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Jefferson County People

LOUISVILLE PEOPLE

APPLEGATE, ELISHA - Erected a flour mill (1808) for Louis and John Tarascon in Shippingport. While erecting the mill, he found an iron hatchet underneath a 200-year-old sycamore tree. Elisha is reported to be the first white child born in Jefferson County. He was also a pioneer tobacco dealer in Louisville. (Info from the book, Louisville Panorama by R.C. Riebel)

BADGER, EDWARD - Was one of the first trustees of the town of Louisville. The first meeting of the trustees was on 24 April 1779. (Info from the book, Louisville Panorama by R.C. Riebel)

BEALE, SAMUEL - Started the construction of a brick home in 1784, on the site of the original "Spring Station", near what is now Cannon's Lane and Lexington Road. (Info from the book, Louisville Panorama by R.C. Riebel)

BENSINGER, NATHAN - Came to America when he was in his teens. In 1866, at the age of 20, he entered into the furniture business in Louisville with his brother Wolff. Bensinger and Brother's original store was on Market Street between 2nd and 3rd. After ten years, Nathan bought out his brother. Nathan was active in the firm until 1916 when his two sons, Charles and Milton, bought him out. (Info from Louisville Magazine)

BONNYCASTLE, JOHN C. - Married Harriet Everett, daughter of Isaac Everett. They had nine children, one of whom was Arthur C. Bonnycastle. John passed away in 1884. His wife, Harriet, donated part of their estate (Walnut Grove) to the city of Louisville for the development of a park. The city hired noted landscape architect, Frederick Law Olmsted, in 1891 and made the land park of Cherokee Park. Harriet passed away in 1906. (Info from the book, A Place in Time by the Courier Journal)

BRASHEAR, MARSHAM - Was one of the first trustees of the town of Louisville. The first meeting of the trustees was on 24 April 1779. He was the Secretary for the first meeting. He did not arrive with the original settlers, but came in the fall of 1778 or spring of 1779. He married Nancy Ann Linn, the niece of William Linn. By 1780, he was engaged in distilling whiskey. (Info from the books, Louisville Panorama by R.C. Riebel and Two Hundred Years at the Falls of the Ohio by George H. Yater)

BRECKINRIDGE, ALEXANDER - Came to Jefferson county soon after his release from a British prison ship in 1781, and established a residence along Beargrass Creek, near Floyd's Station. He had a half brother, John Breckinridge, in Virginia. (Info from the book, Two Hundred Years at the Falls of the Ohio by George H. Yater)

BROADHEAD, DANIEL - Opened Louisville's first general store in 1783, on the North side of Main between 5th & 6th Streets. (Info from the book, Louisville Panorama by R.C. Riebel)

BUCKLIN, JOHN C. - He was the first mayor elected under the charter of the "City of Louisville". His term was for one year. He was re-elected annually to serve five consecutive terms from 1828 - 1833. He was a native New Englander and a merchant. (Info from the books, Louisville Panorama by R.C. Riebel and Two Hundred Years at the Falls of the Ohio by George H. Yater)

BULLITT, CUTHBERT - In 1817, Thomas Prather and Cuthbert Bullitt donated the land on which the Marine Hospital was built. (Info from the book, Louisville Panorama by R.C. Riebel)

BURGHARD, E.R. - Burghard was one of the original partners of Peter & Burghard Stone Company, which was founded in 1880 and incorporated in 1890 with E.R. as president. His son Joseph E. Burghard, who died in 1947, succeeded E.R. as head of the firm. In 1949, J. Tyler Thomas, grandson of the founder, became president. (Info from Louisville Magazine)

BUSCHEMEYER, WILLIAM G. - Sometime around 1880, he was hired by August Rees as an apprentice and taught the jewelry trade. In 1887 W.G. Buschemeyer and Louis Seng bought the business from August Rees. Buschemeyer and Seng continued in business for nine years. The firm then became W.G. Buschemeyer. In the Late 1940's or early 1950's, the company was purchased and reorganized by James G. Davis and is now Buschemeyer and Davis Company. (Info from Louisville Magazine)

BUSTARD, JOHN - In 1812 he was the cashier of the branch of the Bank of Kentucky that absorbed the Louisville Bank. (Info from the book, Louisville Panorama by R.C. Riebel)

BUTLER, WILLIAM H. G. - Who was a professor and school principal, was killed by Matthew F. Ward for disciplining Ward's younger brother.

