winding trail up Lowry Hill through scrub oak and hazel underbrush. Clinton Morrison (1842-1913,) the son of Dorillus Morrison and Harriet Whitmore Morrison, was born in Livermore, Maine, was educated in the common schools of Minneapolis, married Julia K. Washburn in 1873, engaged in the mercantile business under the firm name of Morrison & Gardner in Minneapolis from 1865 under 1870, engaged in the lumber business as Morrison Brothers from 1870 until 1880, was the vice president and manager of the Minneapolis Harvester Company from 1880 until 1893, was a member of the board of directors and the secretary of the Minneapolis Flour Manufacturing Company in 1892, retired from active business in 1896, had extensive real estate and industrial holdings in Minneapolis, was the president and a member of the board of directors of the North American Telephone Company, was the president and a member of the board of directors of the Great Western Elevator Company, was the president and a member of the board of directors of the Northwestern Knitting Company, was the vice president and a member of the board of directors of the North Star Woolen Mills, was one of the original incorporators of the Minneapolis, Sault Ste. Marie & Atlantic RailRoad, was a member of the Minneapolis Commercial Club, was a member of the Minneapolis Club, was a member of the St. Paul Town & Country Club, was a member of the Minikahda Club, was a member of the Lafayette Club, was a Mason, became a life member of the Minnesota Historical Society in 1915, resided at 305 East 24th Street in 1907, and officed at the Guaranty Building in 1907. Ethel Morrison Van Derlip (1876-1921) was the daughter of financier Clinton Morrison and, in 1898, married John Russell Van Derlip (1860-1935,) a lawyer from New York who came to Minneapolis in 1881, was one of the founders of the Minneapolis Institute of Arts, was a trustee of the Minneapolis Institute of Arts and its president from 1928 to 1935, and left his collection of 229 objects and 1,112 books to the Institute. Ethel Van Derlip left an endowment to the Minneapolis Institute of Arts. Dr. Angus Washburn Morrison was the sole son of Clinton Morrison. The museum building was originally designed to have a series of large inner courts created by a Museum, Orchestra Hall, Architectural Hall, and an Arts School. Unfortunately, only the museum frontispiece was built. It is one of the finest Beaux-Arts buildings in Minnesota, with its portico, grand stairs, rotunda, fountain court, and a third-floor central gallery lit by a sky light. The Arts School was built in 1916. In 1973-1974, the museum was enlarged with the addition of modernist wings on the east and west, and with the construction of additional gallery space behind the original building. The entrance was shifted away from the front steps to a modern glass and brick side on 3rd Avenue. Tange's designs also included the Children's Theater and the Minneapolis College of Art and Design as companions to the museum. Hanibal Hamlin Kimball was named for a family friend in Bangor, Maine, who was a U.S. Senator from Maine and was Abraham Lincoln's first term Vice-president, attended the New York Medical College, then moved to Minneapolis, and worked as a surgeon. Hanibal Hamlin Kimball married, but the couple had no children and Kimball treated his neice and nephew, Emily Ames (1893- ) and Paul Ames, the children of Paul Kimball Ames and Agnes Guptil Kimball, as if they were his children. Hannibal Hamline Kimball (1843-1928,) the son of John Kimball, a lawyer, and Abigail Homans Kimball, was born in Carmel, Penobscot County, Maine, studied at the Hampden Academy in Maine, studied at the Lewiston Seminary in Maine, studied at the Hampden Academy, studied at the Pittsfield Medical College in Massachusetts, studied at the Medical School of Maine, studied at the Bellevue Hospital Medical College in New York, graduated in medicine from the medical school of Bowdoin College in 1866, moved to Minnesota in 1867, settled in Minneapolis, married Grace Everett Morrison, the daughter of Dorilus Morrison, in 1870, was licensed to practice medicine in Minnesota in 1883, practiced allopathic medicine and surgery in Minneapolis, toured European hospitals in 1879-1880, was the medical practice partner of Dr. Calvin Gibson Goodrich for five years, was a Mason, became a Master Mason in 1872, was the president of the Hennepin County Medical Society, was the president of the Minnesota Medical Society from 1886 until 1887, was vice president of the American Medical Association, was the president of the United States Board of Pension Examiners, was a surgeon employed by various railroads, and died in Minneapolis. In 1877, Dr. H. H. Kimball was an examiner of Civil War pension applicants. F. A. Dunsmoor (1853- ) was associated for a time with H. H. Kimball in a medical practice and was a surgeon for the Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad. Frederick Alanson Dunsmoor (1853- ,) the son of James A. Dunsmoor and Almira Mosher Dunsmoor, was born in Harmony, Richfield Township, Minnesota, graduated from the public schools of Richfield and Minneapolis, graduated from the University of Minnesota, graduated from the Bellvue Hospital Medical College in New York in 1875, was a private student of Frank H. Hamilton, Alfred G. Loomis, Austin Flint, Sr., E. G. Janeway, and R. Ogden Doremus in surgery, diseases of the chest, pathology and chemistry, moved to Minneapolis in 1875, was a physician initially in a partnership with Dr. H. H. Kimball, was a surgeon after 1877 in solo practice, was a partner of Williard Byther Pineo, and subsequently was a partner of Dr. Nicolay H. Scheldrup in Minneapolis, was a Republican, was a Methodist, married Elizabeth Emma Billings "Bessie" Turner, the daughter of United States Army surgeon George F. Turner, in Minneapolis in 1876, was a professor of surgery in the St. Paul Medical College from 1877 until 1879, was county physician for Hennepin County in 1879, was chair of surgery in the medical department of Hamline University from 1879 until 1881, was a founder of the village of Buxton, Minnesota, in 1880, was an organizer of the Minnesota College Hospital and was dean of the college, was active in organizing Asbury Methodist Hospital in 1892, was a surgeon at St. Mary's Hospital, at the St. Barnabas Hospital, at the City Hospital, and at the Swedish Hospital, was a gynecologist at the City Hospital, at the University of Minnesota Free Dispensary, and at the Minneapolis Free Dispensary, introduced antiseptic surgery to Minnesota, was the surgeon for the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha RailRoad, the Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sault Ste. Marie RailRoad, the Northern Pacific RailRoad, the Great Western RailRoad, and the St. Paul & Duluth RailRoad, was the medical director of the Surety Fund Life Company, was a member of the Minneapolis Club, was a member of the Commercial Club, was a member of the University of Minnesota Medical Department from its organization when the Minnesota College Hospital was merged into the State University in 1889 until 1913, was a member of the International Medical Congress, was a member of the National Association of Railway Surgeons, was a member of the American Medical Association, was a member of the Minnesota Academy of Medicine, was a member of the Western Surgical and Gynecological Association, was a member of the Tri-State Medical Association, was a member of the Crow River Medical Association, was a member of the North Dakota State Medical Society, was a member of the Tri-State Medical Society, was a member of the Society of Physicians and Surgeons of Minneapolis, was a member of the Hennepin County Medical Association, and was a member of the Minnesota State Medical Society, made an especial and extensive study and practice of gynecology, presented the paper "Successful Surgery" before the Minnesota State Medical Society in 1892, authored the paper "The Call For Exploratory Operation in the Gall-Bladder Region" in the Journal of the American Medical Association, presented the paper "Necrosis of Soft Parts Following Enormous Subcutaneous Injections of Adrenalin" before the Minnesota State Medical Association in 1904, was a member of the Nu Sigma Nu Society, was a Methodist, was a Mason, was a Druid, was a Good Templar, officed at the Andrus Building in 1907, resided at 1413 Harmon Place in 1907, and had a summer residence at Kenjockety, Lake Minnetonka, Minnesota, in 1907. Frederick Alanson Dunsmoor and Elizabeth Emma Billings Turner had seven children, three who lived to maturity, Frederick Laton Dunsmoor ( -1911,) Marjorie Allport Dunsmoor (Mrs. Fred) McCartney, and Elizabeth Turner Dunsmoor (Mrs. Homer) Clark. Charles Bidell was a coachman employed by F. A. Dunsmoor in 1882. Hanibal Hamlin Kimball ( -1928) died in Hennepin County. Dorilus Morrison was born in Livermore, Androscoggin County, Maine, was a banker, was a member of Minnesota State Senate from the Fifth District (1864-1865,) and was mayor of Minneapolis. In 1864, Dorilus Morrison established the fifth saw mill at St. Anthony Falls. Morrison had previously operated a gang mill on the east side and had previously been engaged in logging in the Rum River pineries. The Minneapolis Gas Light Company was founded in 1870, with Dorilus Morrison as its president. The company built a coal gasification plant at the foot of 14th Avenue South on top of the river bluff. Also in 1870, Dorilus Morrison built the Minneapolis Cotton Mill on the east side of the west side canal at the falls of St. Anthony. The mill moved to the back of the west side sawmill platform in 1877 and continued to operate into the early 1880's. Dorilus Morrison died in Minneapolis and is interred at Lakewood Cemetery, Minneapolis. Clinton Morrison was one of the original incorporators of the Minneapolis, Sault Ste. Marie & Atlantic Railway Company (the "Soo Line") with W. D. Washburn, H. T. Welles, John Martin, Thomas Lowry, George R. Newell, Anthony Kelly, C. M. Loring, J. K. Sidle, W. W. Eastman, William D. Hale, Charles A. Pillsbury and Charles J. Martin and served on the original board of trustees in 1883. He was replaced by C. H. Pettit in 1884. Ethel Morrison (1876-1921) was the daughter of Clinton Morrison and Julia Kellogg Morrison and was the wife of John Russell Van Derlip (1860-1935.) Angus Washburn Morrison (1887- ) was a son of Clinton Morrison and Julia Kellogg Morrison and married Sarah Helen Truesdale (1887- ) in 1914. Curtis Hussey "C. H." Pettit (1833-1914,) the son of Joseph Pettit (1809-1892) and Hannah Grubb Hussey Pettit (1810-1869,) was born in Hanover/Hanoverton, Columbiana County, Ohio, attended a Friend's school at Sandy Springs, Ohio, attended the public schools of Hanoverton, Ohio, attended Oberlin College, was a bookkeeper in the Forest City Bank of Cleveland, Ohio, moved to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, was an employee of C. G. Hussey & Company, an early iron and steel firm, moved to Galena, Illinois, on a prospecting tour in 1855, later came to Minnesota in 1855, settled in Minneapolis, initially opened a bank and real estate office on Bridge Square in Minneapolis, developed the townsites of Glencoe, Minnesota, Hutchinson, Minnesota, and Watertown, Minnesota, married Deborah McBride Williams (1833-1926,) the daughter of Captain Louis Hudson Williams (1802-1889) and Tabitha Patterson McKeehan Williams (1812-1866,) in 1856, was a partner with John G. Williams in the Minneapolis Journal in 1858, was a member of the Minneapolis City Council in 1859, sold his newspaper and banking interests by 1860, established a retail hardware business, Williams Hardware Company, in 1861, was a lumberman and miller, was a member of the firm of Ankeny, Robinson & Pettit, which operated a sawmill at St. Anthony Falls, formed the firm of Pettit, Robinson & Company and operated the Pettit Flour Mill, was a stockholder in and treasurer of the Minneapolis Elevator Company and was a builder of Elevator A, was a partner of Jabez M. Robinson in timber land development in St. Louis County, Minnesota, and Lake County, Minnesota, was a Republican, was a member of the Minnesota Senate representing Hennepin County (District 5) from 1869 until 1872, was a member of the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Hennepin County (Districts 26 and 29) from 1873 until 1877 and from 1886 until 1889, where he sponsored liquor control legislation, was a member of the board of trustees of the Washburn "A" Mill Mill Disaster Relief Fund of Minneapolis in 1878, was the assignee of Norman B. Harwood of the bankrupt N. B. Harwood & Company in 1880, was a member of the Hennepin County, Fifth Congressional District and state central committees of the Republican Party, was a member for 32 years of the board of trustees of the Minnesota State Reform School/Minnesota State Training School for Boys and Girls, was a member of the board of directors of of the Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sault Ste. Marie RailRoad, was a member of the board of trustees of the Westminster Presbyterian Church, became a life member of the Minnesota Historical Society in 1907, and died in Minneapolis. Curtis H. Pettit and Deborah McBride Williams Pettit were the parents of five children, Irene Hussey Pettit (1858-1877,) Louis Williams Pettit (1862-1884,) Edward Curtis Pettit (1864-1865,) Alice Mary Pettit (1868-1869,) and Bessie Tabitha Pettit (Mrs. George P.) Douglas (1870- .) Williard/William Byther Pineo (1858- ,) the son of Benjamin C. Pineo, a stone contractor and Cordelia W. Ramsdell Pineo, was born in Columbia/Columbia Falls, Maine, was educated at the Oak Hill Seminary in Buckport, Maine, was educated at Kent Hill's Seminary in Readfield/Redfield, Maine, moved to Minnesota in 1882, settled in Minneapolis in 1882, married Saidie Kendal Cobb in 1884, graduated from the Minnesota Hospital College, graduated from the medical school of the University of Minnesota in 1885, received instruction on the eye, car, nose and throat at the Polyclinic and Manhattan Eye and Ear Infirmary of New York City, New York, from 1889 to 1890, studied the eye, car, nose and throat in Berlin, Germany, Vienna, Austria, Paris, France, and London, England, in 1895, was a physician in Minneapolis, was a member of the Society of Physicians and Surgeons of Minneapolis, was a member of the Hennepin County Medical Society, was a member of the Minnesota Medical Society, was an oculist and aurist, was a specialist for diseases of the eyes, nose, and throat, was a Republican, was a member of the Minneapolis Commercial Club, was a member of the Minneapolis Whist Club, was a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, was a Scottish Rite Mason, was past master of Hennepin Lodge, No. 4, and Minneapolis Council, No. 2, was the past junior warden of Zion Commandery, No. 2. was the present wise master of St. Vincent de Paul Chapter of Rose Croix, No. 2, of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite, was Right Worshipful District Deputy Grand Master of the state of Minnesota Masons, was vice-president of the Masons' Fraternal Accident Association of Minneapolis, was president of the University of Minnesota alumni association, resided at the Holmes Hotel in 1907, and officed at the Pillsbury Building in 1907. Angus W. Morrison ( -1949) died in Hennepin County. The Minneapolis Mill Company was incorporated by the Territorial Legislature in 1856 and developed the water power on the west side of the river, while the St. Anthony Falls Water Power Company, also incorporated in 1856, developed the water power on the east side of the river. The only cooperative venture of the two companies was the construction of a rock-filled, timber-cribbed structure called the St. Anthony Falls Dam, built in the shape of a "V", which angled out from both shores and met upriver, and constructed between 1856 and 1858. The Minneapolis Mill Company quickly moved ahead of the St. Anthony Company in developing ways to distribute water power and built a canal angling inland from the millpond and running along the shore to carry water to numerous mill sites. The west-side water system included smaller canals to carry water from the main canal to the mills (headraces) and from the mills back to the river (tailraces.) When the system was completed, the Minneapolis manufacturing district consisted of 2.9 miles of tunnels and open canals. The canal system enabled Minneapolis to quickly surpass St. Anthony in the development of manufacturing at the falls. By 1869, Minneapolis was producing five times as much flour and twice the amount of lumber as the east-side manufacturers. The original Washburn Mill was built in 1874 by the Minneapolis Mill company. St. Anthony was eventually incorporated into the city of Minneapolis. [See note on Edwin Hawley Hewitt.] [See note on Edwin Hacker Brown.] [See note for Tri-State Telegraph & Telephone Company for 596 Portland Avenue.] [See note for the Minneapolis, Sault Ste. Marie & Atlantic RailRoad.] [See note for the Northern Pacific RailRoad.] [See note for the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha RailRoad.] [See note for the Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sault Ste. Marie RailRoad.] [See note for the Northern Pacific RailRoad.] [See note for the St. Paul & Duluth RailRoad.]

