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BLAND Family Tree (1)

Bland Family Crest




The name BLAND is first recorded near the end of the thirteenth century. It is a locational name, originally referring to someone who lived in a hamlet called Bland in Yorkshire. The village was in a high and unsheltered position, so it derived its name from the Old English gebland, meaning storm or high wind. Early spellings of the name include Blanda and de Blande.






Photo is of Norma Lorene (Bland) Sparks

Obituary: Norma Lorene Sparks, almost 93, of Spencer, IN, died Sunday, March 2, 2014 at the home of her son Rick and his wife Debbie. She was born March 5, 1921 at Bloomington, IN. Her parents were Ernest Bland, and Ophia (Stanley) Bland. She was the third child of six children. Her siblings are James Fredrick Bland (who is deceased), Robert Gabrial Bland (who is deceased), Virginia Louise (Bland) Lamb of Oaktown, IN, Charles Philip Bland (who is deceased) and Margaret Jean (Bland) Cardinal of Sullivan, IN. She married James Lee Sparks on October 22, 1938 in Vincennes, IN. She loved the outdoors and was a beautiful landscape painter. She was a wonderful seamstress, did crocheting and other needlework, and loved tracing her family tree. Norma was baptised at the East 10th. Street Methodist Church in Indianapolis, IN on February 26, 1956. She had the following children, Pamela Sue Jones-Hatfield of Carlisle, IN, Rickey Duane Sparks of Spencer, IN, and Marilyn Leanne Burch of Solsberry, IN. Her grandchildren are Marcy Leanne Knudtson, David Lee Jones (who is deceased), Scott Lee Jones, Anthony Wayne Jones, Carrie Ann Sparks, Shannon Lorene Sparks, Jessica Jalene (Burch) Bechtel and Matthew Jeremiah Burch. She has 16 great grandchildren who are Jack Paul Knudtson (who is deceased), David Karl Knudtson, step great granddaughter Stephanie Leigh (Gregory) Jones, Evy Eliza Jones, Katelyn Laura Jones, Emily Beth Jones, Heaven Leigh Mulvihill, Alexia Nicole Kay Grubb, Brenden Ezekiel Grubb, Bryce Elijah Grubb, Ethon Jay Sparks, Cheyenne Lorene Quick, Marissa Dean Hatton, Bram Colton Reynolds, Kayden Duane Reynolds, and Cooper Ryan Bechtel. Also, 3 great, great, step grandchildren Madison Brooke Jones, Avery Leigh Jones and Emma Faith Jones. There will be a graveside service and burial at the Newark Cemetery in Newark, IN on Saturday, May 31, 2014, at 2 pm. Rev. Harold H. Hatfield will be officiating.





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Ernest "Red" Bland (Norma Bland's father) married Ophia "Ophie" Stanley
Born: August 16, 1898 in Greene County, Indiana
Married: September 8, 1915 in Greene County, Indiana
Died: November 20, 1975 in Sullivan County, Indiana
Proof of Parentage: Greene County, Indiana Application for Marriage License
Place of Burial: Newark Cemetery, Greene County, Indiana

Photo #1 is Ernest "Red" Bland - Photo #2 are (back) Ernest Bland, James Fredrick Bland, Robert Gabrial Bland, Charles Philip Bland, Ophia (Stanley) Bland, (front) Norma Lorene (Bland) Sparks, Virginia Louise (Bland) Lamb, Margaret Jean (Bland) Cardinal - Photo #3 are Ophia (Stanley) Bland and Ernest Bland




Children of Ernest and Ophia (Stanley) Bland:

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First Row: Photo #1 are James Fredrick "Fred" and Miriam "Snooks" (Shauntz) Bland, Photo #2 are James Fredrick and Roberta M. "Bobbie" (Anderson) Bland

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Second Row: Photo #1 is Robert Gabrial "Bob" Bland - Photo #2 is of Louise (Griffith) and Robert Gabrial Bland - Photo #3 is of James "Jim" Lee Sparks holding Norma Lorene (Bland) Sparks and Charles Philip Bland holding Virginia Louise Bland

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Third Row: Photo #1 is of Norma Lorene (Bland) Sparks holding Pamela Sue Sparks - Photo #2 is of Virginia Louise (Bland) Lamb and Norma Lorene (Bland) Sparks - Photo #3 is of Virginia Louise (Bland) and Loren "Dutch" Lamb