BYERS, DAVID - In 1817, established the first drug store in Louisville. In 1818, it became Byers & Butler. Apparently Peter-Neat-Richardson traced its origin to this store. (Info from the book, Louisville Panorama by R.C. Riebel)

CALDWELL, WILLIAM E. - The W.E. Caldwell Company, founded by William E. Caldwell in 1887, began business on Main Street as a wood tank manufacturer. It soon started making distillery equipment and flour mill machinery and eventually entered the steel tank field. The types of tanks have ranged from small pickle barrels to cadaver tanks for medical schools, to elevated water tanks of a half million gallons capacity. The Old Forester bottle atop the Brown-Forman distillery, which holds eight million jiggers of water, is a Caldwell tank. Three generations of the Caldwell family have been involved in the business, including Walter E. Caldwell who served as president of the company. Walter is the son of William E. Caldwell. (Info from Louisville Magazine)

CAMPBELL, JOHN - In 1783, he erected a tobacco warehouse in Shippingport (now part of Louisville).
(Info from the book, Louisville Panorama by R.C. Riebel)

CARRELL, DAN - Opened a shop for cleaning, altering, and laying carpets, on February 1 1893, known as the Louisville Carpet Cleaning Company. (Eventually, he combined business with a local rug manufacturer and they became the Carrell-Rogers Company). In 1903, His company made innovations in home carpet cleaning by using two compressed air machines to clean carpets. They were mounted on horse drawn wagons with a long hose running from the wagon to the house. Mr. Carrell was called away from his business during the Spanish-American War, and in 1898, he Went to Puerto Rico as a line lieutenant with General John L. Castleman. He later detailed as a supply officer on Col. Morris Belknap's staff. When the YMCA launched a building drive in 1910, Mr. Carrell got involved and was Captain of one of the fund raising teams. (Info from Louisville Magazine)

CHENOWETH, RICHARD - Was one of the first settlers arriving at Corn Island and one of the first trustees of the town of Louisville. The first meeting of the trustees was on 24 April 1779. He had a wife, Hannah, and four children, Mildred, Jane, James and Thomas. (Info from the book, Louisville Panorama by R.C. Riebel)

CLEVELAND, ELI - In 1781 George Rogers Clark confiscated a keg of whiskey from Eli for his , Militia men. Eli pressed charges against Clark. (Info from the book, Louisville Panorama by R.C. Riebel)

CORCORAN, MARTIN - Was in business with John Gargan in 1863; (the firm was originally called John Gargan & Company). In 1882, Martin's Brother Matthew became a partner in the firm. Matthew had been a Coppersmith since 1861 possibly longer. (Info from Louisville Magazine)

CORCORAN, MATTHEW - Entered into partnership with his brother in 1882, and from 1893 to 1905 was head of their firm. In 1905, the company Name was changed from John Gargan & Company to Matt Corcoran & Company. Matthew Corcoran had at least one son, M.P. Corcoran. His son in turn had four children who operated the business in the 1950's. They were M.P. Corcoran Jr., J.B. Corcoran, T.L. Corcoran and W.G. Corcoran. (Info from Louisville Magazine)

DOLFINGER, JACOB - Founded Dolfinger's in 1862, and sold such items as glass, pottery, china vases, decorated china and glass imports from France and Germany, dinner sets, chamber sets, Queensware from England, bisque figurines, onyx tables, lamps, fine table cutlery, and saloon and bar glassware. Jacob was born in Germany and began working in Louisville sometime around 1851 as a Gold and Silversmith. (Info from Louisville Magazine)

DONNE, JOHN - CPT John Donne was one of the original settlers on Corn Island.   He was also the owner of a slave by the name of Cato Watts. Cato was charged in the murder of John Donne and hung for the offence. Cato claimed the death was an accident. John Donne had a wife, Martha (Daughter of Joseph Hunter), and a son, John. (Info from the book, Louisville Panorama by R.C. Riebel)