2400 Stevens Avenue: Preston King House/Minneapolis International Hostel; Built in 1909 (1910 according to Minneapolis property tax records); Georgian Revival in style; William Channing Whitney, architect. The structure is a 2.5 story, 6636 square foot, seven room, four bathroom, house. This house was built for Preston King, son of Colonel William Smith King. Preston King (1857- ,) the son of William S. King and Mary Stevens King, was born in Ilion, New York, was educated in the common schools of Minneapolis, graduated from Williston Seminary at East Hampton, Massschusetts, in 1876, graduated from Yale College in 1880, married Josephine Marrs in 1886, was a merchant, was engaged in mercantile business until 1895, was one of the incorporators of Nothrop King Company Inc., seedsmen, in 1895, was the treasurer of Northrop King Company Inc. in 1907, and officed at 28 Hennepin Avenue in 1907. William Smith King (1828-1900) was a flamboyant newspaper publisher, was a member of Congress, and was a promoter of state agricultural fairs. Lyndale Avenue was named after the 1,400 acre farm, which bordered Lake Harriet and Lake Calhoun in south Minneapolis that was once owned by William S. King. The farm itself was named after William S. King's father, the Reverend Lyndon King. William S. King (1828-1900) was born in Malone, Franklin County, New York, attended the Franklin County, New York, common schools, then engaged in agricultural pursuits, then moved to Otsego County, New York, in 1846, and engaged as a solicitor for mutual insurance companies, was the editor of the Free Democrat in Cooperstown, N.Y., in 1852, moved to Minneapolis in 1858, was then engaged in journalism (the State Atlas, the Minneapolis Tribune, the St. Paul Pioneer Press, and the Minneapolis Journal) and agricultural pursuits, was the postmaster of the House of Representatives from 1861 to 1865 and from 1867 to 1873, founded Lakewood Cemetery in 1871, was the surveyor general of logs and lumber in the Second Congressional District of Minnesota in 1874, was elected as a Republican to the 44th Congress (1875-1877,) was engaged in cattle raising near Minneapolis, died in Minneapolis, Hennepin County, and was interred in Lakewood Cemetery (Section 2.) William S. "Old Thaumaturgus" King was a member of the Minnesota Agricultural Society in the 1870's, which demanded a Minneapolis location for the State Fair. Twin City rivalry then led to competing fairs being held simultaneously in both cities and under King's leadership, Minneapolis outdid St. Paul with a bigger fair. Finally, in 1884, the Minnesota State Agricultural Society established a committee to negotiate for a permanent location for the fair and two sites emerged, one at Minnehaha Falls in Minneapolis and the other at the 210-acre Ramsey County Poor Farm in Hamline Township, Minnesota, adjacent to St. Paul's northwest boundary. Ramsey County ended the stalemate by donating its parcel to the agricultural society and the first State Fair was held on the new site in 1885. William S. King erected a grand pavilion at Lake Calhoun in 1877 and later sold it to L. F. Menage, who converted it to a hotel, which later burned. The title "Colonel" appears to have been an honorific, since he did not serve in the Civil War in a Minnesota unit. Orange S. King (1839-1876,) the brother of William S. King, was born in Malone, New York, moved to Minneapolis in 1859, was engaged in the printing trade, worked in Minneapolis as a journalist and printer at The State Atlas, a newspaper owned by his brother, was a veteran of the First Minnesota Regiment, Company D, during the American Civil War, was wounded by a bayonet in the eye and then captured at the battle of Bull Run, was interned at Libby Prison, Richmond, Virginia, and at a prison in Salisbury, North Carolina, in 1861, was exchanged and returned to serve with the First Minnesota Regiment, was discharged from the U. S. Army in 1862, was a Republican, moved to Fergus Falls, Minnesota, in 1871, established the Fergus Falls, Minnesota, Advocate, a four page Republican-oriented newspaper with a circulation of 525, sold the paper and returned to Minneapolis in 1876, died of consumption in Minneapolis, leaving a widow and six children, and was buried at Lakewood Cemetery. Preston King joined the seed firm of Northrup, Braslow & Goodwin. In 1885 and 1886, William S. King and Caroline M. "Carrie" King were involved in litigation in the Minnesota Supreme Court real property case of William S. King, vs. Philo Remington, Caroline A. Remington, Robert S. Innes, Louis F. Menage and Amanda A. Menage. William S. King and Caroline M. King owed money that they had borrowed to buy large tracts of land in Minnesota, including the Lyndale Farm, and with creditors hounding them, the Kings convinced a New York financier, Philo Remington, to advance them $120,000 to pay off their debts in return for turning over management of their properties, including Lyndale Farm and shares in the Pioneer Press that Caroline King owned, with Robert S. Innes as trustee, but Remington never advanced the money and the Kings filed bankruptcy, and Remington fraudulently sold to Menage the Lyndale Farm. The west side of Lake Calhoun was already owned in the early 1880's by Louis Menage, so it is easy to see why Menage was willing to buy up King's debt and foreclose on the farm. In subsequent litigation, the Kings prevailed and were awarded $2 million from Menage, who then sold fictitious Minneapolis real estate mortgages in the Eastern third party market as president of the Northwest Guarantee Company/Guarantee Loan Company/Northwestern Guaranty Loan Company, a fraud that resulted in his indictment after the Panic of 1893 occurred and the creditors attempted to foreclose on those mortgages and caused Menage to flee to Guatemala for six years. Louis Menage (1850-1924) was born in Rhode Island, moved to Minnesota to cure his "weak lungs," was a developer who platted Prospect Park as a Minneapolis subdivision in 1885, and died in New Brunswick. Louis Menage, real-estate tycoon, financier, mortgage banker, patron of the arts and sciences, and civic visionary, a man of of deep faith and lax ethics, also built the Guaranty Loan Building in 1890, the first skyscraper located west of Chicago, featuring twelve stories of red granite and lacy wrought iron. Menage was the author of the "Menage forfeiture clause," added to almost every title on land he sold in Minneapolis, that provided that any purchaser who knowingly or unknowingly allowed the sale of liquor to occur on his property would automatically forfeit the title to the property back to Menage or his descendents, and functioned to vex city residents until an exasperated Legislature passed a law in 1937 specifically voiding the clause. The "Menage forfeiture clause" was not included, however, in the title to the property Menage sold to the developers who built the Minikahda Country Club. In 1884, Jesse Erastus Northrup and Charles P. Braslan started the company known as Northrup, Braslan & Company, as a wholesaler and retailer of agricultural and garden seeds. In 1887, A. H. Goodwin joined the firm, and it was renamed the Northrup, Braslan & Goodwin Company. Colonel W. S. King and his son, Preston King, brought in much needed financial support in 1894, but, in 1896, a fire destroyed a company building and the company declared bankruptcy. Upon reorganization, the firm changed its name to Northrup King in 1897, when Preston King became its secretary/treasurer, a position he held until his death in 1919. Charles C. Massie became president in 1914, after the death of Preston King and the retirement of J. E. Northrup, with Lyndon M. King as vice president. Northrup King's board of directors made a public stock offering in the fall of 1968. The company was purchased in 1976 by Sandoz, Ltd., of Basle, Switzerland. In 1993, a group of employees and investors bought the consumer products division of Northrup, King & Company. Jesse Erastus Northrup was the son of Elijah Sears Northrup ( -1863,) a Michigan State Senator who died in Lansing, Michigan, and the great grandson of Elijah Northrup, a Revolutionary War veteran, and Amy Williams Northrup. Jesse Erastus Northrup's children were Sarah Florence Northrup (1878- ) and Edwin Barcele Northrup (1883- .) Preston King married Josephine Morrs (1868- ) in 1886 and the couple had two children, Lyndon Mars King (1887-1969) and Katherine King (1890- .) Lyndon Mars King married Helen Dunwoody Abbott (1889-1938,) the daughter of Amos Wilson Abbott (1844-1927,) a physician in Minneapolis, and Helen Griswold Wright (1858-1938,) and they had seven children. The house was then occupied by William Sweatt, the founder and president of Honeywell, and Jessie Sweatt, his wife. Honeywell can trace its roots back to 1885, when an inventor named Albert Butz patented the furnace regulator and alarm. He formed the Butz Thermo-Electric Regulator Company, in Minneapolis, in 1886. William R. Sweatt arrived in Minneapolis from Fargo, North Dakota, in 1891. He started the Sweatt Manufacturing Company, building wooden wheelbarrows, grocery boxes, and wooden washing machines at a factory in Robbinsdale, Minnesota. Sweatt invested in the Consolidated Temperature Controlling Company at about this time, and was given a seat on its board of directors. The Consolidated Temperature Controlling Co., Incorporated, acquired Butz's patents and business, and by 1893, had renamed itself Electric Heat Regulator Company. In 1898, the company was purchased by W. R. Sweatt, who, by 1916, had changed the name of the company to Minneapolis Heat Regulator Company. In 1904, a young engineer named Mark Honeywell, was perfecting the heat generator as part of his plumbing and heating business. In 1906, he formed the Honeywell Heating Specialty Company, Incorporated. In 1927, the Minneapolis Heat Regulator Company and the Honeywell Heating Specialty Company merged to form the Minneapolis-Honeywell Regulator Company, and became the largest producer of high-quality jeweled clocks. W. R. Sweatt became chairman and Mark Honeywell became president. Minneapolis-Honeywell became a defense contractor in 1940. Of particular note was its development of an electronic autopilot, which came to be used on all types of U. S. bombers during World War II. The company's name was officially changed to Honeywell Inc. in 1963. Harold W. Sweatt (1892-1980) was a former chairman of the board of Honeywell, Inc. Charles B. Sweatt was Harold Sweatt's brother. Jessie Sweatt was W. R. Sweatt's wife and the mother of Harold Sweatt and Charles Sweatt. The 1917 Catalogue of the Beta Theta Pi Fraternity, published by James T. Brown of New York, indicated that Charles Baxter Sweatt, who received a bachelors degrre from the University of Minnesota in 1916, resided at this address and that Harold Wilson Sweatt, who received a bachelors degree from the University of Minnesota in 1913 and was vice president of the Minneapolis Heat Regulator Company, resided at 2747 Fourth Avenue South. The University of Minnesota's Institute of Technology has established two endowed chairs, the Harold Sweatt Chair in Technological Leadership, held by Masoud Amin, and the William Sweatt Visiting Land Grant Chair in Technological Leadership, held by Rias van Wyck. Honeywell Inc. merged with AlliedSignal Inc., of Morris Township, New Jersey, in 1999, with Lawrence A. Bossidy, chairman, and Michael R. Bonsignore, CEO. In 1935, the home was drastically altered to become a rooming house. In 1909, Jessie Sweatt and W. R. Sweatt resided at 1729 Park Avenue. The 1909 city directory indicates that Preston King, treasurer of Northrup, King & Company, resided at 624 South Ninth Street and that William R. Sweatt, president and treasurer of the Electric Heat Regulator Company, resided at 1729 Park Avenue. Harold W. Sweatt boarded at 1729 Park Avenue in 1909. The 1910 city directory indicates that Preston King, treasurer of Northrup, King & Company, resided at this address and that Lyndon M. King boarded at this address. The 1915 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Sweatt and H. W. Sweatt resided at this address. The 1923 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Sweatt and C. P. Sweatt resided at this address. Jesse Northrup ( -1915) died in Hennepin County. Caroline M. King ( -1917) died in Hennepin County. Preston King (1923-1991) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Abbott, and died in Hennepin County. Lyndon M. King (1887-1969) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Morrs, and died in Hennepin County. Jessie Wilson Sweatt ( -1948) died in Hennepin County. William Richard Sweatt (1866-1937) died in Hennepin County. Harold W. Sweatt (1891-1980) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Wilson, and died in Hennepin County. Charles B. Sweatt (1894-1977) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Wilson, and died in Hennepin County. Charles C. Massie ( -1947) died in Hennepin County. The Minneapolis International Hostel, the former City of Lakes International House, is a youth hostel. Thomas H. Hodne, Jr., residing at 2520 Stevens Avenue, is the former owner of record of the property. Zev Oman, residing at 12011 West River Road, Champlin, Minnesota, is listed by the City of Minneapolis as the current owner of record of the property and Stevens Group LLC is the taxpayer for the property. Thomas H. Hodne, Jr., is a design architect consultant and a professor at the School of Architecture and Landscape Design at the University of Minnesota. Zev Oman and Kristi Koethe-Oman were involved in 2002 property title litigation in the Minnesota Court of Appeals over a parcel at 2400 Stevens Avenue South in Brooklyn Park, Minnesota, in Fredrick R. Schilling, et al., v Zev Oman, et al., CX-01-2014. [See note on Whitney.]

2300 Stevens Avenue South: First Christian Church Residence; Built in 1964. The First Christian Church is affiliated with the Christian Church/Disciples of Christ, a church in the Baptist and Presbyterian tradition that arose out of the teachings of Barton W. Stone (1772-1844,) Thomas Campbell (1763- 854,) and Alexander Campbell (1788-1866.) The building is a combination of office space and an apartment. The building is owned by the Portland Avenue Church Of Christ. The 1902 University of Minnesota Alumni Record indicates that Charles S. Pillsbury, a 1900 graduate and associated with the Pillsbury-Washburn Flour Mills Company, and John S. Pillsbury, Jr., a 1900 graduate with the Pillsbury-Washburn Company, both resided at the former nearby 2200 Stevens Avenue South. Stanley Washburn, vice president and general manager of the Washburn Steel Castings & Coupler Company, resided at the former 2200 Stevens Avenue South according to the 1909 city directory. The other officers of the Washburn Steel Castings & Coupler Company were W. D. Washburn, president, and C. C. Crane, secretary and treasurer, and the company officed at the Met Life Building according to the 1909 city directory. [See the note for the Church Of Christ/Campbellite Church for 180 McBoal Street.]

100 East 22nd Street: Blindness Learning In New Dimensions, Inc.; Built in 1912. The structure is a three story, 20056 square foot, office building. The 1923 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. S. Pillsbury resided at this address. Charles S. Pillsbury was the twin brother of John S. Pillsbury. BLIND, Incorporated was an adjustment center founded in 1986 by blind Minnesotans, offers orientation-to-blindness training programs, and is affiliated with the National Federation of the Blind. Charles S. Pillsbury ( -1939) died in Olmsted County, Minnesota. [See note for Charles S. Pillsbury for 2201 First Avenue South.]

116 East 22nd Street: Alfred F. Pillsbury House; Built in 1903; English Tudor Gothic/Tudor Revival in style; Ernest Kennedy, architect. The structure is a three story, 8342 square foot, building. The house was built of local Platteville limestone. The facade is articulated by a two-story entrance bay topped by a balustrade. The bay is slightly off center, creating an asymmetrical effect characteristic of the English Gothic style. The 1909 city directory indicates that Alfred F. Pillsbury, president of the St. Anthony Falls Water Power Company and the Union Terminal Elevator Company, resided at this address. The 1910 city directory indicates that Alfred F. Pillsbury, president of the St. Anthony Falls Water Power Company, president of the Union Terminal Elevator Company, and vice-president of the Pillsbury Flour Mills Company, resided at this address. The 1916 University of minnesota Alumni Directory indicates that Alfred F. Pillsbury resided at this address. The 1923 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. A. F. Pillsbury resided at this address. Alfred Fiske Pillsbury (1876-1950) was an 1894 graduate of the University of Minnesota Law School, was a University of Minnesota football (1886, 1887, 1888, 1889, 1890, 1891 and 1892) and baseball player, was a member of the board of trustees of the Farmers' and Mechanics' Savings Bank, was a member of the board of directors of the First Security National Bank, was the treasurer of the Pillsbury Flour Mills Company, was a member of the Minneapolis Club, was a member of the Minikhada Club, was a member of the Lafayette Club, was a member of the board of directors of the Aero Club of Minneapolis in 1918, and officed at the Metropolitan Life Insurance Building in 1916. Alfred F. Pillsbury was the only son of John Sargent Pillsbury (1827-1901), the uncle of Charles A. Pillsbury, and the brother-in-law of Edward Gale, never cared much for the family business, and devoted his attention instead to art collecting during the 1930's and 1940's. Alfred F. Pillsbury became a company vice president in 1909. Time magazine, in 1940, reported that Alfred Fiske Pillsbury resigned as treasurer of the Pillsbury Company, leaving the Pillsbury family without an officer in the company until Philip Winston Pillsbury, son of Charles S. Pillsbury, class of 1924 at Yale University, known as "Teedyboom," and a guard on the undefeated, untied 1923 Yale football team, assumed the Pillsbury Company treasurer's position. Alfred Pillsbury's bequest to the Minneapolis Institute of Arts in 1950 included over nine hundred Asian objects, and it still forms the nucleus of the Minneapolis Institute of Art's ancient Chinese, Islamic pottery and Chinese Qing period (1644-1911) porcelain collections. Pillsbury was a stamp collector and also owned the first high-wheeled bicycle and one of the first three cars in Minneapolis. Another early auto owner was Swan Turnblad of the American Swedish Institute. Alfred Pillsbury died with an estate of $6 million, leaving his outstanding collection of Chinese bronzes, jade, and porcelain to the Minneapolis Institute of Arts. Pillsbury, Barnes County, North Dakota, population 24, reputedly was named for Alfred F. Pillsbury. Eleanor Field (Mrs. Alfred F.) Pillsbury ( -1942) was born in Boston, Massachusetts, the daughter of Massachusetts Supreme Court Chief Justice Walbridge Abner Field and Eliza Ellen McLoon Field, formerly of Rockland, Maine, married Alfred Fiske Pillsbury in 1899, was one of 128 female signers of an anti-suffrage petition filed with the Minnesota Legislature in 1869, and died in Minneapolis. John Sargent Pillsbury was born in South Sutton, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, arrived in Minneapolis in 1855 and set up as a hardware merchant in old St. Anthony, was a Republican member of Minnesota State Senate from 1864 to 1868, in 1871, and from 1873 to 1875, was the Governor of Minnesota from 1876 to 1882, was a regent of the University of Minnesota, and died in Minneapolis. John Sargent Pillsbury is largely considered the founder of the University of Minnesota. Ex-Governor John S. Pillsbury reputedly had more carriages than any other gentleman in Minneapolis, usually driving a cabriolet and also owning an extension coupe rockaway, a canopy-top Saxon wagon and a six-seated rockaway. Charles Alfred Pillsbury (1842-1899) was born in Warner, New Hampshire, arrived in Minneapolis in 1869 and, with financial backing from his uncle, John S. Pillsbury, and his father, George Alfred Pillsbury (1816-1898), founded the Pillsbury Milling Company under the name of C. A. Pillsbury & Company in 1872, served as a Minnesota State Senator, and died in Minneapolis. George Alfred Pillsbury (1816-1898,) the son of John Pillsbury (1789-1856) and Susan/Susanna Wadleigh Pillsbury (1793-1876,) was born in Sutton, New Hampshire, moved to Boston in 1834, was employed by a grocery and fruit store in the Boylston Market, married Margaret Sprague Carleton (1817-1901,) returned to Sutton, New Hampshire, and was employed by John C. Pillsbury in a stove and sheet iron ware company, moved to Boston in 1848 and was employed in a wholesale dry goods store, resided in Warner, New Hampshire from 1849 until 1851, was a town selectman, was the town treasurer, was a member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives, was a postmaster, resided in Concord, New Hampshire, from 1851 until 1878, was the purchasing agent for the Concord RailRoad, was the president of the First National Bank of Concord, New Hampshire, was a member of the New Hampshire Histroical Society in 1869, was the mayor of Concord, New Hampshire, from 1876 until 1877, moved to Minneapolis in 1878, was a flour manufacturer, was a member of the firm of Charles A. Pillsbury & Company, was president of the Northwestern National Bank of Minneapolis, was a philanthropist of the Pillsbury Academy in Owatonna, Minnesota, other educational institutions and other charities, was president of the Minneapolis Common Council, was mayor of Minneapolis from 1884 until 1885, was the president of the Minneapolis Board of Trade, was the president of the Minneapolis Chamber of Commerce, was a member of the Minneapolis School Board, was a member of the Minneapolis Park Board, was a member of the Baptist church, was the president of the American Baptist Missionary Union from 1887 until 1889, funded the Pillsbury Free Library in Warner, New Hampshire, in 1891, and died in Minneapolis. George Alfred Pillsbury and Margaret Sprague Carleton Pillsbury had three children, Charles Alfred Pillsbury (1842-1899,) Mary A. Pillsbury (1849-1849,) and Fred Carleton Pillsbury (1852-1892.) Charles Alfred Pillsbury (1842-1899) was born in Warner, New Hampshire, graduated from the New Hampshire Public Schools, graduated from the New London Academy, New London, New Hampshire, married Mary Ann Stinson (1842-1902,) the daughter of Capt. Charles Stinson and Mary Ann Poore Stinson, in 1862, graduated from Dartmouth College in 1863, worked for six years as a clerk and a partner in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, at a mercantile enterprise, moved to Minneapolis in 1869, was a prominent flour miller, was a partner with George Alfred Pillsbury (1816�1898) and Frederick Carleton Pillsbury (1852-1892) in Charles A. Pillsbury & Company, was a member of the Minnesota State Senate representing Hennepin County (Districts 26 and 29) from 1877 until 1887, and died from heart disease in Minneapolis. Charles Alfred Pillsbury and Mary Ann Stinson Pillsbury were the parents of four children, George Alfred Pillsbury (1871-1872,) Margaret Carleton Pillsbury (1876-1881,) Charles Stinson Pillsbury (1878- ,) and John Sargent Pillsbury II (1878- .) Edward C. Gale ( -1943,) Eleanor Field Pillsbury ( -1946,) and Alfred Fiske Pillsbury ( -1950) all died in Hennepin County. The property has been sold four times over the last 15 years, from 116 E. 22nd Associates to D. Nordahl and K. Betzler in 1990 for $300,000, from Ken R. Betzer to Wayne M. Stevens in 1991 for $450,000, from the GMAC Mortgage Corporation to Lloyd Curt Mangel, III, in 1995 for $286,500, and from Lloyd C. Mangel, III, to J. Uriel Camarena in 2002 for $550,000. J. Uriel Camarena and Melissa Camarena are the owners and taxpayers of record for the property. Melissa Camarena is associated with MCM Designs and Uri Camarena is associated with Somos Inc.

2200 First Avenue South; Nu Way House; Built in 1900. The structure is a 2.5 story, 8236 square foot, 17 room, 30 bed, group home. Nuway House Incorporated was established in 1966 and operates two alcohol and drug counseling half-way houses. The current owner of record is Nu Way House Inc.