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Forth Row: Photo #1 is of Charles Philip "Phil" Bland - Photo #2 is of Charles Philip Bland, Clint Bland, Edith Marie (Hanslaben) Bland, and Steve Bland - Photo #3 is of Margaret Jean "Marg" (Bland) Cardinal



Photo is of William Joseph "Bill" and Margaret Jean "Marg" (Bland) Cardinal



Photo is a school picture with James Fredrick Bland in the center of first row holding sign



Photo is a school picture with James Fredrick Bland in the back row third from right, Robert Gabrial Bland is on the third row to the far left, and Norma Lorene Bland is in the second row and is second from the right




Grandchildren of Ernest and Ophia (Stanley) Bland:

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First Row: Photo #1 is Bette Ann (Bland) Sims - Photo #2 is Bill Bland - Photo #3 is Libby Kay Bland

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Second Row: Photo #1 is Bobby Gene Bland - Photo #2 is Tammy (Bland) Jones - Photo #3 is Shane L. Bland - Photo #4 is Brent Dion Bland

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Third Row: Photo #1 is Pamela Sue (Sparks) Jones, Rickey Duane Sparks, and Marilyn Leanne (Sparks) Burch - Photo #2 is Larry Loren Lamb - Photo #3 is Douglas Lee Lamb

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Forth Row: Photo #1 is Dale Gene Lamb - Photo #2 is Phil Gene (Bland) Lee - Photo #3 is Tondra (Bland) Varnadoe and daughter Melissa (OBrian) Pedersen

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Fifth Row: Photo #1 is Clint Wade Bland - Photo #2 is Steven Bland - Photo #3 is Karen Marie (Bland) Bailey - Photo #4 is Stephen Joseph Cardinal

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Sixth Row: Photo #1 is Jerry Wayne Cardinal - Photo #2 is Kim Gene Cardinal - Photo #3 is Anita Kay (Cardinal) Joslin





Roland Wallace Bland (Norma Lorene Bland's grandfather) married Elizabeth Edmond Bingham
Born: about November, 1858 in Greene County, Indiana
Married: 5Feb.1880 in Greene Co., IN
Died: September 6, 1930 in Greene County, Indiana
Place of Burial: Newark Cemetery, Greene County, Indiana
Proof of Parentage: Greene County, Indiana Death Certificate

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Photo: (Left to Right) Ralph Bland, Minnie Bland, Harvey Bland, Roland Wallace Bland, Eva Mae (Cox) Bland, Elizabeth (Bingham) Bland, Jewey Bland and Dewey Bland (Twins)

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Photo: (Left to Right) Ralph Bland, Dewey Bland, Roland Wallace Bland, Elizabeth Edmond (Bingham) Bland, Harvey Bland, Minnie Bland, Eva Mae (Cox) Bland and Jewey Bland (Dewey and Jewey areTwins)




Children of Roland Wallace and Elizabeth Edmond (Bingham) Bland:

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Grandchildren of Roland Wallace and Elizabeth Edmond (Bingham) Bland:

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First Row: Photo is Lester Harvey Bland s/o Harvey George Bland






Photo: Believed to be James Bland & Lydia (Burch) Bland

James Bland (Norma L. Bland's great grandfather) married Lydia Burch
Born: about 1813 in KY
Married: December 18, 1836 in Greene County, Indiana
Died: after 1880, and before 1890 in Greene County, Indiana
Proof of Parentage: Abstract Title for Sarah Bland (widow of Jesse P. Bland), dated August 20, 1894, entry #6, recorded April 13, 1867 in Greene County, Indiana, states James Bland is the son & heir to Osborne Bland Jr.





Children of James Bland:

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Grandchildren of James Bland:

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First Row: Photo #1 is Elvira (Bland) d/o William Bland and William Marion Stamper - Photo #2 is Anvern Mack Bland s/o William Bland - Photo #3 is Alvin Elmer Bland s/o William Bland

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Second Row: Photo #1 is Armida M. (Bland) Hedrick d/o William




Osborne Bland Jr. (Norma L. Bland's (2 greats) grandfather)
Born: about 1774 Virgina
Married: January 21, 1799 to Patsey Donahoo in
Died: February 5, 1849 in Greene County, Indiana
Proof of Parentage: 1820 Monroe County, Kentucky Census shows Osborne Bland Sr. living close to Osborne Bland Jr., and Osborne Bland Sr. is listed as "Osborne Bland Senr." meaning he had a Jr.