DOUGHERTY, NEAL - Was one of the first settlers of Louisville on Corn Island. (Info from the book, Louisville Panorama by R.C. Riebel)

DOWLER, EDWARD - Louisville's first police department was started in 1810. John Ferguson and Edward Dowler were named the public watchmen at a pay-rate of $250.00 per year. (Info from the book, Louisville Panorama by R.C. Riebel)

EASTIN, MR. - In 1789, Eastin built the second brick house within the Louisville city limits. (Info from the book, Louisville Panorama by R.C. Riebel)

EVERETT, ISAAC - Dry-goods merchant and Co-Proprietor of the Galt House. His wife, Adele Barney Everett, passed away in 1848 leaving him with two small children, Isaac Jr. & Harriet. His slaves built the Walnut Grove mansion in the 1860's in what is now the Bonnycastle area. The mansion was built on 150 acres, which was purchased from Angereau & Myrah Gray in 1848. Isaac's Daughter, Harriet, married John C. Bonnycastle & was eventually given the land. She started living there in the 1860's (Info from the book, A Place in Time by the Courier Journal 1989)

FAITH, WILLIAM - Was one of the first settlers of Louisville on Corn Island. He had a wife, Elizabeth, and a son, John. (Info from the book, Louisville Panorama by R.C. Riebel)

FERGUSON, JOHN - Louisville's first police department was started in 1810. John Ferguson and Edward Dowler were named the public watchmen at a pay-rate of $250.00 per year. (Info from the book, Louisville Panorama by R.C. Riebel)

FILSON, JOHN - Born in 1747, Filson served in the Colonial Army, taught school, and was a surveyor. He was Kentucky's first historian and wrote Discovery, Settlement, and Present State of Kentucke which was published in 1784. In 1785 he was in the fur business in Louisville, and in October of 1788 he disappeared and was presumed to have been killed by Indians. (Info from the book, Louisville Panorama by R.C. Riebel)

FRENCH, HENRY - Was one of the first trustees of the town of Louisville. The first meeting of the trustees was on 24 April 1779 (Info from the book, Louisville Panorama by R.C. Riebel)

GARGAN, JOHN - In 1848 was working as a coppersmith and by 1863 was in business with Martin Corcoran at their firm (John Gargan & Company) on Fifth Street, between Main and Water Streets. (Info from Louisville Magazine)

GRAHAM, JAMES - Was one of the first settlers of Louisville on Corn Island. He had a wife, Mary, who was the sister of Edward Worthington. (Info from the book, Louisville Panorama by R.C. Riebel)

GUTHRIE, JAMES - (1750-1841) In 1778, at age 28, he accepted 400 acres near Cedar Creek (Fern Creek area) in payment for his Revolutionary War service. According to the book Lore & Legacy, he was shot in the cheek during an Indian attack and lost four of his teeth. His second wife, Eunice Cooper Price, was related to John Paul Jones. James passed away in 1841. (Info from the book, A Place in Time by the Courier Journal)

GUTHRIE, JAMES - (1792-1869) Served nearly four years as Chairman of the Board of Trustees and when Louisville became a city he became a councilman. He was a lawyer, businessman, legislator, Secretary of the Treasury, railroad promoter, and president of the L & N Railroad. James was involved in establishing the University of Louisville in 1837 and was their first president.(Info from the book, Two Hundred Years at the Falls of the Ohio by George H. Yater)

GWATHMEY, JOHN - In 1806, ( 1810 by some accounts), he built the Grayson House at 432 S. 6th Street. In 1954, this was the oldest house still standing in Louisville. (I do not know if it's still there.) (Info from the book, Louisville Panorama by R.C. Riebel)

HARRISON, JOHN - MAJ John Harrison opened a tavern at 6th & Main in 1793. (Info from the book, Louisville Panorama by R.C. Riebel)

HARROD, WILLIAM - Was one of the first trustees of the town of Louisville. The first meeting of the trustees was on 24 April 1779. (Info from the book, Louisville Panorama by R.C. Riebel)

