Internet Textbook

Week 1:
Begin Unit

Quiz on Friday

To Read or View, Week 1:
"The Highwayman
by Alfred Noyes
Was the highwayman a hero? Was Bess?  Why or why not? 
Best videos: poem read with text (6:43)   poem read with pics (7:34)   

Other versions: Song with pics  (10:14)        song with film  (10:21)
animation only  (4:56)          Song with computer animation (8:38)
Language Joke  Language Family Tree   
Latin and Indo-European Languages   History of the English in 10

Writing for Week 1:
Persuasive Essay Prompt: Why do we tell stories about heroes? 
Option 1: Explain why you think heroic stories are popular.  Use specific stories as examples. 
Option 2: Choose three or four specific stories and tell how they helped you define heroism. 
Option 3: Tell why you think that a character in a specific story is heroic. 

Week 2: What is a hero?

Mon:
Introduction to our books
And
Sustained Silent Reading

Tues:
"Horatius
by Thomas Maculay
See diagram

Wednesday:
Heroic Codes:
Bushido, the Chivalric Code, The Code of Whitman, The Golden Rule, Chuck Norris, Martin Luther King Jr., The Native American Code, the 9-12 Project The John Galt Oath
(see also Calvin and Hobbes)

"Time's 100 Most Important People of the Century"

Thur-Fri: Persuasive Essay Prompt:
Option 1: Argue for or against a person's appearance on the "Time's 100 Most Important People of the Century" list or in support of a person who was omitted. 
Option 2: Using support from text we have read, argue whether or not a person should adopt a personal code. 
Option 3: Using support from texts we have read, agree or disagree with the following statement: Sometimes the journey is more important than the destination. 

Essays should be a
minimum of five paragraphs and should include solid, specific examples or arguments. 

Focus for 1st Quarter:
Big ideas:
xx The Power Of Language To Transform Lives
xx oral tradition/ storytelling
xx  the power of language to transform lives
xx  the journey
xx  honor
xx  truth
xx  heroic codes
xx  value systems
xx  use of language
xx  transformation/ transformational thinking
Themes
In the transformation from oral language to the written word, universal truths of human nature were formalized.

The evolution of language impacts life.

Sometimes the journey itself is more important than the destination

Week 3: Beowulf

Monday: Each student will find an Internet picture that exemplifies each word's meaning.  The student must then copy and paste the pictures into a PowerPoint show prepared by the teacher.  Beginning this week, this assignment will also include finding synonyms and antonyms for words. 
Vocabulary:
lament             loathsome
murky             pilgrimage
reparation      reprisal
sinew              solace
taut                  vexed
Download assignment

Tues-Wed:
Beowulf's World and Our World are almost opposites.
Anglo-Saxon riddles and  More Anglo-Saxon Riddles
And Even More
Most of this week will be spent reading and discussing the text of
Beowulf, Parts 1-11: Page 18
Thurs:   Quiz
Be able to identify Beowulf, Hrothgar, Herot, and Grendel.

Fri: Each student will find an Internet picture that exemplifies each word's meaning.  The student must then copy and paste the pictures into a PowerPoint show prepared by the teacher.  Beginning this week, this assignment will also include finding synonyms and antonyms for words. 
Vocabulary:
blunder           league (measurement)
dismayed        battery (artillery)
Crimea            exile     
sullen              sloth     
folly                tawdry

Focus Questions
How does the interpretation of language impact decision making?
How can studying the past lead to new opportunities for the future?
How do the heroes who are immortalized in literature reflect the cultural values of the time?
How have modern-day icons used language to transform our thinking?
Essential Questions
What evidence do I have that I am committed to learning?
Where will I find wisdom?
When is loyalty to myself more important than loyalty to a friend?
How do I demonstrate that I am open-minded enough to learn from my experiences?
How do the heroes of literature reflect the values of the time?
What journey will I take to become my own hero?

Each student should create one to three modern day riddles that model those of the Anglo-Saxon period.  Turn them in by the end of the week. 