2201 First Avenue South; First Christian Church/Site of the Charles A. Pillsbury House; Built in 1954. The church stands on the site of the former Johnson/Pillsbury House. The Charles A. Pillsbury residence was originally built for John W. Johnson in 1883 by the architectural firm of Kees & Fisk. John W. Johnson lived in the house for only two years before selling it to Pillsbury. Charles A. Pillsbury ( -1899,) along with his uncle John S. Pillsbury, was the founder of the flour milling company that grew to be the largest in the world. When Charles A. Pillsbury died, he left the mansion to his twin sons, John S. Pillsbury and Charles S. Pillsbury. According to legend, the two brothers decided to avoid a family dispute by tossing a coin to decide who would be the sole owner of the house. John Pillsbury won, and Charles S. Pillsbury built a house across 22nd Street, which still stands. The Johnson-Pillsbury House was razed in 1937 and the site remained vacant until the First Christian Church was built in 1954. Charles A. Pillsbury (1842-1899) paid $10,000 in 1869 for a one-third interesting a five year-old Minneapolis flourmill. His father, George A. Pillsbury, and his uncle, John S. Pillsbury, staked him. By investing in new machinery that was able to process hard spring wheat into fine white flour, the Pillsburys built a prosperous business. Also in 1869, Charles Pillsbury joined Cadwalader Washburn, the founder of the company that became General Mills, formed a millers' buying pool, despite the two men being competitors. In 1872, Pillsbury began adding four "X"s to its "Best Flour" packaging, one more "X" than the traditional marks for the highest grade flour. Pillsbury constructed the Pillsbury "A" mill between 1879 and 1881, which was the world's largest mill at the time and set a one day production record of 5,107 barrels of flour in 1882. By 1886, the C. A. Pillsbury Company was doing a $15 million per year business and was the largest milling company in the world. In 1887, Charles Pillsbury purchased the first Humphrey manlift, a wood frame belt driven elevator device invented by Seth Humphrey of South Dakota and then Faribault, for the Pillsbury "A" Mill. In 1889, the 20 year-old Pillsbury firm passed into the hands of an English financial syndicate and merged into Pillsbury-Washburn Flour Mills, including the brother of Cadwalader Washburn. Charles Pillsbury stayed on as managing director but died at the age of 57. Pillsbury-Washburn floundered in 1907 because of bad crops and it fell into receivership. One year later, a leasing company, Pillsbury Flour Mills, was organized. Three of the Pillsbury family were active in the new Pillsbury management, Alfred F. Pillsbury, Charles S. Pillsbury, and John S. Pillsbury. By 1927, Pillsbury became a public company and was first traded on the New York Stock Exchange. The Pillsbury "A" Mill, where Pillsbury's Best bread flour is milled and various animal feeds are made, is the oldest operating flour mill in Minneapolis. General Mills traces its roots to Cadwallader Washburn, who built one of the leading milling companies in the world in the 19th Century. Cadwallader Colden Washburn (1818-1882) was born in Livermore, Maine, attended school in Wiscasset, Maine, moved to Davenport, Iowa, in 1839, then moved to Rock Island, Illinois, studied law and was admitted to the practice of law in Illinois, then moved to Mineral Point, Wisconsin, formed a partnership with land agent, Cyrus Woodman, in 1844 and established the Wisconsin Mining Company, married Jeanette Garr (1818-1909,) the daughter of Andrew Sheffield Garr and Elizabeth Sinclair Garr, in 1849, was a Republican, was a member of the U. S. House of Representatives from Wisconsin from 1856 until 1861 and from 1867 until 1871, formed the Minneapolis Milling Company in 1856, primarily to lease power rights to mill operators, served in the U. S. Army during the American Civil War, was governor of Wisconsin from 1872 until 1874, built an immense flour mill in Minneapolis in 1876, formed, with John Crosby, the Washburn-Crosby Company in 1877, bequeathed $375,000 to fund an orphans home in Minneapolis in his will, and died at Eureka Springs, Arkansas. In 1866, Washburn built his first mill, the Washburn "B" mill, and in 1874, Washburn built a larger mill, the Washburn "A" mill. John Crosby became Washburn's partner in 1877. The "A" mill was destroyed by a grain dust explosion in 1878, leveling five other mills with it and destroying one-half of Minneapolis' milling capacity. Washburn replaced the "A" mill with a larger mill with better safety features and with automatic steel rollers to replace grinding wheels. In 1880, the Washburn Crosby Company entered the first International Millers' Exhibition in Cincinnati, Ohio, and won the gold, silver, and bronze medals, causing the company to rename its prime flour product "Gold Medal" flour. James Stroud Bell became the head of the Washburn Crosby mills in 1888 and was suceeded by his son, James Ford Bell, who, through a merger of regional millers (Red Star Milling Company (Kansas,) Sperry Milling Company (West Coast,) Larrowe Milling Company (Michigan,) Kell Group (Southwest,) Rocky Mountain Elevator Company (Montana,) Royal Milling Company (Montana,) and Kalispell Flour Mill (Montana),) led the Washburn Crosby Company to become General Mills in 1928, which then had 27 associated companies operating in 16 states. James Stroud Bell (1847-1915,) the son of Samuel Bell and Elizabeth Faust Bell, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, was educated in the Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, public schools, became a clerk with W. & S. Bell in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1864, became a partner with his father in the firm Samuel Bell & Son, sales agent in Pennsylvania for Washburn Crosby & Company, in 1868, married Sallie Montgomery Ford ( -1905) in Philadelphia in 1873, moved to Minnesota in 1888, engaged in flour milling, was a partner in the firm of Washburn, Martin & Company from 1888 until 1889, became the president of Washburn Crosby & Company in 1889, married Mabel Sargent in 1912, was vice president of the St. Anthony & Dakota Elevator Company, was vice president of the Barnum Grain Company, was president of the Royal Milling Company, was president of the Frontier Elevator Company, was a director of the Northwestern National Bank of Minneapolis, was vice presi�dent of the Minneapolis Trust Company, was a director of the Chicago Great Western RailRoad, was a Republican, was a Presbyterian, was a member of the Chicago Club, was a member of the Union League of Philadelphia, was a member of the Minneapolis Club, was a member of the Minikahda Club, and was a member of the Lafayette Club. General Mills survived the Great Depression through conservative fiscal policies and creative merchandising. James Ford Bell, the son of James Stroud Bell and Sallie Montgomery Ford Bell, guided the company until 1947, including the creation of "Betty Crocker" in 1921 and the development of non-food industries, including the building of bombsights and precision control instruments for Navy and Army Air Force airplanes during World War II, developing the Ryan Flight Recorder "blackbox," conducting hot air balloon experiments after World War II, and designing and building the deep sea submarine "Alvin." Diagio, the London-based owner of such prestigious labels as Johnnie Walker, Tanqueray, and Guinness, which had purchased Pillsbury decided to return to its core liquor business and shed its food businesses, sold Pillsbury to General Mills, combining the two entities into a single company, General Mills, on Halloween in 2001. Rev. Dr. Joseph Grubbs and Rev. Mark MacWhorter are the pastors of the church.

2206 First Avenue South: Built in 1900. The structure is a 2.2 story, 4780 square foot, 14 room, 11 bedroom, seven bathroom, triplex. The current owners of record are L. M. Rolfshus and D. A. Rolfshus and the taxpayer of record is Leigh M. Rolfshus, who resides in Golden Valley, Minnesota.

2218 First Avenue South: B. Patrick Cronin House; Built in 1900. The mansion is currently the location of the Alcoholics Anonymous organization of Minneapolis. The building is known as the "Mother Club," "2218," the "Original Group," and is the oldest continuously operating in the same location Alano in the country, having opened in 1942. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that John Washburn resided at this address from 1888 to 1941. The 1909 city directory indicates that John Washburn was the second vice president of the Washburn-Crosby Company and resided at this address. The 1915 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. John Washburn and their daughters resided at this address. The 1923 city directory indicates that Mrs. E. H. Washburn resided at this address. John Washburn (1858-1919,) the son of Algernon Sidney Washburn, a banker, and Anna Moore Washburn, was born in Hallowell, Maine, graduated from the Hallowell Classical Academy, attended Bowdoin College, moved to Minneapolis in 1880, married Elizabeth Pope Harding (1857- ,) the daughter of the Rev. H. F. Harding and Mary Elizabeth O'Brien Harding, in Hallowell, Maine, in 1884, acquired an interest in the C. C. Washburn Company in 1887, engaged in grain milling and grain dealing, was a director and the vice president of the C. C. Washburn Flouring Mill Company, was the president of the St. Anthony Elevator Company, was president of the Washburn-Crosby Company, was the president of the St. Anthony & Dakota Elevator Company, was the president of the Royal Milling Company of Great Falls, Montana, was the vice president of the Imperial Elevator Company, was the president of the Kalispell Milling Company of Kalispell, Montana, was the president of the Rocky Mountain Elevator Company of Great Falls, Montana, was the vice president of the Huhn Elevator Company of Minneapolis, was a director of the Brown Grain Company, was a director of the Barnum Grain Company of Duluth, Minnesota, was a director of the First National Bank of Minneapolis, was a trustee of the Farmers & Mechanics Savings Bank of Minneapolis, was a member of the board of directors of the Security National Bank of Minneapolis, was a director of the Minneapolis Trust Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Chicago & Great Western RailRoad, was a member of the Chicago Board of Trade, was a member of the New York Produce Exchange, was a member of the Winnipeg Grain Exchange, was a member of the Duluth Board of Trade, was a member of the Kansas City Board of Trade, was a member of the Minneapolis Club, was a member of the Minikahda Club, was a member of the Lafayette Club, was a member of the Psi Upsilon fraternity, was a member of the Minneapolis Civic & Commerce Association, was the president of the Minneapolis Chamber of Commerce in 1900 and 1901, was a member of the board of directors of the Washburn Memorial Orphan Asylum, was a Republican, was a member of the Minneapolis Universalist Church, and died of heart disease. Elizabeth Pope Harding Washburn was a life member of the Minnesota Historical Society. John Washburn and Elizabeth Pope Harding Washburn were the parents of three daughters, Margaret Washburn, Elizabeth Pope Washburn, and Sidney Washburn. B. Patrick Cronin (1897-1965) was associated with Alcoholics Anonymous and with Hazelden. An alcoholic, Cronin went into the Minneapolis library to stay warm and while there read the 1939 Alcoholics Anonymous text. Cronin wrote the organization to inquire about the existence of any Alcoholics Anonymous members in Minneapolis, only to discover that there were none. On the eve of the 1940 Armistice Day Blizzard, two Chicago Alcoholics Anonymous members "barged" in on Cronin and spent the next four days working on him. Cronin went on to assist in the founding of 450 AA groups in the Midwest. Hazelden was founded in 1949 as an exclusively Alcoholics Anonymous-oriented facility. In 1910, John Washburn was a trustee for the Washburn Memorial Orphan Asylum, at Nicollet Avenue and 49th Street, with W. D. Washburn, Mrs. Frances A. Pray, Charles J. Martin, W. D. Hale, and Mrs. C. A. Holmes. Frances A. Pray was the widow of Otis A. Pray and resided at 4500 Newton Avenue South according to the 1909 city directory. Otis Arkwright Pray (1833-1890,) the son of Otis Pray and Eliza Allen Weeks Pray, was born in Livermore, Maine, learned the trade of a millwright under the direction of his father and under Daniel Beedy of Lewsiton, Maine, initially settled in St. Cloud, Minnesota, moved to Minneapolis in 1856/1857, was a manufacturer, married Frances Adeline Fenderson, the daughter of Cyrus Fenderson, in Wilton, Maine, in 1858, built the first mills on the West side of the Mississippi River in Minneapolis, the Eastman mill and the Cataract mill, manufactured mill machinery and furnishings, was the vice president of the National Bank of Commerce, was a member of the Minneapolis City Council from 1871 until 1873, supplied all the driving machinery for the Pillsbury A and B mills, installed the first roller mills in the Northwest for C. A. Pillsbury, was the builder of the Minneapolis Exposition building, was a member of the Church of the Redeemer, and died in Minneapolis. O. A. Pray resided at the corner of Second Street and Helen Avenue (now Second Avenue South) in Minneapolis in 1857. In 1881, with William D. Washburn , Joel Bean Bassett, Sumner W. Farnham, James A. Lovejoy and Otis Arkwright Pray, Loren Fletcher and Charles Morgridge Loring co-founded the Minnesota Electric Light & Electric Motive Power Company, later the Minnesota Brush Electric Company. Charles J. Martin was the secretary-treasurer of the Washburn-Crosby Company and resided at 1300 Mount Curve Avenue according to the 1909 city directory. Major William D. Hale was the U. S. Postmaster at the Federal Building who resided at 1825 Third Avenue South and William H. Hale was an assistant engineer for the Kettle River Quarries Company who boarded at 1825 Third Avenue South according to the 1909 city directory. Caroline A. Holmes, the widow of Freeland S. Holmes, resided at 615 South Eighth Street according to the 1909 city directory. Otis Arkwright Pray (1833-1890) was born in Livermore, Maine, trained as a millwright business, came to Minneapolis in 1857 and was employed on the improvements at St. Anthony Falls, built the first flour mill, the "Cataract," belonging to Eastman & Gibson, on the west side of the river in 1859,except the old government mill, then built many mills in various parts the state associated with Leander Gorton, then became a member of the firm of Webster & Pray, engaged in mill furnishings, built the Washburn B mill in 1866, formed the firm of O. A. Pray & Co. and built an extensive plant of machine works on First Street in 1876, was a member of the Minneapolis City Council for several years, was involved with the militia in Afton, Minnesota, was the coadjutor of Dr. James Harvey Tuttle (1824-1903,) minister from 1866 to 1893 at the First Universalist Church of Minneapolis, and was a most enthusiastic promoter of the Minneapolis Industrial Exposition. James Harvey Tuttle (1824-1903,) the son of Ransom Tuttle, a farmer and a Baptist, and Ethena Ellis Tuttle, was born in Salisbury, Herkimer County, New York, attended the Fairfield Academy and the Clinton Liberal Institute, was a Unitarian Universalist clergyman, preached at Ingham's Mills, New York, Ford's Bush, New York, and Little Falls, New York, was a Universalist pastor at Richfield Springs, New York, was a Universalist pastor at Fulton, New York, in 1848, married Harriet Merriman in Fulton, New York, in 1848, was a Universalist pastor at Rochester, New York, from 1854 until 1860, was a Universalist pastor in Chicago from 1860 until 1866, moved to Minnesota in 1866, was the pastor of the First Universalist Church in Minneapolis for 25 years, authored The Field and The Fruit, died in New York, and was buried at Lakewood Cemetery. Tuttle's decision to reside in Minnesota was reportedly motivated in part by the Great Minnesota Falsehood, which was the idea promoted by land speculators that the state's climate was a cure-all for every kind of ailment. Bernard Patrick Cronin (1897-1965) was born outside of Minnesota and died in Hennepin County. Caroline A. Holmes ( -1920,) John Washburn ( -1930,) William D. Washburn ( -1929,) and Elizabeth Harding Washburn ( -1941) all died in Hennepin County. Frances Adeline Pray ( -1911) died in Hennepin County. Charles J. Martin ( -1926) died in Meeker County, Minnesota. The building was formerly used as a restaurant, first as the "2218 Kitchen", and then as "Broosters." Little Sketches of Big Folks indicates that William Penrose Hallowell, Jr., resided at the nearby former 2302 First Avenue South in 1907. William Penrose Hallowell, Jr. (1863- ,) the son of William P. Hallowell, Sr. (1833-1894,) a Quaker who was a first lieutenant and the adjutant of the 55th Massachusetts Regiment, the second black regiment raised in the state, during the American Civil War, and Elizabeth Corbit Davis Hallowell (1835-1876,) was born in Germantown, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, attended the Friends' Central School in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, attended the Cheltenham Academy, Cheltenham, Pennsylvania, attended Swarthmore College, Swarthmore, Pennsylvania, left college and moved to Minneapolis in 1883, joining his brothers, Morris Longstreth Hallowell (1857- ) and Isaac Roberts Davis Hallowell (1859- ,) was employed by the Northwestern National Bank of Minneapolis, was employed by D. Morrison & Company, merchant millers, was employed by the Nelson Tannery Company from 1883 until 1888, served in Company "I" of the First Regiment of the Minnesota National Guard from 1883 until 1888, married Agnes Hardenbergh (1863- ,) the daughter of Charles M. Hardenbergh and Mary Lee Hardenbergh, in Minneapolis in 1888, was a coal dealer, was employed as a clerk by the Northwestern Fuel Company from 1888 until 1902, was a partner in H. W. Armstrong & Company, a coal merchant, the resident manager of the Youghiogheny & Lehigh Coal Company from 1902-1904, was the secretary, vice president and treasurer of the Holmes & MacCaughey Company in 1904, was the vice president and treasurer of the Holmes & Hallowell Company, which succeeded the Holmes & MacCaughey Company, wholesale and retail coal dealers with offices in Minneapolis and St. Paul after 1905, was the chief executive of the Ramaley Boat Company, manufacturers of cruisers, auto boats, hydroplanes, racing sailboats, high grade rowboats and canoes, was a Republican, was a member of St. Mark's Episcopal Church, was a member of the Minneapolis Club, was a member of the Minikahda Club, was a member of the Lafayette Club of Minneapolis, was a member of the Lincoln Automobile Club, officed at 412 First Avenue South in 1907, and officed at the Plymouth Building in 1918. William Penrose Hallowell, Jr., and Agnes Hardenbergh Hallowell were the parents of one child, William Penrose Hallowell III (1891/1892-1913.) William Penrose Hallowell III, a graduate of Middlesex School, and a member of the Harvard University Class of 1915 and a member of the Harvard University Freshman track squad, died at Hampden Hall at Harvard University of an overdose of sleeping medication. Morris Longstreth Hallowell IV, a vintage gun dealer in Livingston, Montana, is the great-great-grandson of William Penrose Hallowell, Sr.

2309 First Avenue South: Built in 1900. The structure is a 2 1/2 story, 3135 square foot, eight room, four bedroom, three bathroom, house. The current owner of record is the First Christian Church. In 1916, Perry Harrison was a member of the Minnesota Historical Society and resided at the former nearby 2306 First Avenue South. In , Perry Harrison, son of Hugh G. Harrison and nephew of T. A. Harrison, was the vice president of the Security National Bank. Hugh G. Harrison formed a wholesaling venture called H.G. Harrison Company in 1879. In 1916, Harrison's grandson, Perry Harrison, joined Winston, Harper, & Fisher as vice-president and co-owner. In 1926, George R. Newell Company and Winston, Harper, & Fisher Company merged to form Winston & Newell Company, with Perry Harrison and L. B. Newell as principal shareholders. Winston & Newell was incorporated in 1926 in response to the threat that independent retailers faced from the emerging grocery store chains that began developing in the 1920's. Winston & Newell eventually became Supervalu Inc. In 1882, Perry Harrison was an officer of Company A of the Minneapolis Zouaves, a militia organization. Hugh Galbraith Harrison (1822-1891,) the son of Thomas Harrison, was born in Belleville, Illinois, graduated from McKendree College at Lebanon, Illinois, joined with his father and brothers in their milling enterprise at Belleville, Illinois, came to Minneapolis with his brothers, Thomas A. Harrison and William Harrison, in 1859, invested in property, was an original stockholder of the First National Bank of St. Paul, was a heavy investor in the St. Paul & Sioux City RailRoad, engaged in the lumber trade as partners in the firm of Joseph Dean & Company, built a lumber mill on Bassett's Creek, was mayor of Minneapolis in 1868, built the Pacific mill in Minneapolis, retired from the lumber business in 1877, was a founder, with Thomas A. Harrison, of the Security National Bank, became the president of the Security National Bank, was an organizer of the grocery house of B. S. Bull & Company in the 1870's, established the grocery house of George R. Newell & Company, was associated with the Minneapolis Trust Company, was a trustee of the Hennepin Avenue Methodist Episcopal Church, first married Irene A. Robinson (1822-1876) in St. Clair, Illinois, in 1847, and then, in 1877, married Mrs. Elizabeth Wood Hunt (1848-1931) of Allentown, Pennsylvania. Hugh Galbraith Harrison and Elizabeth Wood Hunt Harrison had six children, George Harrison, National Guard Brigadier General Perry Harrison, Edwin J. Harrison, Lewis Harrison, Hugh Harrison, and James Galbraith Harrison. Elizabeth Wood Hunt Harrison donated two Connick stained glass windows to the Hennepin Avenue Methodist Church in 1918. Elizabeth Wood Hunt Harrison was born in Chester, New York, graduated from Elmira College in 1868, was a suffragist, was the vice president of the Equal Suffrage Association of Minneapolis from 1914 until 1919, worked for the League of Women Voters, was an officer of the Political Equality Club of Minneapolis, was a member of the Minnesota Woman Suffrage Association, was a member of the Congressional Union, was a signifcant member of the Hennepin Avenue Methodist Church, once held the record for the longest tenured Bible class teacher in the United States, was the treasurer of the Needle Work Guild of Minneapolis, was vice president of the Home for Children and Aged Women in Minneapolis, was a member of the board of directors of the Minneapolis YWCA, and was a member of the board of directors of the national YWCA.

