1st Quarter    Sep-Nov
1800-1862

2nd Quarter   Nov-Jan
1862-1914

3rd Quarter   Jan-Mar
1914-1950s

4th Quarter   Mar-June
1960s-Present


Week 1:  Intro to Romanticism

Wed: Introduction to Romanticism: The word "Romanticism" means something very different nowadays than it did originally: just check out this illustration!  To really understand that Romanticism was a complete way of thinking and viewing the world, watch this PowerPoint show.  Students will take notes (here they are in a webpage and in a Microsoft Word document) to help prepare for the quiz on Friday.   Use the article "The Romantic Sensibility" on pg 143 of our text.  Use this cross-curricular PowerPoint show to contrast romantic and classic styles by examining their paintings. 

Thur: Each student will find an Internet picture that exemplifies each word's meaning.  The student must then copy and paste the pictures into a PowerPoint show prepared by the teacher.  Beginning this week, this assignment will also include finding synonyms and antonyms for words. 
Vocabulary
quaint             lore
wrought         entreating
implore          decorum
melancholy   divining
gloating         censer

Friday:  literary element: Alliteration (See English Terms)

"The Raven"
by Edgar Allen Poe, pg 282 
XXX(2  3/4 pgs) preview
Read it on The Interactive Raven
while listening to James Earl Jones   

Other versions:
xxxAnimation version
xxx
Eagles' Web Version
xxxRead by Christopher Walken  video version
XXX (Includes sound effects)
xxxThe Raven (Simpson's Version)
xxxThe Taco (Parody)

Big Ideas of Classicism and Romanticism
Worldview (Paradigm)
The Folktale / Folklore
The Inner Workings of the Mind
The Power of the Individual
Human Relationship to Nature
imagination vs. reason
American culture, early 1800s
intuition  vs. 
carpe diem  (5:29)
Individuality and conformity (a poem)
inspiration (2:42)

Week 2: "The  Raven"  -  the  mysterious, elements of the mind

Writing This Week:  Define Romanticism. 

Tues:
Review "The Raven" and alliteration. 
Read and Discuss the "Essential Questions" and "Quotations" at right.
Use remaining time for writing. 

Essential Questions
What balance should be made between the individual and society?  How much should an individual give up to fit into society? 

Can an individual alone overcome almost anything? 

Should important decisions be made with reason or intuition?

What is the effect of imagination on art?  Do imaginative elements in a story make it intriguing or silly? 

What is nature? Can nature inspire humans spiritually, intellectually, or emotionally?  Is it entirely impersonal, almost mechanical, obeying strict scientific laws?  Can Nature be mysterious?  Is there a part that we will never understand? 

What is more important in art: skill or inspiration?

What does the word "Gothic" mean? 

Should we admire heroes, or "just be ourselves"?

Requirements: The paper should be at least a five-paragraph essay, meaning:

Paragraph 1: Introduction - the general information (when where who what). 

Paragraphs 2-4: each of these 3 paragraphs should cover one of Romanticism's most important beliefs.  Begin with a topic sentence and then give details and examples.  Do NOT focus on things that caused changes in their beliefs (technology, history); instead focus on their beliefs themselves. 

Paragraph 5: Conclusion

Resources:
Encyclopedias in our library. 

"Romantic Sensibility" article on pg 143 of our text. 

Concise Oxford Companion to American Literature
XXX(810.9 in the reserved section of the library) 
New World Companion to American Literature
XXX(820.9 in the reserved section of the library) 

Internet Links:
Romantic Art    About.com     Paul Reuben     Handbook to Literature    Paul Brians   

Wed:
Take "The Raven" quiz.

Use remaining time for writing.

Thurs-Fri:
Finish writing assignment. 

Week 3: "The Cask of Amontillado" 

Mon: Each student will find an Internet picture that exemplifies each word's meaning.  The student must then copy and paste the pictures into a PowerPoint show prepared by the teacher.  Beginning this week, this assignment will also include finding synonyms and antonyms for words. 
Vocabulary
endeavor        fettered           impose           impunity
obstinate        precluded        rampart          recoil
retribution      succession

Wed- Thursday:
Neutral
Individualism vs. Group (0:50) The West vs Asia
Pro-Individualism
Read the poem "Conformity"
Boutique (0:30) Canadian Propaganda
The John Galt Oath (0:46) Ayn Rand
Bee Movie (0:56) more propaganda
Pro-Collectivism
Collectivism vs. individualism (1:45) 
Anti-Individualism  (1:41) 
Altruism (0:59)     
Pay Your Fair Share (0:59) 
Needs of the Many and the Few (0:27)
Which is stronger?
conformity (2:40) an experiment

Persuasive Essay: Individualism  vs. Teamwork
Paragraph 1:
Take a position on this issue: What is more important, for people to be themselves, or for people to get along with their group? 
Paragraphs 2-4: Give examples from your own life, your reading, film, TV, or other sources.  These examples must demonstrate the position you have taken. 
Paragraph 5: Address those who make the opposite choice.       

