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  1. Where can I find some easy patterns/graphs to use for afghan crochet stitch?
    Thanks to Jacqui Simmons from Australia, I do have 4 easy card patterns at my site that are available starting on this page. The patterns are Jacqui's and the patterns are for a heart, diamond, club, and spade. They are great to use for learning the afghan stitch and/or practicing changing colors. Otherwise, look for simple patterns/graphs without too many colors/color changes that aren't too busy or, as a beginner, you may get too frustrated to get the hang of doing the stitch. I also have all kinds of graphs that I have made that are available from/through my web site starting on this page and my Epson albums. You may want to look at/use filet graph charts as there are some that would look great done in the afghan stitch.
    Here are some links to other pages/web sites that offer some easy patterns/graphs to use:


  2. How do I read a graph?
    As a rule of thumb, unless specified otherwise on the graph (and in my own experience as a right-hander):
    IF you are right-handed, you start reading a graph from the LOWER left corner and read it from right to left for crocheting, working the graph from bottom to top.
    IF you are left-handed, you start reading a graph from the LOWER right corner and read it from left to right for crocheting, working the graph from bottom to top.
    From what I've been told (and read), a left-hander can read a graph the same way as a right-hander does but may end up with a mirror image of the graph pattern which is usually not a big problem/issue unless there is text or letters involved on the graph.
    As a beginner/newbie, you need to remember that with the afghan/tunisian crochet stitch, each square on the graph represents ONE stitch and each row of the graph equals 1 row in afghan stitch and you do not turn your work as you do with other types of crochet/stitches. The afghan/tunisian crochet stitch consists of two steps to create 1 row:
    • 1st Step: putting all loops (stitches) ON the afghan crochet hook
    • 2nd Step: taking all loops (stitches) OFF the hook.
    FYI, When you get to the last row in your afghan stitch/tunisian crochet project, you will need to "bind off" the stitches in order to make the last row look like the other rows and to finish it off. (If you're not sure how to do the last row, please look at the binding off tutorial links that I have on my tutorials page.)
    According to Valerie at MoEZ Unlimited, if you are right-handed AND the graph starts at the TOP of the graph, you read the graph from left to right, from top to bottom. If you are left-handed AND the graph starts at the TOP of the graph, you read the graph from right to left, from top to bottom.


  3. What is a "row count"?
    A row count in the MoEZ group at Yahoo is nothing more than a written pattern done in rows for a graph. Some people find it easier to work from a row count rather than a graph so they don't have to count each block/square in a graph while crocheting and others prefer to work directly from a graph. For more help and hints concerning row counts, please take a look at the information on this page at my site.
    If you are looking for row counts, try visiting Linda's web sites at Angelfire and/or Geocities as she is the "Keeper of the Counts" for the MoEZ Yahoo group and has all kinds of row counts there.
    If you want to have a row count made for you from a specific graph, it's best to politely ask someone in the group if they can do one for you if it hasn't already been done. Please remember that no one is under any obligation to do one for you just because you ask for/request one/want one done. Since row counts are usually done for free on a voluntary basis within the group, you should allow the person(s) doing it to do it on their time schedule and not yours as most people in the group do have other demands on their time (work/jobs, family, school, etc.) and you need to remember that sometimes the unexpected things (accidents, illness(es), deaths, etc.) do happen to get in the way of getting a row count done.
    If you really need to have a row count done for you within a specific time period, then you should try making your own. Row counts are not hard to make/do but they can be very time-consuming depending on the graph used so you may need to have a lot of patience at times in order to do one.


  4. How do I convert a graph to use for single crochet?
    Using a regular crochet hook in whatever size needed, you need to add 1 chain (ch) to the starting chain for the graph and make your first single crochet (sc) stitch (st) in the 2nd ch from the hook. Sc in each ch st across, (following the graph pattern), ch 1 and turn (or turn and ch 1, if you prefer). You need to ch 1 at the end of each sc row to allow for turning your work. Sc in next sc and in keeping with the graph, sc across row to end, ch 1, turn.
    If you are crocheting a graph right-handed, row 1 is usually the first row of the graph starting at the LOWER right corner and you work the graph from right to left, making your sc stitches the same as it shows for each square/block in the graph for the first row. Row 2 starts on the left side of the graph and you work row 2 of the graph from left to right to the end. So all odd rows (1, 3, 5, 7, 9, etc.) on the graph start on the right side of the graph and all even rows (2, 4, 6, 8, 10, etc.) start on the left side of the graph.
    If you are crocheting a graph left-handed, row 1 is usually the first row of the graph starting at the LOWER left corner and you work the graph from left to right, making your sc stitches the same as it shows for each square/block in the graph for the first row. Row 2 starts on the right side of the graph and you work row 2 of the graph from right to left to the end. So all even rows (2, 4, 6, 8, 10, etc.) on the graph start on the right side of the graph and all odd rows (1, 3, 5, 7, 9, etc.) start on the left side of the graph.


  5. How do I convert a row count to use for single crochet?
    Using a regular crochet hook in whatever size needed, you need to add 1 chain (ch) to the starting chain for the graph and make your first single crochet (sc) stitch (st) in the 2nd ch from the hook. Sc in each ch st across, (following the row count for any color changes), ch 1 and turn (or turn and ch 1, if you prefer). You need to ch 1 at the end of each sc row to allow for turning your work. Sc in next sc and in keeping with the graph, sc across row to end, ch 1, turn.
    For the row counts at Linda's (diznemom's) sites, most of them are written for right-handers and the lefties are marked as such. If you are crocheting from a row count for the right-handed, row 1 is done as written for the row. You would read Row 2 from the end of the row to the beginning of it (going from right to left). In other words, work the first row & all odd-numbered as written (right to left) and end with a ch 1 and turn your work. Work the second row and all even-numbered rows in reverse of what the row count says (left to right) and end with a ch 1 and turn your work.
    Example:
    Original Row count:
    1 - 3. 100M (100 stitches total)
    4. 55M, 5B, 40M
    5. 52M, 3B, 5C, 4B, 36M
    6. 50M, 2B, 12C, 2B, 34M

    Converted row count for sc:
    1 - 3. 100M (100 stitches total)
    4. 40M, 5B, 55M
    5. 52M, 3B, 5C, 4B, 36M
    6. 34M, 2B, 12C, 2B, 50M


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