Note: There were two Bland Settlements in Greene County. One family originated in Chatham County, North Carolina and moved directly to Indiana as descendants of James Bland (1749-1799). They moved almost as a clan and are found in Tulip, Highland, Beech Creek and Jefferson Townships. The other family appears in Richland and Center Townships and are descended from the so called Kentucky Blands. They are the children of Osborne Bland Jr. (1774-1849) and Patsy Donahoo. Osborne moved into the area I think around 1830-1835, with his children who married and made a notorious name for themselves, including various shootings, adulteries, fist fights and of course Hiram Bland's murder of William Walker, his brother in Law, for which Hiram became the first man to be hanged in the Greene County, Indiana.

Osborne Jr. (1774-1849) remarried at the twilight of his life following the death of his wife Patsy Donahoo Bland in 1847. The Greene County, Indiana marriage records show Osborne Bland Jr. marry­ing Sally Kent Andrews, November 15, 1848. He died shortly after their marriage on February 5, 1849, beaten to death by Isaac Andrews, the son of his new wife Sally. Sally's son was arrested, but walked free by saying that there was indeed an altercation, but Osborne had really died of injuries resulting from a fall he had taken off his horse the week before.
Sally dropped the Bland name after Osborne died, and applied for a pension in her first husband's name, Alexander Andrews, and was granted one. But, when the Pension Bureau learned that she had married Osborne Bland Jr., the pension was stopped. She lived to be about 98 or 99, and tried repeatedly to secure the pension again, but without success.

Osborne Bland Jr. and many of his family members were believed to be buried at Conder Cemetery in Greene County, Indiana, but the stones have worn away long ago. When my mother and I visited the cemetery which was being used as a cow pasture on Tunny Sharr's farm, the stones were broken and scattered. Some did have some letters carved in them, but nothing we could make out. This was back in the early seventies. (Since then, stones for Osborne and Hiram Bland have been placed there in 2005 by Eddie Burch, a descendant of Hiram's oldest daughter, Elizabeth "Betts" Bland Burch.)




Children of Osborne Bland Jr.:

GREENE COUNTY INDIANA COURT FINAL RECORD, 1838-42
Pages 52-55, records State of Indiana vs. Eli Bland and Osborne Bland, his security, December 17, 1838. At court on Monday, October 1, 1838 Eli Bland and Osborne Bland were each called three times and failed to appear. Each were fined $25.00.
Pages 77-80, is recorded State of Indiana vs. Warren Bland, Indict for Riot, April 2,1838. It appears that on April that Eli Bland and John Brennaman, with force of arms unlawfully assembled and gathered together and did in a public place in the town of Bloomfield by agreement fight and make an affray. Futher, Warren Bland, late of Greene County, did with force of arms, aid, abet, assist, council, encourage and fire the said Eli Bland and John Brennaman to commit the affray aforesaid, For this they were fined $25.00 each.
Page 79, is recorded that Osborne Bland acknowledged himself to owe and be indepted to the State of Indiana the amount to be levied on his property if the said Warren Bland did not appear to answer the indictment (by Grand Jury). On April 1,1839, after trail, the defendant was fined $5.00. Osborne was security for payment of $5.00 and costs.