2312 First Avenue South: Built in 1968. The structure is a three story, 19806 square foot, 23 unit (five one bedroom units and 18 two bedroom units,) apartment building. The property was last sold in 1989 by Jack and Beverly Kahn to J. Myhre and B. Yates for $480,000 and in 1994 by Jack Y. Kahn to Robert J. Kleinman for $137,500. The current owner of record is the Garfield Court Partnership LLC, located at 5301 East River Road.

2318 First Avenue South: Built in 1920. The structure is a three story, 6566 square foot, office building. The property was last sold in 2000 by Jay T. and Adrian K. Mega to Derf Bistodeau for $260,000. The current owner of Derf F. Bistodeau and the current taxpayer of record is Derf D. Bistodeau.

2319 First Avenue South: Built in 1900. The structure is a 3.6 story, 4780 square foot, 14 room, six bedroom, six bathroom, duplex. The current owner of record is Beatrice A. Rothweiler and the current taxpayers of record are Beatrice A. Rothweiler and Neil Derechin.

2401 First Avenue South: Whittier Place; Built in 1925. The structure is a 2 1/2 story, 5370 square foot, lodging house. Whittier Place is an independent living and assisted living retirement center. The current owner of record is Supportive Living Solutions LLC.

17 24th Street East: Built in 1911. The structure is a 4 1/2 story, 19104 square foot, 18 room, 18 bedroom, transitional housing building. The structure is a reconverted abandoned apartment building that is transitional housing for 17 women and their children. The current owner of record is Women's Community Housing and the current taxpayer of record is Passage Community Housing.

4 24th Street East: Built in 1914. The structure is a two story, 17700 square foot, church. The current owner of the property is the Twin City Fellowship.

2401 Nicollet Avenue South: Hark's Food Market; Built in 1915. The structure is a one story, 7150 square foot, commercial building. The current owner of record is Marcellino Y. Hark.

2400 Nicollet Avenue South: McDonald's Restaurant; Built in 1961. The structure is a one story, 4254 square foot, fast food restaurant. The current owner of record is the Mcdonald's Corporation and Brenda Henry of Maplewood, Minnesota, is the franchisee.

2344 Nicollet Avenue: Built in 1923. The structure is a 3 1/2 story, 46220 square foot, office building. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that the Hardware Mutual Insurance Building was located at this address from 1924 to 1964. The Hardware Mutual Insurance Company was founded in 1899 by a small group of Minnesota hardware dealers who met in Minneapolis to organize a mutual insurance company to protect hardware dealers from fire losses. It first did business as The Retail Hardware Dealers Mutual Fire Insurance Company and was the first class mutual insurance company. In the beginning, insurance was available only to hardware dealers, and only stock and merchandise were covered. Later, the buildings and homes of hardware dealers were also covered. Eventually, other lines of coverage were added, and products and services were extended to other states and to other classes of business and property owners. The company name changed several times, eventually to American Hardware Mutual Insurance Company. The American Merchants Casualty Insurance Company and the AHM Insurance Agency were added in 1986 and the group of companies became known as The American Hardware Insurance Group. American Hardware entered into an affiliation agreement with Motorists Mutual Insurance Company of Columbus, Ohio, in 1993 and American Hardware redomiciled from Minnesota to Ohio. The current owner of record is the City Of Lakes Waldorf School. Waldoff High School Watershed is located at this address, as is the Multiple Sclerosis Society, Lavender Magazine, the American Refugee Committee, accountant Neal Thoelke, Access to Employment, Inc., the Center for Policy, Planning and Performance, the Tibetan American Foundation, and Freedom of Speech, Inc. The City of Lakes Waldorf School was founded by six mothers in 1988 as the Waldorf City School and is an independent and self-administered school with a 40 member teaching and administrative staff serving more than 200 children from preschool through eighth grade. There are more than 170 Waldorf schools in the United States, Mexico and Canada. The Watershed High School is Minnesota's only Waldorf Charter high school and was founded in 1996 by a group of City of Lakes Waldorf students who wished to continue their Waldorf education beyond middle school and became a public charter school in 2002.

19 24th Street West: Built in 1915. The structure is a 1.7 story, 1394 square foot, seven room, four bedroom, three bathroom, house. The owner of record is Roy Start and the taxpayer of record is the Rand Corporation, located in St. Louis Park, Minnesota.

22 24th Street West: Built in 1956. The structure is a one story, 672 square foot, building. The property was last sold in 1984 by C.H.Y & Co. to Haverstock Jr. for $226,115 and in 1997 by C.H.Y & Co. to Midtwown Holding for $167,000. The current owner of record is the City Of Lakes Waldorf School.

2401 Blaisdell Avenue South: Built in 1915. The structure is a three story, 5342 square foot, six unit (two efficiency units and four one bedroom units,) apartment building. The property was last sold in 2005 by the Scott A. Gulden Trust to Colin Hebson for $460,000. The property is currently owned by Colin Hebson, who resides in Chicago.

2400 Blaisdell Avenue South: Built in 1903. The structure is a 2 1/2 story, 10175 square foot, two unit office building. The 1909 city directory indicates that Mary C. McDonald and Millard H. McDonald, a student, both boarded at this address. The 1910-1911 Directory of the University of Minnesota indicates that Millard H. McDonald, a student, resided at this address. The 1916 University of Minnesota Alumni Directory indicates that Millard H. McDonald resided at this address. The 1923 city directory indicates that M. H. McDonald, Miss Mary McDonald, and W. T. McDonald all resided at this address. Millard H. McDonald, the son of Matthew McDonald (1848-1910) and Bridget Halpins McDonald, was a 1911 graduate of the University of Minnesota Law School, was a member of the Psi Upsilon fraternity, was a member of the Phi Delta Phi fraternity, served with the aviation forces during World War I, was employed in the traffic department of the McDonald Brothers Company, was a member of the Minneapolis Athletic Club, was a member of the University Club, was a member of the Minneapolis Traffic Club, was impersonated by Ed Madden in the fraudulent purchase of a diamond that was subsequently pledged to a third party to pay off a debt, resulting in Oscar P. Gustafson v. Equitable Loan 186 Minn 236 (1932,) and officed at 500 First Avenue North in 1916. Millard H. McDonald (1891-1963) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Halpin, and died in Hennepin County. Walter T. McDonald (1887-1976) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Halpin, and died in Hennepin County. Walter McDonald, a buyer for McDonald Brothers Company, a wholesale general merchandise firm, boarded at this address according to the 1909 city directory. The listed owners of the building are Phyllis S. Poehler and Ronald F. Groff.

2322 Blaisdell Avenue South: Blaisdell Manor; Built in 1915 (1900 according to Minneapolis property tax records;) Georgian in style. The structure is a three story, 19931 square foot, commercial building. The mansion was built for the Bovey family, early Minnesota lumber barons. The 1923 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Bovey resided at this address. Charles A. Bovey, the treasurer at the the Bovey-Delaittre Lumber Company, resided at 12 South 13th Street according to the 1909 city directory. Charles Argalis Bovey (1832-1911) joined with John Delaittre (1832-1912,) from Maine, to form a lumber company in 1871. John DeLaittre, the son of Charles DeLaittre and Rosalie Van Bartel DesIsles DeLaittre (1799- ,) and the grandson of Charles DeLaittre and Henriette DeLaittre, was born in Ellsworth Falls, Hancock County, Maine, was educated in the common schools of Hancock County, Maine, went to sea from 1848 until 1850, began active career in the cod fishery business, went to the gold fields in 1850 at Murphy's Camp (now Murphys,) California, where he made a small fortune, engaged in mining and lumbering, was a member of a party of eight white men who first saw the Washingtonia Giganteas (giant sequoia) of California, returned to the East in 1863, married Clara Towle Eastman, the sister of one of his business partners and friends in California, at Conway, New Hampshire, in 1865, came to Minneapolis in 1865, engaged in woolen and flour manufacturing business until 1869, purchased an interest in a sawmill, entered into the manufacture of lumber under firm name of Eastman, Bovey, De Laittre Lumber Company, which was incorporated later as the Bovey-De Laittre Lumber Company, was a partner in the Bovey-De Laittre Lumber Company, was involved in the Eastman, Bovey & Company, was mayor of Minneapolis from 1877 to 1879, was appointed by Governor John Pillsbury as State Prison Inspector from 1879 to 1887, was president of the Nicollet National Bank from 1884 until 1888, was the president of the Farmers' & Mechanics' Savings Bank, was a Republican, was a commissioner overseeing the construction of the Minneapolis City Hall and City Court House, 1900, served as a commissioner for the State Capitol building in St. Paul in 1900, resided at 24 Grove Street in 1907, officed at the Farmers' & Mechanics' Savings Bank in 1907, died in Minneapolis, and was buried in the family plot in Lakewood Cemetery. John DeLaittre met Clara Eastman on a return trip to Maine from California to visit his dying mother when, at the behest of his friend, William Eastman, he visited the Eastman family in New Hampshire and fell in love with Clara Eastman, but was unable to marry her until five years later, in 1865, after he had returned to California to settle his affairs. Clara Eastman was eighth of nine siblings, who were Haskett Derby Eastman, John Whittemore Eastman, Ezra Eastman, William Wallace Eastman, Annette Eastman, Charlotte Eastman, and Calista Eastman. George Eastman, of Eastman-Kodak fame, was a member of this family as well. John DeLaittre and Clara Eastman DeLaittre were married in Conway, New Hampshire, by Reverend Slason,and the couple had four children, William Francis DeLaittre, who died in Conway, New Hampshire, Francis William DeLaittre (1870-1871,) Corinne/Corine DeLaittre (1867- ,) and Karl DeLaittre (1872- .) Charles DeLaittre and Henriette DeLaittre came to Maine from France in 1790 and settled in Trenton, Hancock County, Maine. While John Delaittre played a large role in Minneapolis and Minnesota politics and affairs, as a mayor of Minneapolis (1877-1878,) he also, along with Bovey and E. J. Longyear, was one of the founders of the city of Bovey, Minnesota. The Bovey-Delaittre Lumber Company, having logged in the area and acquired land holdings, saw an opportunity in 1904 to plat and sell lots, taking advantage of the expected mining activities on the western Mesabi. John Delaittre was the president of the Bovey-Delaittre Lumber Company, while H. M. Delaittre was its vice-president, F. A. Bovey was its secretary, and C. A. Bovey was its treasurer according to the 1909 city directory. John Delaittre resided at 122 Franklin Avenue West in 1909. John Delaittre's wife was the sister of William Wallace Eastman, a partner in the Minnesota Flouring Mill and the owner of the North Star Woolen Mills. Karl De Laittre (1874-1957,) the son of John De Laittre and Clara T. Eastman De Laittre, was born in Minneapolis, graduated from the Minneapolis East Side High School, was secretary of the Republican Club at Harvard University, graduated from Harvard University in 1897, was actively engaged in business in Minneapolis since leaving college, was a wholesale grocer and lumber merchant, was the president of the North Fork Lumber Company, was employed in the wholesale grocery and import business as secretary of the Green & De Laittre Company, was a banker, married Rosamond Kimball Little in Salem, Massachusetts, in 1906, was a former construction worker for the Pioneer Fuel Company on the Duluth, Minnesota, coal docks, was a former lumberman with the Bovey-De Laittre Company, was the first chairman of the Minneapolis Chapter of the American Red Cross, was a member of the Minneapolis Rotary Club in 1924, was a Republican member of the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Hennepin County (District 38) from 1904 until 1907, was a member of the Minneapolis City Council from 1909 until 1915, was involved with the Karl De Laittre Company (General American Tank Car Corporation) in 1920, was member of the Minneapolis Club, was a member of the Lafayette Club, was a member of the Minneapolis Commercial Club, was a member of the Minikahda Club, was a member of the Roosevelt Club, was a member of the Skylight Club, was a member of the Minneapolis Society of Fine Arts, officed at 18-22 Third Street North in 1907, and resided at 24 Grove Street in 1907. Charles Bovey's father, John A. Bovey, had come to America from the village of Bovey Tracey in Devonshire, England. "Bovey" is a word of Saxon origin and the derivation of the name is, roughly, Bovi or Bofa in Old English, meaning "the stream." In 1871, John De Laittre, William Easton and Charles A. Bovey pooled their capital to form a company and purchase the Pioneer Mill on the Water Power Company's dam in Minneapolis. Bovey and De Laittre decided the Pioneer Mill would supply the lumber necessary for increased building in Minneapolis. Eastman sold his interest in the mill. Bovey and DeLaittre operated this lucrative sawmill until 1910. The Boveys built several homes in the Whittier neighborhood, all characterized by their stately front steps with pillars. Charles Argalis Bovey I and Hannah Caroline/Carolina Brooks Bovey (1831- ), married in 1856, and had four sons and two daughters, John Alden Bovey, Frank Alden Bovey, Charles Cranston Bovey (1864-1955,) William Howard Bovey, Caroline Hayden Bovey, and Anne Bovey. Frank Alden Bovey married Sara Newton Johnson and the couple had one son, Charles Argalis Bovey. Charles Cranston Bovey married Kate Estelle Koon Bovey (1874-1964) in 1898 and the couple had three children, Martin Koon Bovey, Sr., Ruth Alden Bovey, and Charles Argalis Bovey II (1907-1978.) Charles Argalis Bovey II worked for the Royal Mill in Great Falls, Montana, bought a farm near Great Falls and raised sheep and cattle, married Rachel Sue Ford in 1933, was elected to the Montana House of Representatives in 1942, and worked to preserve Virginia City, Montana. Charles Argalis Bovey I ( -1911) died in Hennepin County. Ruth Alden Bovey (1902- ) attended Northrop Collegiate School, married Nathaniel E. Stevens II in 1924, and resided in Wayzata, Minnesota in 1994. Ruth Alden Bovey Stevens and Nathaniel E. Stevens II had four children, Ruth Alden Stevens, Nataniel Stevens, Jr., Charles Cranston Bovey Stevens, and Murray Ten Brock Stevens. Kate Koon Bovey and Charles Cranston Bovey resided in Wayzata, Minnesota, in 1914 and donated the 1899 painting "Isles of Shoals," by Frederick Childe Hassam (1859-1935,) to the Minneapolis Institute of Arts in 1914. Ruth Bovey Stevens was the author of Just For Us, a biography of the Bovey and Kuhn families and a history of the Washburn-Crosby Company, published in Wayzata, Minnesota, by R. B. Stevens in 1992. The manor was originally acquired by the Lee family, who were the inventors of Lavoris mouthwash. In 1910, John DeLaittre authored and published the Reminiscences of John deLaittre, covering his travels in California and relating the story of meeting his future wife. John De Laittre (1832-1912) was born in Ellsworth, Maine, received a public school education, was a sailor for three years, was engaged in the lumber, sawmill and general store businesses in California from 1852 until 1865, returned to Maine in 1865, married Clara Towle Eastman (1838- ) in 1865, moved to Minnesota, was with the firm of Eastman, Gibson & Company from 1865 until 1869, sold his interest and joined the firm of Eastman, Bovey & Company (later incorporated as Bovey-De Laittre Company,) was vice president of Green & De Laittre Company, a wholesale grocery firm, was a Republican, was the mayor of Minneapolis in 1877, was a state prison inspector from 1879 until 1886, was president of the Nicollet National Bank from 1884 until 1888, was a Hennepin County courthouse and Minneapolis city hall commissioner in 1889, was a member of the board of state capitol commissioners in 1893, invested in Oregon, Washington, and Idaho timber lands, and was a member of the board of trustees and vice president of the Framers & Mechanics Bank. John Delaittre's son, Karl DeLaittre (1874-1957,) was educated in Minneapolis public schools, graduated from Harvard University in 1897, was employed by the Pioneer Fuel Company in Duluth, Minnesota, was employed by the Bovey-De Laittre Lumber Company in Minneapolis, and was a banker and a politician, and his grandson, John DeLaittre (1906/1907-1992,) was a bank president (the Farmers & Mechanics Savings Bank of Minneapolis,) was a bank vice-president (the Midwest Federal Savings & Loan Association,) a government official (with the Federal Home Loan Bank Board,) and a corporate director. John De Laittre, the son of Karl De Laittre and Rosamond Little De Laittre (1886- ) and a grandson of lumberman John De Laittre (1832-1912,) attended the Blake School until 1923, graduated from Milton Academy, Milton, Massachusetts, in 1925, earned a bachelor's degree in 1929 and a law degree in 1933 from Harvard University, participated as a member of the Harvard Mountaineering Club in an expedition to Jasper National Park in the Canadian Rockies in 1927, worked as an attorney with the Minneapolis law firm of Kingham, Cross, Morley, Cant & Taylor from 1933 to 1940, spent many years with Farmers & Mechanics as assistant treasurer from 1940 to 1942, treasurer from 1942 to 1947, vice president from 1946 to 1956, executive vice president from 1956 to 1957, and president from 1957-1962, was president of the National Association of Mutual Savings Banks from 1959 to 1960, was a member of the Federal Home Loan Bank Board from 1962 until 1966, was executive vice president of the Mortgage Bankers Association of America from 1966 to 1968, was a director of Midwest Federal Savings and Loan Association from 1974 to 1989, was a director and officer of some other mortgage and banking organizations, was involved with the Bovey and the De Laittre lumber and iron ore interests as counsel, officer, director, agent, trustee, and partner, married his first wife, Carolyn Erminger (1911-1982) in 1934, and the couple had three children, Corinne DeLaittre Ropes, Carolyn E. "Dermy" DeLaittre Hawley, and Lila DeLaittre, subsequently married Delores DeLaittre, and died in Minneapolis of heart failure. The younger John DeLaittre owned Tettegouche Camp, which eventually became Tettegouche State Park, northeast of Silver Bay, Minnesota. The "Tettegouche Club," a group of businessmen from Duluth who used the area as a fishing camp and retreat, developed the camp in 1910, and sold it to one of the members, Clement Quinn, in 1921. The DeLaittres acquired the Tettegouche property from Quinn in 1971 and through the Nature Conservancy, transferred the land to the State of Minnesota in 1979. The Midwest Federal Savings and Loan Association eventually failed and the Farmers and Mechanics Savings Bank of Minneapolis was acquired in 1983 by Carl Pohlad's Marquette Bank. Karl DeLaittre ( -1939) died in Hennepin County. Clement J. Quinn (1893-1961) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of McKenna, and died in Ramsey County. John Delaittre (1907-1992) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Little, and died in Hennepin County. In the 1930's, the Windus family purchased the mansion, renamed it Windus Manor, and began a bridal business. The Windus family also rented rooms on the third floor of the house to young ladies of the local gentry. Frank A. Bovey also was the president of the Melone-Bovey Lumber Company and resided at 1300 Harmon Place according to the 1909 city directory. Karl DeLaittre ( -1939) died in Hennepin County. Emma Cecelia Windus (1907-1963) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Trelch, and died in Hennepin County. George Windus ( -1940) and Mary Windus ( -1947) both died in Hennepin County. Harry J. Windus (1899-1964) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Cloutier, and died in Hennepin County. From 1967 to 1977, the mansion was owned and managed by the Boys Club of America. In 1978, the property was purchased by a Women's Club that practiced a modernistic approach to health and well being, and was known for tastefully prepared dinners and brunches. In 1985, after extensive renovation, Apples Associates, Inc., a catering, event, and contract food service company, took over the mansion as its corporate headquarters and base of operations. In August, 1996, the mansion and catering operations were acquired by Mintahoe Hospitality Group, a Twin Cities catering and event planning company located in St. Paul. The Skylight Club was organized in 1890 as a salon for intellectually inquisitive and culturally sophisticated men to gather and discuss the issues of the day. Initially, its meetings were held in the studio of artist Donald Volk, organizer of the Minneapolis College of Art and Design, at 719 Hennepin Avenue. Subsequently, its meeting place moved to the Miller Building, 118 Sixth Street South. The name of the club was because its first two meetings rooms had a skylight. The Skylight Club later moved to the architectural offices of Hewitt & Brown and met there from 1920 until 1974. From 1974 until 1976, the club met in one of the Pillsbury mansions on 24th Street South. In 1976, the Club moved to the American Association of University Women at 2115 Stevens Avenue. In 1985, the club had 171 members. The Club did not elect officers nor did it have a formal written constitution. Founding members of the Skylight Club were John Scott Bradstreet, interior designer; Edward Chenery Gale, attorney; Burritt "Burt" Harwood, Harwood Foundation, University of New Mexico; Herbert Putnam, librarian of the United States Congress; Harry Perry Robinson, journalist for the London Times; Walter Checkley Tiffany, attorney and magazine editor; Douglas Volk, founder of the Minneapolis School of Art; Edward S./Stanley S. Chevalier Waters, librarian of the Minnesota State Bar Association Library; and William Channing Whitney, architect. Other club members included Judge Lindsay G. Arthur, James Ford Bell, Prof. Richard D. Burton, Clarence Chaney, George Perrigo Conger, John Crosby, William C. Edgar, Dr. Burnside Foster, Cass Gilbert, Roy D. Herrick, Edwin Hewitt, William H. Hinkle, Jim Kimbrough, Col. Harry A. Leonhauser, Scott Long, Arthur Naftalin, Al Nier, Philip W. Pillsbury, Dr. Marion B. Shutter, John R. Vanderlip, Charles L. Wells, Dr. Frank Westbrook, Dr. S. Marx White, and Judge Charles A. Willard. [See note for the Minikahda Club for 702 Fairmount Avenue.]