Week 4:Beowulf

Mon-Tues:
Fri: Beowulf, Parts 8-17 (about 14 pages)

Quiz 

Wed: Heroic--or not?
"St. Crispen's Day Speech"  From
Henry V by Wm. Shakespeare
View from 1989 film (5:14)
View from 1944 film (2:14)

"The Charge of the Light Brigade" by Alfred Lord Tennyson
Watch the battle reenacted in film 1  and Part 2

"White Man's Burden" by Rudyard Kipling

Thurs-FriThe Heroic Essay
Paragraph 1: Define heroism. 

Paragraphs 2, 3 and 4: Select three people who demonstrate  heroic qualities. Choose your heroes from a variety of areas, such as sports, literature, history, medicine, science, etc., as well as personal heroes. Explain why these people meet your definition of heroism. 

Paragraph 5: Find a quotation that defines your concept of "hero."  Use a search engine to find it.  At the end of the quotation, be sure to credit the source. Use the correct MLA format for your reference. Be creative; add your own formatting ideas.

Grades for this project will be based on the variety of areas represented by the people in the essay, the details of the written explanation for each hero, and the use of transitions between examples.

Week 5: The Dark Side of Heroism

Monday: Each student will find an Internet picture that exemplifies each word's meaning.  The student must then copy and paste the pictures into a PowerPoint show prepared by the teacher.  Beginning this week, this assignment will also include finding synonyms and antonyms for words. 
Vocabulary:
absurd              coolie
dominion         innumerable
labyrinth          preoccupied
pretext             senility   
squalid            supplant   

To Read or View, Week 5:
"Shooting an Elephant" by George Orwell, pg 1138 

We will also study the literary element of 
irony (See English Terms). 

"Home they brought her warrior Dead" by Alfred, Lord Tennyson

"The War Song of Dinas Vawr" by Thomas Love Peacock

"Death of the Ball-Turret Gunner"  by Randall Jarrell

Writing for Week 2:
Prompt:
Short Story Option: Write a short story that demonstrates the shortfalls or downside of heroism. 

Essay Option: Explain how heroism can be a negative thing. 

ARMS AND THE BOY
Let the boy try along this bayonet-blade
How cold steel is, and keen with hunger of blood;
Blue with all malice, like a madman's flash;
And thinly drawn with famishing for flesh.
Lend him to stroke these blind, blunt bullet-leads,
Which long to nuzzle in the hearts of lads,
Or give him cartridges whose fine zinc teeth
Are sharp with sharpness of grief and death.
For his teeth seem for laughing round an apple.
There lurk no claws behind his fingers supple;
And God will grow no talons at his heels,
Nor antlers through the thickness of his curls.
Wilfred Owen

Anthem for Doomed Youth
What passing-bells for those who die like cattle?
Only the monstrous anger of the guns.
Only the stuttering rifles' rapid rattle
Can patter out their hasty orisons.
No mockeries now for them; no prayers nor bells,
Nor any voice of mourning save the choirs,-
The shrill demented choirs of wailing shells;
And bugles calling them from sad shires.
What candles may be held to speed them all?
Not in the hands of boys, but in their eyes
Shall shine the holy glimmers of goodbyes.
The pallor of girls' brows shall be their pall;
Their flowers the tenderness of patient minds,
And each slow dusk a drawing-down of blinds.


Teacher & District Resources
"Inside the Chrysalis" Contributed by Dr. Lincoln Bower
Beowulf Language Lesson:
NPR - Talk of the Nation:
Audio Resource 1
Audio Resource 2
Beowulf Resource 1
Beowulf Resource 1
Canterbury Tales Resource 1
Canterbury Tales Resource 2
Literary Analysis Rubric
Digital Storytelling 1
Digital Storytelling 2


http://t3.k12.hi.us/t302-03/tutorials/digstory/elements.htm
http://www.digitales.us/
http://www.storycenter.org/memvoice/pages/tutorial_1.html

Historical context of
Beowulf and The Canterbury Tales
To connect to the Primary document, order CDs
"Scholarly Digital Editions"
Burke, Jim. 2003.
Writing Reminders: Tools, Tips, and Techniques, Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
Burke, Jim and Carol Ann Parker. 2000.
I'll Grant You That: A Step by-Step Guide to Finding Funds ,Designing Winning Projects, and Writing Powerful Grant Proposals,  Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.

Quotations
"They said that of all the kings upon the earth he was the man most gracious and fair-minded, kindest to his people and keenest to win fame." (Beowulf . 3180-82)