THE MURDER OF WILLIAM WALKER
In September, 1850, Hiram Bland was indicted for murder. He was charged with the murder of William Walker. Contrary to the usual practice, and in opposition to the opinion of one of his attorneys (Maj. Livingston), he entered upon his trial at that term of court. The State was represented by A. L. Rhodes, and the defense wa's conducted by George G. Dunn and H. L. Livingston. It was a clear and aggravated case of murder. He murdered his victim in daylight, for revenge. The main effort in the defense was to save the defendant's life. He was found guilty, and sentenced to be hung by the neck, on the 15th day of November next following. This is the only case in the county where the accused has had the death penalty pronounced upon him. On the 28th of October, 1850, at night, the defendant broke jail and escaped. He was concealed near his house, and did not make an effort to escape from the county. Great efforts were made to find him, but for a long time they appeared unavailing. His hiding place was finally revealed by one of his pretended friends for the price of a new saddle, and on the 2d day of January, 1851, he was retaken. His hiding place was in a corn pen, in the center of which was a place prepared for the purpose. The corn pen was against the house in which his family lived, and he had a secret passage under the floor from one place to the other. At the April term, 1851, a motion was made for a new trial, and affidavits were read contradicting several particulars in the testimony that was given by the State on the trial. Mr. George G. Dunn made a powerful effort to procure a new trial, but it was unavailing. The court pronounced judgment that he should be banged on the 25th day of April following. On that day an immense concourse of people assembled to witness the execution (in that day execution were public),but it was postponed by the Governor until the Supreme Court could review the decision of the Circuit Court. The Supreme Court affirmed the decision of the Circuit Court, and Mr. Bland expiated his crime on the gallows on the 13th day of June, 1851. On that day, another large body of men, women and children assembled to witness the execution: The gallows was erected a short distance southwest of the place where the southwest corner of the depot now stands, and from it, in public view, the unfortunate man was suspended by the neck until he was dead. The land on which be was executed belonged to Peter C. Vanslyke, who now resides in Bloomfield, and it was made a part of the contract of permitting the execution there that the gallows should, after execution, remain on the ground until it disappeared by decay, and it was left standing until it rotted down. William J. McIntosh was Sheriff at the time, and conducted the proceeding with intrepidity, and great credit to himself. One thing that contributed largely toward bringing about the death penalty in this case was the turbulent character' of the accused. He and several brothers were powerful men'phy, sic-ally, and when drinking were very quarrelsome and dangerous. When not under the influence of intoxicating liquor, as a rule, they were peaceable. Then this trial came off when the public mind was excited to the very highest pitch, and it is impossible for jurymen to be different from other men. All persons become excited over a sudden and seemingly unprovoked murder. If the advice of Maj. Livingston had been taken, and the case bad been continued one term, the probabilities are that, after the first burst of excitement abated, the jury would have sent him to State prison for life. During this year, Hiram S. Hanchett, James McConnell, Wells N. Hamilton, William P. Hammond and Aden G. Cavins were admitted to practice. Mr. Hanchett was a student in the office of the Rousseaus, and soon after his admission to the bar moved West. W. P. Hammond was afterward Governor of the State.

HISTORY OF GREENE COUNTY, INDIANA, CHAPTER 13:
In September, 1850, Hiram Bland was indicted for murder. He was charged with the murder of William Walker. Contrary to the usual practice, and in opposition of the opinion of one of attorneys (Major Livingston), he entered upon his trial at that term of court. The State was represented by A. L. Rhodes, and the defense was conducted by George G. Dunn and H. L. Livingston. It was a clear and aggravated case of murder. He murdered his victim in daylight, for revenge. The main effort in the defense was to save the defendant's life. He was found guilty, and sentenced to be hanged by the neck, on the 15th day of November next, following. This is the only case in our county where the accused had the death penalty pronounced upon him. On the 28th day of October, 1850, at night, the defendant broke jail and escaped. He was concealed near his house, and did not make an effort to escape from the county. Great efforts were made to find him, but for a long time they appeared unavailing. His hiding place was finally revealed, and on the 2nd day of January, 1851, he was retaken. At the April term, 1851, a motion was made for a new trial, and affidavits were read contradicting several particulars in the testimony that was given in by the State on the trial. Mr. George G. Dunn made a powerful effort to procure a new trial, but it was unavailing. The court pronounced judgement that he should be hanged on the 25th day of April following. On that day an immense concourse of people assembled to witness the execution, but it was postponed until the Supreme Court could reveal the decision of the Circuit Court. The Supreme Court affirmed the decision of the Circuit Court, and Mr. Bland expiated his crime at the gallows, about the middle of June following. On that day, another large body of men, women and children assembled to witness the execution. The gallows was erected on the level plain, about two hundred yards southwest of Colonel Stough's mill, and from that the unfortunate man was suspended by the neck. William J. McIntosh was Sheriff, and conducted the proceedings with great credit to himself. The gallows was left standing for quite a number of years - in fact, until it fell from decay. One thing that no doubt contributed largely towards bringing about the death penalty in this case, was the turbulent character of the accused. He and several brothers were powerful men physically, and when drinking were very quarrelsome and dangerous; when not under the influence of liquor, as a rule; they were peaceable. Then this trial came off when the public mind was excited at the very highest pitch. It was utterly impossible for jurymen to be different from other men. All persons became excited over a sudden seemingly unprovoked murder. If the advise of Major Livingston had been taken, and the case had been continued one term, the probabilities are that after the first burst of excitement abated, the jury would have sent him to State Prison during life. There are various views on the subject of capital punishment. Many urged that it is a relic for barbarism, and incompatible with the spirit of enlightened civilization. Others say that it is an ordinance of God: "That who so sheds man's blood, by the man shall his blood be shed," and that man has no right to change it. Then the answer comes that in the early ages of the world, God was the civil ruler of the people, as well as the moral governor, and that, occupying these two relations toward man, two classes of laws were proclaimed by Jehovah for man's government. That one class was proclaimed for his civil government, and one for his moral government. That while man has no right to repeal, change or modify the laws prescribed for his moral government; yet, when God surrendered to man the right to enact laws for his civil government, it carried with it the right to change the laws enacted for his civil government; and, therefore, he had a right to change the law on the subject of punishment for crime. The laws under this rule that man would have the right to change, are such laws as prescribe a punishment to be inflicted by man. Where the punishment for a violation of a law was to be inflicted by God, then man would not have the right to change the law. Under this rule, the law-making power would have the right to prescribe such punishment for murder as they saw proper. Perhaps our law is the best that could be adopted on the subject; that is, to allow the jury to inflict either the death penalty or imprisonment for life.
Lest we take this noble politician (Oscar Bland) at his word, let it be noted that Hiram was out for some kind of revenge. Hiram stabbed William Walker, husband to Hiram's sister Lettice. What started the brawl is uncertain. But remember that Lettice later testified that Walker had taken a stick to Hiram, suggesting self-defense. The jury found him guilty and hanged him amid great fanfare.