2312 Blaisdell Avenue South: Built in 1963. The structure is a three story, 26 unit, apartment building which is owned by the Blaisdell Avenue Corporation. In 1907, Joseph U. Barnes resided at this address. The 1915 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. F. A. Chamberlain and C. F. Chamberlain resided at this address. The 1923 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. F. A. Chamberlain and T. G. Cassady all resided at this address. Francis A. Chamberlain, president of the Security National Bank, resided at 1758 Hennepin Avenue and Cyrus F. Chamberlain, a clerk at the Security National Bank, boarded at 1758 Hennepin Avenue according to the 1909 city directory. Thomas Cassady, a watchman, resided at 2043 Crystal Lake Avenue according to the 1909 city directory. In 1908, the Security National Bank was a creditor in the Pillsbury-Washburn Flour Mills Company bankruptcy. The 1910-1911 Directory of the University of Minnesota indicates that Bernice Barnes and Mildred Barnes, students, resided at this address. Joseph Uriah Barnes (1858-1930,) the son of William L. Barnes and Betsy B. Miller Barnes, was born near Geneseo, Illinois, was raised on a farm, was educated in the Geneseo, Illinois, public schools, attended the Davenport, Iowa, Commercial College, was a banker, was employed by the Stuart, Iowa, Bank in 1878, was employed by a Minneapolis bank from 1879 until 1885, married Mary Lovina Upson (1855-1932) in Geneseo/Atkinson, Henry County, Illinois, in 1880, was employed by a private bank in Alexandria, Minnesota, in 1885, continued employment by that bank in Alexandria, Minnesota, in 1886, after it incorporated as a state bank, was the president of the Minnesota Title, Insurance & Trust Company, after 1888, was the principal organizer and stock holder in the First National Bank of Elbow Lake, Minnesota, was the vice president of the Douglas County Bank in Alexandria, Minnesota, was the president of the Interstate Securities Company, was the president of the Improved Farms Company, was the president of the Northern Trustee Company, was a large investor in Minneapolis real estate, was a member of the Minneapolis Real Estate Board, was a member of the Bankers' Association, was a member of the American Metric Association, was a member of the Liberty Calendar Association of America, was a member of the Minneapolis Commercial Club, was a member of the Minneapolis Board of Trade in 1896, was a member of the Minnesota Bankers Association, was a Republican, was a Methodist, was a Mason, was a member of the citizen's staff of the Grand Army of the Republic, was a member of the Minnetonka Country Club, was a member of the Minneapolis Athletic Club, was a member of the Lincoln Club, was engaged in farming as a hobby on a farm at Lake Minnetonka, Minnesota, engaged in the hobby of hunting, was a golfer, officed at the Oneida Building in 1907, and died in Minneapolis. Joseph U. Barnes was the author of The Liberty Calendar and the First Year under the New Calendar, published in Minneapolis in 1918, which argued for a new 13 month calendar referred to as the "Liberty calendar." The Bank Directory of the Ninth Federal Reserve District was published from 1915 to 1928 by the First and Security National Bank of Minneapolis. Joseph Uriah Barnes and Mary L. Upson Barnes were the parents of six children, Bessie May Barnes (1881- ,) Katherine "Kate" "Katie" Jane Barnes (1883- ,) Eugene Burdette Barnes (1885- ,) Mildred Barnes (1887- ,) Bernice "Bennie" Barnes (1890- ,) and Lewis Miller Barnes (1893- .) Mrs. Francis A. Chamberlain was a member of the Women's Committee of the Minnesota Division Council of National Defense in 1917 and Mrs. Francis Chamberlain was the Minnesota chair of the Woman's Liberty Loan Committee of the Federal Reserve System in 1917. Francis Asbury Chamberlain (1855- ,) the son of James T. Chamberlain and Caroline Emery Chamberlain, was born in Bangor, Maine, moved to Red Wing, Minnesota, as a child in 1857, attended the Red Wing, Minnesota, public schools, attended Hamline University, studied at the University of Minnesota, was initially employed as a collector in the Merchants National Bank, then was a clerk of the old Merchants National Bank, married Frances Faft Foss/Frances T. Fass of New York in 1883, was cashier of the Security National Bank of Minneapolis in 1897, became the president of the Security National Bank of Minneapolis, was chairman of the special gift committee for the Minneapolis Young Womens Christian Association building campaign, was a member of the Minnesota Historical Society in 1922, was a member of the board of directors of the Minnesota Loan & Trust Company, was a member of the board of trustees of the Hennepin County Savings Bank, was the president of the Minneapolis Eastern Railway Company, was the president of the Minneapolis Threshing Machine Company, was the president of the Security Bank of Minnesota, was a member of the board of directors of the Northwestern Life Insurance Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Minnesota Loan & Trust Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Minneapolis Antheneum, was the executive committee chairman of the First National Bank & Trust Company in 1937, was a major backer and unofficial treasurer of the Minneapolis Citizen's Alliance, was a Mason, was a Republican, was a member of the Minneapolis Club, was a member of the Minneapolis Commercial Club, was a member of the Minikahda Club, was a member of the Lafayette Club, officed at the Security Bank in 1907, and resided at 1758 Hennepin Avenue in 1907. Francis Asbury Chamberlain and Frances Faft Foss Chamberlain were the parents of Cyrus F. Chamberlain, Ruth Chamberlain, and Caro Chamberlain. Cyrus Foss Chamberlain (1889-1918,) the son of Francis A. Chamberlain, a Minneapolis banker, and Frances Foss Chamberlain, was born in Minneapolis, attended Minneapolis public schools, graduated from Princeton University in 1910, was a partner in the Marsh & McLennan insurance firm until 1917, sailed for France aboard the S.S. Chicago to enter World War I, enlisted in France's Service Aeronautique in Paris, the last American in the Lafayette Escadrille, attended the aviation schools at Avord, Pau, and the G.D.E., was assigned at the Front to Escadrille SPAD 85, was reassigned to SPAD 98, and flew combat patrols with that squadron until his death in a mixup with 13 enemy fighters near La Ferte-Milon. Sergeant Chamberlain was posthumously awarded France's Croix de Guerre, with Palm. In 1928, Chamberlain's remains were removed from the military cemetery at Coulommiers, France, to the Lafayette Flying Corps memorial near Paris, France. In 1921 or 1923, Wold-Chamberlain field in Minneapolis, the current Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport, was named in his honor. The other pilot honored in the air field name was Ernest Groves Wold (1897-1918,) who was the son of Theodore T. Wold (1868- ,) who grew up in the Lowry Hill neighborhood of Minneapolis, graduated from Minneapolis West High School in 1914, attended Officers' Training Camp at Fort Niagara at the start of World War I, transferred to aviation and was commissioned a First Lieutenant, went to France, became a member of the Lafayette Escadrille, First Observation Squadron, in 1917, flew observation planes to photograph enemy locations, established an altitude record in 1918, and was killed in action near Chateau Thierry, France. Theodore T. Wold, the son of John S. Wold and Elizabeth Espeseth Wold, was born in Decorah, Iowa, attended the public schools of Decorah, Iowa, worked as a clerk in a general store at Decorah, Iowa, from 1885 until 1889, was a bank clerk at Elbow Lake, Minnesota, from 1889 until 1890, then was the assistant cashier of the First National Bank of Little Falls, Minnesota, from 1890 until 1896, then was the cashier of the Merchants Bank of Winona, Minnesota, from 1896 until 1910, was president of the Scandinavian American National Bank of Minneapolis from 1910 and 1914, was the first governor of the Ninth Federal Reserve Bank from 1914 until 1919, headed the state hotel inspection division, then was the first vice president of the Northwestern National Bank of Minneapolis, was a 32nd degree Mason, was a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, was a member of the Plymouth Congregational church, was a member of the Minneapolis Club, was a member of the Odin Club, was a member of the Lafayette Club, and was a member of the Minneapolis Automobile Club. Theodore T. Wold married Belle E. Groves of Decorah, Iowa, in 1893 and the couple resided at 1779 Emerson Avenue South. The First National Bank of Minneapolis and the Security National Bank merged in 1915, first under the name of First and Security National Bank, and in 1920, again became the First National Bank. The Scandinavian-American National Bank, with former governor John Lind as a member of its board of directors, grew out of the Swedish-American Bank, which was incorporated in 1888 and was acquired by the Northwestern National Bank in 1908, the fifth nationally chartered bank of the sixteen commercial banks in Minneapolis. The bank consolidated with the National City Bank in 1914, and H. R. Lyon, the former president of the National City Bank, was the second president of the expanded Scandinavian-American National Bank and also was the vice president of the Russell Miller Milling Company, succeeding Theodore Wold. Suspicion of all things foreign during World War I prompted the bank to drop its ethnic connection in 1917 and change its name to the Midland National Bank. In 1926, the Midland National Bank acquired the Union State Bank and the Sixth Avenue State Bank. Northwest Bancorporation acquired the Midland National Bank in 1929, but remained largely independent until 1982, when Northwest Bancorporation was reorganized, becoming known as the Norwest Bank Midland N. A.. Wells Fargo eventually acquired the Northwest Bancorporation. The name was changed to Midland National Bank and Trust Company. The Minneapolis Eastern Railway Company was organized by Joel Bassett as a corporation in 1878 under Laws of Minnesota 1869, Chapter 78 (Minnesota General Statutes, Chapter 34,) was granted a right of way on and across Minneapolis public streets by a Minneapolis City Council ordinance enacted in 1879, had a property dispute with the Minneapolis Mill Company and the Minneapolis & St. Louis RailRoad, was a belt line railroad with about one mile of track along which the Pillsbury mills in Minneapolis were located, was jointly owned by the Chicago & North Western RailRoad and the Chicago, Milwaukee, Saint Paul & Pacific RailRoad in 1966, and continued in existence until 1972. Thomas Cassady ( -1922) and Francis A. Chamberlain ( -1940) both died in Hennepin County. [See note for the Minneapolis Citizens Alliance for 216 Ann Street.] [See note on the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks for 334 Cherokee Avenue.] [See the note the Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA) for 198 Western Avenue North.] [See note for the Minneapolis & St. Louis RailRoad.] [See note for the Minneapolis Eastern RailRoad.] [See note for the Chicago & North Western RailRoad.] [See note for the Chicago, Milwaukee, Saint Paul & Pacific RailRoad.]

2302 Blaisdell Avenue South: George H. Rogers and John J. Rogers House; Built in 1909. The structure is a 1.7 story, 1946 square foot, nine room, two bedroom, one bathroom, house. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Thomas Walston resided at this address from 1904 to 1906. The 1909 city directory indicates that George H. Rogers, vice president of the Rogers Lumber Company, and John J. Rogers, secretary-treasurer of the Rogers Lumber Company, both resided at this address. The 1910 city directory indicates that George H. Rogers, a vice president of the Rogers Lumber Company, resided at this address, that Arthur R. Rogers was the president of the Rogers Lumber Company, and that Alex A. Cirkler, a physician at the Syndicate Arcade, resided at 1937 Park Avenue. The 1915 city directory indicates that G. H. Rogers and Miss N. R. McCormack resided at this address. The 1923 city directory indicates that Dr. and Mrs. A. A. Cirkler resided at this address. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that the Minnesota Baptist Convention was located at this address from 1948 to 1970. Arthur Ross Rogers ( -1938) and George Henry Rogers ( -1948) both died in Hennepin County. The 1909 city directory indicates that Arthur R. Rogers, the president of the Rogers Lumber Company, the president of the Rogers-Youmans Lumber Company, and the secretary of the H. B. Waite Lumber Company, resided at 1415 Mount Curve Avenue. In 1909, A. R. Rogers was the president, G. H. Rogers was the vice president, and J. J. Rogers was the secretary-treasurer of the A. R. Lumber Company, located at 526 Security Building. In 1909, A. R. Rogers was the president and G. H. Rogers was the secretary-treasurer of the Rogers-Youmans Lumber Company, also located at 526 Security Building. Nora McCormack ( -1928) died in Ramsey County. The 1909 city directory indicates that Alexander A. Cirkler was a physician located at 429 Syndicate Arcade and boarded at 1937 Park Avenue and that Herman A. Cirkler, the secretary-treasurer of the American Rubber Company, also boarded at 1937 Park Avenue. Alexander A. "Alex" Cirkler (1865- ,) the son of Herman Cirkler (1832-1911) and Johanna Henn Cirkler (1822-1894,) was born in St. Paul, was educated in the public schools of Minneapolis, attended the University of Freiburg, Germany, from 1885 until 1886, attended the University of Heidelberg, Germany, from 1886 until 1887, attended the University of Munich, Germany, from 1887 until 1888, attended the University of Berlin, Germany, from 1888 until 1893, completed the state medical examination of Germany in 1893, passed the Medical Doctor examination at Berlin, Germany, in 1893, was a physician, was unmarried in 1907, married Irene B. Robinson (1872- ) in Chicago, Illinois, in 1918, was a member of the American Medical Association, was a member of the Minnesota State Medical Association, was a member of the Hennepin County Medical Society, was a member of the Minneapolis Commercial Club, officed at the Syndicate Arcade, resided at 1937 Park Avenue in 1907, and moved to Los Angeles, California before 1930. Herman Cerkler/Cirkler (1832-1911) and Johanna Cerkler/Cirkler (1824-1894) were the parents of Ida M. Cirkler (1859-1930), who first married Carl G. Hille in 1880 and then married Peter A. Aurness (1861-1928,) born in Norway, in 1893. Peter Andreas Aurness (1860-1928) was born in Norway, was a member of the Class of 1892 of the University of Minnesota Medical School, was a physician, was a member of the Thulanian Society, was a member of the Minneapolis Commercial Club, was a member of the Minneapolis Civic Club, was a member of the Odin Club, officed at the Pillsbury Building in 1916, resided at 1937 Park Avenue in 1916, died in Minneapolis, and is buried in Lakewood Cemetery. Peter A. Aurness and Ida Cirkler Hille Aurness were the parents of Rolf Cirkler Aurness (1894-1982.) Rolf Cirkler Aurness, a Methodist and a businessman, married Ruth Duesler (1894-1986,) the daughter of Hess Graves Duesler and Mabel Schroutenbach and a journalist, and the couple were the parents of Peter D. Aurness (1926-2010,) a two-time Minnesota High School state track champ who became the actor Peter Graves, and James Aurness (1923-2011,) who became the actor James Arness. Arthur Ross Rogers (1864- ) was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, settled in Minneapolis in 1885, graduated from the Law School at the University of Minnesota in 1891, and was the president of the Rogers Lumber Company. Harry Bradley Waite (1865- ,) the son of Henry J. Waite, a physician, and Ann Ellis Waite, was born in Chicago, moved with his parents to Minneapolis in 1880, was educated in the Minneapolis public schools, was initially employed as a traveling salesman, was employed by the Minnesota Transfer Railway Company, subsequently was engaged in lumber manufacturing, was a bookkeeper employed by Cole & Weeks, a lumber company, was the sales manager for N. P. Clarke & Company, a lumber company, married Luella Lichty of Waterloo, Iowa, in 1891, organized the H. B. Waite Lumber Company in 1896, was the president of the H. B. Waite Lumber Company, organized the Waite Mill & Timber Company in 1903, was the president of the Waite Mill & Timber Company, was a director in the Northwestern National Bank, was a member of the Minneapolis Club, was a member of the Lafayette Club, was a member of the Minikahda Club, was a member of the Woodhill Country Club, was a member of the Rainier Club of Seattle, Washington, was a Mason, and was active in Liberty Loan drives during World War I. The Thulanian Club or Society was organized in 1889 or 1899, was incorporated in the State of Minnesota in 1910, and was composed of Norwegian college students and Norwegian college faculty members. In 1910, the Thulanian Club at the University of Minnesota had 35 active members and 175 alumni. In 1910, chapters of the Thulanian Club were established at the University of Iowa, at the University of Chicago, the University of Wisconsin, and at the University of North Dakota. The Thulanian Club purchased the J. T. Wyman residence in 1910 as its club house. In 1924, the Thulanian Club became the Alpha Pi chapter of the Theta Chi fraternity at the University of Minnesota, largely through the efforts of Horace A. Clifford, the treasurer of the Northern Pacific RailRoad. Two of the most prominent Thulanians were Minnesota Governor J. A. O. Preus and Minnesota Governor Theodore Christianson. The house is owned by Jeanine M. Marchessault and P. J. Barr. The property was last sold in 1990 by the Institute Of Cultural Affairs to Jeanine M. Marchessault and P. J. Barr for $125,000. Jeanine M. Marchessault was the 1981 Conference Coordinator for the Minnesota Association for the Education of Young Children, an organization that aims to promote the professional growth and development of those who are committed to the care and education of young children, a Region V facilitator for the National Head Start Child Development Institute, and a faculty member of the Center for Early Education and Development of the College of Education and Human Development of the University of Minnesota. [See note for the Minikahda Club for 702 Fairmount Avenue.] [See note for the Northern Pacific RailRoad.] [See note for James Thomas Wyman for 2006 Second Avenue South.] [See note on J. A. O. Preus for 839 Fairmount Avenue.] [See note for the Minnesota Transfer RailRoad.]