HUMBLE, MICHAEL - 1782 Humble became Louisville's first Gunsmith. (Info from the book, Louisville Panorama by R.C. Riebel)

HUNTER, JOSEPH - Was one of the first settlers of Louisville on Corn Island. He had five children, Joseph, David, James, Martha (Mrs. John Donne) and Ann. (Info from the book, Louisville Panorama by R.C. Riebel)

JOHNSTON, WILLIAM - A native of Virginia and educated at William and Mary College, he arrived in Louisville in 1782. By 1786, he had acquired 35 lots in Louisville in the High Lands on the east side of town which he called Cave Hill Farm, (now Cave Hill Cemetery). (Info from the book, Two Hundred Years at the Falls of the Ohio by George H. Yater)

KAYE, MR. - Built first brick house in Louisville (city limits) in 1789. (Info from the book, Louisville Panorama by R.C. Riebel)

KENDRICK, WILLIAM - Sometime before 1832, William Kendrick began the Jewelry business at Fourth and Main Streets. This business was a partnership (partner unknown). When the depression of 1838 hit, the company went under. A year later, William Kendrick was back in business, alone, on Third Street between Main & Market, starting with a capital of $150 ($20 cash, a silver watch worth $19 and a few tools). In seven years, he had paid the debts of the earlier venture and built a thriving business. In 1880, the business passed into the hands of his sons, William C. and George P. Kendrick. In the 1950's, the business was headed up by the third and fourth generations of the family, (William P. Kendrick-president, and William Kendrick Ewing). The business today is under the name of Merkley-Kendrick Jewelers. (Info from Louisville Magazine)

KIMBLEY, ISAAC - Was one of the first settlers of Louisville on Corn Island. He had a wife named Mary. (Info from the book, Louisville Panorama by R.C. Riebel)

LACASSAGNE, MICHAEL - The first Post Office in Louisville opened in 1795 with Michael LaCassagne as the postmaster. (Info from the book, Louisville Panorama by R.C. Riebel)

LEMON, JAMES INNES - "In 1825, the elderly Marquis De Lafayette applauded for help given by France in the Revolutionary War, visited Louisville on tour of an appreciative United States. He was officially welcomed to the city by James Innes Lemon, young nephew of five American patriots who fell in the battle of Brandywine. Three years later, Louisville (population nearly 9,000) incorporated as a city, and Lemon, then 24, opened a small jewelry store on Main Street. In 1862, he took his son, James K. Lemon, into partnership and changed the firm name to James I. Lemon & Son. James Innes Lemon died in 1869, and 8 years later Lemon & Son selected new quarters in the Courier Journal building, then at Fourth and Liberty. James K. Lemon's son, Brainard Lemon, entered the firm a few years later and became president in 1907 when his father died. The store then moved to the Seelbach Building and operated there until 1929, when Brainard Lemon died and Lemon & Son, chose its present (in 1957)location at 570 South Fourth. Owned and operated since 1929 by Mrs Brainard Lemon, Lemon & Son for 128 years has played an active part in the community's business life, serving the people of Louisville with fine diamonds, silver, watches, china and crystal. Lemon & son is proud to continue the careful service that permitted it to become the oldest retail firm in the city." (Information found in Vol 8 Number 3 of Louisville Magazine, [dated March 20 1957])

LINN, WILLIAM - Was one of the first settlers of Louisville. He was a widower and brought at least some of his six children with him to Corn Island. By 1779, he had moved out to the Beargrass area and was establishing Linn's Station at what is now the Hurstbourne Country Club. (Info from the book, Two Hundred Years at the Falls of the Ohio by George H. Yater)

MARCUS, THERMAN - Founded the Edw H. Marcus Paint Company, (one of the oldest - if not THE oldest - paint companies in the South), in 1853. His original store was on Market street where he sold paint out of wooden kegs. His son was Edward H. Marcus, and his grandsons were Herman W. Marcus and Calvin H. Marcus. His Great Grandsons, Calvin H. Marcus Jr. and Merritt E. Marcus were active in the management of the paint store. (Info from Louisville Magazine)