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There is a book written by Georgia Lucas called "The Hanging of Hiram the Hoss". Photo is of the book and Georgia Lucas, who is a descendant of Hiram Bland. It can be bought online.


There was a divorce in May, 1866, between Jesse Bland and Jane Sleeth Bland, who were married according to marriage records, October 30, 1860. Charges filed by Jesse included abandonment without just cause, and illicit carnal intercourse with Hiram Bland and with Eli Bland, both sons of Osborne Bland Jr. Jesse Bland was the son of Warren Bland, grandson of Osborne Bland Jr.
(In those days, the only reason one might obtain a divorce was abandonment or adultery. Sometimes people would get their friends to testify in court that they had had intercourse with their spouse in order to get a legal divorce. This may, or may not have been one of those situations.)
Jesse P. Bland married Sara Jane Bays on June 16, 1866 in Greene County, Indiana. About 1 month after the divorce.




Grandchildren of Osborne Bland Jr.:

MY GRANDPAPPY WAS HUNG IN BLOOMFIELD
Bloomfield - Arthur Bennie stopped his automobile at the Ozarks Crossroads store. A lounger with a grey beard that reached almost to his belt buckle and which was amber colored around his mouth opening, ambled over and said, "Indiana, huh?" That was very evident because Bennie's 1913 Model T, 3-door Ford had Indiana license plates, front and back. "Where from in Indiana?" said the old greybeard. "Linton" answered Bennie, "I'm from Linton." "That anywhere near Bloomfield?" asked old greybeard. "About 12 miles" answered Bennie. "Waal now," the amber stains in the greybeard parted, "My Grandpappy was hung in Bloomfield. Greybeard said his name was Bland, and that his Grandpappy's name was Hiram.

FAMILY OF WILLIAM BLAND
William Bland was born about 1838, probably in Greene County, Indiana. He married Mary (Skinner) Brock in 1858. I find William Bland in the Indiana State Prison for murder on the 1860 census. The census indicates he’s been there since 1859. Mary and their daughter Eliza are living with Mary’s mom. William is back out by the 1870 census.
William is the son of James and Lydia (Burch Shaver) Bland, making William the nephew of the infamous Hiram Bland. Consistently, William’s birth date is shown as approximately 1838, making him only 12 when Hiram murdered William Walker in 1858.
John A. Pate, Clerk of the Indiana State Prison South, gives us a history of all the convicts sent from Greene County to the State’s prison at Jeffersonville, Indiana:
William BLAND, April 19, 1859, assault and batter with intent to kill, two years; served out sentence.
Through the kindness of John A. PATE, who formerly lived at Bloomfield, but is now Clerk of the Indiana State Prison South, we are enabled to give the readers of the News a history of all the convicts sent from Greene County to the State’s prison at Jeffersonville, Indiana.

The prison was established in 1822. It has not been the custom until recent years to record the particulars of the crime a prisoner was convicted of, hence the record history of the early convicts is very incomplete. William BLAND, April 19, 1859, assault and batter with intent to kill, two years; served out sentence.
John BLAND, October 26, 1881, petit larceny, one year, discharged October 16, 1882.

