By adding that style to your horizontal rule, you can have a border
color around it. You can experiment with the colors, rule height and
border thickness and style to come up with a variety of different
looks. For the border style, in addition to "solid," you can use:

dotted, dashed, solid, double, groove, ridge, inset, or outset.

You can even set a different border for each side of the rule if you
like, but replacing "border" with:

border-top, border-right, border-bottom, and border-left.

Some of the border styles won't work if the border is set to thin,
such as the 1 pixel in my example. Just increase the border size to
experiment with the different looks.

<.hr style="background-color:blue; height: 7px; width: 400px; border: solid red 1px;">

1.



2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.




=> Once again it's time to address the issue of advertisers.
Because there is an advertisement in this ezine does not mean I
endorse the product unless I specifically state that I do.

A recent complaint is what prompted this item. If any one product
receives too many complaints, I remove that advertiser from future
issues. However, with a list this large and with any product, there
will always be a few that are unhappy. If warranted, I will remove an
advertiser based on one complaint, but the product one person
complained about has been helpful to other people, so it is a
difficult matter to manage at times.

Most of my advertisers sell through Clickbank. As a rule, I'm not
afraid to include products sold through Clickbank because
Clickbank is generally quick to refund your money, even if the
advertiser is unresponsive or uncooperative regarding a refund.

All advertising represents vested interests. The vendor has an
interest in making sales, and I need the advertising revenue to pay
for the distribution of this free newsletter - free to you that is, it
costs me hundreds of dollars per year.

So, buyer beware applies. I do my best not to advertise for scam
artists or low quality products, but also, what is low-qualilty to you
may be just what another person needs. As in all of life, use your
best judgment.

________________________________________


- Q & A -

Q: In ebook farming (great product by the way), in the personal
success philosophy section, you said "You will always think and
act from within your character." Can you explain what this means? I
think I know, but I don't know if I know, you know?

~ Teresa K.

A: This statement in eBook Farming is in reference to developing a
consistent ethical base by which you run your business and your
personal life. All decisions are made from within your character
unless you let others make your decisions for you. Dishonesty,
inconsistency, disloyalty, and other undesirable traits practiced in
either your business or personal life will affect your total character,
and therefore, they affect your decision making ability in all facets
of your life. When you are sick, the whole body is effected; when a
part of your character suffers, the whole of your character suffers.

In the grand scheme, your life is not separated into different parts, 
it
is simply, life. Poor decisions and actions in any area of life affect
all areas of life in one way or another, sooner or later.

While it's possible to find temporary success while practicing
unethical behavior, history is replete with examples of those who
have, only to crash and burn in shame. History is also replete with
examples of men and women who became successful and suffered
no shame, are remembered well, and are held up as examples for
all of us today. Those are the people who did things the right way
on a consistent basis in all areas of their lives.

So, for lasting success, one needs to see the big picture and think
in the long-term. Treat your own character as your most valuable
and important asset, because it is. By acting from a consistent
ethical base, even many seemingly hard decisions will be easy
simply because you follow your own established ethics. In doing
this, you'll build the wholeness of your character into a person
others look up to with admiration and esteem.

( http://www.boogiejack.com/book/ebookfarm.html )

________________________________________


- The Tips Jar -

NOTE: In code examples I insert a period after every left arrow
bracket so all subscribers can see it. If you copy and paste, be
sure to remove the period or it won't work and you'll think me a
goof. I am a goof, but that's not the right reason to think it.

Tip 1 - HR Revisited

The horizontal rule ( <.hr> ), once a boring gray line, has had many
a webmaster using all kinds of tricks to dress it up. From images to
skinny tables to repeated underscores with a font color, HTML's
horizontal rule just didn't do what a lot of people wanted.

I introduced you to the fact you could simply add a "color=red" to
an HR tag to change its color many years ago, but now with CSS
you can do a little more.

<.hr style="background-color:blue; height: 7px; width: 400px;
border: solid black 1px;">

By adding that style to your horizontal rule, you can have a border
color around it. You can experiment with the colors, rule height and
border thickness and style to come up with a variety of different
looks. For the border style, in addition to "solid," you can use:

dotted, dashed, solid, double, groove, ridge, inset, or outset.

You can even set a different border for each side of the rule if you
like, but replacing "border" with:

border-top, border-right, border-bottom, and border-left.

Some of the border styles won't work if the border is set to thin,
such as the 1 pixel in my example. Just increase the border size to
experiment with the different looks.

Tip 2 - Server Side Includes (SSI)

A few issues ago when I ran a tip that showed the alternative to
SSI, several of you wanted to know how to use SSI on your sites.
For that, I dug into the archives to rerun this tip from 14 months
ago.

All my site navigation is printed into each web page on my site via
SSI. If I were to add a new site section, I'd only have to change the
navigation.ssi file to have that change reflected on all 500+ pages of
my site. That's good stuff!

To use SSI, your web host has to have your server enabled for SSI.
Many hosts enable it automatically. You can test it out for yourself
without their help. If it doesn't work, then you'll have to request 
that
they enable SSI.

For SSI to work, most hosts have it set so that you must name
your HTML pages with a .shtml extension instead .html or .htm,
however, they can enable their server so that all pages, regardless
of the page extension, can run SSI.

To include SSI on a page, place the following at the place on your
page where you want the SSI file to appear.

<.!--#include file="ssi_files/navigation.ssi"-->

This example references a file called navigation.ssi which is located
in the folder (directory) called ssi_files. That's all there is to 
adding
a navigation system to your page using SSI, as long as your web
site is SSI enabled (and if necessary for your server, your page is
named with a .shtml extension).

The only thing left to do is create the actual navigation.ssi file you
are referencing. This file is simply whatever code you'd actually
place on the page if you weren't using SSI. For example for links to
show up like this:

Home Page | Contact Me

You'd create your navigation.ssi file with only this in it:

<.a href="index.html">Home Page<./a> |
<.a href="contact.html">Contact Me<./a>

If that were the only links you wanted in your navigation system,
that's all you'd need to include. Just save it with a .ssi extension,
such as navigation.ssi and you're done.

You can use any standard HTML code in an SSI file that you'd use
on a web page. Just don't start it off with the <HTML> declaration
and go through the TITLE, HEAD, BODY routine. You only add the
actual code that you'd place at that spot on the page.

That's the way it works