MCMANNESS, JOHN - Was one of the first settlers of Louisville on Corn Island. He had a wife, Mary, and three sons, John, George and James. (Info from the book, Louisville Panorama by R.C. Riebel)

MOORE, SIMEON - Was one of the first trustees of the town of Louisville. The first meeting of the trustees was on 24 April 1779. (Info from the book, Louisville Panorama by R.C. Riebel)

MURRAY, HARRY EWELL - Born 13 August 1875, he was the son of Benjamin F. Murray and Eliza V. (Collester). He married Clara Blunk 9 April 1904, and died 12 January 1931. He is buried in Cave Hill Cemetery, U.S. Soldiers Section. He was in World War I as a Private in the Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He had two children, Mabel who married Charles Peck, and James Calvin who was born 11 May 1911 and married Jo Nell Phillips.

MURRAY, BENJAMIN FRANKLIN - Born circa 1847 in Tennessee, (probably Cocke County). Married Eliza V. Collester 14 September 1871. They had three Children, Benjamin H. Born July 1872, Harry Ewell Born 13 August 1875, and Willie Born 1879. Benjamin F. was a Carpenter by trade. He died 17 October 1887 leaving Eliza widowed with three children ranging in age from 8 to 15. Joseph Gault took the widowed Mrs. Murray to court to force her to sell the house that they were living in to pay off a debt left by Benjamin F. for some lumber he had received on credit. This lumber was used to add to and repair the house that they were living in. Mr. Gault already had a lien on the house. The amount of the debt was $77.91. This house was located at the Northwest corner of Rowan and 29th Streets. The House extended westwardly with and having a front on the north side of Rowan Street of forty feet and there extending back Northwardly some 200 feet. Mrs. Murray recognized the validity of the account against her property and had promised to pay off the debt when she could. Mr. Gault still took her to court. They decided in court that she would not have to sell her property. Benjamin F. Murray died of Chronic Dysentery, his medical attendants were Doctors Pelle and Allan. He was buried in Eastern Cemetery and has no headstone. He was 40 at the time of his death.

MURRAY, BENJAMIN H. - Was born in Bunkum (Buncombe) Co., North Carolina, circa 1810. In 1863, he stood five foot seven and 3/4 inches, was fair complexed with gray eyes and gray hair. He was a Wagoner in CPT James R. Nobles' Company F of the 28th Kentucky Volunteer Infantry. He made a living as a Carpenter. He was discharged from the Army because of Chronic Spinal Meningitis caused by a fall while on duty at Bowling Green Kentucky in October of 1862. His degree of disability was judged to be 1/2 and was discharged on the 3rd day of May 1863. He had signed up on the 14th day of November of 1861. He was discharged at Clarksville Tennessee. His children were Margaret, Sophronia, Phebe Katherine (Kate) Born 25 July 1837 and died 29 January 1924, Harriet (Murray) Oliver, Lucinda, Robert (Who also fought in the Civil War), Susan (Murray) Randolph Born 5 April 1857, Benjamin Franklin Born circa 1847 and Died 17 October 1887, and Narcessa. In 1850, he was living in Cocke County Tennessee, and around 1852 he and his family moved to Louisville. When he first came to Louisville, he made a living as a house and sign painter, later to become a carpenter, and after his injury in the Civil War he ran a boarding house which he called Murray House. His wife, first name we are unsure of, has been recorded as Amoretta and America with a few variations on Amoretta, and her maiden name was Chambers. Benjamin H. died in Louisville at the age of 87 on the 26th of January 1898, Cause of death is listed as Senile Atrophy. He was attended by Doctor Hood, and buried in Eastern Cemetery. There is no headstone.