2222 Blaisdell Avenue South: Built in 1966. The building is a three story, 10086 square foot, 12 unit (one efficiency unit, five one bedroom units and six two bedroom units,) apartment building. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Dr. Arthur E. Benjamin resided at this address from 1902 to 1953. The 1902 University of Minnesota Alumni Record indicates that Arthur E. Benjamin, an 1892 Medical School graduate and a physician and surgeon who officed at the Pillsbury Building, resided at this address. The 1909 city directory indicates that Arthur E. Benjamin, a surgeon, officed at the Donaldson Building and resided at this address. The 1909 University of Minnesota Catalogue indicates that Arthur E. Benjamin, M.D., a clinical instructor in the diseases of women, resided at this address. The 1910 city directory indicates that Arthur E. Benjamin, a physician at the Donaldson Building, resided at this address. The 1910-1911 Directory of the University of Minnesota indicates that Dr. Arthur E. Benjamin, a faculty member, resided at this address and officed at the Donaldson Building. The 1915 city directory indicates that Dr. and Mrs. Arthur E. Benjamin resided at this address. The 1916 University of Minnesota Alumni Directory indicates that Arthur Edwin Benjamin resided at this address. The 1923 city directory indicates that Dr. and Mrs. A. E. Benjamin resided at this address. Arthur Edwin Benjamin (1868-1953,) the son of Dr. John Benjamin (1823-1902) and Elizabeth Garner Benjamin (1830-1900,) was born in Hutchinson, Minnesota, was educated in the public schools of Hutchinson, Minnesota, graduated from the Hutchinson, Minnesota, high school, was a medical student at the University of Minnesota, graduated from the medical school in 1892, was a member of the Alpha Kappa Kappa fraternity, located in general practice in Minneapolis, was a surgeon, officed in the Donaldson Building, did postgraduate work in surgery in leading American and European hospitals, was a clinical instructor at the University of Minnesota after 1892, was a member of the medical staff of St. Barnabas Swedish Hospital, was a member of the medical staff of the Minneapolis City Hospital, was the chief of staff at Northwestern Hospital, was a member of the Minneapolis Board of Charities and Corrections, wrote a complete history of the Hennepin County Medical Society, married Blanche Grimshaw (1870-1951,) a daughter of Robert Elwood Grimshaw (1817-1900) and Salome Boutell Grimshaw (1834-1916,) in Minneapolis, Minnesota, in 1900, was a member of the Congregational church, was a bicycle racer, served in Hattiesburg, Mississippi, and in Camp Wheeler, Macon, Georgia, during World War I, was a Republican, was a member of the board of charities and correction under Mayor Wallace G. Nye, retired from the University of Minnesota as an emeritus professor in 1937, was a member of the American Medical Association, was a member of the Western Surgical and Gynecological Society, was a member of the Minnesota State Medical Society, was a member of the Minnesota Academy of Medicine, was a member of the Hennepin County Medical Society, was a member of the board of directors of the Associated Physicians Clinic in Minneapolis upon its incorporation in 1921, was the president of the Alumni Association of University of Minnesota Medical school, was amember of the Minnesota Historical Society in 1922, was a Mason, was a member of the Minneapolis Commercial Club, was a member of the Interlachen Country Club, was a member of the Lafayette Club, was a member of the Minneapolis Athletic Club, was a member of the Minneapolis Golf Club, was a member of the Minneapolis Civic & Commerce Association, was a member of the Better Minneapolis Commission, officed at the Donaldson Building in 1916, and resided at 710 34th Street East in 1906. Arthur Edwin Benjamin and Blanche Grimshaw Benjamin were the parents of four children, Edwin Grimshaw Benjamin (1905-1976,) Harold Garner Benjamin (1907-1996,) Maude Elizabeth Benjamin (Mrs. Charles) Hoover (1910- ,) and Alice Louise Benjamin (1913-1985.) Blanche Grimshaw Benjamin ( -1951) and Arthur E. Benjamin ( -1953) both died in Hennepin County. Alice Louise Benjamin (1913-1985) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Grimshaw, and died in Hennepin County. The property was last sold in 1992 by Jack Y. Kahn to John W. Fitzerald for $205,000 and in 2000 by John and D. Fitzgerald to S. A. Bebault for $475,000. The owner of record of the property is Sandra A. Bebault of Plymouth and the taxpayer of record is 2222 Blaisdell LLC.

2221 Blaisdell Avenue South: Built in 1965. The structure is a three story, 23328 square foot, 29 unit (three efficiency units and 26 one bedroom units,) apartment building that is owned by the Blaisdell Avenue Corporation. The 1909 city directory indicates that Harry L. Robinson, secretary-treasurer of the Gamble-Robinson Commission Company, a wholesale fruit and vegetable company, resided at 1341 Vine Place and that Cynthia E. Robinson, the widow of Henry J. Robinson, resided at 25 South 13th Street. The 1915 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Robinson and Mrs. Cynthia E. Robinson resided at this address. The 1923 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Robinson and Mrs. C. E. Robinson resided at this address. Harry L. Robinson (1908-1981) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Allen, and died in Hennepin County. Harry L. Robinson (1915-1966) was born outside of Minnesota and died in Hennepin County. Cynthia E. Robinson ( -1934) died in Hennepin County. [See note on the Gamble-Robinson Company for 170 Summit Avenue.]

2215 Blaisdell Avenue South: Built in 1964. The structure is a three story, 21072 square foot, 23 unit (two efficiency units, ten one bedroom units, and 11 two bedroom units,) apartment building that is owned as of record by the Blaisdell Avenue Corporation. The 1909 city directory indicates that Stanley Washburn was the vice president and general manager of Washburn Steel Castings & Couplings Company, located at 830 Met Life Building, and resided at the corner of 22nd Street and Stevens Avenue. The 1915 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Washburn resided at this address. The 1923 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. R. Stone and their daughter resided at this address. Stanley Washburn (1878-1950,) the son of William Drew Washburn and Elizabeth M. Muzzy Washburn, was born in Minneapolis, attended Williams College, was a war correspondent for the Chicago Daily News in the Russo-Japanese War (1904-1905) and as a special correspondent for the London Times on the Russian front during World War I, later was a major and then a colonel in the U.S. Army, was a member of the board of trustees of several corporations, married Alice Langhorne in 1906, was a Republican, was a delegate to Republican National Convention from Minnesota in 1912, was the author of Trails, Trappers, and Tender-feet in the New Empire of Western Canada in 1913 and of Field Notes From the Russian Front in 1917, was president of the Washburn Lignite Coal Company of Wilton, North Dakota, from 1926 until 1929, eventually resided in Lakewood, Ocean County, New Jersey, was an unsuccessful candidate for U.S. Representative from the Third District of New Jersey in 1932, was a member of the Freemasons, was a member of the Elks, was a member of the Delta Psi fraternity, was a member of the American Legion, was a member of the Veterans of Foreign Wars, was a member of the Reserve Officers Association. Stanley Washburn was the brother of Cadwallader Lincoln Washburn (1866-1965,) of Franklin Muzzy Washburn (1861-1877,) of William Drew Washburn, Jr., (1863- ,) of Mary Caroline Washburn (1868- ,) of Edwin Chapin Washburn (1870- ,) of George Henry Washburn (1871-1872,) of Elizabeth Washburn (1874- ,) and of Alice Washburn (1881-1881.) William Drew Washburn (1831-1912,) the son of Israel Washburn, Sr., and Martha B. Washburn, was born in Livermore, Androscoggin County, Maine, attended Gorham Academy, graduated from Farmington Academy, graduated from Bowdoin College, Brunswick, Maine, in 1854, was a clerk employed by the United States House of Representatives in the 1850's, read the law at the office of John A. Peters at Bangor, Maine, was admitted to the practice of law in Maine in 1857, came to Minnesota in 1857, began the practice of law in Minneapolis in 1857, married Elizabeth M. "Lizzie" Muzzy in 1859, was the U. S. surveyor general for the State of Minnesota from 1861 until 1865, was an unsuccessful candidate for the United States House of Representatives in 1864, was a member of the Minneapolis School Board in the 1860's, was a member of the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Hennepin County (District 5) from 1871 until 1873, was a member of the U. S. House of Representatives (Districts 3 and 4) from Minnesota from 1879 until 1885, was a Republican Senator from Minnesota from 1889 until 1895, was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection to the United States Senate in 1894, was engaged in flour and lumber manufacturing, organized W. D. Washburn & Company, was the president of the Minneapolis & St. Louis RailRoad, was the president of the Minneapolis, St. Paul, & Sault Ste. Marie "Soo Line" RailRoad, was a Universalist, died in Minneapolis, and was buried in Lakewood Cemetery. The 1909 city directory indicates that William D. Washburn, Sr., was the president of the North Star Feed & Cereal Company, the Washburn Lignite Coal Company, the Washburn Elevator Company, the Washburn Steel Castings & Couplings Company, and the Lakewood Cemetery Association. William Drew Washburn, Jr. (1863-1929) was born in St. Paul, graduated from the Minneapolis Public Schools, graduated from Phillips Andover Academy, Massachusetts, graduated from Yale University in 1888, initially was engaged in the newspaper business with the Minneapolis Tribune and the Chicago Tribune, subsequently was engaged in the lumber, real estate, and railroad contracting businesses, was a Republican, and was a member of the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Hennepin County (Districts 41 and 31) from 1901 until 1903, from 1905 until 1907, from 1909 until 1913, from 1917 until 1919, and from 1821 until 1927. The 1909 city directory indicates that William D. Washburn, Jr., was a member of the Minneapolis Real Estate Board and dealt primarily in farm lands. Cadwallader "Cad" Lincoln Washburn was a graduate of the Minnesota School for the Deaf at Faribault, Minnesota, was a graduate of Gallaudet College, and was a graduate of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and was an artist, an entomologist, a world traveler and explorer, a writer, an architect, a teacher, and a diplomat. In 1925, Cad Washburn traveled to the Marquesas Islands to sketch rare birds and collect eggs and, when cannibals killed his guide and he was stranded on an island with his dog, he made friends with the natives and taught them signs, for which they gave him the canoe in which he escaped from the island. At age 77, Cad Washburn married Margaret Cowles Ohrt. Cadwallader L. Washburn was the grandson of Martha "Patty" Benjamin Washburn (1792- ,) the daughter of Lieut. Samuel Benjamin and Tabitha Livermore Benjamin, and of Israel Washburn. Colonel Stanley Washburn served as a war correspondent for the Chicago Daily News with Cad Washburn during the Russo-Japanese War between 1904 and 1905. William Drew Washburn, Jr., was the husband of Florence Agnes Savier. Mary Caroline Washburn was the wife of Elbert Francis Baldwin. The 1909 city directory indicates that Edwin C. Washburn resided at 2412 1st Avenue South. [See note on the Minneapolis & St. Louis RailRoad.] [See note on the Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sault Ste. Marie RailRoad.]

2214 Blaisdell Avenue South: Built in 1900. The house is a 3.2 story, 3258 square foot, 14 room, six bedroom, three bathroom structure. The 1909 city directory indicates that James H. McCarthy, Sr., president of McCarthy Brothers Company, a grain company located at the Chamber of Commerce Building, resided at this address and James H. McCarthy, Jr., salesman for McCarthy Brothers Company, boarded at this address. The 1923 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. H. McCarthy resided at this address. James H. McCarthy ( -1925) and James H. McCarthy ( -1928) both died in Hennepin County. James H. McCarthy (1873-1955) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Russell, and died in Hennepin County. It is currently owned by Pete Rhodes, Jr., and Kimberly K. Bedell-Rhodes. Pete Rhodes is the Vice Chair of the Minneapolis Charter Commission. Pete Rhodes and Kimberly Bedell-Rhodes own WRNB Cable Radio and, in 2003, received the "Black Radio Pioneers Awards" recognizing their achievement in founding Minnesota's first African-American owned and operated commercial Black music radio station. They were the founders of the Minnesota Black Music Awards. WRNB Cable FM service is an affiliate of the ABC Radio Networks and plays a mix of solid gold soul and today's best R&B, Gospel, Jazz, Blues music and special entertainment features and serves over 250,000 cable subscribers throughout Minneapolis, St. Paul and the seven county metro area via Time Warner cable and AT&T Broadband Music Choice cable service. The property has been sold twice in recent years, in 1996 from Linnea A. Mielke to John J. Montour for a purchase price of $140,000 and in 2000 from John J. Montour to Pete Rhodes, Jr. and Kimberly K. Bedell-Rhodes for a purchase price of $349,000.

2208 Blaisdell Avenue South: Built in 1913. The structure is a 2 1/2 story, 5110 square foot, 12 room, five bedroom, four bathroom, house. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that William S. Jones resided at this address from 1914 to 1924. The 1909 city directory indicates that William S. Jones, secretary and business manager for the Journal Printing Company, resided at 3316 Second Avenue South. The 1915 and 1923 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Jones and their daughter all resided at this address. In 1894, the Journal Printing Company acquired the Minneapolis Times from the Minneapolis Times Company, which had been in the newspaper business since at least 1819. William Selwyn Jones ( -1946) died in Hennepin County. The property was last sold in 2002 by the estate of Clement B. Kuerbs to Jose P. Vido for $389,900 and in 2005 by Jose P. Vido to Slade J. Winchester for $789,000. The property currently is owned by J. Slade Winchester. The 1910-1911 Directory of the University of Minnesota indicates that F. L. McDonald, a student, resided at the former nearby 2202 Blaisdell Avenue South.

2201 Blaisdell Avenue South: Built in 1959. The structure is a three story, 20718 square foot, office building which is owned by the Minneapolis Urban League Inc.

2200 Blaisdell Avenue South: Site of the former Morris McDonald Residence; Built in 1970. The building is a four story, 33280 square foot, 24 unit (six one bedroom units and 18 two bedroom units,) apartment building. Little Sketches of Big Folks indicates that Morris McDonald resided at this address in 1907. The 1909 city directory indicates that Morris McDonald, president of the McDonald Brothers Company, a wholesale general merchandise company located at the corner of Fifth Street and First Avenue North, resided at this address. Matthew McDonald was the vice president and treasurer and Maurice C. McDonald, Jr., was the secretary of McDonald Brothers Company in 1909. The 1909 city directory indicates that Matthew McDonald and Maurice McDonald both resided at 2400 Blaisdell Avenue South. The 1915 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Morris McDonald and their daughter all resided at this address. The 1916 University of Minnesota Alumni Directory indicates that Francis Louis McDonald resided at this address. The 1923 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Morris McDonald and their daughter all resided at this address. Morris McDonald (1850- ,) the son of Morris McDonald, Sr., and Eliza O'Donald/O'Donell McDonald, was born in Susquehanna County, Pennsylvania, was educated in Pennsylvania common schools, was employed by the construction department of Erie Railway Company from 1872 until 1877, was engaged in the retail china business in Bradford, Pennsylvania, with Matthew McDonald as a member of McDonald Brothers from 1877 until 1882, moved to Minneapolis, was married in 1884 to Susan Smith, was a merchant, was the president of McDonald Brothers Company, Inc., continued business at Bradford, Pennsylvania, until 1887, and officed on the corner of First Avenue and Fifth Street North in 1907. Matthew McDonald (1848-1910,) the son of Morris McDonald and Elizabeth O'Donell McDonald, was born in Silver Lake, Pennsylvania, acquired a common school education in Pennsylvania, graduated from the academy at Binghamton, New York, was in the china, crockery and glassware trade business at Bradford, Pennsylvania, as McDonald Brothers from 1877 until 1884, married Bridget Halpins ( -1922,) the daughter of Michael Halpins and Elizabeth Sullivan Halpins, in 1878, came to Minneapolis in 1884, opened a wholesale and retail china, crockery and glassware trade establishment on Nicollet Avenue and Fifth Street, was a trustee of the Catholic Orphans' Home, was a member of the St. Stephen's Catholic Church, and was a Republican. Matthew McDonald and Bridget Halpins McDonald were the parents of eight children, Maurice McDonald ( -1918,) Elizabeth McDonald ( -1880,) James McDonald, Mary McDonald, Walter McDonald, Edith McDonald, Millard McDonald, a World War I aviator, and Joseph McDonald ( -1895.) Francis Louis McDonald was a 1911 graduate of the University of Minnesota Law School, was a member of the Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity, was in the wholesale general merchandise business, was a member of the University Club, was a member of the Interlachen Club, and officed at the corner of First Avenue North and Fifth Street in 1916. Matthew McDonald ( -1910) died in Hennepin County. The property currently is owned by the Blaisdell Avenue Corporation.

26 22nd Street West: The Marie Antoinette; Built in 1939. The structure is a four story, 31904 square foot, 33 unit (one bedroom units,) apartment building. The owner of record is Stanley R. Kagin, who resides at 2905 Dean Parkway. Stanley R. Kagin does business in residential rental property in the S S I Properties Company.

2118 Blaisdell Avenue South: Built in 1913. The structure is a three story, 22628 square foot, office building. The current owners of record are Russell H. Underdahl and others and the current taxpayer of record is Russell H. Underdahl. John G. Purple, a special agent for the Mutual Life Insurance Company, resided at the former nearby 2115 Blaisdell Avenue South and Gertrude Purple, a student, and Marguerite Purple, a music teacher, boarded at the former nearby 2115 Blaisdell Avenue South according to the 1909 city directory.

301-305 22nd Street West: Built in 1910. The structure is a 2 1/2 story, 6438 square foot, four unit (two two bedroom units and two three bedroom units) apartment building. The 1909 city directory indicates that George W. Taylor, the manager of the Union Central Insurance Company, resided at 2404 Nicollet Avenue. The 1915 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. George W. Taylor and Miss Josephine Taylor all resided at this address. The 1923 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. L. F. Miller resided at this address. The Union Central Life Insurance Company of Cincinnati, Ohio, was located at the Met Life Building. George Washington Taylor (1840-1925,) the son of George Taylor (1811-1851) and Ann Brynes Taylor (1814-1872,) was born at Dundas, Canada, married Lodusky Jerusha Patten, the daughter of William H. Patten, a banker, in 1874, and died in Minneapolis. George Washington Taylor and Lodusky Jerusha Patten Taylor were the parents of five children, Jessie Flora Taylor (1877-1878,) Isadora Taylor (1884-1884,) Georgina Taylor (1879-1902,) William Henry Taylor (1882-1906,) and Katherine Irene Taylor (1896-1925.) Lodusky J. Taylor entered relief work in 1895, was the 20th president of the National Council of the Women's Relief Corps of the Grand Army of the Republic in 1902, and was the National Counselor of the National Council of the Women's Relief Corps of the Grand Army of the Republic in 1910. George Washington Taylor ( -1925) and Josephine E. Taylor ( -1952) both died in Hennepin County. Josephine E. Taylor (1896-1986) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Rundquist, and died in Hennepin County. The Union Central Insurance Company was founded in 1867 in Cincinnati, Ohio, by Dr. John Pascal Paoli Peck, a physician turned businessman, was named "Union" after the American Civil War soldiers who fought to preserve the Union, and "Central" because of the strong financial presence of Cincinnati, Ohio, in what was then the center of the nation, and was the first domestic life insurance company licensed in the State of Ohio. The last sales of the property were in 1994, when Ray M. Landis sold it to Thomas Eric Dickson for $127,500 and in 2000, when the Brighton Company sold it to James R. and Laura A. Rubin for $305,000. The property currently is owned by James R. and Laura A. Rubin of Edina, Minnesota.

