1st Quarter    Sep-Nov
1800-1862

2nd Quarter   Nov-Jan
1862-1914

3rd Quarter   Jan-Mar
1914-1950s

4th Quarter   Mar-June
1960s-Present

Raisin in the Sun Act I

Tues-Wed
Setting:
It's May 2026!  You have come to The Village Inn on Mackinac Island for a planned reunion with a few of your friends from high school.  Ten years ago, you and these same close friends were having a serious discussion about your individual dreams or vision for your future.  The discussion was so good that you agreed to meet at this location in ten years to check with each other on your progress toward realizing your dreams.  You are early and have time to reflect and write some notes to share with your friends who will be arriving soon. 

First describe what you look like, what you are wearing, where you are, and the way you are feeling.  (2 minutes)
Then write about your progress toward realizing the dreams/vision you talked about ten years ago. What have you accomplished? Reflect on your progress in your journey toward realizing your dreams and on the positive steps you have taken toward your goal.  Jot down some notes to share with your friends when they arrive: (10-15 minutes)

Big Ideas of
The Harlem Renaissance

Dreams and Visions
Stereotyping
Diversity
Human Motivation
Social Equality
Rise of Anti-Religious Attitudes
American culture, late 1900s

Themes
Fighting racial discrimination
Importance of family

ELA 10  Michigan Merit Curriculum Course Requirements, 35

Thurs

For the Act I quiz
, you will need to know the following vocabulary:
Xx ally
Xx anguish
Xx assimilation
Xx drily [sic]
Xx furtively
Xx mutual
Xx permeated
Xx unobtrusively
Xx reflective
Xx raucous

Fri   
Read and discuss a
Oh, the Places You'll Go! by Dr. Seuss, also on the subject of reaching one's dreams, but in poetic form.
7 minute video    2 minute video

How the Image of Yourself affects your success.  6 minutes

Read aloud "Who am I?" and "Get in the Habit" from
The Seven Habits of Highly Effective Teens 

Week 2

Mon            day 5
Review vocabulary using game on G drive.

The poems of Langston Hughes:
"Harlem"  764
"I, Too"  733   
"The Weary Blues" 761
"The Negro Speaks of Rivers"
"Theme for English B"
Read & discuss the poem, "A Dream Deferred"  828, by Langston Hughes; see also this video
Written Response:
Level 1: What is the poet actually saying here? (Restate in your own words.) This level is simply using the student's words to say the same thing that the poet says.
Level 2: What does that mean? (Explain the poet's meaning within the poem.) This level is still within the poem, talking about the people in the poem, using their names.
Level 3: What might the poet be suggesting about the world beyond the poem? This level uses terms such as "mankind" or "people."

Tues          day 6
Read and discuss Marrianne Williamson's "Our Greatest Fear", the paragraph from Emerson's
Self-Reliance, and  the "Conclusion" of Henry Thoreau's Walden, paragraph 5.  Then, complete the Comparison Chart, identifying the two main ideas from each selection and supporting quotes for the main ideas, as well as stating their opinion about the authors' concept of the American Dream. 
       Coach Carter clip

Thurs  day 8
Brief review of materials covered so far and how they present the concept of the American Dream. 
Define drama.  Review conflict and plot
Assign parts for reading the play.

Read aloud "The Personal Bank Account" pp. 31-46, from
The Seven Habits of Highly Effective Teens by Sean Covey, a book that will help you realize your dreams and become a happy and successful adult. 

Essential Questions
What is meant by the American Dream?
When did the phrase American Dream come into vogue?  How has its meaning changed? Does it mean the same for all races?
What must happen for the dream to come true? What can you do to realize your dreams or visions for the future?
What is expected of you by adults at home? At school? Are these expectations realistic? How do your expectations of yourself differ from adults' expectations of you?
What do your peers expect from you?
What problems occur if your expectations and others' expectations of you differ? Give a specific example from experience or the experience of someone you know.
If your expectations differ from those others have of you, how can you resolve this? Where does your personal loyalty belong?

As required by ELA 10  Michigan Merit Curriculum Course Requirements, 35

Wed              day 7
Read and discuss the essentials on the right hand side of this page. Read "What is the American Dream?"
Writing Assignment:
What is the author's purpose?
How does the author use historical details such the
Declaration of Independence, homesteaders, Martin Luther King, Jr.?
Is this your American Dream?  Why or why not? How does it differ from your vision of the American Dream?

Week

"It is common sense to take a method and try it. If it fails, admit it frankly and try another. But above all, try something."      Franklin D. Roosevelt

"It is the nature of thought to find its way into action." Christian Nevell Bovee

"It is time for us all to stand and cheer for the doer, the achiever - the one who recognizes the challenge and does something about it."   Vincent Lombardi

"It takes less time to do things right than to explain why you did it wrong."  Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

"I've found that luck is quite predictable. If you want more luck, take more chances. Be more active. Show up more often."   Brian Tracy

"Just as a flower, which seems beautiful has color but no perfume, so are the fruitless words of a man who speaks them but does them not." Dhammapada

"Traditionally, Americans have sought to realize the American dream of success, fame and wealth through thrift and hard work. However, the industrialization of the 19th and 20th centuries began to erode the dream, replacing it with a philosophy of 'get rich quick.' Matthew Warshauer, Professor of History at Central Connecticut State University

Mon                 day 9
Students will receive a copy of the Character Analysis Chart, in which students will relate the characters in the play to their class definition of the American dream.  (We will briefly review the characteristics of the class definition).  Students should keep these in mind as the play begins to unfold and they learn about characters.

