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TWO U.S. Soldiers



Two bodies were unearthend by rain at the prison site in 1899. Both bodies were buried in the same grave, Section B, Grave number 13,718, in Andersonville National Cemetery. The headstone reads " Two U.S. Soldiers"

Andersonville Dove is a Mystery



Rows and rows of identical Marble headstones mark the graves of almost 13000 Union soldiers who died at Andersonville Prison, but one stands out. The headstone is like the others, except it has a stone dove on top. Headstone number 12,196 in section H of the National Cemetery marks the grave of L.S. Tuttle, a corporal in Company F of the 32nd Maine regiment. His death in Andersonville stockage on November 30, 1864, resulted from diarrhea, a common cause of death in the crowded Confederate prison. He was only 29. Only the barest facts of Tuttle's life are known. Tuttle was born in Saco, Maine. Records show he was a cooper, one who makes or repairs wooden barrels. He had 2 brothers in his company and regiment. Tuttle and his brother David ( who died of scurvy at Andersonville and is buried beneath a plain headstone in grave number 12,322, section H )were captured in a contested crossing of the North Anna River in Virginia, May of 1864. His older brother, Loren , was probably the luckiest of the three. A Confederate rifleman shot him in the shoulder, which allowed him to be discharged and avoid the possibility of capture and incarceration at Andersonville. Records do not show what happened to him after the Civil War. Lewis Tuttle`s military records indicate he was six feet tall, fair skinned, and had light hair and grey eyes. He had a wife named Lydia Ann and two daughters, Clara Ella and Addie Cora. For years, people have been curious about the dove. The National Park Service continues their search in finding the answer. The dove has been on the marker for many years, but again, no one knows exactly when it first appeared. There have been many theories as to who put it there and why, but the dove is still a mystery........
UNITED STATES COLORED TROOPS


There are twenty-two graves at Andersonville National Cemetery that bear the initials U.S.C.T. This acronym stands for " United States Colored Troops," the group of black troops that fought for the Union. Most of the black prisoners at Andersonville were captured at the Battle of Olustee, Florida. Generally the black prisoners were treated more harshly by the guards because the Confederates felt that the Union black soldiers were disloyal to the South. Andersonville was an enlisted man`s prison. The officers were sent to separate prison camps. However, the Confederates kept the Union Officers that led the U.S.C.T. troops in the same prisons with the enlisted men. Many of the black prisoners were used as parolees on burial detail in the cemetery. Being a parolee was not without its advantages. Although the work was hard, parolees were usually issued more food and they were able to get out of the foul air of the prison stockade.

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