ALMOST ANOTHER MURDER!
Our county is becoming noted for murder, riots, horse thieves, burglers, &e. We are forced to chronicle another affray which occurred on Friday evening, the 26th ult., in the east part of Highland township. A difficulty occurred some time since between Augustus Nations and Wm. Bland, and on Friday last they met. Bland showed a disposition to fight it out, but Nations told him that they had been enemies long enough, and proposed to shake hands and drop the matter, at the same time extending his right hand. Bland immediately drew a pistol and fired at Nations, thee slugs taking effect—two in the lower part of the stomach, and the third in the right arm. They were extracted without doing much damage. Bland had made threats some time since that he intended to kill Nations the first time they met.
Bland was arrested, and on Monday brought before Esq. Andrews, in this place, who recognized him to the next Circuit Court under bail of two hundred and fifty dollars.
The Valley Times, Worthington, Indiana, Thursday, April 1, 1858




Osborne Bland Sr. (Norma Lorene Bland's (3 greats) grandfather) married Letitia "Lettice" Hamrick
Born: about 17?? in Prince William County, Virginia
Married: Letitia "Lettice" Hambrick about 1769 in Virginia
Died: 1820-1830 in Monroe County, Kentucky
Proof of Parentage: John Bland's Will, dated December 8, 1795 in Nelson County, Kentucky

An injunction in Prince William County, Virginia, ordering Osborne Bland to keep the peace with Mary Hamrick in 1767, the assumption being that Osborne was after Mary's daughter Letitia "Lettice" and Mary threw cold water on him.

Nelson County, Kentucky Court Records a charge against him for hog thieving in Washington County, Kentucky in November 1806, he was found innocent.

Note: Osborne and Letitia and their children were among the victims of the Kinchloe Indian Massacre, at Nelson County, Kentucky in September, 1782:
As the story goes, the Shawnee swarmed around the Kinchloe Station between midnight and daybreak, broke down the gates, and forced their way into the fort's interior. The inhabitants were overpowered, killed or captured. Among them were Osborne and Lettice Bland and their children, as well as some of their relations. Thompson Randolph claimed to be fighting in a hand-to-hand situation, when his wife, who was loading his rifle with one hand while holding a baby with the other, was struck and killed, as was the baby. Randolph claimed to have retreated with another child to a hayloft that handily escaped the Indians' torch. Osborne Bland, who was Thompson Randolph's cousin, killed the son of an Indian chief and after running out of ammunition, clubbed his empty rifle and bashed the Indians right and left. If the stories, as they merge, are to be believed, Osborne was with his wife and two children when the raid occurred. A baby was killed before Osborne's and Lettice's eyes, and young sons, Jesse & Moses, was said to have been captured. Jesse was described as "quite young" at the time of capture. It appears he returned many years later and was identified by a scar on his body. Sometime after the 1810 census and before 1825, Jesse and his family moved to Saline/Pulaski County, Arkansas. There he established the Kentucky Baptist Church. Jesse was well known for his oratory skill and the force with which he preached and was nicknamed "Old Hardsides".
Osborne and Lettice were captured near a box of paints that had belonged to the chief's son, whom Osborne allegedly killed. They were both condemned to be burned alive and were taken prisoner with Osborne bound and Lettice left to walk along free.
As they began the march to the Indian village, Osborne urged Lettice to break away and leave him when she could. The opportunity came at night while the Indians were sleeping. Lettice crept away and her departure was not noticed until the Indians awakened the next day. Meanwhile, Lettice, who had been walking in circles, had not gone far from the band of Indians. Fearing discovery, she insinuated herself into a hollow log and concealed herself well enough that the Indians passed by her. Having shaken the Indians, Lettice tried to walk back to the fort, but again walked in circles and ended up the first day of freedom back at the hollow log where she slept until she was chased out by a bear. Lettice, having escaped Indians and bears, now subsisted in the wilderness for seventeen days, eating "sour grapes and green walnuts," until presently she made her way back to Kinchloe's station. Arriving before the station's walls, her gaunt and nude body gave out and she fell in a dead faint. Sharp-eyed watchmen from the tower, no doubt a bit "touchy" about bare chested people (Indian braves habitually dropped down when detected), thought she was an Indian. They trained their collective rifles on her and made ready to shoot if poor Lettice pulled herself to her feet. Fortunately, before she regained consciousness, a passing huntsman, being perceptive enough to tell the difference between a hostile Indian brave and a naked woman, gathered Lettice into his arms and carried her to hearby Lynn's Station, where she was nursed back to good health.
Osborne, according to various accounts, was taken to Canada and later exchanged. He must have returned to Jefferson/Nelson County about a year later for as previously indicated, he was known to have lived at Phillips Station from 1782-1784. Lettice and Osborne were sturdy souls, and were still kicking around in 1812, by which time, as they had been "...for long years an object of awe and veneration."
It must be noted that these stories have been told and retold too many times and by too many people to have been taken from whole cloth, and one must acknowledge that even in its most basic outlines, the memory of an intense life and death struggle, marked by the murder of an infant child and the death of neighbors and relatives, capture, death sentence and ultimate escape, must have left an indelible mark on the memory of Osborne and Lettice Bland, and it may have been one of those primal traumas in human life that forged their lives into the people they were.
Osborne Bland resided in 1785 at Nelson County, Virginia (KY).
He resided in 1786 at Nelson County, Virginia (now Kentucky).
He resided on 19 July 1788 at Pottingers Creek, Nelson County, Virginia (now Kentucky).
He resided in 1791 at Nelson County, Virginia (now Kentucky).
He resided in 1820 at Monroe County, Kentucky.
He appeared on the census of July 1, 1820 at Monroe County, Kentucky,
with 1 male 18-26,
1 male over 45, (Osborne Bland Senr.)
and 2 females over 45, (Letitia "Lettice" (Hambrick) Bland)
listed as Osborne Bland Senr. (listed as Senr. means he had a Jr.)
Also listed as an unknown value.




