WELCOME TO THE AWEFULFEST HALL OF FAME

BE IT KNOWN HERE AND NOW THE FOLLOWING ARE ENSHRINED AND AWARDED A "TOR STATUE" FOR THEIR DISTINGUISHED CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE AWEFULFEST GALAXY OF FILM & CULTURAL ENTERTAINMENT.

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ED WOOD

Honorary First Inductee Dec 1, 2015

October 10, 1924 – December 10, 1978. The poster child for unintentionally funny movies, Ed leaves behind a legacy of films of the horror-sci-fi and social commentary genre, including Glen or Glenda, Jail Bait, Plan 9 From Outer Space, The Violent Years and Bride of the Monster. Known to have a fetish for angora sweaters (indeed there is stong evidence that the protagonist in Glen or Glenda was autobiographical)Wood was infamous for being a cheapskate director. His wife was left with an unpaid bill following his death for a science lab he rented for scenes in a film and he was good at dodging the fees cities and towns charged for filming. Indeed, one actor commented that Ed could complete a scene and have everyone on the set out of there even as the police were approaching!

HAROLD P. WARREN

Inducted Jan. 1, 2016

Oct. 23, 1923 – Dec. 26, 1985. Writer, director, actor, fertilizer salesman. Harold proved that all it took to make a horror movie was someone betting him he couldn’t. After a walk-on role in the TV series Route 66, Warren, an insurance and fertilizer salesman from El Paso, met screenwriter Stirling Silliphant. Warren claimed it wouldn’t be difficult to make a horror film and bet Silliphant that he could make an entire film on his own. With no training whatsoever, Harold set out to make a movie with the help of some local theater actors, $19,000 dollars, and a 16mm Bell & Howell camera. The resulting film, “Manos: The Hands of Fate” previewed at one theater in El Paso in 1966. Words used to describe the movie were, “abysmal”, “tedious”, and “inexplicable”. We rate the film simply,aweful(sic).

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ROGER CORMAN

Inducted January 9,2016

A former engineering student, Roger Corman entered the picture business as a messenger and ended up a producer/director after a stint as a story analyst and a brief detour to Oxford University. After returning to Hollywood, he saw an opportunity to make money and gain experience by making low-budget films to feed the drive-in and neighborhood theater circuits, which had been abandoned in large part by the major studios. Working from budgets of as little as 50,000 dollars, he quickly learned the art of creating bargain-basement entertainment and making money at it, producing and directing pictures for American International Pictures and Allied Artists. Five Guns West, Apache Woman, The Day the World Ended, It Conquered the World, Not of This Earth, The Undead, Attack of the Crab Monsters, Teenage Doll, Machine Gun Kelly, The Wasp Woman, and Sorority Girl were only a few of the titles, and they were indicative of their subjects.

William Castle

Inducted Feb. 19, 2016

April 24, 1914 – May 31, 1977)The man with a gimmick, Castle produce and direct a series of inexpensive horror films in the late 50’s and early 60’s, notable for their use of promotional gimmicks to enhance interest and therefore revenue. For his movie, “Macabre”, every customer received a $1000 life insurance policy in case they should die of fright; for the movie “The Tingler”, electronic buzzers were attached to select seats in the theater to simulate the affect of the “Tingler”; and for “13 Ghosts”, filmed in “Illusion-O”, every patron received a ghost viewer that enabled them to see the ghost on screen. Castle’s gimmicks accompanied 10 horror films over the course of his career and cemented his legacy as horror movie’s “man with a gimmick”.

SAM ARKOFF & JAMES H. NICHOLSON

INDUCTED 2/25/2016

The co-founders of American-International Pictures and the godfathers of the beach party and teenage werewolf movies. When Arkoff and partner James H. Nicholson founded AIP in 1954, the major Hollywood studios were little interested in movies aimed at teenagers, or in the summer releasing season. Under Arkoff and Nicholson,AIP had surprising success with low-budget youth pictures, and took advantage of less competition in the summer to open double-features with titles like "Muscle Beach Party" and "Invasion of the Saucer Men."

DWIGHT FRYE

INDUCTED MARCH 13, 2016 Dwight Frye (Feb. 22, 1899 – Nov. 7, 1943) – Everyone’s favorite hunchbacked clubfoot, Frye cast the mold for the Demented Assistant to the Mad Scientist. He robbed graves for Dr. Frankenstein, ran errands for Count Dracula, and stole every scene he was ever in. Though featured in just 5 horror films over the course of his career, the shear force of these performances has given Frye legendary status in the annuals of screen horror.

JAMES WHALE (Inducted April 2, 2016)

One of the most stylized and talented filmmakers of the 1930s, director James Whale was also one of the most successful; a fact that stood in direct contrast to his long-underappreciated stature in the history of cinema. Arriving in Hollywood at the dawn of the sound era, he made a name for himself around town with the war dramas "Journey's End" (1930) and "Waterloo Bridge" (1931). It was, however, the Universal horror classic "Frankenstein" (1931) that established Whale as an A-list director, influential enough to choose his own projects and cast them as he saw fit. Despite his best efforts to diversify, hugely popular films like "The Invisible Man" (1933) and "Bride of Frankenstein" (1935) pigeon-holed him as a horror director, even as critics who were dismissive of the genre failed to recognize his formidable visual and aesthetic brilliance.

KENNETH TOBEY

INDUCTED MAY 3, 2016

Kenneth Tobey (March 23, 1917 – Dec. 22, 2002) – Like many other actors of his era such as, John Agar, Richard Carlson, and Kevin McCarthy, Tobey played a variety of TV and movie roles. But within the community of horror and sci-fi fans of the 50s, he was the no-nonsense, go-to guy when confronting giant creatures from the sea or evil aliens from outer space. Tobey brought gravitas to movies like The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms, It Came from Beneath the Sea, and of course, The Thing from Another World.