Grapes of Wrath: A family is forced off their land; they head to CA looking for work, but finding trouble. 1940.  Henry Fonda.  Best dir. (John Ford), best actress.  AFI's 100 Best Films; 129 minutes

Maltese Falcon: After a detective's partner is killed, he plunges into intrigue. 1941, film noir.  Dir: John Huston; Humphrey Bogart.  AFI's 100 Best Films.  101 minutes. 

How Green Was My Valley: A family in a mining town deals with strikes.  1941.  Dir: John Ford; Best Picture, Best Director, Best Cinematography, Best Supporting Actor.  AFI's 100 Best Films, 118 minutes. 

Casablanca: Pre-signed papers could allow any two people to leave Morocco and escape the Nazis--but who will end up with them?  1942,  Best picture, director, & screenplay.  AFI's 100 Best Films.  102 minutes 

Films: 1940-44
Abe Lincoln in Illinois 
XXXX1940
All the King's Men
XXXX Academy Award  Best Picture, GG Best Picture
Citizen Kane
XXXX1941  American Film Institute's 100 Best Pictures
Fantasia
XXXX1940
Going My Way
XXXX1944 Academy Award Best Picture, GG Best Picture
Great Expectations
XXXX British Film Institute's 50 Greatest British Films
His Girl Friday
XXXX1940
Life & Death of Colonel Blimp,
XXXX1943 British Film Institute's 50 Greatest British Films
The Magnificent Ambersons
XXXX1942
Meet John Doe
XXXX1941
Mrs. Miniver
XXXX1942 Academy Award Best Picture
Philadelphia Story
XXXX1940 American Film Institute's  100 Best Pictures
Pinocchio
XXXX1940
Rebecca
XXXX Academy Award Best Picture
Shepherd of the Hills
XXXX1941
Suspicion
XXXX1941
Song of Bernadette
XXXX1943 GG Best Picture
Yankee Doodle Dandy
XXXX1942 American Film Institute's  100 Best Pictures

Bambi
Dir: Walt Disney

Arsenic and Old Lace: On his wedding night, this orphan discovers that the aunts who raised him are mass-murderers.  1944, Comedy, Cary Grant 118 minutes

Double Indemnity: An insurance agent helps an unsatisfied housewife make a large sum of money by killing her husband.   1944. Seven nomination, AFI's 100 Best Films list, film noir.  107 minutes

Lecture Notes

Film Noir - a dark, on-the-edge film
Often used narration
Often made cheaply
These movies pushed the Hays Code censors to the limit through subtle or devious means

Main Character:
XX a loner
XX a private eye or someone involved with crime
XX  a shady character, someone from outside the system, comfortable in forbidden areas,
Femme Fatale character
XX a Dangerous Woman- see Femme Fatale 
XX Seductive, but pushes her man toward evil
XX Unobtainable - getting involved with her is playing with fire; Gives the film a sense of doom
XX Love is actually a perversion of love, an obsession
Cinematography:
XX Almost always black and white
XX uses light and shadow with hard contrasts, including deep shadows; venetian blind effect, shadow-play. 
XXCharacter may be trapped, his situation getting worse and worse

Resources:
"American Cinema - Film Noir."  (2010).  Retrieved from Youtube:enfuegoentertainment.
XXX  http://youtu.be/m85lGQSkag0Parts 1-4 and about half of 5
"Femme Fatale." 
Wikipedia.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Femme_fatale
"Film Noir".  Wikipedia.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Film_noir


Hayes Code 
Officially called the
Motion Picture Production Code, the Hayes Code regulated the film industry until 1968, when the rating system was put into place. 

XX Films were regulated by Hollywood, not the government. 
XX Put in place to keep the government off the film industry's back
XX Reassured Americans that corruption and decay they saw in Hollywood would not be spread
XX XX all over the country.   

Resources:
"Hayes Code."  Wikipedia.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hayes_Code