1st Quarter    Sep-Nov
1800-1862

2nd Quarter   Nov-Jan
1862-1914

3rd Quarter   Jan-Mar
1914-1950s

4th Quarter   Mar-June
1960s-Present


Week 1: The Crucible

Mon (Day 1) Focus on Samuel Parris
1 Read Arthur Miller's The Crucible beginning with "Rev. Parris is praying now…" on pg 14 and read until pg 24, "He goes out with Putnam." 
2 Watch the first three minutes of the video "Characters of the Crucible: Rev. Parris (until the narrator begins to talk about Act III).   
3 Fill in character notes for Parris . 
4 Focus Question 5: Describe Reverend Parris, his beliefs, and the motivations for his beliefs. 

5 Continue reading until pg 26, "Enter John Proctor." 
6 Watch "Characters of the Crucible: Abigail Williams." (9:12)
7 Fill in character notes for Abigail. 
8 Focus Question 6: What have we learned about Abigail Williams?

Tues (Day 13):
1 Read Arthur Miller's The Crucible pages 26-38, beginning with the description of John Proctor and ending with "I'll clap a writ on you!".
2 Focus Q7: Explain how John Proctor sees himself. 
3 Fill in character notes for the rest of the front page. 

Wed (Day 14):
1 Read The Crucible, pgs 38-47.  Begin with description of John Hale, end with "Aye, we'll discuss it."
2 Video: "John Hale in Act 1" (5:23). 
3 Fill in character notes for John Hale
4 Focus Question #8: Describe Reverend John Hale's background, beliefs, and purpose. 

Thurs (Day 15):
1 Read The Crucible, pgs 47-53, beginning with John Hale to all "Now mark me, if the Devil is in her…"
2 Focus Question # 9: Why did Tituba, Abigail, and Betty confess?

Fri (Day 16):
1 Read The Crucible pages 55-68.  (Begin at Act Two and end "you will tear it free!")
2 Video: "The Crucible: The Proctor's Fractured Relationship" (6:55).
3 Fill in character notes for Elizabeth. 
4 Focus Question 10: Is Elizabeth right to continue to mistrust John even though his affair with Abigail has been over for seven months?  Or is John right in believing that by now Elizabeth should have forgiven and forgotten his affair with Abigail and come to trust him again?  Choose to support either Elizabeth's or John's viewpoint in your answer. 

Big Ideas of The Crucible
powers of the individual,
individual vs. religious
authority, individuals
as members of a community,
willingness to make sacrifices for the truth, dealing with powerful accusers,
Puritanism resentment, hysteria, hypocrisy

Essential Questions
• What is the importance of individuality?
• How can people use their power to make a difference in their lives and the lives of others?
• What are the risks and rewards of using the power of the individual?

Week 2: The Crucible

The major question:
In the 1780s, people were accused of being witches and were hanged. 
In the 1940s-50s, people were accused of being  communists and lost their jobs. 
In the 2000s, people are being accused of  _________ and are losing their jobs. 

Quotations
"The closer a man approaches tragedy the more intense is his concentration of emotion upon the fixed point of his commitment, which is to say the closer he approaches what in life we call fanaticism." -Arthur Miller

"Whatever hysteria exists is inflamed by mystery, suspicion and secrecy. Hard and exact facts will cool it." -Elia Kazan

"I am not sure what
The Crucible is telling people now, but I know that its paranoid center is still pumping out the same darkly attractive warning that it did in the fifties." -Arthur Miller

Drama and literature are highly moral in nature, showing what is "right and wrong, good and bad, high and low". The purpose of drama and literature is to reform people morally, "not so much by setting forth these values as such, but by showing, so to speak, the wages of sin.".
Arthur Miller.  "Morality and Modern Drama", The Theatre Essays of Arthur Miller: Ed. Robert A. Martin, N.Y., 1978 

In
The Crucible, Arthur Miller "is following the maxim of many a totalitarian government or dictatorship - if you are going to tell a lie, make it a big one if you want it to be believed.

Week 3: The Crucible

Mon (Day 17): 
1 Read Arthur Miller's The Crucible pages 68-86 (the end of Act II). 
2 Watch Elizabeth Proctor Arrested (7:42)
3 Focus Q11 Why is John Proctor hesitant to expose Abigail's lies?
1. Introduce the answer by restating and beginning to answer the question.
2. Write several reasons why Proctor is hesitant to testify in court.
3. Conclude with a sentence or two predicting whether or not you think Proctor's testimony would be believed.

