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The text of the picture reads: A woman so loved that from one lyre there came more lament than from all lamenting women; that a whole world of lament arose in which all nature reappeared: forest and valley, road and village, field and stream and animal; and that around this lament world, even as around the other earth, a sun revolved and a silent star-filled heaven, with its own disfigured stars -- so greatly was she loved.

This graphic is based of the mythology story of Orpheus and Eurydice.

Eurydice and Orpheus were young and in love. So deep was their love that they were practically inseparable. So dependent was their love that each felt they could not live without the other. These young lovers were very happy and spent their time frolicking through the meadows. One day Eurydice was gaily running through a meadow with Orpheus when she was bitten by a serpent. The poison of the sting killed her and she descended to Hades immediately.


Orpheus was son of the great Olympian god Apollo. In many ways Apollo was the god of music and Orpheus was blessed with musical talents. Orpheus was so sad about the loss of his love that he composed music to express the terrible emptiness which pervaded his every breath and movement. He was so desperate and found so little else meaningful, that he decided address Hades. As the overseer of the underworld, Hades heart had to be hard as steel, and so it was. Many approached Hades to beg for loved ones back and as many times were refused. But Orpheus' music was so sweet and so moving that it softened the steel hearted heart of Hades himself. Hades gave permission to Orpheus to bring Eurydice back to the surface of the earth to enjoy the light of day. There was only one condition--Orpheus was not to look back as he ascended. He was to trust that Eurydice was immediately behind him. It was a long way back up and just as Orpheus had almost finished that last part of the trek, he looked behind him to make sure Eurydice was still with him. At that very moment, she was snatched back because he did not trust that she was there. When you hear music which mourns lost love, it is Orpheus' spirit who guides the hand of the musicians who play it.

There are many interpretations of this story, many of which are based on historical ideals of the time. I tend to overlook all of that and look at the romantic side of it. The story to me is one of true love... the kind of love that knows no bounds... the type of love that only true soul mates could share and understand fully. Orpheus loved Eurydice in such a manner that when she died, he was lost without her and only through song could he express his feelings of love and lose. He loved his wife enough to challenge the very gods for her return to life, which was granted .... but in the end he lost her forever due a lack of trust and faith in the gift he was granted.

Is there a moral to the story? In my humble opinion there is: Never take for granted the gift of love that has been granted to you; for there is only one source that allows us to find and enjoy true love: the Creator, no matter what the one's name for him/her might be.

Unlike Orpheus, I am not blessed with the talent of music but I am blessed enough with talents of imagery and words. I have also been blessed with the rare occurance of finding the one person that I can truly call my soul mate with out a shadow of a doubt. Most of the people who are reading this know her either as Pookie or Rae .... I know her, in my heart, as my wife and the lady that I wish to share my life with and to grow old with .... She is my Raedoll. My love for her knows no bounds, much like Oprheus' for Eurydice, and I know oh too well the emptiness and sadness of not being in her presence no matter how short the time may be and I can fully imagine the suffering that Orpheus felt if I were ever to lose in any fashion this person that I love so dearly. But I'm not foolish enough to overlook or take for granted this precious gift of love that has given to me in her form. Though I am blessed with talents of imagery and words, I find it oh so hard to fully express my love for her so that she may fathom the depths of this love. The image at the top of this page and the words it contains is the expression of but only a sliver of what I feel in my heart for my wife ... hopefully that will be a start to greater expression that will strengthen an already strong love.

In closing I can only say "I love you, Rae, with all my heart and soul for all eternity and I thank my Creator for giving such a warm and loving person as you to me to be in love with"

Hugs and Kisses,

Mark