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Garlic and Pets

Veterinarians call it the "poor man's penicillin". It is an essential part of the daily diet of some of the world's most highly prized racehorses. You guessed it The Stinkin Rose, the natural way to keep your pets at their best.

David Smith,DVM, of North Hills, CA, commonly prescribes garlic as part of his flea prevention program and for treating and preventing allergy flare-ups. He also believes it may help prevent certain cancers in pets. Researchers at California's Loma Linda University School of Medicine attribute garlic's ability to control parasites to its powerful antibacterial action. They say it controls the growth of microorganisms.

Top priced thoroughbreds at the famous Newmarket racing stables in England consume buckets of the Stinkin Rose everyday. According to Professor John Heinerman, a world authority on herbs and herbal medicines, breeders found that modern medicines were not always effective against the various diseases that used to cripple horses. Lord John Fitzgerald was the first of the local trainers to experiment with the garlic. He used it to prevent viruses, eliminate worms and keep the blood thin, which protects the heart.

Garlic has had its brush with celebrity pets, as well. When actress June Lockhart started losing the battle with her dog Tony's fleas, she was told to mix garlic extract with his food. " The flea problem just disappeared," she said. In fact Lockhart, who became a spokesperson for International Hearing Dog Inc., after staring in the Lassie TV series, was so excited by garlic's power that she arranged for the extract to be sent out with every newly trained dog.

Although you should try to use fresh garlic, granulated or extracts will suffice if you have no choice. Just grate or mince a little into your pet's food at every meal. About 1/2 to 3 cloves depending on the size of your pet.