Tues (Day 20):
1 Read The Crucible, pgs 87-98 (to stage direction "Marshal Herrick returns").
2 Focus Q12: Why does Francis Nurse fear he has brought trouble to the ninety-one people who signed their names to the document presented in court?
Answer Plan
1. Introduce the answer by restating the question.
2. Based on previous events of the play, write several sentences that predict possible consequences that may come to these people.
3. Conclude with a personal observation of the way that witnesses have been handled so far in the play.

Wed (Day 21):
1 Read Arthur Miller's The Crucible pages 98-110 (to "Danforth peers at her").
2 Focus Q13: Discuss Mary's inability to faint on demand for the members of the court.
Answer Plan
1. Introduce your answer by predicting why you think Mary could not faint.
2. Write a number of sentences to support your prediction.
3. Conclude by predicting the possible consequences of her inability to prove she was simply pretending

Thurs (Day 22):
1 Read The Crucible, pgs 111-122 (to end of Act III).
2 Watch Characters of The Crucible: Elizabeth in Court (5:39)
3 Focus Q14: Why did John Proctor disclose his affair with Abigail?
Answer Plan
1. Restate the question.
2. Write a number of sentences that detail what John hoped to achieve by disclosing the affair.
3. Conclude by giving your opinion of his decision. 

Fri (Day 23):
1 Read The Crucible, pgs 123-130  (when Hale enters). 
2 Watch video: Reverend Hale in Acts 3 & 4 (9:18)
3 Focus Q15: Hathorne indicates that Parris is overreacting to the scheduled hanging of Rebecca and Proctor because "at every execution [he has] seen naught but high satisfaction in the town."  What would happen to a townsperson who protested the hangings or appeared dissatisfied in any way with the court's proceedings and decisions?
Answer Plan
1. Introduce the answer by restating the question.
2. Write several sentences in which you provide examples of the result of challenging the authorities. As often as possible, use the text to support your claim.
3. Conclude by predicting what you think will happen. 

Week 4: The Crucible

Tues (Day 22): Miller, Arthur.  The Crucible.   Pages 111-122 (to end of Act III), followed by Focus Q14: Why did John Proctor disclose his affair with Abigail?
Answer Plan
1. Restate the question.
2. Write a number of sentences that detail what John hoped to achieve by disclosing the affair.
3. Conclude by giving your opinion of his decision.
Characters of The Crucible: Elizabeth in Court

Thurs (Day 24):  Read Arthur Miller's The Crucible pages 130-146, the end of the play. 
Answer
Focus Question #16 (After Day 24) FQ16 Why do Parris and Hale ask for postponement?.
Both Parris and Hale ask Danforth to postpone the executions, but their reasons for wanting a postponement are vastly different. What motivates each one?
Answer Plan
1. Introduce the answer by restating the question.
2. Write several sentences in which you assert Parris's reasons for wishing the executions postponed.
3. Write a sentence or two where you reveal Hale's motivation.
4. Conclude with a prediction about whether Danforth will oblige either one.

Wed (Day 23): Read Arthur Miller's The Crucible pages 123-130  (when Hale enters), followed by Focus Q15: Hathorne indicates that Parris is overreacting to the scheduled hanging of Rebecca and Proctor because "at every execution [he has] seen naught but high satisfaction in the town."  What would happen to a townsperson who protested the hangings or appeared dissatisfied in any way with the court's proceedings and decisions?
Answer Plan
1. Introduce the answer by restating the question.
2. Write several sentences in which you provide examples of the result of challenging the authorities. As often as possible, use the text to support your claim.
3. Conclude by predicting what you think will happen.
Video: Reverend Hale in Acts 3 & 4

Is The Crucible still relevant today?
This is an essay that gives you the opportunity to show what you have learned and to show that you have thought about the issues here.  Compare the events in the play to a twenty-first century crucible, an issue in which people overreact, accuse those that you don't believe should have been accused, or get hysterical.  Choose one modern issue and make comparison between it and the play. 

"The New McCarthyism."
Maclean's Magazine
"Political Correctness Gone Wild" (video)
Goldberg, Jonah.  "Two Cheers for McCarthyism? Taking it Back - A Little".
XXX The National Review
Indoctrinate U (full-length film)