304-308 22nd Street West: Built in 1939. The structure is a three story, 48,124 square foot, 45 unit (34 one bedroom units and 11 two bedroom units) apartment building. The property is owned by Stanley Hall Court LLP.

2201 Pillsbury Avenue South: Built in 1910. The structure is a 2 1/2 story, 9635 square foot, 21 room, nine bedroom, seven bathroom, former parsonage or rectory. The current owner of record is Dennis Kemp.

2200 Pillsbury Avenue South: Westbriar Apartments/Former Cavour Langdon Residence; Built in 1960. The structure is a two story, 16950 square foot, 24 unit, apartment building. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Cavour S. Langton resided at this address from 1906 to 1946. The 1909 city directory indicates that Cavour S. Langdon, affiliated with Linton & Company, resided at this address. The 1915 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. S. Langdon resided at this address. The 1923 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. S. Langdon and Miss Eleanor Blakeley resided at this address. Linton & Company, comprised of Alonzo H. Linton and Cavour S. Langdon, were railroad contractors and were located at the New York Life Building. Cavour Smith Langdon (1861-1945,) the son of Robert Bruce Langdon (1826-1895) and Sarah Smith Langdon (1839-1911,) was the president of the the Minneapolis Civic & Commerce Association in 1917 and 1918. Mabel Ellen Langdon (1899-1991,) the daughter of Cavour S. Langdon and Martha Aurelia Langdon (1863-1928,) and Howard Ives McMillan (1897-1960,) the son of John D. McMillan (1860-1941) and Grace E. Thomason McMillan (1864-1933,) were married in 1921 and the couple had three children, Cavour Langdon McMillan (1922- ,) Howard Ives McMillan, Jr. (1929- ,) and Elizabeth McMillan (Mrs. Walter M., Jr.) Ringer (1924- .) The 1909 city directory indicates that John D. McMillan (1860-1941) was the president of the Osborne-McMillan Elevator Company and resided at 239 Clifton Avenue. The Osborne-McMillan Elevator Company was associated with the International Elevator Company of Winnipeg, Manitoba, and the Empire Elevator Company, the Northland Elevator Company, the Minnekota Elevator Company, and the Lemert Grain Company, all of Minneapolis. E. N. Osborne was the vice president and treasurer and F. J. Smith was the secretary of the Osborne-McMillan Elevator Company in 1909. The Osborne-McMillan Elevator Company was located at the Chamber of Commerce Building. Cavour Langdon McMillan was a navigator and bombardier in the Pacific Theater of operations during World War II from 1943 to 1945. Cavour Langdon McMillan married Mary E. Wyer in 1944. Howard McMillan, Jr., was educated at the Hotchkiss School in Connecticut (1945-1946) and served in the Army from 1952 to 1955, including a tour of duty in Japan. Howard Ives McMillan, Jr., resided in Long Lake, Minnesota, in 2005. Robert Bruce Langdon (1826-1895,) the son of Seth Langdon, was born in New Haven, Vermont, was the foreman of a construction company engaged in the building of the Rutland & Burlington Railroad in Vermont in 1848, was an employe of Selah Chamberlain in Ohio and Wisconsin, built 75 miles of the Illinois Central Railroad in 1853, built portions of the Milwaukee & La Crosse RailRoad and of the Milwaukee & Prairie du Chien RailRoad after 1853, moved to Mendota, Minnesota, in 1857, moved to St. Paul in 1858, worked on the Mobile & Ohio RailRoad between 1858 and 1860, married Sarah Smith, the daughter of Dr. Horatio A. Smith and Jerusha Bell Smith in New Haven, Vermont, in 1859, moved to Minneapolis in 1866, was engaged in railroad construction in Minnesota, the Northwestern United States, Manitoba, and Western Canada, was a general contractor associated at different times with D. M. Carpenter, David C. Shepard, and A. H. Linton, was engaged in the construction of canals, bridges, city infrastructure, and flour mills, including the first Washburn mill, was a vice president and a director of the Minneapolis & St. Louis RailRoad, was vice president of the Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sault Ste. Marie RailRoad, was a vice president of the National Exchange Bank of Minneapolis, was an official of the Great Northern RailRoad, was a director of the Twin City Stockyards at New Brighton, Minnesota, was a director of the City Bank of Minneapolis, was a partner in the wholesale grocery house of George R. Newell & Company, invested in the Terminal Elevator Company, invested in the Twin City Belt Railway, was an Episcopalian, was a member of St. Mark's Episcopal Church, initially was a Whig, subsequently was a Republican, was a member of the Minnesota State Senate representing Hennepin County (Districts 27 and 30) from 1873 until 1878 and from 1881 until 1885, was a delegate to the 1876, 1884, 1888, 1nd 1892 Republican National Conventions, and died in Minneapolis. Robert Bruce Langdon and Sarah Smith Langdon had three children, Cavour S. Langdon, Martha A. Langdon (Mrs. H. C.) Truesdale, and Caroline Bell Langdon (Mrs. William Frederick) Brooks (1866- .) Caroline Bell Langdon Brooks was the author of Robert Bruce Langdon and his descendants, published by the Miller Publishing Company in Minneapolis (1926.) The Minneapolis Civic & Commerce Association grew out of the Minneapolis Commercial Club, which was formed in 1892, when the Commercial Club and two other organizations merged in 1911. The Minneapolis Civic & Commerce Association inherited the Citizens Alliance of Minneapolis from the Minneapolis Commercial Club and the Citizens Alliance managed to break every strike in Minneapolis from its formation in 1903 through the entry of the United States into World War I. Responding to threats from the left in the form of the Nonpartisan League, the Industrial Workers of the World, union recognition throughout many western states in 1916-1917, and the 1916 Mesabi Iron Range strike, the Citizens Alliance opposed unions in Minnesota and crushed the Twin Cities streetcar strike of 1917. Caroline Bell Langdon Brooks (1866- ) was the author of Robert Bruce Langdon and his descendants, published in Minneapolis by the Miller Publishing Company in 1926. Robert Bruce Langdon (1826-1895) was born in Vermont, came to St. Paul in 1858, moved to Minneapolis in 1865, was a contractor, built the first Washburn mill and many other important buildings in Minneapolis, was initially a Whig, subsequently was a Republican, was a Minnesota senator representing Hennepin County (Districts 27 and 30) from 1873 until 1879 and from 1881 to 1889, and was a great-grandfather of Clinton Morrison, who was a director of the First National Bank of Minneapolis and was the chairman of the Chamber of Commerce of the United States. David Chauncey Shepard (1828-1920,) the son of David Shepard and Dolly Olmstead Foote Shepard, was born near Geneseo, New York, was educated in the district schools of Geneseo, New York, attended Temple Hill Academy, Geneseo, New York, attended the Brockport Collegiate Institute, Brockport, New York, was the assistant engineer on the construction of the Erie Canal/Genesee Valley Canal in New York from 1847 until 1851, married Frances Aurelia Parsons (1830-1902,) the adopted daughter of Chauncey Parsons and Wealthy Hitchcock Parsons, in Geneseo, New York, in 1850, then was a surveyor for the Rochester & Genesee Valley RailRoad/Dorchester & Genesee Valley RailRoad in 1851, was the chief engineer for the route of the Canandaigua & Niagara Falls RailRoad from Syracuse, New York, to Albany, New York, in 1852, was the assistant to the chief engineer for the Cleveland, Zanesville & Cincinnati RailRoad in 1853, was the division engineer and the assistant to the chief engineer for the construction of the Atlantic & Great Western RailRoad, was the chief engineer of the Atlantic & Great Western RailRoad in 1854, was the chief engineer of the Milwaukee & Beloit RailRoad in 1856, moved to Minnesota in 1857, was the chief engineer of the Minnesota & Pacific RailRoad from 1857 until 1862, was the chief engineer of the Minnesota & Central RailRoad from 1863 until 1870, then was employed by the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad, then became the general manager of the Northwestern Construction Company from 1870 until 1872, was a prominent railroad contractor from 1872 until 1894, when he retired, was elected a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers in 1883, and resided at 324 Dayton Avenue in St. Paul in 1907. Frank P. Shepard (1853- ,) the son of David Chauncey and Frances Aurelia Parsons Shepard, was born in Cleveland, Ohio, married Anna McMillan in 1880, was a capitalist, was engaged in railroad construction with his father, engaged in private investments, was a member of the board of directors of the First National Bank of St. Paul, was a stockholder in many corporations, and resided at 325 Dayton Avenue in St. Paul in 1907. Alonzo H. Linton ( -1911) and Cavour S. Langdon ( -1945) both died in Hennepin County. [See note on Linton and Langdon for 2505 Park Avenue South.]

2119 Pillsbury Avenue South: Built in 1971. The structure is a six story, 45500 square foot, 49 unit (four efficiency units and 45 one bedroom units,) apartment building which is owned by the Blaisdell Avenue Corporation.

2118 Pillsbury Avenue South: The structure is a 16 unit apartment building. The current owner of record is SAS Properties LLC.

2118 1/2 Pillsbury Avenue South: Built in 1903. The structure is a 1.7 story, 1646 square foot, apartment building containing three apartments, one efficiency apartment, one one bedroom apartment, and one two bedroom apartment. The 1909 city directory indicates that Charles M. Case was associated with Piper, Johnson & Case and was the vice president and the treasurer of the George C. Bagley Elevator Company and resided at this address. The 1910 city directory indicates that C. M. Case was associated with Piper, Johnson & Case, was a vice president and the treasurer of the George C. Bagley Elevator Company, and resided at this address. The 1915 and 1923 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. C. M. Case resided at this address. Piper, Johnson & Case were brokers located at the Chamber of Commerce Building and included George F. Piper, George P. Case, Charles M. Case, Ellsworth C. Warner, Walter D. Douglas, and James F. Whallon in 1909. George C. Bagley was the president of the George C. Bagley Elevator Company, located at the Chamber of Commerce Building, and resided at 2645 Park Avenue in 1909. George Colt Bagley (1851- ,) a son of Dudley Selden/Shelden Bagley (1818-1906,) a grain dealer, and Martha H. Allis Bagley, was born in Stewartstown, Coos County, New Hampshire, moved to Brookfield, Vermont, in 1855, moved to Wauwatosa, Wisconsin, in 1856, worked for Crampton & Dodge, an insurance agency, moved to Colorado in 1872, returned to Plymouth, Wisconsin, in 1875, married Cornelia E. Mead (1855- ,) a daughter of Milan Mead and Salina Wixom Mead, in 1876, moved to Canton, Lincoln County, South Dakota, in 1884, moved to Minnesota in 1885, settled in Minneapolis, resided at 2645 Park Avenue, was associated with several grain companies, formed a partnership with S. S. Cargill as Bagley & Cargill, built nine elevators on the H. D. division of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad in South Dakota, bought out Cargill and incorporated George C. Bagley & Company in 1890, bought the Atlantic Elevator Company in 1899, organized the Royal Elevator Company in 1895, bought an interest in the Sabine Canal Company, which operated an irrigation canal at Vinton, Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana, in 1902, formed a partnership with Charles M. Case, George B. Case, and J. F. Whallon as Whallon-Case & Company/Wallon, Case & Company, a brokerage and loan business, organized the Homestead Elevator Company in 1905, bought a seat on the New York Stock Exchange in 1907, organized the Calcasieu, Louisiana, Land & Rice Company in 1909, was a director of the Minneapolis Fire & Marine Insurance Company, was the president of the Kellogg Commission Company, was a member of the Minneapolis Chamber of Commerce, was a member of the Duluth Board of Trade, was a member of the Chicago Board of Trade, was a member of the Minneapolis Club, was a member of the Minikahda Club, was a member of the Lafayette Club, was a member of the Automobile Club, was a member of the Society of Colonial Wars, was a director of the Winona Fire Insurance Company, and was a director of the First National Bank of Minneapolis. In 1901, the New York Stock Exchange seat of L. C. Rubsamen was transferred to George C. Bagley and in 1911, the New York Stock Exchange membership of George C. Bagley was transferred to Denman F. Johnson of Piper, Johnson & Case. George Colt Bagley and Cornelia E. Mead Bagley had two sons, Dudley Selden Bagley ( -1895,) and Ralph Colt Bagley ( -1919.) Bagley, Minnesota, was named for George Colt Bagley. Ralph Colt Bagley, Jr. (1915-2007,) the son of Ralph Colt Bagley, Sr., and Margaret Bagley Harrison, attended the Blake School, graduated from the Lawrenceville School, entered Yale University and studied linguistics and majored in Latin, entered the family grain business while living in the Dakotas and returned to Minneapolis to become president of the George C. Bagley Elevator Company/Bagley Grain Company, was the president of the Minneapolis Grain Exchange from 1965 until 1966, was elected a Councilman of the Village of Orono from 1954 until 1963, was president of Woodhill Country Club from 1957 until 1958, was Senior Warden and served on the vestry for St. Martins by the Lake Church, was member of the board of the St. James School, was member of the board of the Abbott Northwestern Hospitals, started the Minnesota Field Archery Association with Fred Bear, was noted as a Master Bridge Player, was an avid fly fisherman, and was a golfer. Ralph Colt Bagley, Jr., was married twice, to Winifred Mackey Bagley and Mary Jim Bagley, and was the father of Ralph Colt Bagley III of Bermuda, George Noyes Bagley of New Canaan, Connecticut, Bridget Ann Bagley of Spring Park, Minnesota, and Lonny Bagley McDougall of Apollo Beach, Florida. The Minneapolis Fire & Marine Insurance Company began business in 1902 as the Winona Fire Insurance Company, changed its name in 1911, reinsured the business of the Globe Fire Insurance Company of Huron, South Dakota, in 1916, was owned and controlled by people identified with grain elevator interests in Minneapolis, had its underwriting after 1917 under the charge of its secretary, Walter C. Leach, an experienced underwriter who was the president of the Northwestern Fire and Marine Insurance Company before it was acquired by The Hartford, was licensed in 1919 in California, Colorado, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Jersey, New York, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Texas, Washington and Wisconsin, had its mortgage loans secured largely by improved farm property located in Minnesota and North and South Dakota, and was affiliated with Western Union and the Board of Fire Underwriters of the Pacific. The officers of the Minneapolis Fire & Marine Insurance Company in 1919 were Fred C. Van Dusen, president, J. D. McMillan, vice-president, Walter C. Leach, treasurer and secretary, and F. M. Merigold, assistant secretary and assistant treasurer, and its directors, all from Minneapolis, were Charles. M. Case, the president of the Atlantic Elevator Company, John Crosby, the president of the Washburn Crosby Company, H. F. Douglas, a grain dealer, P. L. Howe, the president of the Imperial Elevator Company, Walter C. Leach, the secretary of the company, J. R. Mayfield, a grain dealer, John D. McMillan, the president of the Osborne-McMillan Company, Charles W. Sexton, general insurance, and Fred C. Van Dusen of Van Dusen-Harrington, capitalist. George F. Piper resided at 2000 Pleasant Avenue in 1909. George P. Case was the president of Mercer-DeLaittre Lumber Company and resided at 1419 Harmon Place in 1909. Ellsworth C. Warner resided at 1613 First Avenue South in 1909. Walter D. Douglas resided at 1419 Harmon Place in 1909. James F. Whallon was a grain broker who resided at 2507 Blaisdell Avenue in 1909. Montana-Dakota Grain, one of the businesses owned by the George C. Bagley Company of Minneapolis, acquired Tom Fleming's elevator in Fergus County, Montana, between 1916 and 1928. In 1900, the George C. Bagley Company built the "Wik house" grain elevator on the Chicago & Milwaukee Railroad siding at Millard, South Dakota, and sold it to the local farmers� cooperative in 1918. George Frank Piper (1856- ) was born Minneapolis, settled in Mankato, Minnesota, in 1870, was president of the Mankato Linseed Company, moved to Minneapolis in 1896, built a linseed oil mill, and was the treasurer of the Midland Linseed Company. Charles M. Case (1870-1959) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Pratt, and died in Hennepin County. George F. Piper ( -1917,) James Frederick Whallon ( -1926,) George Bagley ( -1930,) and George Price Case ( -1944) all died in Hennepin County. The property has been sold three times since 1990, first in 1990, when J. and K. Benson sold it to R. L. Seifert for $226,130, then in 2001, when the Family Share Trust sold it to Exceltitle LLC for $940,000, and then in 2003, when NPM Properties I LLC sold it to SAS Properties LLC for $1,250,000.

2115 Pillsbury Avenue South: Former Carlson Manor; Built in 1931. The structure is a 2.2 story, 4000 square foot, 19 room, 14 bedroom, seven bathroom, house. The building formerly housed the Carlson Manor, a restaurant and caterer. It then became the Three Sons Kitchen, a restaurant and caterer. It is now a residence owned by Daniel Z. Cooper. The property was last sold in 1998 by W. W. and S. A. Carlson to Daniel Z. Cooper for $315,000.

