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The Unknown Marx Brothers (1993)


SB: The title of this TV documentary, The Unknown Marx Brothers, is obviously meant to evoke memories of Unknown Chaplin, the astounding 1983 British documentary featuring much previously unseen footage of Charlie Chaplin. Unknown Marx Brothers isn't quite in that league but is well done and quite eye-popping nonetheless.

Narrated by actor-turned-slapstick-comedian Leslie Nielsen, Unknown offers a wealth of facts, interviews, and TV and movie clips. There's minutia that was little-known prior to this bio, such as the birth of a sixth Marx Brother, Manfred, who died shortly after birth. Interviewees include Groucho's first daughter Miriam, Chico's daughter Maxine, and two of Harpo's adopted children, Bill and Minnie; Maxine and Bill, in particular, are most generous with their facts about the Marxes' career and their anecdotes about growing up as Marx children.

Most astounding is the doc's wealth of clips, many of them rarely seen. Trailers for nearly every Marx Bros. movie are shown. A scene from Harpo's film debut in Too Many Kisses (1925) shows that, ironically, this silent movie was the only film appearance in which Harpo had dialogue (albeit in a subtitle). Generous clips from the Marxes' TV work include segments from: the TV pilot for Groucho's quiz show "You Bet Your Life"; an attempted Chico pilot named "Papa Luigi"; a 1959 extended routine (beautifully preserved on video) between Harpo and Milton Berle; one of Groucho's final TV appearances, on 1973's "The New Bill Cosby Show"; and most interestingly for Marx buffs, reassembled footage from the Marxes' final team work, the aborted TV pilot "Deputy Seraph," depicting Harpo and Chico as pratfalling angels commandeered by heavenly boss Groucho.

There are nitpicking debits with the show. The background music, credited to Harpo's son Bill, sounds like random spewings from a synthesizer. Many of the less savory details of the Marxes' lives, such as mother Minnie's overdominance and Groucho's beleaguered final years, are simply ignored--as are, strangely, the final deaths of the Marxes, leaving any Marx novice to wonder if they're still alive. And while much of the doc's second half features very funny footage from "You Bet Your Life," this seems a too-often-used source (perhaps because it has been used so much by less imaginative TV shows). But overall, Marx Bros. completists will find much to shout about here.

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