Tues:
Literary element:  Unreliable Narrator    Irony

Read and discuss "The Cask of Amontillado
" by Edgar Allen Poe, Pg 232 in the Yellow Book 
Animation 1 (4:02) Alan Parsons
Animation 2 (4:26) Alan Parsons
Animation 3 (2:35) narration                       film (11:15)

Quotations:
"Steam ships were not created by mastering the technologies of sails and rigging."

"In Romanticism, the main determinant is the mood, the atmosphere."
Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau

"Intuition becomes increasingly valuable in the new information society precisely because there is so much data."
John Naisbitt

"Listen to your intuition. It will tell you everything you need to know."
Anthony J. D'Angelo

Fri: Quiz and then take this personality quiz to determine whether you are a classic or a romantic!   

Honors English: Choose three of the following stories: "The Fall of the House of Usher" (in our text), "The Murders in the Rue Morgue",  "The Black Cat", and "The Purloined Letter".  Read both of the following poems: "Annabelle Lee" and "Eldorado".

Week 4: "Rip Van Winkle"

Mon: what is a folktale?  What are some examples of American folktales?

Each student will find an Internet picture that exemplifies each word's meaning.  The student must then copy and paste the pictures into a PowerPoint show prepared by the teacher.  Beginning this week, this assignment will also include finding synonyms and antonyms for words. 
Vocabulary
amiable             obsequious
malleable           scrupulous
vehemently        placid
reiterated           torpor
fidelity              conscientious

Thurs-Fri:  Creative Writing:                                        See EZ Print Assignment

Option 1:
Write a modern version of a piece of traditional folklore.  Folktales from all around the world frequently use familiar motifs and elements, such as these:
xx-a simple story line with simple characters
xx-the number three is significant
xx-talking animals or creatures
xx-monsters often appear
xx-use of trickery
xx-wishes are granted, magic objects
xx-the youngest and smallest in the family succeeds after others fail
xx-involves superhuman strength or talent
xx-a poor person becomes rich
xx-a magic sleep

Option 2: Write a scene from this story from the point of view of Dame Van Winkle. 

Tues-Wed:
Literary elements
: folklore see pg 162
setting see pg 1200 
"Rip Van Winkle" by Washington Irving,
pg 154 
(about 9 pgs)   video

Fri: Tues-Wed:
Quiz  over  "Rip Van Winkle" by Washington Irving, pg 154  (about 9 pgs)

Honors English: Read "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow" and "The Devil and Tom Walker"

Week 5 "Dr. Heidegger's Experiment"

Mon: Each student will find an Internet picture that exemplifies each word's meaning.  The student must then copy and paste the pictures into a PowerPoint show prepared by the teacher.  Beginning this week, this assignment will also include finding synonyms and antonyms for words. 
Vocabulary
dotage               conjurer
delusion            effervescent
infirmity            intimates
quaff                  venerable
visage                decrepit

To Read or View, Week 5:
"Dr. Heidegger's Experiment" by Nathaniel Hawthorne.  This story is not in our text.  About eight pages. 

Literary elements:

Writing for Week 8: The Mysterious
Essay 1: Some people crave stories about the supernatural, aliens; others can't stand that "fake" stuff.  Write an essay explaining how you feel about this topic.  Use examples from movies and stories you have enjoyed or despised. 

Short Story 1: Create a short story focusing on something paranormal. 

Writing for Week 8: The Mental
Essay 2: Some people crave stories about the workings of the inner mind, especially an irrational or twisted mind; others can't stand that stuff.  Write an essay explaining how you feel about this topic.  Use examples from movies and stories you have enjoyed or despised. 

Short Story 2: Create a short story focusing on the workings of the inner mind, especially an irrational or twisted mind.

Honors English: Read "The Minister's Black Veil" (in our text) and "Young Goodman Brown". 

Week 6 Presentation of the Poem

Required Literary elements:
rhyme scheme
speaker
stanza
meter
Additional if they apply:
narrative poem
refrain

To Read or View:
Longfellow
Whittier
Holmes
Lowell

Presentation for Week 6:
Choose a Poem for Oral Presentation and be prepared to read and explain the poem in front of the class.  Select a poem, and then check out the rubric.  You may also want to use this "Poetry Analysis Flowchart."

WARNING:
Presentations are due at the beginning of the hour Friday.  There will be no preparation time allowed--NONE! There will be no make-up!