John Bland married Margaret Osborne (Norma L. Bland's (4 greats) grandfather)
Born: about 1725 in Stafford Co., VA
Married: 1746
Died: 1795 in Nelson Co., KY
Proof Of Parentage: (John Bland is believed by many genealogists be the son of William Bland, but we have no real proof of parentage. There was however a James Bland who was born in Cumberland County, England, St. Andrews Parish, Penrith, in 1661 and died in 1708. James had an oldest son William born about 1682 and died 1744. This William Bland who married Catherine Key, is probably the father of our John Bland who married Margaret Osborne because #1 Between 1722 and 1726 James Bland and his son William gained an additional 72 acres between them in the area of Stafford County, which later became Prince William County. #2 There was also a 312 acre grant to William Bland made in 1742. #3 On March 27, 1776 our John Bland deeded to his son Osborne 100 acres that had formerly been part of the 312 acre grant that had been given to William. To make a long story short, they're all living on the same land which is kind of a dead giveaway.)

Note: John Bland came down the Ohio River on a flatboat and landed at Louisville in 1784 with his sons William and Osborne, and others. Settled near Bloomfield in Nelson County, Kentucky where he became a substantial farmer and slave owner. He was a soldier under General Wayne through the Indiana and Ohio campaign. The History of Kentucky, edition 4, 1887, Perrin, on pages 791-792 contains a biography of John Bland's grandson Elijah Bland. The biography says that John Bland was a "native of England", and his wife was a "native of Ireland", and they immigrated to Virginia "in colonial days." We note that Washington County, Kentucky was formed in 1792 from Nelson County, so that many records for the Blands are found in Washington County references.

John Bland's Will:
Will Book A, Page 166, dated October 5, 1795,
Nelson County, KY. Probated December 8, 1795

"In the name of God, Amen. This fifth day of October in the year of our Lord One Thousand Seven Hundred Ninety-five, I, John BLAND of the County of Nelson, State of Kentucky, being in a weak and low state of health....do constitute, make and ordain this to be my last will and testament. It is my will that Margret, my dearly beloved wife inherit all my estate, both real and person, all moveable or immoveable....it is my will that my eldest son, Osborn BLAND be paid twenty pounds cash out of my estate at the decease of my wife Margret...it is my will that my eldest daughter, Prudence SMITH wife to Fleming SMITH, be paid five pounds specia in like manner as above...it is my will that my son Samuel BLAND be paid thirty pounds specia in like manner...it is my will that my son John BLAND shall have a conveyance of a part of a tract of land I purchased of James DAVIS....it is my will that my two sons Isaac and Elijah BLAND have the remaining part of the land I now hold on the waters of Simpsons Creek, at the decease of my wife Margaret, also one negro each of them is to have of the increase of my negro woman Seicy.
...it is my will that the remaining part of my moveable estate together with my real estate is to be equally divided among six of my chidren: Mildred HUGHES, Daniel BLAND, William BLAND, John BLAND, Frances HUGHES and Molly RANDOLPH.....it is my will that Nancy BLAND, daughter to Henry BLAND is to have twenty pounds specia which is to come out of Mildred HUGHES part of my estate....it is my will that my wife Margret together with Daniel and John BLAND, my two sons, be executors whom I do constitute and appoint of this my last will and testament........I have hereinto set my hand and seal this day and date first written. Signed, John Bland

