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How to Work On a Monologue  

First, performing a monologue is not fundamentally different from acting a role in a full-length play.

The best definition I know of acting is this: Acting is human behavior under imaginary circumstances.

4 Questions to ask yourself:

1:   Who are you talking to?

2:   What do you want from them? What do you need from them?

3:   What do you need to do to get it? (This is your ACTION)

4:   What do they do in response to your trying to get whatever it is you want? And how do you adjust accordingly?  

Other Things To Think About:

        EXPECT TO WIN!!!  

   Monologues only get long because you donít get what you want right off the bat: They are not memorized speeches.  

            The higher the stakes the better: The more you can personalize, the better.  

THE MOST IMPORTANT THING IS THAT YOU ARE WORKING MOMENT-TO-MOMENT, THAT YOU ARE ALIVE AND REALLY DOING YOUR ACTIONS.  

Better to be simple and believable and perhaps not as emotionally full as you would like than to pretend like youíre sad or happy or whatever.  

                  The more you can ACTIVATE the other person the better.

USE active verbs to express you emotions and feelings and this helps   See  Making a Monologue to a Dialogue     

APPROACH THE ROLE JUST AS YOU WOULD ANY OTHER ROLE; DONíT SHORTCHANGE YOURSELF BECAUSE YOUíRE ONLY DOING 1 TO 2 MINS.  

YOU MUST DO THE SAME KIND OF PREPARATION YOU WOULD DO FOR AN ENTIRE ROLE  

READ THE PLAY AND DO NECESSARY RESEARCH  

So what do you look for in an audition monologue?  

Second, use only well-written monologues

Here are some other tips on picking good monologues:

Good sources for monologues

                  The Drama Book Shop: 212/944-0595

                  Or Theater Books: 212/757-2834

One example: THE ACTORíS BOOK OF CONTEMPORARY STAGE MONOLOGUES, Nina Shengold, Ed  

NOTE: I believe you can do it, its tough out there and criticism can help you or break you. Remember your self-esteem. Donít bring yourself down if you donít get anything. If you want to be in the business of acting, be a professional and act like youíre in the business of acting.  

Notes: Once you found a good monologue, make a copy of it. Or type it up, for it can be readable for you to read and save a copy on your computer, disk, or flash drive that means you have a clean copy every time you print it out.   If you have good handwriting thatís fine too. With your copy of the monologue, mark whatever you need to do to for example your active verbs . Scoring the Monologue  If you are auditioning in front of casting director please do not give your draft away. Keep extras copies of your monologue. Thatís what I did. You can use my ideas.  

NOTES:  I found this on YouTube on what Casting Directors look for. Please check it out.

Another Tip: Use YouTube in part of research of musicals plays or other plays. Sneak peeks of musicals.  

NOTES: Read the whole play to get the story of the characters  

NOTES: If you get a monologue from a film watch the DVD know the story and the character  

NOTES: Music. Singing auditions  16 bars  

NOTES: When presenting a monologue to the casting director try not to look at the casting director find an object in the room and present your monologue.  The camera person,  or the wall behind the casting director.  

NOTES: By the way, yoga is good. Have your class or you  do yoga. Try to get your students to get their blood flow to the brain. Start it in the beginning of the class for a few minutes. A different  yoga exercise every day.  

NOTES:  Vocal warm ups too. Tongue twisters are great to do. Breathing is also good too.  

NOTES: If you are going for an acting class take a university course in acting.   

NOTES:  When doing a cold reading. Prepare yourself. How? If  you know the character of the play then itís good. Getting a copy of the script ahead of time and reading it, is a better chance you may or may not get the role. Remember prepared yourself. Ask yourself What am I doing?  What is your emotion? What is it about? (Which is your subtext? Ė in other words what does it mean)  

Note Please DO NOT BE LIKE Britney Spears, Paris Hilton, or Lindsay Lohan. You know what I mean. Itís a business and they want someone who can work long hours, under pressure, and still look great.  Remember your attitude.

NOTES: I got this information from my class in Acting Class. You can use it.  

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