This incident happened in Inverness sometime around 1954-55. A photo was published in the Aberdeen "Press and Journal" of the bull looking out

the top window of the tailors shop in Eastgate. I would like a copy to publish on this page. If you can help, please contact:    mr.mo@gil.com.au

Story confirmed

A load of Bull?  

 Thank you.

 

Thanks to the Editor of the Inverness Courier, Mr Jim Love, staff writer Willie Morrison, Maureen Fridge and a number of their readers, the mystery has been solved. I am sad to say that although - even with the passage of time - the main facts in the story were correct, there was an element of "Bull" in the story, so the tale has been renamed:

A "BULL" NAMED SALLY.

An appeal in an article in "SHENNACHIE'S DAIRY" in The Inverness Courier for information brought in confirmation of the incident, with one notable exception, the "Bull" was in fact a seven-year old Friesian cow, her name was Sally and belonged to Farmer Hugh Munro, of Balmore of Leys.

The Courier writes, "Mrs Marlene Sutherland, of Dalneigh has more reason to remember the incident than most - because it nearly ruined her start to married life". " Mrs Sutherland was working in the Buttercup Dairy in Hamilton Street on the day it happened - 2nd March 1955 - when the cow charged into the close leading to MacKenzie Bros. premises and mounted two flights of stairs before falling through the ceiling into the dairy". "I remember the date well, because my late husband Alex and I were due to get married on the 17th March, she recalled".

"Mr MacKenzie the tailor had given us the lease of the flat above his shop and we had already moved some furniture in.

"My boss, Bunty Cameron, was in hospital recovering from an operation and I was looking after the shop.

"I could hear a commotion upstairs but I didn't know what it was until I went outside and saw a lot of people.

"A policeman said there was nothing to worry about. 'It's only a cow upstairs, ' he told us, so I went back inside the shop.

"Suddenly the cow plunged headfirst through the ceiling and landed on the sink, breaking off a horn, turning on a tap, blocking the sink and flooding the shop.

"I was asked later if I wanted the horn as a keepsake but I'd had enough of the cow.

"We couldn't use the flat upstairs after the damage the cow caused. The building was taken down soon after that, but fortunately we were able to get another flat in Tomnahurich Street ."

Retired photography shop proprietor Jim Nairn also recalled the incident. "I was in the shop in Baron Taylor's Street when a customer came in and told me that the cow had escaped and was causing havoc in the dairy, " he said.

"I grabbed a camera and went up to the dairy and I could see the staircase had collapsed.

"Then I turned and the beast was behind me. A van had stopped at the traffic lights and I took a quick snap of the look on the driver's face as the cow charged past him."

Retired photography shop proprietor Jim Nairn also recalled the incident. "I was in the shop in Baron Taylor's Street when a customer came in and told me that the cow had escaped and was causing havoc in the dairy, " he said.

"I grabbed a camera and went up to the dairy and I could see the staircase had collapsed.

"Then I turned and the beast was behind me. A van had stopped at the traffic lights and I took a quick snap of the look on the driver's face as the cow charged past him."

Photo courtesy: Mr Jim Nairn, Inverness. 02-03-1955

 

 

Under reconstruction

This is one tale that has to be told and, I can assure you it is true, although telling it here in Australia brings immediate accusations about the Scots and their consumption of the amber fluid etc. 

The Inverness cattle markets were situated in Eastgate and sales were held there every Tuesday and Wednesday. One day a large bull broke out of the market and headed towards the town centre. Naturally it caused a bit of panic in the streets. When it came to the junction of High St. and Hamilton St. the animal entered a doorway next to a shop called the "Buttercup Dairy".  

The bull somehow managed to climb the stairs to the tailors shop located above the dairy. Meanwhile, in the dairy shop they heard this commotion and a lady customer said to the counter assistant," it sounds as if there is a bull upstairs". By this time a very large crowd had gathered in the street below to watch and things really began to liven up when, much to the amusement of the crowd, the bull poked his head out of the tailor's upstairs window.

Inside the dairy the noise got louder when, all of a sudden, there was an almighty bang and the bull came crashing through the ceiling. Luckily nobody was hurt, however as the ceiling collapsed the water pipes burst and all hell broke loose as boxes of dairy products went flying everywhere. 

The bull charged out the front door onto the main street. Had there been a lamp post climbing competition, Invernessians would have been amongst the world's leading contenders. The crowd dispersed in record time, in all directions.

The poor distressed animal ran down High Street across the suspension bridge and was finally rounded up and destroyed somewhere in the region of Telford Gardens.

Now for all you sceptics out there who are muttering "what a load of bull", there was a story and a picture of the bull looking out of the upstairs window of the tailor's shop published in the  "Press and Journal". The date would be about summer of 1954-55. So go to it all you history buffs, researchers and "doubters"! 

I have had confirmation of the story from my old Ardersier mate, Jim Loan who now lives in New Zealand

Whilst this was going on another incident on the street caused quite a lot of laughter in the crowd. A farmer coming from the market had pulled up in the line of traffic, when suddenly the car behind failed to stop and ran into the back of him.

As the farmer got out of his car he was heard to say in a very loud voice "% )+@> ?"!^% %" ~}:*^%", or something to that effect. At the same time the driver of the other car got out very sedately and was about to apologies profusely. When he heard the farmer's mutterings he was slightly taken aback.  It was the sudden change of  expression on the farmer's face and the instant show of politeness that brought guffaws from the crowd as he approached the driver of the other vehicle and said, "How are you today vicar? Now I'm sure it was just an accident" . . . . . 

I have written to the "Press and Journal" on the chance that they may have the story and photograph of the bull on file, but if anyone reading this item has any more precise details of dates etc.    I would be delighted to hear from you at:   mr.mo15@bigpond.com

I have now been informed the "Courier" did not publish photographs in the 1950's.

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