1st Quarter    Sep-Nov
1800-1862

2nd Quarter   Nov-Jan
1862-1914

3rd Quarter   Jan-Mar
1914-1950s

4th Quarter   Mar-June
1960s-Present


Dr. Heidegger's Experiment

Mon: Each student will find an Internet picture that exemplifies each word's meaning.  The student must then copy and paste the pictures into a PowerPoint show prepared by the teacher.  Beginning this week, this assignment will also include finding synonyms and antonyms for words. 
Vocabulary
dotage               conjurer
delusion            effervescent
infirmity            intimates
quaff                  venerable
visage                decrepit

To Read or View, Week 5:
"Dr. Heidegger's Experiment" by Nathaniel Hawthorne.  This story is not in our text.  About eight pages. 

Literary elements:

Writing: The Mental
Essay 2: Some people crave stories about the workings of the inner mind, especially an irrational or twisted mind; others can't stand that stuff.  Write an essay explaining how you feel about this topic.  Use examples from movies and stories you have enjoyed or despised. 

Short Story 2: Create a short story focusing on the workings of the inner mind, especially an irrational or twisted mind.

Friday:
Take the quiz.

Writing is due.    Take the quiz.

Writing is due.   

Honors English: Read "The Minister's Black Veil" (in our text) and "Young Goodman Brown". 

Two Longer Poems and a Taste of Novels "The Wreck of the Hesperus" and "The Skeleton in Armor" 

Mon: Each student will find an Internet picture that exemplifies each word's meaning.  The student must then copy and paste the pictures into a PowerPoint show prepared by the teacher.  Beginning this week, this assignment will also include finding synonyms and antonyms for words. 
Vocabulary

Tues: Read "The Wreck of the Hesperus" by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow



Wednesday: Read "The Skeleton in Armor"  by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Thursday:
View this survey of Romantic novels. 

Take this personality quiz to determine whether you are a classic or
a romantic!   

Friday:
Take the quiz. 

Presentation of the Poem

Presentation 
Choose a Poem for Oral Presentation and be prepared to read and explain the poem in front of the class.  Select a poem, and then check out the rubric. 
Required Literary elements:
rhyme scheme
speaker
stanza
meter
Additional if they apply:
narrative poem
refrain
You may also want to use this "Poetry Analysis Flowchart."

Recommended: 

William Cullen Bryant
The Yellow Violet
To a Waterfowl
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
Excelsior!
The Village Blacksmith
The Rainy Day
The Cross of Snow
The Tide Rises, The Tide Falls
The Day is Done
A Psalm of Life
I Heard the Bells on Christmas Day
The Arrow and the Song
God's Acre


John Greenleaf Whittier
Telling the Bees
Barbara Frietchie
Prayer To Nature
Oliver Wendell Holmes
The Chambered Nautilus
Old Ironsides
The Last Leaf
James Russell Lowell
The First Snowfall
Edgar Allen Poe
Annabelle Lee
The Lake
To Helen
The City in the Sea

WARNING:
Presentations are due at the beginning of the hour Friday.  There will be no preparation time allowed--NONE! There will be no make-up!

Excerpt from Walden by Henry David Thoreau

Monday:

Neutral
Individualism vs. Group (0:50) The West vs Asia
Pro-Individualism
Read the poem "Conformity"
Boutique (0:30) Canadian Propaganda
The John Galt Oath (0:46) Ayn Rand
Bee Movie (0:56) more propaganda
Pro-Collectivism
Collectivism vs. individualism (1:45) 
Anti-Individualism  (1:41) 
Altruism (0:59)     
Pay Your Fair Share (0:59) 
Needs of the Many and the Few (0:27)
Which is stronger?
conformity (2:40) an experiment

Monday-Wednesday:

Read the Excerpts

Watch the Playlist

Persuasive Essay:
Individualism  vs. Collectivism
Paragraph 1:
Take a position on this issue: What is more important, for people to be themselves, or for people to get along with their group? 
Paragraphs 2-4: Give examples from your own life, your reading, film, TV, or other sources.  These examples must demonstrate the position you have taken. 
Paragraph 5: Address those who make the opposite choice.       

Friday:
Take the quiz.

Writing is due.    Take the quiz.

Writing is due.   

Term Paper:  Define Romanticism

Requirements: The paper should be at least a five-paragraph essay, meaning:

Paragraph 1: Introduction - the general information (when where who what). 

Paragraphs 2-4: each of these 3 paragraphs should cover one of Romanticism's most important beliefs.  Begin with a topic sentence and then give details and examples.  Do NOT focus on things that caused changes in their beliefs (technology, history); instead focus on their beliefs themselves. 

Paragraph 5: Conclusion

Resources:
Encyclopedias in our library. 

"Romantic Sensibility" article on pg 143 of our text. 

Concise Oxford Companion to American Literature
XXX(810.9 in the reserved section of the library) 
New World Companion to American Literature
XXX(820.9 in the reserved section of the library) 

Internet Links:
Romantic Art    About.com     Paul Reuben     Handbook to Literature    Paul Brians