Students will begin to read / perform
A Raisin in the Sun, pp. 830-834, stopping after "women with small minds!"

Weekly Writing #1
What are the relationships between the characters and how is the action between them affected by money?  How are their dreams related to money?
Answer Plan
Paragraph 1: Introduce the answer: Inform the reader what play you are writing about.  Restate the question as an answer.  Use characters' names, not just "he" and "she" and "they". 
Paragraph 2:  Write several sentences giving details of the characters' relationships and their responses to money or the lack of it.
Paragraph 3: Conclude with a personal observation about how money motivates a person's actions.

Tues             day 10
Students perform
A Raisin in the Sun pp. 834-838 (Begin after Walter's "women with small minds!" and end with Mama's "Yes, a fine man…that's all.")
Focus for Listening: What are the characters' dreams? How are these dreams related to The American Dream? How have the dreams been deferred, and how could this have been avoided?

Work on Character Analysis Chart

For the Act I quiz and for exam, you will need to know:
Xx Biography of the playwright, pg 826
Xx Internal conflict and external conflict (link or use pg 1191)
Xx Dialect (link or use pg 1192)

A Raisin in the Sun Trailer 1961, NPR Article audio clip (8:55)

He's moving on full steam
He's chasing the American dream
And he's going to give his family the finer things
"Not this time son.  I've no time to waste.
Maybe tomorrow we'll have time to play."
And then he slips into his new BMW
And drives farther and farther and farther away

So he works all day and tries to sleep at night
He says things will get better, better in time
And he works and he builds with his own two hands
And he pours all he has into a castle made with sand
But the wind and the rain are coming crashing in.
Time will tell just how long his kingdom stands.

His American Dream is beginning to seem
More and more like a nightmare
With every passing day:
"Daddy, can you come to my game?"
"Oh Baby, please don't work late."
Another wasted weekend,
And they are slipping away.

He used to say, "Whoever dies with the most toys wins"
Now he works all day and cries alone at night
It's not getting any better
Looks like he's running out of time
'Cause he worked and he built with his own two hands
And he poured all he had in a castle made with sand
But the wind and the rain are coming crashing in
Time will tell just how long his kingdom stands

All they really wanted was you
All they really wanted was you
All they really wanted was you

Wed day 11
Continue having students perform
A Raisin in the Sun pp. 838-841.  Begin with Beneatha's "What could be so dirty…" and end with "Curtain."
Focus for Listening: What do we learn about Beneatha?

Weekly Writing #2
What information about Beneatha have we learned from this part of the play?
Answer Plan
Paragraph 1: Introduce the answer: Inform the reader what play you are writing about.  Restate the question as an answer.  Use characters' names, not just "he" and "she" and "they". 

Paragraph 2:  Write a number of sentences detailing what we have learned about Beneatha. Provide both characteristics you believe describe Beneatha and then give evidence from the play that shows she demonstrates that trait.

Paragraph 3: Conclude by giving your opinion of Beneatha.

Thurs   day 12
Continue having students perform Act I, Scene Two of
A Raisin in the Sun, pp. 842-846 ending with Asagai's exit.

Focus for Listening: What is Beneatha searching for in her life?

Weekly Writing #3
What influence do you think Asagai will have on Beneatha's dream?
Answer Plan
Paragraph 1: Introduce the answer: Inform the reader what play you are writing about.  Restate the question as an answer.  Use characters' names, not just "he" and "she" and "they". 

Paragraph 2: Write several sentences that describe how Asagai's view on African-American culture and women could have an impact on Beneatha.  Provide quotes for support.

Paragraph 3: Conclude in a sentence or two how Asagai's views may affect Beneatha.

Fri   day 13a
Continue reading
A Raisin in the Sun pp. 846-850, beginning after Asagai exits and end with "Curtain."
Focus for Listening: What is everyone's reaction when the check arrives? How does this fit in with each character's view of the American Dream?

Weekly Writing #4: Describe how the arrival of the check does not create happiness for Ruth, Walter, and Mama.
Answer Plan
Paragraph 1: Introduce the answer: Inform the reader what play you are writing about.  Restate the question as an answer.  Write 1-2 sentences about what is upsetting Ruth.  Use characters' names, not just "he" and "she" and "they". 
Paragraph 2: Write 1-2 sentences about why Walter feels discouraged.
Paragraph 3: Write 1-2 sentences about why Mama feels sad.
Paragraph 4: Conclude with a sentence or two predicting what you think will happen between these three characters.

Fri   day 13b
Quiz Act I of
A Raisin in the Sun