MYERS, JACOB - Was living in Louisville by 1780 and engaged in distilling whiskey. (Info from the book, Two Hundred Years at the Falls of the Ohio by George H. Yater)

PATTON, JAMES - Was one of the first settlers on Corn Island and first trustees of the town of Louisville. The first meeting of the trustees was on 24 April 1779. He had a wife, Mary, and three daughters, Martha, Peggy, and Mary. (Info from the book, Louisville Panorama by R.C. Riebel)

PEARSON, LORENZO D. - Cabinet maker who in 1832 left Shelby County, KY, to open a shop in Louisville. He was occasionally asked to make coffins and in a few years became a successful funeral director. In the year 1848, he formed the firm of L.D. Pearson and Son. His son, Edward C. Pearson, became a leader in promoting the education and licensing of embalmers.(Info from Louisville Magazine)

PEARSON, EDWARD C. - Son of Lorenzo D. Pearson, he became a leader in promoting the education and licensing of embalmers, and he himself held the first embalmer's license issued in Kentucky. E.C. Pearson was the President of the Funeral Auto Company, which replaced the Horse drawn funeral. (Info from Louisville Magazine)

PERKINS, SAMUEL - Was one of the first settlers of Louisville. (Info from the book, Louisville Panorama by R.C. Riebel)

PRATHER, THOMAS - In 1812, he was the president of the branch of the Bank of Kentucky that absorbed the Louisville Bank. in 1817, Thomas Prather and Cuthbert Bullitt donated the land at Chestnut Street between Floyd and Preston on which the Marine Hospital was built . The hospital later moved to Portland. (Info from the book, Louisville Panorama by R.C. Riebel)

REAGER, JACOB - Was one of the first settlers of Louisville on Corn Island. He had a wife, Elizabeth, and three children, Sarah, Mariah, and Henry. (Info from the book, Louisville Panorama by R.C. Riebel)

REES, AUGUST - He was a jeweler since 1840 and opened a shop in Louisville in 1865. Sometime around 1880 he hired William G. Buschemeyer as an apprentice and taught him the jewelry trade. In 1887, W.G. Buschemeyer and Louis Seng bought the business from him. (Info from Louisville Magazine)

SANDERS, JOHN - Started what is considered the first Banking in Louisville. During a spring flood in 1780, he brought a large flatboat up to what is now Third and Main Streets. When the water subsided, he gave the boat windows and doors, and started a kind of warehouse he called the "Keep". He would receive skins of animals and issue a receipt (certificates of deposit) for them. These "certificates" circulated as a kind of currency and did the work of modern bank notes. On May 20th 1784, Daniel Boone had deposited six beaver skins at the "Keep". (Info from the book, Louisville Panorama by R.C. Riebel)

SCOTT, WILLIAM - Was one of the first settlers of Louisville. He came to Corn Island with his wife (Name unknown), and his 14-year-old son Patrick. (Info from the book, Two Hundred Years at the Falls of the Ohio by George H. Yater)

SINCLAIR, JOHN - Was one of the first settlers of Louisville on Corn Island. (Info from the book, Louisville Panorama by R.C. Riebel)

SKIDMORE, JOHN - Established the first iron foundry in Louisville. (Info from the book, Louisville Panorama by R.C. Riebel)

SHREVE, LEVIN LAWRENCE - He was the first president of the Louisville and Nashville Railroad (1851-1854). In 1856, He and Thomas Shreve were the first in Louisville to have bathtubs installed in their homes. They lived in a large double house on Walnut Street where the old Armory now stands. (Info from the book, Louisville Panorama by R.C. Riebel)

SHRYOCK, GIDEON - Architect, designed the Capital Building (now the Old Capital Bldg) in Frankfort, the Jefferson County Courthouse, and the Bank of Louisville building (no longer the bank) at 320 West Main Street. He was a devout Baptist and lived in Louisville for 45 Years. He passed away at the age of 78 and is buried at Cave Hill Cemetery. (Info from the book, Louisville Panorama by R.C. Riebel)

TARASCON, LOUIS - In 1802, built and operated the first water-power project, a large mill at Shippingport. (Now part of Louisville.) (Info from the book, Louisville Panorama by R.C. Riebel)

TARASCON, JOHN - Opens a flour mill with Louis Tarascon in 1808, at what is now the foot of 26th Street.   While building this warehouse, the builder, Elisha Applegate, found an iron hatchett under a 200-year-old Sycamore tree. (Info from the book, Louisville Panorama by R.C. Riebel)