2112 Pillsbury Avenue South: Built in 1909. The structure is a 2.5, 6158 square foot, 13 unit apartment building, with eight efficiency apartments and five one bedroom apartments. The 1909 city directory indicates that David D. Tenney was a manager for Arthur C. Andrews, a grain trader, and resided at 26 West Grant Street. The 1910 city directory indicates that David D. Tenney resided at this address. The 1915 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. D. D. Tenney resided at this address. The 1923 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. D. N. Winton resided at this address. Arthur C. Andrews, a grain trader located at the Chamber of Commerce Building, resided at 245 Clifton Avenue. David D. Tenney ( -1936) died in Hennepin County. Arthur C. Andrews ( -1951) died in Hennepin County. The 1909 city directory indicates that David N. Winton was secretary of the Thief River Falls Lumber Company and president of the Bemidji Lumber Company and resided at 2916 Aldrich Avenue South. David Nelson Winton was associated with the Winton Lumber Company, operated with his brother, Charles J. Winton (1862-1934). In 1909, D. N. Winton was the secretary and manager of the Thief River Falls, Minnesota, Lumber Company. David N. Winton was an at-large member of the Thief River Falls, Minnesota, city council from 1902 to 1903. David N. Winton ( -1930) died in Hennepin County. The Winton Lumber Company operated primarily in Martell, California, in Oregon as the Winton Timber Company and its successor, the Winton Oregon Timber Company, in British Columbia, Canada, as the Eagle Lake Spruce Mills, and The Pas Lumber Company of The Pas, Manitoba, and later, from 1952 to 1962, in Prince George, British Columbia. The Winton Lumber Company was a family-owned firm that was founded in Wisconsin in 1889, bought the Giscome, B. C., mill, and called it Eagle Lake Spruce Mills. In 1919, partners Charles Winton, David Winton, and Alvin Robertson purchased the Finger Lumber Company and for $1,075,000, the men took possession of the complex in The Pas, Manitoba, one tug, two steam barges, and 324 square miles of timber limits along the Carrot and Saskatchewan rivers. In 1957, The Pas Lumber Company began to liquidate its logging equipment, the sawmill closed in August, 1957, and the planing mill closed in May, 1958. The Wintons then moved their operations to the Prince George region of British Columbia. In 1910, Charles J. Winton, Sr., resided at 1324 Mount Curve Avenue, a Prairie Style house designed by architect George Washington Maher. The Winton family were financial supporters of Macalester College in St. Paul and of Princeton University. David Judson Winton (1897- ) was a son of Charles J. Winton, Sr., was the head of the Winton Lumber Company and its affiliates and subsidiaries, and served on the Macalester College Board of Trustees from 1937 to 1981. David Judson Winton was the son of Charles Joel Winton and Helen Smith Winton, married Katherine Decker, the daughter of Edward W. Decker, in 1921, and the couple had three children, Margaret Winton (Mrs. Clifford F.) Anderson (1922- ,) Katherine Winton (Mrs. Rowland) Evans (1925- ,) and David Michael Winton (1928- .) David Judson Winton was educated in Wausau, Wisconsin, the Emerson Public Grade School in Minneapolis, and the Blake School. In 1916, David Judson Winton entered Princeton University, but joined the American Field Service Ambulance Corps in 1917, serving in France with the French army, then served in the Tank Corps of the A.E.F., was wounded, and was awarded the DSC and the purple heart, was discharged from the American army in 1919, returned to Princeton, and graduated in 1920 with special faculty dispensation. Leon Brown rescued Winton from the battlefield in World War I and Genevieve Bridel was the French surgical nurse who cared for Winton during World War I. David Judson Winton began his career working in logging camps and finally settled in Minneapolis where he became head of the Winton companies with his brother Charles. Among the Winton companies were the Winton Lumber Company, Winton Company, The Pas Lumber Company Ltd., United Lumber Yards, Winton Lumber Sales Company, Kenwood Oil Company, Amador Lumber Company, Winton Oregon Timber Company, Addison Oil Company, Baldridge Logging Company, Inc., and Siskiyou-Minnesota Timber Company. David Judson Winton also served on the boards of several other organizations, including Consolidated Freightways and the Spokane International Railway Company, was the receiver of the Exchange National Bank of Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, in 1933, was a director of the old National Bank Corporation of Spokane, Washington, served as chief of the Pulp and Paper Division of the War Production Board in 1942, as chief of the WPB lumber mission to England in 1943, as the director of Region 12 of WPB in 1944, as a special assistant to the chairman of WPB in 1945, as a special assistant to the Assistant Secretary of State in 1947, as a deputy to the Assistant Secretary of the Army in 1949, and was a member of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade Conference in 1961-1962. David Judson Winton was a trustee or board member of the Blake School, the National Policy Committee, the Washburn Home, the Minnesota Historical Society, the Forest History Foundation, the Florida Presbyterian College/Eckerd College, and the Minnesota Association for Mental Health, was a member of the U.S. National Committee for the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, of the United World Federalists, of the Atlantic Union Committee, of the Canadian-American Committee, of the British-American Committee, the National Planning Association, and the Minnesota Citizens Committee on Crime and Delinquency. David Judson Winton also was a consultant to the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Boundary Waters Canoe Area Review Committee. The Winton Reading Room at the School of Architecture of Princeton University, a gift from Mrs. C. W. Jones, David J. Winton 1920, and Charles J. Winton, Jr. 1922, was the original library of the school until the 1967-1968 school year, when the library was expanded. Winton Health Services at Macalester College was given to the college in 1952 as a memorial to Mr. and Mrs. Charles J. Winton. David Judson Winton's siblings were Helen Winton (Mrs. Carl Waring) Jones (1890- ) and Charles Joel Winton, Jr. (1899- .) Helen W. Jones (1890-1988) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Smith, and died in Hennepin County. Charles Joel Winton, Jr., married Henrietta McDonald Winton. Clifford Anderson, who operated a plywood mill, and Rowland Evans, Jr., a columnist for the Washington Post and a contributor to the Evans-Novak Political Report were sons in law of David Judson Winton. Charles Joel Winton, Sr. (1864-1934,) died in Hennepin County. Charles Joel Winton, Jr. (1899-1981,) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Smith, and died in Hennepin County. Charles Joel Winton III (1926-2000) graduated from the Blake School, attended Princeton University, served in the U. S. Army, graduated from Macalester College, received a MBA from Stanford University, was employed by the Winton Lumber Company, was a champion sailor in Minnesota and for the San Francisco Yacht Club, married Marie Winton and the couple had three children, Charles Joel Winton IV, Michael Winton, and Anne Winton Marsh, and died in California. Arthur C. Andrews was a Minneapolis grain merchant and outdoorsman who took an interest in conservation work, particularly in relation to Isle Royale, Michigan, and to the Grand Portage area of northeastern Minnesota and maintained a summer home on Isle Royale. Frances E. Andrews (1885-1961,) the daughter of Arthur C. Andrews and Mary Hunt Andrews, was a friend of the conservationist Ernest Carl Oberholtzer (1884-1977,) the first president of the Quetico-Superior Council and was one of the founding members of the Wilderness Society, and was active in the Audubon Society. The building is currently owned by 2112 Pillsbury Avenue So., LLC.

2108 Pillsbury Avenue South: Built in 1909. The structure is a 1 1/2 story, 1560 square foot, 14 unit (eight efficiency units, five one bedroom units, and one two bedroom unit,) apartment building. The current owner of record is 2112 Pillsbury Ave S LLC.

2100 Pillsbury Avenue South: The Sexual Violence Center; Built in 1913. The structure is a 3.2 story, 4880 square foot, 11 room, five bedroom, three bathroom, building. The 1915 and 1923 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. Herman Wehmann resided at this address. Herman Wehmann married Elizabeth __?__. The 1909 city directory indicates that Herman Wehmann, a flour and feed broker, resided at 2109 Blaisdell Avenue. In 1922, Hermann Wehmann (1861- ,) of Minneapolis, passed through Ellis Island. The last sales of the property were in 1984, when Rathbun Studio Properties sold it to the Franklin Corporation for $225,000, and in 1993, when the Franklin Corporation sold it to the Sexual Violence Center for $279,900. The current owner of record is Gary V. Kirt and the taxpayer of record is Simpson Housing Service Inc.

2020 Pillsbury Avenue South: Built in 1960. The structure is a three story, 17175 square foot, 18 unit (six one bedroom units and 12 two bedroom units) apartment building. The 1923 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Lee resided at this address. William H. Lee, cashier for the Hennepin County Savings Bank, resided at 625 South Ninth Street according to the 1909 city directory. The porch restoration project of the William H. Lee House, 625 South Ninth Street, received an award in 2003 from the Minneapolis Heritage Preservation Commission and the Minneapolis Chapter of the American Institute of Architects. Mrs. William H. Lee (Caroline Trumbull Isham) was a charter member of the Minnesota branch of the National Society of the Colonial Dames of America, formed in 1896, along with Mrs. George R. Metcalf (Julia Bowen French,) Mrs. Daniel R. Noyes (Helen A. Gilman,) Mrs. George H. Christian (Leonora Hall,) Mrs. Charles P. Noyes (Emily Hoffman Gilman,) Mrs. John Quincy Adams (Ada Walker,) Mrs. Edward H. Cutler (Lucy Dunbar,) Mrs. Edwin G. Mason (Frances Kingsbury,) Mrs. Charles Eliot Furness (Marion Ramsey,) Mrs. Reece M. Newport (Eliza Thompson Edgerton,) Mrs. George B. Young (Ellen Fellows,) Mrs. Charles A. Bovey (Hannah Caroline Brooks,) Mrs. Henry Hale (Mary Elizabeth Fletcher,) and Mrs. Charles McC. Reeve (Christine McLaren Lawrence.) William Henry Lee ( -1944,) William Henry Lee ( -1945,) and William H. Lee ( -1971) all died in Hennepin County. Wayne H. Lee (1910-1963) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Wiggin, and died in Hennepin County. The current owner of record for the property is the Anderson Family Limited Partnership and the taxpayer of record is David Anderson of Eden Prairie, Minnesota.

2017 Pillsbury Avenue South: Built in 1971. The structure is a three story, 37941 square foot, 45 unit (30 one bedroom units and 15 two bedroom units,) apartment building which is currently owned by Shepard Road Partners, located in Minnetonka, Minnesota. The property was last sold in 2005 by the 2017 Pillsbury Associates LLP to Shepard Road Partners for $2,430,000.

2011 Pillsbury Avenue South: Built in 1908. The structure is a 2 1/2 story, 9736 square foot, 24 room, apartment building. The 1909 city directory indicates that Leonard R. Welles, the president of the L. R. Welles Lumber Company, resided at this address. The 1915 and 1923 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. L. R. Welles resided at this address. The L. R. Welles Lumber Company was located at the Security Bank Building in 1909 and George P. Thompson was its treasurer. The L. R. Welles Lumber Company was the successor to Trimble-Winton Lumber Company in Dazey, North Dakota, and operated for a one-year period before becoming the Wells-Thompson Yard. The building is currently owned by Alliance Housing Incorporated.

2008 Pillsbury Avenue South: Former Heatherwood Bed & Breakfast; Built in 1906; Kees & Colburn, architect; John Scott Bradstreet, interior designer. The structure is a 2 1/2 story, 5544 square foot, 13 room, six bedroom, three bathroom, Blond Iron brick and terra cotta house. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Samuel J. Hewson resided at this address from 1906 to 1914. The 1915 city directory indicates that Hon. and Mrs. W. A. Lancaster resided at this address. The 1909 city directory indicates that William A. Lancaster, associated with the law firm of Lancaster & McGee, resided at 3145 Second Avenue South and that John F. McGee, also associated with Lancaster & McGee, resided at 2712 Pillsbury Avenue South. The 1923 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Lancaster resided at this address. Samuel James Hewson (1857- ,) the son of John Hewson and Alice Cellaway Hewson, was born in Detroit, Michigan, was educated in the Detroit, Michigan, public schools, moved to Minnesota in 1879, first settled in Le Sueur, Minnesota, was a shipping clerk in a large jobbing house in St. Paul, married Frances J. Burdick in 1885, moved to Minneapolis in 1887, was a Republican, was a Mason, was a member of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, was a member of the Minneapolis Club, was a member of the Minikahda Club, was a member of the Minneapolis Automobile Club, was a member of the Civic & Commerce Association, and was the general manager of the Menomonie Hydraulic Press Brick Company. Samuel James Hewson and Frances J. Burdick Hewson had two children, Katherine Jewson (Mrs. Jean W.) Johnson and Alice Jewson (Mrs. F. 0.) Woodward. William Atwood Lancaster (1859- ,) the son of Henry Lancaster, was born in Detroit, Maine, attended the common schools of Detroit, Maine, graduated from the Maine Central Institute at Pittsfield, Maine, in 1877, attended Dartmouth College for two years, read law in Augusta, Maine, with Gardiner C. Vose and Loring Farr, was admitted to the practice of law in Maine in 1881, moved to Boston, Massachusetts, from 1881 until 1884, was a member in the Delta Kappa Epsilon society, returned to Augusta, Maine, from 1884 until 1887, married Kate I. Manson, the daughter of Dr. J. C. Manson, in Pittsfield, Maine, in 1886, moved to Minnesota in 1887, settled in Minneapolis, was a Democrat, was the vice president of the First National Bank of Motley, Minnesota, and was a judge in the Fourth Judicial District from 1897 until 1899. Lancaster & McGee was a law firm located at the New York Life Building in 1909 and John F. McGee was one of its two partners. William A. Lancaster unsuccessfully represented the city, with John F. McGee and Frank Healy, in City of Minneapolis v. Minneapolis Street Railway Company, 215 U.S. 417 (1910,) which was litigation challenging a 1907 city ordinance that prescribed the rate of fare for the transportation of passengers over any street railway line in the city of Minneapolis different from a rate specified in an 1875 contract with the city. William A. Lancaster successfully represented the bank, with Claude B. Leonard and Milton D. Purdy, in Farmers & Mechanics Savings Bank of Minneapolis v. State of Minnesota, 232 U.S. 516 (1914,) which was litigation challenging state taxation of bonds that were issued by the Oklahoma Territory and assumed by the State of Oklahoma. William A. Lancaster unsuccessfully represented, with Nathan H. Chase and Clifford Thorne, the oil company in Pure Oil Company v. State of Minnesota, 248 U.S. 158 (1918,) which was litigation challenging an inspection fee required under a 1909 state law. John Franklin McGee (1861-1925,) the son of Hugh McGee and Margaret Heenan McGee, was born in Amboy, Illinois, read the law with C. H. Wooster in Amboy, Illinois, and in the law office of Moore & Warner in Clinton, Illinois, was admitted to the practice of law in Illinois in 1882, was in private practice in Devil's Lake, Dakota Territory, as a partner of D. E. Morgan from 1883 to 1887, married Libbie L. Ryan in 1884 in Wapella, Illinois, settled in Minneapolis in 1887 and was in private practice as the partner of A. H. Noyes until 1897, was a Republican, was a judge in the Fourth judicial district from 1897 until 1902, was in private practice in Minneapolis as a partner of Judge W. A. Lancaster from 1902 to 1923, and was a federal judge on the United States District Court for the District of Minnesota from 1923 until 1925. John Franklin McGee and Libbie L. Ryan McGee had four children. Hugh Henry McGee (1885-1947,) a graduate of West Point, was an Army instructor before serving overseas, served in the Philippines, was in action in France during the First World War, retired from the army in 1919 as a lieutenant colonel, was a banker, and was the president of Bankers Trust in New York, was a son of John Franklin McGee. The house was featured in a 1908 edition of The Western Architect. Milton Dwight Purdy (1866-1937,) the son of Milton Cushing Purdy, a stoneware and match manufacturer, and Sarah Jane Hall Purdy, was born in Mogadore, Summit County, Ohio, moved to Illinois in 1870, was educated in the public schools of Whitehall, Illinois, graduated from high school in 1884, taught in Greene County, Illinois, moved to Minnesota in 1886, graduated from the University of Minnesota in 1891, was a member of the Phi Kappa Psi fraternity, graduated from the University of Minnesota Law School in 1892, settled in Minneapolis, married Belle M. Morin in Albert Lea, Minnesota, in 1893, was a Republican, was a member of the Union League, was an assistant city attorney of Minneapolis from 1893 to 1897, was an assistant county attorney of Hennepin County from 1897 to 1898, was the U. S. attorney for Minnesota from 1901 until 1902, was an assistant U. S. Attorney General from 1903 until 1908 enforcing the Sherman Antitrust Act, was a U. S. District Court judge from 1908 until 1909, first on a recess appointment from Theodore Roosevelt, but was unconfirmed, and then on a recess appointment from William H. Taft, but resigned prior to confirmation hearings, unsuccessfully represented the lumber company on the question of intrastate business regulation in Central Lumber Company v. State of South Dakota, 226 US 157 (1912,) successfully represented the bank on the question of the taxability by the state of bonds issued by municipalities in Indian territory and in the territory of Oklahoma in Farmers Mechanics Savings Bank of Minneapolis v. State of Minnesota, 232 US 516 (1914,) was a judge on the United States Court for China in Shanghai, China, from 1924 until 1934, and died of heart disease in Honolulu, Hawaii. Milton D. Purdy was famed as Theodore Roosevelt's "chief trust buster," and won the historic Northern Securities Supreme Court decision in 1904 which blocked merger of the Great Northern RailRoad and the Northern Pacific RailRoad. The Menomonie Hydraulic Press Brick Company was a regional brick manufacturer acquired by the Hydraulic Press Brick Company, with works in Minneapolis and in Menomonie, Wisconsin. Hydraulic press bricks were dry pressed bricks that replaced soft mud process bricks in the mid-19th Century and gained maturity in the 1870's and 1880's. The Hydraulic Press Brick Company operated in eight cities in 1893, operated 16 yards in 13 locations in 1903, and employed over 1,000 men with an annual output of 300 million bricks in 1904. William A. Lancaster ( -1924) and John Franklin McGee ( -1925) died in Hennepin County. It is now a residence owned by Peter Sturm and Kendahl D. Sweet. Peter Sturm is a Project Manager for energy conservation in the Capital Improvements Department of the Minneapolis Public Housing Agency.

2002 Pillsbury Avenue South: W. Yale Dennis House; Built in 1903. The structure is a 3.2 story, 3456 square foot, 12 room, eight bedroom, three bathroom, house. The book of Minnesotans: a biographical dictionary of leading living men of Minnesota, edited by Albert Nelson Marquis, indicates that Washington Yale Dennis resided at this address in 1907. The 1909 city directory indicates that W. Yale Dennis, president of Yale Land Company, resided at this address. The 1915 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. W. Y. Dennis resided at this address. The 1923 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Melgaard resided at this address. Washington Yale Dennis (1868-1939,) the son of Lloyde/Lloyd Bernard Dennis (1837-1924) and Celestina Yale Dennis (1839/1843-1916,) was born in Norwalk, Huron County, Ohio, was educated in the public schools of Norwalk, Ohio, graduated from the Norwalk, Ohio, high school in 1886, was employed in the Motive Department of the Wheeling & Lake Erie Railway in 1886 as a locomotive fireman, was promoted to engineer by the Wheeling & Lake Erie Railway in 1889, married Edith Woodward (1869-1955) in Norwalk, Ohio, in 1890, resigned from the Wheeling & Lake Erie Railway in 1898, came to Minneapolis in 1889, assumed the management of seven-12ths the estate of Washington Yale on behalf of his mother, brother, sister and himself, became engaged in the real estate business, organized the Yale Realty Company and the Yale Land Company, was the president of the Yale Realty Company, was the president of the Yale Land Company, was the president and treasurer of the Dennis-Mitchell Company, a real estate, farm lands, and the management of office, mercantile and apartment buildings, served eight years in the Ohio National Guard in Company G of the Fifth and 16th Regiments, was an Independent in politics, was a Royal Arch Mason, was a Knight Templar, was a Shriner, was a member of the Royal Arcanum, was a member of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers, engaged in the hobbies of automobiling and fishing, was a member of the Commercial Club, officed at the Bank of Commerce Building in 1901, officed at 206 South Fourth Street in 1907, and died in Minneapolis. Washington Yale Dennis and Edith Woodward Dennis were the parents of one child, Helen M. Dennis (1893-1972.) Washington Yale Dennis ( -1939) died in Hennepin County. Harold L. Melgaard (1903-1986) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Mnakell, and died in Hennepin County. The current owners of the property are L. E. Broberg and G. T. Hoehn of Robbinsdale, Minnesota. The property was last sold in 1989 by Carl M. Johnson to L. E. Broberg for $115,000.

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Internet Sources: Encyclopedia Titanica: First Class Passenger: Nelle Stevenson (Mrs. John Pillsbury) Snyder [http://www.encyclopedia-titanica.org/bio/p/1st/snyder_jp2.shtml]

Information from the University of Minnesota, Northwest Architectural Archives, was used in this webpage.

Last Modified: August 3, 2011.