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Andersonville Civil War Prison



Hi researchers. My name is Kevin Frye and I live in Butler, Georgia, a small town 40 miles from the infamous Andersonville Civil War Prison Camp . I have been a historian of and at Andersonville National Historic Site for more than 16 years. Although I no longer am associated with the National Park Service at the site, I still do volunteer look-ups at no charge as well as take pictures for fellow researchers who want photos of their ancestor's grave. I have also taken photos of all of the nearly 14000 Union graves at Andersonville and have them on disk. You can contact me and request any information I might be able to help with. I also have a CD with the roster of 42,596 names by alphabet which helps me find names by alternative spellings often able to find prisoners who the volunteers at the site have proven unable to find. I also have other resources that Andersonville National Historic Site does not have access to and will often be able to supply more information and details to you that contacting the park will fall short on. Please feel free to email for information, lookup request, or comments.
Email: andersonvillehistorian@gmail.com

THE STOCKADE


Andersonville, or Camp Sumter as it was officially known, was one of the largest of many established prison camps during the American Civil War. It was built early in 1864 after Confederate officials decided to move the large number of Federal prisoners kept in and around Richmond, Virginia, to a place of greater security and a more abundant food supply. During the 14 months the prison existed, more than 45,000 Union Solders were confined here. Of these, almost 13,000 died from disease, poor sanitation, malnutrition, overcrowding, or exposure to the elements.

The pen initially covered about 16 1/2 acres of land enclosed by a 15 foot high stockade of hewn pine logs. It was enlarged to 26 1/2 acres in June of 1864. The stockade was in the shape of a parallelogram 1,620 feet long and 779 feet wide. Sentry boxes, or "pigeon roost" as the prisoners called them, stood at 30 yard intervals along the top of the stockade. Inside, about 19 feet from the wall, was the " DEADLINE ," which the prisoners were forbidden to cross upon threat of death. Flowing through the prison yard was a stream called Stockade Branch, which supplied water to most of the prison. Two entrances, the North Gate and the South Gate, were on the West side of the stockade. Eight small earthen forts located around the exterior of the prison were equipped with artillery to quell disturbances within the compound and to defend against feared Union cavalry attacks. The first prisoners were brought to Andersonville in February, 1864. During the next few months approximately 400 more arrived each day until, by the end of June, some 26,000 men were confined in a prison area originally intended to hold 13,000. The largest number held at any one time was more than 32,000- about the population of present-day Sumter County- in August, 1864. Handicapped by deteriorating economic conditions, an inadequate transportation system, and the need to concentrate all available resources on the army, the Confederate government was unable to provide adequate housing, food, clothing, and medical care to their Federal captives. These conditions, along with a breakdown of the prisoner exchange system, resulted in much suffering and a high mortality rate. On July 9, 1864, Sgt. David Kennedy of the 9th Ohio Cavalry wrote in his diary: ' Wuld that I was an artist & had the material to paint this camp & all its horors or the tounge of some eloquent Statesman and had the privleage of expresing my mind to our hon. rulers at Washington, I should gloery to describe this hell on earth where it takes 7 of its ocupiants to make a shadow.'

TURN YOU THE STRONGHOLD YE PRISONERS OF HOPE....... Zechariah 9:12


Andersonville Prison ceased to exist in May, 1865. Some former prisoners remained in Federal service, but most returned to the civilian occupations they had before the war. During July and August, 1865, Clara Barton, a detachment of laborers and soldiers, and a former prisoner named Dorence Atwater, came to Andersonville cemetery to identify and mark the graves of the Union dead. As a prisoner, Atwater was assigned to record the names of deceased Union soldiers for the Confederates. Fearing loss of of the death record at war's end, Atwater made his own copy in hopes of notifying the relatives of some 12,000 dead interred at Andersonville. Thanks to his list and the Confederate records confiscated at the end of the war, only 460 of the Andersonville graves had to be marked " Unknown U.S. Soldier."
Source : Andesonville National Historic Site Official Map and Guide National Park Service U. S. Department of the Interior.

" ASK ME ABOUT MY GUIDED TOURS"
" Join my facebook group for Descendants of Andersonville and Andersonville researchers"
" VIRTUAL TOUR OF ANDERSONVILLE DVD NOW AVAILABLE"
" DETAILS OF PRISONERS BY STATE "
"NEW SOMETHING SPECIAL FOR TENNESSEE DESCENDANTS NEW"
" THE BEST REENACTMENT GROUP I HAVE HAD THE HONOR TO ASSOCIATE WITH"
" A Virtual Tour of the National Prisoner Of War Museum at Andersonville"
" DRIVING DIRECTIONS TO ANDERSONVILLE"
" A CAUSE WORTH LOOKING AT... POW RIDE HOME "
" HOMEPAGES OF REGIMENTS HELD AT ANDERSONVILLE"
"ANDERSONVILLE ARTIFACT COLLECTORS,,,BEWARE "
" WHISPERS IN THE WIND "-----THOUGHTS OF A MODERN DAY VISITOR
POEMS IN HONOR OF OUR HEROS
MEMORIAL DAY 2001
A LITTLE ABOUT MYSELF
MAP OF THE PRISON SITE
TIMELINE : RECORD OF ACTIVITY - CAMP SUMTER
ASSORTED PERIOD PHOTOS
THE STORY OF DORENCE ATWATER
THE DORENCE ATWATER HOMETOWN MEMORIAL
THE STORY OF CLARA BARTON
REPORT OF AN EXPEDITION TO ANDERSONVILLE, GEORGIA, JULY, 1865
DETAILED NUMBERS IN THE OPERATION OF ANDERSONVILLE
ANDERSONVILLE ONLINE LOOKUP DATABASES
THE ATWATER DEATH LIST ( original )
EASY TO READ ATWATER LIST
THE ANDERSONVILLE GUARDS DEATH LIST
STATE MEMORIALS
" RAIDERS AT ANDERSONVILLE "
" QUOTES " FROM THE PEN
FINAL RESTING PLACE OF CAPTAIN WIRZ
UNIQUE GRAVES
UNITED STATES COLORED TROUPS at ANDERSONVILLE( USCT )
THE BEGINNING AND THE END
MEMORIAL DAY
VOLUNTEER RESEARCHERS
VOLUNTEERS FOR OTHER CIVIL WAR PRISONS
WEBSITES OF MY CLOSE FRIENDS
CIVIL WAR REGIMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS
OTHER CIVIL WAR RESEARCH LINKS
PRISONER LOOKUP LINKS
HOMEPAGES OF DESCENDANTS OF ANDERSONVILLE PRISONERS
NAMES AND EMAIL ADDRESSES OF DESCENDANTS OF ANDERSONVILLE PRISONERS
NAMES AND EMAIL ADDRESSES OF DESCENDANTS OF ANDERSONVILLE GUARDS
OTHER CIVIL WAR PRISONS
THE POW NETWORK ( A GREAT SITE!!!!)
THE VIETNAM WALL...A NAME SEARCH DATABASE
THE VIETNAM WALL...A VERY MOVING SONG
OTHER NATIONAL CEMETERIES
CONFEDERATE CEMETERIES
GENEALOGICAL RESEARCH SITES
ANDERSONVILLE PRISON AND CEMETERY/POW MUSEUM/CIVIL WAR VILLAGE
OTHER UNION AND CONFEDERATE POW SITES

Please feel free to email for information, lookup request, or comments.

Email: andersonvillehistorian@gmail.com

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TURN YOU THE STRONGHOLD YE PRISONERS OF HOPE....... Zechariah 9:12

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