TAYLOR, RICHARD - Col Richard Taylor, Father of President Zachary Taylor, settled in Louisville in 1785. (Info from the book, Louisville Panorama by R.C. Riebel)

TAYLOR, T. P., SR. - Opened the first Taylor Drug Store in Louisville on May 1, 1879. He was 22 at the time he opened the store and had served his apprenticeship and worked as a registered pharmacist in other drug stores before opening his own. His first store was in the Portland area on 34th Street near the river. His second store was opened at the corner of third and Jefferson around 1881. He established the company's policy as "Dependable service at the lowest possible prices, combined with service that is courteous, efficient and prompt". Taylor Drug Stores continued up into the 1970's. (Info from Louisville Magazine)

TEWELL, JOHN - Was one of the first settlers of Louisville on Corn Island. He had a wife, Mary, and three children, Ann, Winnie, and Jessie. (Info from the book, Louisville Panorama by R.C. Riebel)

TRAVIS, ROBERT - Was one of the first settlers of Louisville on Corn Island. (Info from the book, Louisville Panorama by R.C. Riebel)

VAIL, SAMUEL - On the 18th of January 1801, he published the first issue of "The Farmer's Library", a weekly paper in Louisville. With a press he had brought from Vermont, he continued until 1808 at which time he decided to join the U.S. Army. He rose up through the ranks to Major and then retired to a sugar plantation in the South. (Info from the book, Louisville Panorama by R.C. Riebel)

WALKER, J.S. - Walker's first job was working at his father's hay and grain business. There he saw the need for a local bag manufacturer to supply the trade. In August of 1891 J.S. Walker & Company started production in a Fourth Street shop. Then a change in the packaging of flour - from barrels to smaller units in cotton bags - created a new market. But the biggest development in the bag trade came with the merchandising of brand names and of new; diverse livestock feeds by the feed industry. In 1925, the Walker Bag Company moved to 120 North 10th street, the site of the old DuPont paper mill and artesian well. This famous sulphur well was permanently sealed when the flood wall was built just north of the plant. S. Craig Walker Jr., grandson of the founder, was president of the firm in the 1950's. (Info from Louisville Magazine)

WARD, ROBERT J. - His children were Matt F. and Sally, (later to be Sally Downs). In 1854, his House was mobbed by a reported crowd of 8,000 people who threw stones, destroying a large glass conservatory and then setting his house on fire. (The fire department arrived in time to save the house). The mob was infuriated by the not-guilty verdict of his son Matt, who had killed Wm. Butler, the principal who had disciplined his younger brother (Name unknown). The crowd burned in effigy Matt Ward and all the principals in the Case, (including the Jury and the defense lawyers).

WATTS, CATO - Was the slave of CPT John Donne. He was the only Negro who first settled in the Louisville Area (corn Island). He was a fiddle player and played for the settlers for their first Christmas celebration. Three years later, he was hanged for the murder of CPT John Donne, though he claimed it was an accident. (Info from the book, Louisville Panorama by R.C. Riebel)

WILLIAMS, EVAN - In 1783, Williams makes the first whiskey in Louisville - according to the book, Louisville Panorama. But, according to the book, Two hundred Years at the Falls of the Ohio, he and two others were already engaged in distilling whiskey in 1780. (Info from the books, Louisville Panorama by R.C. Riebel, and Two Hundred Years at the Falls of the Ohio by George H. Yater)

WILSON, GEORGE - Erected the first courthouse in Louisville (1784) at a cost of $309.79. (Info from the book, Louisville Panorama by R.C. Riebel)

WORTHINGTON, EDWARD - Was one of the first settlers of Louisville on Corn Island. He had a wife, Mary, and a son, Charles. He had two sisters, Mary (Mrs. James Graham), and Elizabeth (Mrs. Jacob Reager). He served with George Rogers Clark in the Illinois campaign. (Info from the books, Louisville Panorama by R.C. Riebel and Two Hundred Years at the Falls of the Ohio by George H. Yater)

MAYORS

Streets in Louisville

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