Signed, sealed and delivered in presence of us:
Anthony THOMPSON, Henry TINKINSON, Elizabeth TINKINSON.

At a court held for Nelson Co., on the 8th day of December 1795, this last will and testament of John Bland, deceased was proved by the oaths of Anthony Thompson, Henry Tinkinson and Elizabeth Tinkinson subscribing witness thereto and sworn to by Margaret Bland, Daniel Bland and John Bland executors therein and ordered.

Attest: Benjamin Grayson, Co., Clerk, State of Kentucky, County of Nelson.

(One of the slaves belonging to John Bland was Jacob. Jacob was left to John's daughter Frances (Bland) Hughes. After the death of John Hughes, Frances' husband, the slave Jacob was set free. It is said that Jacob spent the rest of his life trying to buy his children out of slavery. Nelson County, Kentucky records show Jacob Bland bought the freedom of 2 of his daughters "Ary" and "Fanny". Ary Bland married David Cousins January 18, 1826 in Nelson County, Kentucky. Fanny Bland married Edmund Duncan November 3, 1832 in Nelson County, Kentucky. Also, in the will of Joseph Hobbs, dated October 5, 1809 in Nelson County, Kentucky, Joseph Hobbs gives slave Fanny and her children freedom, and allows Jacob Bland to buy his son Ben at a reasonable price.)




William Bland




James Bland

JAMES BLAND'S WILL, Stafford County Will Book Liber z, 1699-1709, Reg. C5071


In the name of God, Amen, I, James Bland of the county of Stafford in the Colony of Virginia, being sick of body, but of sound and perfect sence and memory, praise be therefore given to Almghty God for it, do make and ordain this my last will and testimony in manner and form, as follows:

First and principally, I commend my soul to Almighty God who gave it, hoping in and by the merits, death and passion of my savior Jesus Christ , to have free pardon and remission of all my sins and to enter into eternal life, and secondly, I commit my body to the ground to be decently buried at the discretion of my excr's hereafter mentioned.

Item: My will and mind is, that all my depts be fully satisfied and paid.

Item: My will and mind is: that my loving wife, Margaret, shall fully possess my now dwelling plantation, and the land from the month of the creek, to the first branch above the said plantation, during her natural life, and after her decrease to fall to my loving son Robert Bland and his heirs lawfully begot.
Item: I give and bequeath to my loving son William Bland, 150 acres of land beginning at the upper side of the above said branch and so running up the creek, the full complement of 150 acres aforesaid to him and his heirs lawfully begot

Item: I give to my two sons James Bland and John Bland all of the reversion of my land, the said tract beginning where my son William leaves off, and so running to the head of my line, and to be equally divided, between them, when my sons shall arrive to the age of twenty-one years old, to them and their heirs lawfully begot, and in case any of my sons should die without issue, then to fall to the survivors to be equally divided amongs't them.

Item: My will and my mind is, that my loving son, William Bland, may have the tuition and bringing up of my daughter Alice, and my youngest daughter Hannah.

My desire is that my loving son, James Bland, may have the tuition and bringing up of my daughter Patience and my daughter Ellen, and my youngest son Robert, my daughters till they come to 18 or married, and my son till he is 21 years.

Item: My will and desire is, that after my debts are all paid, then what is left of my movable estate shall be equally divided between my loving wife, Margaret, and my eight children, every one to have an equal share alike, when they shall come to the age of aforesaid.

Item: I make and ordain my 2 sons William Bland and James Bland, to be my whole and sole excutors of this my last will and testament. In confirmation whereof, I set my fixed my seal, this 22nd. day of December 1708.

his
James X Bland

(Seal)


At a court held for the said county the 9th. day of March, 1708, this was proved in court to be the last will and testament of James Bland.




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The names BLAND, STANLEY, BINGHAM, BURCH, and HAMBRICK are from England, the names DONAHOO and OSBORNE are from Ireland.




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